Canada Day 2020 — Let’s innovate together!

Wanted: Bright minds to innovate, collaborate and help conquer a global pandemic.

Discover how Canadians are voluntarily contributing to the fight against COVID-19.

Science communicator Sabrina Cruz leads this salute to innovators across the country as they highlight the most important factor to success: working together.

Share your impressions with the hashtag #InnovatingTogether on your feeds.

Transcript

Transcript for “Video — Canada Day 2020 — Let’s innovate together!”

Video length: 5:21 minutes

This is a bilingual video. The dialogue is in both English and French.

Samantha Yammine has being asked questions in an interview. She is sitting in a living room.

[Text on screen: HOW DID YOU FEEL WHEN YOU FIRST LEARNED ABOUT COVID-19 COMING TO CANADA?]

Interviewer: How did you feel when you first learned about COVID-19 coming to Canada?

Samantha Yammine: I was and have been terrified.

[Text on screen: LET’S INNOVATE TOGETHER]

Narrator: Our country is drastically different from where it was one year ago due to the novel coronavirus.

Sequence of images while narrator speaks:

Person dressed in protective equipment working on face shield in lab.

Face shield and mask with special breathing apparatus shown on mannequin head from all sides.

Person pointing to ventilator tubing system.

[Text on screen: UBC FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE]

Woman showing biodegradable mask in lab

[Text on screen: @SCIENCE.SAM VIA INSTAGRAM]

Instagram science.sam page shown - “What’s the point of epidemiological models anyway??”

[Text on screen: COVIDDEMYSTIFIED.CA]

[Website page shown -THE PANDEMIC VISUALIZED]

Narrator: But amidst the chaos, Canadians across the country are innovating. Maker communities are filling the gaps in the demand for PPE, researchers are designing alternative solutions that can last beyond our crisis and science communicators are making sure no questions are left unanswered.

Kenneth Wan speaking at desk wearing headphones in front of computer.

[Text on screen: KENNETH WAN – DIRECTOR, COVIDSTOP.CA]

Kenneth Wan: Then when COVID broke, uh, and things went crazy and all the laboratories shut down, there was lots of people calling us in terms of say, “Hey, how can we help?” And I guess we became suddenly a resource because we were 3D printing, prototyping and laser cutting.

Spools of wire, mannequin head, laser-cutting process.

[Text on screen: NIVATHA BALENDRA – FOUNDER, DISPERSA]

Nivatha Balendra: Reading on the news every day, of course, it’s inevitable to see the dire need for these types of basic supplies. We just wanted to do our own small part, really, to see if we can help.

[Text on screen: CYRIL MANI – STUDENT, PROTECTION COLLECTIVE]

Cyril Mani (translated from French to English): And with the equipment we had, we still managed to produce a fair number of masks, about 50 masks a day... which started to increase to 100 masks a day, because we were able to get help from other people eventually. We managed to reach out to schools, industries, libraries...

People working on masks in lab, shown in fast motion.

Johan Foster: It just kind of started a little bit of a chain reaction.

Nivatha Balendra: We’re seeing other companies do it and that provided us with the confidence to know that we can do it too.

Canadian flag flying against backdrop of snowy mountains.

Cyril Mani (translated from French to English): And I think it’s only in Canada that people come together that quickly in a common cause.

[Text on screen: JOHAN FOSTER – UBC BIOPRODUCTS INSTITUTE]

Johan Foster: Taking our previous skill sets and saying “Hey, we can actually tackle a problem here.” With this need for masks, we’re talking about hundreds of millions, if not billions, of masks in Canada.

Variety of masks shown.

[Text on screen: ORLANDO ROJAS – UBC BIOPRODUCTS INSTITUTE]

Orlando Rojas: The current solutions to the masks are non-biodegradable. And that, they represent an environmental challenge.

Worker wearing gloves displays biodegradable masks in process.

[Text on screen: UBC FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE]

Johan Foster: And we want to avoid that. Can we take our masks, simply put them in the compost and remove them from the waste stream?

[Text on screen: REZA FARIVAR – ORGANIZER, CODE LIFE VENTILATOR CHALLENGE]

Reza Farivar: It was also clear that the needs of the COVID patients were somewhat simpler. We could actually try motivating the creation of this simple ventilator by the creation of a challenge.

Woman wearing a mask and working in lab on ventilator.

Another woman wearing a mask working on wires in device and looking at a handheld device.

[Text on screen: LOUIS-PIERRE FORTIN - ENGINEER, THE LUNG CARBURETOR]

Louis-Pierre Fortin (translated from French to English): We threw ourselves into it. We had about 13, 14 days to develop a ventilator.

Reza Farivar: The process we have done was a very collaborative involvement for many people across Canada. Um, we were able to put together the full definition of the problem. Very efficient.

Sequence of images while Reza Farivar speaking:

Woman wearing mask in front of lab equipment looking down, then looking up.

[Text on screen: CODE LIFE: MGHF]

Reza and co-worker in lab wearing masks and collaborating on ventilator.

Woman pointing to information on screen.

Man checking tube equipment in case on wheels.

Louis-Pierre Fortin (translated from French to English): Because the challenge was somewhat well managed, as there were all the requirements, there were all the descriptions of how a ventilator works. So that helped us a lot in getting creative.

Sequence of images while Louis-Pierre Fortin is speaking:

Man with mask checks equipment containing two large tubes.

Woman tests breathing device by squeezing it.

Reza Farivar with mask sitting down and checking device, girl with mask standing in background.

Woman with mask working on tubing device, left arm raised.

Reza and co-workers with masks in discussion at lab.

