Access to Information Act - Annual Report 2016-2017

(April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017)

This publication is available upon request in alternative formats.
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Canadian Heritage, 2017
Catalogue No. : CH1-1/1E-PDF
ISSN: 1926-3732

Table of contents

1. Introduction

The Department of Canadian Heritage is pleased to present to Parliament its annual report on the administration of the Access to Information Act for fiscal year April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017. Section 72 of the Act requires that the head of every federal government institution submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act during the fiscal year.

1.1. The Access to Information Act

The purpose of the Access to Information Act is to provide a right of access to information in records under the control of a government institution. It maintains that government information should be available to the public; that necessary exceptions to the right of access should be limited and specific; and that decisions on the disclosure of government information should be reviewed independently of government.

The Department of Canadian Heritage is fully committed to both the spirit and the intent of the Access to Information Act to ensure openness and transparency within the Department. The information contained in this report provides an overview of the activities of the Department in implementing the Act.

1.2. Mandate of Canadian Heritage

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada's major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, the arts, heritage, official languages, multiculturalism, citizenship and participation, in addition to Aboriginal, youth, and sport initiatives.

The Department of Canadian Heritage is responsible for programs and policies that help all Canadians participate in their shared cultural and civic life. The Department’s legislative mandate is set out in the Department of Canadian Heritage Act and other statutes for which the Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible and presents a wide-ranging list of responsibilities for the Minister under the heading of “Canadian identity and values, cultural development, and heritage.”

The Department oversees numerous statutes, namely the Broadcasting Act, the Copyright Act and the Investment Canada Act (the latter two acts shared with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada), the Official Languages Act (Part VII), the Museums Act the Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Act, the Cultural Property Export and Import Act, the Status of the Artist Act, the Canadian Multiculturalism Act and the Physical Activity and Sport Act (shared with Health Canada).

The Department of Canadian Heritage is specifically responsible for formulating and implementing cultural policies related to copyright, foreign investment and broadcasting, as well as policies related to arts, culture, heritage, official languages, sport, state ceremonial and protocol, and Canadian symbols. The Department’s programs, delivered through Headquarters, and multiple points of service including five regional offices across the country, fund community and third-party organizations to promote the benefits of culture, identity, and sport for Canadians.

In 2016-2017, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, assisted by the Minister for Sport and Persons with Disabilities, was accountable to Parliament for the Department, five departmental agencies and twelve Crown corporations.

2. Structure of the Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Secretariat is responsible for administering the Access to Information Act, within the Department of Canadian Heritage. Its mandate is to act on behalf of the Minister of Canadian Heritage in ensuring compliance with legislation, regulations and government policy and to create departmental directives, including standards, in all matters relating to the Act.

During the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat consisted of an Operations Unit with 10 positions and a Policy and Governance Unit of two analysts.

The Operations Unit is responsible for processing requests under the Access to Information Act. This includes receiving requests from the public, liaising with program areas within the department to retrieve the records and recommendations, performing line-by-line review of records and conducting external consultations as required to balance the public’s right of access and the government’s need to safeguard certain information in limited and specific cases. The Operations Unit represents the Department in dealings with the Office of the Information Commissioner regarding the application of the Act.

The Policy and Governance Unit provides policy advice and guidance to the Department on access to information and the protection of personal information. It develops policy instruments, processing products and tools. The unit liaises with employees and prepares and delivers training and awareness sessions throughout the department. In addition, the unit prepares the Department’s annual reporting requirements and publishes the department’s Information about programs and information holdings.

In the departmental organizational structure, the ATIP Secretariat reports to the Corporate Secretariat for Canadian Heritage.

3. Delegation order

The powers, duties and functions of the administration of the Access to Information Act have been fully delegated by the Minister to the Director of the ATIP Secretariat. A copy of the Canadian Heritage’s delegation order is appended to this report as Appendix A.

4. Administration of requests

The statistical report on the administration of the Access to Information Act is appended to this report as Appendix B.

4.1. Access requests

The ATIP Secretariat received a total of 566 requests during the reporting period of
April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017. This is the highest number of requests ever received by Canadian Heritage and represents an increase of 58% from the previous fiscal year. With the 54 requests carried over from the previous reporting period there was a total of 620 active requests in 2016-2017.

As shown in Chart 1, there has been a steady increase in the number of requests received at Canadian Heritage since 2013-2014, which represents a 130% growth in three years.

Chart 1 : Number of requests received, 2010-2011 to 2016-2017 – text version

Chart 1 : Number of requests received, 2010-2011 to 2016-2017

This bar graph shows the number of requests Canadian Heritage received each fiscal year from 2010-2011 to 2016-2017. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2010-2011: 253 requests
  • 2011-2012: 262 requests
  • 2012-2013: 237 requests
  • 2013-2014: 241 requests
  • 2014-2015: 297 requests
  • 2015-2016: 358 requests
  • 2016-2017: 566 requests

Topics

The requests for information received by Canadian Heritage cover a wide range of topics, however, as in previous years, certain subjects tend to predominate. For this reporting period, the most frequently requested information related to briefing notes to the Minister or Deputy Minister.

Requests were also made for information on grants and contributions to cultural or sports organizations. Other information sought included funding for commemorative projects for Canada’s 150th anniversary, the revision of the Copyright Act, public consultations on broadcasting, the Royal visit of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio.

Informal requests

Since 2011, government institutions have been posting lists of completed access to information requests on the web. This Open Government initiative is to enable the public to make informal requests for records that were previously released. Canadian Heritage processed 333 informal requests in 2016-2017 for information relating to 242 previously released requests, a 165% increase since the last reporting period. This increase had a notable impact on the operations of the Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat because it mobilized resources already pressured by the important increase of the number of formal requests.

Chart 2 : Number of requests treated informally, 2013-2014 to 2016-2017

Chart 2 : Number of requests treated informally, 2013-2014 to 2016-2017 – text version

This bar graph shows the number of requests Canadian Heritage treated informally each fiscal year from 2013-14 to 2016-2017. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2013-2014: 64
  • 2014-2015: 160
  • 2015-2016: 126
  • 2016-2017: 334

4.2. Applicant sources

Of the requests that were received this reporting period, 30% were made by the media while 18% were made by the public. With the opportunity for applicants to decline to identify themselves a significant 22% chose to do so. The remaining requests were from businesses, academia, and organizations.

As indicated in Chart 3, the media has consistently been the largest source of requests for Canadian Heritage. For the last five fiscal years the general public has steadily represented approximately 15% of requesters. A growing number of requesters identified themselves in the business category.

Chart 3: Applicant sources, 2014-2015 to 2016-2017

Chart 3: Applicant sources, 2014-2015 to 2016-2017 – text version

This bar graph shows the sources of requests from fiscal years 2014-2015 to 2016-2017, and indicates the percentage of requests from each source. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

Applicant sources 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017

Media

12%

31%

30%

Academia

6%

5%

5%

Business

12%

10%

19%

Organization

6%

2%

5%

Public

16%

13%

18%

Decline to identify

16%

39%

22%

4.3. Extensions

Requests can be extended beyond the 30-day statutory time frame in three circumstances; when the request is for a large number of records or necessitates a search through a large number of records, when consultations are necessary, or to give notice to a third party. This reporting period, extensions were taken in 137 cases. In 38 cases, the department required a 30-day or less time extension. In 99 cases, an extension of over 30 days was required, including 11 requests for interference with operations, 42 for consultation with other government institutions and 46 for consultation with third parties. Of the requests closed this reporting period, 29% required extensions. This was a 2% reduction from the last reporting period.

Chart 4 illustrates the circumstances for which extensions were taken during the course of the last four years. As in previous years, consultations with other government institutions (other than those referring to section 69 of the Act) were the most common. In 2016-2017, there was a significant increase in third party notices from 16% to 34%.