Reza Farivar: I think it’s easier to say that without collaboration this was impossible.

Louis-Pierre Fortin speaks, trees in background.

Louis-Pierre Fortin (translated from French to English): The patient really depends on the machine. It’s more or less a matter of life or death, so we did a huge risk analysis. We also had a risk specialist who came to help us. Instead of trying to learn how to do it, we asked for help…

Lasya Vankayala is talking from office, bookcase in background.

[Text on screen: LASYA VANKAYALA – FOUNDER, COVIDDEMYSTIFIED.CA]

Lasya Vankayala: I noticed a lot of people asking really good questions about virology and then, not necessarily getting the answers they need.

[Text on screen: SAMANTHA YAMMINE - SCIENCE COMMUNICATOR]

Samantha Yammine: Anxiety is perpetuated by the unknown. Just not knowing about things, you’ll just start to spiral and go down this path.

Lasya Vankayala: We’re a group of undergraduate students, early-career scientists who take the latest research on COVID, all the papers that are coming out, comb through these long jargon-filled papers, and we distil all of this down into like little, accessible blog posts. Then we put them up on our site.

Samantha Yammine: I never try to tell someone how to act. I’m trying to give them information and then they can make the decision. It is our responsibility to compassionately communicate what we find as scientists and what we learn as scientists.

Reza Farivar: I think it’s important to remember that the antidote to anxiety is creativity and innovation.

Cyril Mani (translated from French to English): And make a difference and use this opportunity as a springboard to improve the future.

Johan Foster: A lot of our scientists are really working on the different aspects of COVID, whether that is the detection, whether that is the evaluation or whether that’s the prevention of transmission.

Lasya Vankayala: It’s important that people understand science. Because otherwise how can we expect them to listen to it?

Samantha Yammine: We’re only going to do as well as our neighbour. It’s not just about one person. It’s about all of us together.

Nivatha Balendra: Informed with this whole puzzle, the earlier…we’re able to solve the problem together faster.

Kenneth Wan: Volunteer, be helpful in any small meaningful way.

Louis-Pierre Fortin (translated from French to English): When you bring together the right team, nothing can stop you from doing what you really want to do.

Collage of all nine speakers shown live while speaking at same time.

Narrator: And this team of volunteers and innovators and Canadians all just want to wish you…

[Individual shots of speakers flash in rapid succession]

All nine speakers: Happy Canada Day!

Lasya Vankayala: I love this country!

[Text on screen: #CanadaDay #InnovatingTogether]

[Text on screen: KENNETH WAN IS THE DIRECTOR FOR COVIDSTOP.CA. THEY DONATED OVER 5000 3D PRINTED FACESHIELDS AND 10,000 EARSAVERS FOR FREE TO HEALTHCARE WORKERS ACROSS CANADA.]

[Text on screen: CYRIL MANI STUDIES MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT MCGILL. HE AND HIS TEAM DESIGNED AN EMERGENCY VENTILATOR AND WERE PART OF PROTECTION COLLECTIVE WHICH HAS PRODUCED OVER 3500 FACESHIELDS.]

[Text on screen: NIVATHA BALENDRA FOUNDED DISPERSA. SHE WORKED WITH HER TEAM AND FAMILY TO PRODUCE AND DONATE HAND SANITIZERS FOR HIGH-RISK GROUPS.]

[Text on screen: JOHAN FOSTER & ORLANDO ROJAS, RESEARCHERS AT THE UBC BIOPRODUCTS INSTITUTE, HAVE DEVELOPED THE CANADIAN-MASK OR CAN-MASK. THE MASK SERVES AS A BIODEGRADABLE ALTERNATIVE TO CURRENTLY MADE PETROLEUM BASED MASKS.]

[Text on screen: REZA FARIVAR ORGANIZED THE CODE LIFE VENTILATOR CHALLENGE WITH THE SUPPORT OF THE MONTREAL GENERAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION. THE CHALLENGE GENERATED DOZENS OF VIABLE, OPEN-SOURCE DESIGNS.]

[Text on screen: LOUIS-PIERRE FORTIN AND HIS TEAM DESIGNED A PORTABLE, LOW-COST VENTILATOR SOLUTION TO HELP IN THE COVID-19 CRISIS. IT WAS ONE OF THE TOP 3 DESIGNS IN THECODE LIFE VENTILATOR CHALLENGE.]

[Text on screen: LASYA VANKAYALA FOUNDED COVIDDEMYSTIFIED.CA. THE WEBSITE HOSTS OVER 50 ARTICLES EXPLAINING THE LATEST RESEARCH INTO COVID-19, ITS TREATMENT, AND BEHAVIOUR.]

[Text on screen: SAMANTHA YAMMINE IS A SCIENCE COMMUNICATOR. SHE HAS SHARED ACCESSIBLE EXPLANATIONS ABOUT COVID-19 AND THE GLOBAL RESPONSE WITH HER SOCIAL MEDIA AUDIENCE OF OVER 75,000 PEOPLE.]

[Text on screen: Canada Wordmark]

Credits

Director: Sabrina Cruz

Producer: Melissa Fernandes

Video editor: Sabrina Cruz

Motion design: Sabrina Cruz

Music: Particle Emission by Silver Maple

Featuring:

  • Nivatha Balendra
  • Reza Farivar
  • Louis-Pierre Fortin
  • Johan Foster
  • Cyril Mani
  • Orlando Rojas
  • Lasya Vankayala
  • Kenneth Wan
  • Samantha Yammine

Special thanks:

  • Viviane Lalande (Scilabus)
  • Marianne Lalande

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