Chart 4: Reasons for time extensions, 2013-2014 to 2016-2017

Chart 4: Reasons for time extensions, 2013-2014 to 2016-2017 – text version

This bar graph shows the reasons for time extensions in each fiscal year from 2013-2014 to 2016-2017, and the percentages for each reason in each year. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

Reason 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017

Interference with operations

13%

13%

20%

15%

13%

Consultation - Section 69

11%

17%

23%

13%

4%

Consultation - Other

47%

41%

40%

55%

48%

Third Party Notice

29%

29%

17%

16%

34%

4.4. Completed requests

Four hundred and seventy-nine requests were completed by the end of March 2017. More than half (54%) of the requests completed resulted in partial disclosure. Ninety-four requests were totally disclosed. Requests processed where no records existed was consistent with the last reporting period at 13%. Information was entirely excluded in three requests and exempted entirely in two requests. Fifty-four requests were either transferred to other federal institutions or were abandoned by the applicants.

Chart 5: Disposition of requests, 2016-2017

Chart 5: Disposition of requests, 2016-2017 – text version

This pie chart shows the disposition of requests for the year 2016-2017. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • All disclosed: 19%
  • Disclosed in part: 54%
  • All exempted: 2%
  • All excluded: 1%
  • No records exist: 13%
  • Request transferred: 6%
  • Request abandoned: 5%

The 479 completed requests were processed in the following timeframes:

  • 57% of requests completed within 30 days
  • 22% of requests completed within 31 to 60 days
  • 18% of requests completed within 61 to 120 days
  • 3% of requests completed within 121 or more days

Of the 479 requests completed during this reporting period, over 94% were completed within the statutory time frame.

Chart 6 indicates the number of pages that were processed by the Department for the last five fiscal years. The peak in 2013-2014 was due to efforts of the ATIP Secretariat to complete a number of outstanding requests. Since 2014-2015, the Department has returned to its regular output.

Chart 6: Number of relevant pages processed, 2012-2013 to 2016-2017

Chart 6: Number of relevant pages processed, 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 – text version

This bar graph shows the number of relevant pages processed each year from fiscal years 2012-2013 to 2016-2017. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2012-2013: 50,161 pages
  • 2013-2014: 93,433 pages
  • 2014-2015: 41,874 pages
  • 2015-2016: 48,034 pages
  • 2016-2017: 46,058 pages

To ensure accurate and timely responses to applicants, the ATIP Secretariat monitored the processing of requests on a daily basis using the ATIP case management system (Access Pro Case Management/Redaction) as well as with bi-weekly meetings between the advisors and management of the Secretariat. In addition, reports that provide details on the status of requests are shared with program liaisons and departmental senior managers as well as with the Deputy Minister’s office on a weekly basis.

4.5. Exemptions / Exclusions

The Access to Information Act does not apply to certain types of records. The legislation allows this information to be excluded from requests. This reporting period, exclusions were applied in 163 requests. Subsection 69(1) (confidences of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada) was applied in 145 requests and paragraph 68(a) (published material) was applied in 18 requests.

The Access to Information Act sets out specific exceptions to the right of access known as exemptions. Each exemption is intended to protect information relating to a particular public or private interest and form the only basis for refusing access to government information under the Access to Information Act. Of the 479 requests completed, exemptions to withhold information were invoked in 266 requests. The exemptions most commonly applied by the Department were: subsection 19(1) (records containing personal information) invoked in 151 requests; paragraph 21(1)(a) (information relating to the internal decision-making processes of government) applied in 150 requests; paragraph 21(1)(b) (account of consultations and deliberations) applied in 128 requests; and paragraph 20(1)(b) (records containing third-party business information), which was invoked in 118 requests.

4.6. Consultations

To assist other institutions in processing their access requests, the ATIP Secretariat reviews and provides recommendations on the disclosure of records that concern Canadian Heritage. During the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat received a total of 135 consultation requests from other federal institutions and other levels of governments. This represents a 17% increase from the previous fiscal year, as shown in Chart 7.

In 2016-2017, Canadian Heritage received consultation requests from 32 federal institutions. The top consulting institutions were the Privy Council Office, the Public Services and Procurement Canada, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Treasury Board Secretariat.

Chart 7: Number of consultations received from other government institutions, 2013-2014 to 2016-2017

Chart 7: Number of consultations received from other government institutions, 2013-2014 to 2016-2017 – text version

This bar graph shows the total number of consultations received for each fiscal year from 2011-2012 to 2015-2016. The data illustrated in the graph is as follows:

  • 2013-2014: 103
  • 2014-2015: 94
  • 2015-2016: 105
  • 2016-2017: 135

4.7. Fees and costs

Under the legislation, fees may be charged during the processing of requests, however, in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Interim Directive on the Administration of the Access to Information Act of May 2016, the policy at Canadian Heritage is to waive all fees except the application fee. In 2016-2017 the total fees collected were $2,300. The totality of this amount was for application fees.

A total of $780,839 was incurred by the ATIP Secretariat to administer the Access to Information Act, including $649,967 in salary costs, $81,022 for professional services contracts and $149,850 in material costs.

5. Complaints, investigations and audits

In the fiscal year, three complaints regarding the processing of access to information requests were filed with the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada against Canadian Heritage. The reasons for the three complaints were: two for administrative delays and one for the non-existence of records.

The Office of the Information Commissioner completed their investigation into ten complaints on Canadian Heritage. Nine investigations were discontinued and one was considered as not well founded. At the end of the fiscal year, 15 complaints were still ongoing.

Canadian Heritage was not involved in Federal Court cases or audits during this reporting period.

6. Education and training activities

To increase the knowledge and understanding of the Access to Information Act across the department, training and awareness sessions were delivered by the ATIP Secretariat. These sessions provided basic information on the purpose and provisions of the Access to Information Act, as well as the roles and responsibilities of employees and the ATIP Secretariat. The information for these awareness sessions was tailored to meet the specific needs of the branches concerned.

The internal website for the ATIP Secretariat is a tool that is accessible to all employees which describes the ATIP Secretariat’s roles and responsibilities and provides information on the Access to Information Act as well as related departmental policies and procedures. In the reporting period, the ATIP website was reviewed and training material available on the website was updated.

During this reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat delivered 16 access to information and privacy training and awareness sessions to employees in the National Capital Region and regional offices as well as to individuals in the Minister’s Office. In total, 128 individuals participated in these sessions.

7. Policies, Guidelines and Procedures

During the reporting period, the ATIP Secretariat was continuously revising its procedures for the processing of requests under the Access to Information Act. The employees of the Secretariat have been using a Board to pinpoint areas that need improvement and to propose potential solutions. This process will eventually lead to a new version of the Department’s procedures.

Appendix A – Delegation order

Delegation Order

Access to Information Act and Privacy Act

Pursuant to Section 73 of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act, I, as head of the Department of Canadian Heritage, hereby designate the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise my powers and functions under these Acts specified opposite each position.

This Delegation Order supersedes all previous Access to Information Act and Privacy Act Delegation Orders.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly
Minister of Canadian Heritage
Date: May 31, 2016

Powers and functions delegated pursuant to Section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations

Legend:

DM
Deputy Minister
CS
Corporate Secretary
ATIP/D
Director, Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat
ATIP/DD
Deputy Director, Access to Information and Privacy Secretariat

Note: The Xs indicate which position has delegated authority for each section of the Act.

Access to Information Act

Section Description DM CS ATIP/D ATIP/DD

4(2.1)

Responsibility of government institutions

x

x

x

7(a)

Notice where access requested

x

x

x

7(b)

Giving access to record

x

x

x

8(1)

Transfer of request to another government institution

x

x

x

x

9

Extension of time limits

x

x

x

x

11(2), (3), (4), (5), (6)

Additional fees

x

x

x

x

12(2)(b)

Language of access

x

x

x

12(3)(b)

Access in an alternative format

x

x

x

13

Exemption - Information obtained in confidence

x

x

x

14

Exemption - Federal-provincial affairs

x

x

x

15

Exemption - International affairs and defence

x

x

x

16

Exemption - Law enforcement and investigation

x

x

x

16.5

Exemption - Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act

x

x

x

17

Exemption - Safety of individuals

x

x

x

18

Exemption - Economic interests of Canada

x

x

x

18.1

Exemption - Economic interests of the Canada Post Corporation, Export Development Canada, the Public Sector Pension Investment Board and VIA Rail Canada Inc.

x

x

x

19

Exemption - Personal information

x

x

x

20

Exemption - Third party information

x

x

x

21

Exemption - Operations of Government

x

x

x

22

Exemption - Testing procedures, tests and audits

x

x

x

22.1

Exemption - Audit working papers and draft audit reports

x

x

x

23

Exemption - Solicitor-client privilege

x

x

x

24

Exemption - Statutory prohibitions

x

x

x

25

Severability

x

x

x

26

Exemption - Information to be published

x

x

x

27(1), (4)

Third-party notification

x

x

x

x

28(1)(b), (2), (4)

Third-party notification

x

x

x

x

29(1)

Where the Information Commissioner recommends disclosure

x

x

x

33

Advising Information Commissioner of third-party involvement

x

x

x

35(2)(b)

Right to make representations

x

x

x

37(4)

Access to be given to complainant

x

x

x

43(1)

Notice to third-party (application to Federal Court for review)

x

x

x

44(2)

Notice to applicant (application to Federal Court by third-party)

x

x

x

52(2)(b), (3)

Special rules for hearings

x

x

x

71(1)

Facilities for inspection of manuals

x

x

x

72

Annual report to Parliament

x

x

x

Access to Information Regulations

Section Description DM CS ATIP/D ATIP/DD

6(1)

Transfer of request

x

x

x

x

7(2)

Search and preparation fees

x

x

x

x

7(3)

Production and programming fees

x

x

x

x

8

Providing access to record(s)

x

x

x

8.1

Limitations in respect of format

x

x

x

Appendix B – Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution: Canadian Heritage

Reporting period: 2016-04-01 to 2017-03-31

Part 1: Requests Under the Access to Information Act

1.1 Number of requests

Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 566
Outstanding from previous reporting period 54
Total 620
Closed during reporting period 479
Carried over to next reporting period 141

1.2 Sources of requests

Source Number of Requests
Media 170
Academia 30
Business (private sector) 108
Organization 30
Public 104
Decline to Identify 124
Total 566

1.3 Informal requests

Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
84 151 94 5 0 0 0 334

Note: All requests previously recorded as “treated informally” will now be accounted for in this section only.

Part 2: Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and completion time

Disposition of Requests Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 4 53 28 8 1 0 0 94
Disclosed in part 8 101 72 69 8 2 4 264
All exempted 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
All excluded 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 3
No records exist 20 36 3 1 2 0 0 62
Request transferred 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 30
Request abandoned 13 3 3 5 0 0 0 24
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 76 195 106 84 12 2 4 479

2.2 Exemptions

Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests
13(1)(a) 5 16(2) 4 18(a) 3 20.1 0
13(1)(b) 0 16(2)(a) 0 18(b) 3 20.2 0
13(1)(c) 10 16(2)(b) 0 18(c) 0 20.4 0
13(1)(d) 4 16(2)(c) 31 18(d) 4 21(1)(a) 150
13(1)(e) 0 16(3) 0 18.1(1)(a) 0 21(1)(b) 128
14 0 16.1(1)(a) 0 18.1(1)(b) 0 21(1)(c) 9
14(a) 8 16.1(1)(b) 1 18.1(1)(c) 0 21(1)(d) 1
14(b) 3 16.1(1)(c) 0 18.1(1)(d) 0 22 0
15(1) 0 16.1(1)(d) 0 19(1) 151 22.1(1) 0
15(1) - I.A.* 28 16.2(1) 0 20(1)(a) 0 23 22
15(1) - Def.* 2 16.3 0 20(1)(b) 118 24(1) 14
15(1) - S.A.* 1 16.4(1)(a) 0 20(1)(b.1) 0 26 1
16(1)(a)(i) 0 16.4(1)(b) 0 20(1)(c) 9
16(1)(a)(ii) 0 16.5 0 20(1)(d) 3
16(1)(a)(iii) 0 17 0
16(1)(b) 0
16(1)(c) 0
16(1)(d) 0

* I.A.: International Affairs
Def.: Defence of Canada
S.A.: Subversive Activities

2.3 Exclusions

Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests
68(a) 18 69(1) 0 69(1)(g) re (a) 56
68(b) 0 69(1)(a) 5 69(1)(g) re (b) 0
68(c) 0 69(1)(b) 0 69(1)(g) re (c) 18
68.1 0 69(1)(c) 1 69(1)(g) re (d) 16
68.2(a) 0 69(1)(d) 0 69(1)(g) re (e) 26
68.2(b) 0 69(1)(e) 5 69(1)(g) re (f) 18
69(1)(f) 0 69.1(1) 0

2.4 Format of information released

Disposition Paper Electronic Other Formats
All disclosed 49 45 0
Disclosed in part 89 175 0
Total 138 220 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of Requests Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Disclosed Number of Requests
All disclosed 8020 7898 94
Disclosed in part 37331 33686 264
All exempted 20 0 2
All excluded 160 0 3
Request abandoned 527 212 24
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100
Pages Processed
101-500
Pages Processed
501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 83 1718 8 1604 1 542 2 4034 0 0
Disclosed in part 173 9904 76 12028 8 3746 7 8008 0 0
All exempted 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned  23 0 1 212 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 283 11622 86 13844 9 4288 9 12042 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation Required Assessment of Fees Legal Advice Sought Other Total
All disclosed 24 0 0 5 29
Disclosed in part 130 0 0 64 194
All exempted 1 0 0 0 1
All excluded 1 0 0 0 1
Request abandoned 4 0 0 0 4
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 160 0 0 69 229

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of Requests Closed Past the Statutory Deadline Principal Reason
Workload External Consultation Internal Consultation Other
30 11 3 4 12
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of Days Past Deadline Number of Requests Past Deadline Where No Extension Was Taken Number of Requests Past Deadline Where An Extension Was Taken Total
1 to 15 days 4 5 9
16 to 30 days 4 3 7
31 to 60 days 2 1 3
61 to 120 days 4 2 6
121 to 180 days 0 1 1
181 to 365 days 0 3 3
More than 365 days 0 1 1
Total 14 16 30

2.7 Requests for translation

Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French  0 0 0
French to English  0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3: Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Disposition of Requests Where an Extension Was Taken 9(1)(a)
Interference With Operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 0 0 8 4
Disclosed in part 17 6 56 38
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 2 0
No records exist 0 0 0 1
Request abandoned 1 0 0 4
Total 18 6 66 47

3.2 Length of extensions

Length of Extensions 9(1)(a)
Interference With Operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 7 5 25 1
31 to 60 days 9 1 32 46
61 to 120 days 2 0 7 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 2 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0 0
365 days or more 0 0 0 0
Total 18 6 66 47

Part 4: Fees

Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
Number of
Requests
Amount Number of
Requests
Amount
Application 460 $2,300 19 $95
Search 0 $0 0 $0
Production  0 $0 0 $0
Programming 0 $0 0 $0
Preparation 0 $0 0 $0
Alternative format 0 $0 0 $0
Reproduction  0 $0 0 $0
Total 460 $2,300 19 $95

Part 5: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and organizations

Consultations Other Government of Canada Institutions Number of Pages to Review Other Organizations Number of Pages to Review
Received during reporting period 121 5388 14 287
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 7 845 0 0
Total 128 6233 14 287
Closed during the reporting period 118 5898 13 287
Pending at the end of the reporting period 10 335 1 0

5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
Disclose entirely 37 30 3 2 0 0 0 72
Disclose in part 7 15 11 3 0 1 0 37
Exempt entirely 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 8
Total 50 48 14 5 0 1 0 118

5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
Disclose entirely 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 7
Disclose in part 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 6
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 5 5 3 0 0 0 0 13

Part 6: Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

6.1 Requests with Legal Services

Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 36 433 3 7 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 1 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 37 448 3 7 0 0 0 0 0 0

6.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7: Complaints and Investigations

Section 32 Section 35 Section 37 Total
3 0 0 3

Part 8: Court Action

Section 41 Section 42 Section 44 Total
0 0 0 0

Part 9: Resources Related to the Access to Information Act

9.1 Costs

Expenditures Amount
Salaries $649,967
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $130,872
Professional services contracts $81,022
Other $49,850
Total $780,839

9.2 Human Resources

Resources Person Years Dedicated to Access to Information Activities
Full-time employees 7.76
Part-time and casual employees 0.00
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.54
Students 0.65
Total 8.95

Note: Enter values to two decimal places.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: