Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act 2017 – 2018

Strengthening multiculturalism

©Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, (2019).
Catalogue No. CH31-1E-PDF
ISSN 1497-7400

On this page

List of Tables and Figures:

List of acronyms and abbreviations

AAFC
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
CBC
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
CCMS
Complaint mechanism service
CERD
United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination
CMF
Canada Media Fund
CRTC
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
EE
Employment Equity Act
FPT
Federal-Provincial-Territorial governments
GAC
Global Affairs Canada
GBA+
Gender Based Assessment Plus
ICERD
International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination
IDRC
International Development Research Centre
IHRA
International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance
NAC
National Arts Centre
NEB
National Energy Board
NFB
National Film Board of Canada
NGOs
Non-governmental organizations
NRC
Natural Resources Canada
PSES
Public Service Employee Annual Survey
RCM
Royal Canadian Mint
RCMP
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
SCC
Service Canada Centre
SIN
Social Insurance Number
TBS
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
WFA
Work Force Availability

Foreword from the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism

The fiscal year 2017–2018 saw the winding down of Canada 150, during which Canadians joined together in communities to celebrate our country and to reflect on Canada's place in the world. The Government of Canada and its partners supported numerous events and initiatives that highlighted diversity and inclusion, which were among the main themes of Canada 150 celebrations. In addition, we helped fund Canadian Multiculturalism Day celebrations in Montréal, Vancouver and Toronto on June 27, 2017.

Throughout this year, domestic and international events, including our commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the Québec City mosque shooting, continue to remind us of the importance of standing up for diversity and building inclusive communities. We are advancing this priority at home, in part through measures announced in Budget 2018, which included more funding for events and projects to bring people and communities together. The Budget also increased funding to support Black Canadians by enhancing local community supports and developing research to support more culturally focused mental health programs.

Budget 2018 reinforces the Government's commitment to eliminate racism and discrimination. New funding will bring together experts, community organizations, citizens and interfaith leaders to propose actions that the Government can take to eliminate barriers to full participation in society. We also increased funds to address racism and discrimination toward Indigenous Peoples and women and girls.

On an international level, Canada provided a response to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) 21st to 22nd Universal Periodic Reports and marked the Recognition of the UN International Decade for People of African Descent.

We also responded to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage Study on Systemic Racism and Religious Discrimination, which looked at how the Government could reduce or eliminate these problems, including Islamophobia. Along with the witnesses who appeared before the committee, our response contributed to a necessary dialogue about these issues in Canada. We have committed to studying measures to reduce these problems, and we will be gathering data to better inform our policies and practices.

This past year afforded us the opportunity to renew our commitments to fostering greater inclusion and celebrating our diversity. I am pleased to see that, as we mark the 30th anniversary of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act in 2018, most federal institutions have taken steps to reduce obstacles to employment and to promote awareness of diversity among their employees. The CRTC, for example, encourages name blind hiring practices and insists on anti-bias training for all hiring committee members.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism, I am proud of all that we have accomplished in 2017–2018, and I invite you to read through this report for further details.

Foreword from Gary Anandasangaree, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism

As Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism, I am pleased to provide greetings in this year's Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act 2017–18. This Report outlines the many ways in which we have carried out our mandate to support multiculturalism and to ensure that all Canadians can participate fully in our society.

I have met with Canadians across the country through my talks to support multiculturalism and anti-racism initiatives, and to highlight the 30th anniversary of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act. These meetings will inform ongoing policy development and will help in the creation of a new federal strategy to combat discrimination and racism.

I am proud of our government's commitment to embracing diversity and to helping all Canadians build a strong and inclusive society, a commitment that is reflected in the many initiatives outlined in this report.

Introduction

Since the adoption of Canada's Multiculturalism Policy in 1971, Canadian society has undergone significant socio-economic and political shifts, including a changing demographic, increased use of digital technology, and new global markets. Such changes have had an impact on Canada's diversity and the way Canadians think about diversity and multiculturalism.

According to the 2016 Census, the visible minority population represents more than one-fifth of Canada's total population (22.3%). Approximately three out of 10 persons identifying as visible minorities were born in Canada. It is estimated that by 2036, the visible minority population could represent 31.2% to 35.9% of the Canadian population.Footnote 1 Patterns of diversity are shifting: Francophone communities have experienced a 3% increase in the population of individuals born outside Canada relative to the general population.Footnote 2 In the Prairies, immigrant settlement has more than doubled over the past 15 years,Footnote 3 and the three Atlantic provinces received their largest numbers of new immigrants, doubling their proportion of total immigrants to Canada.

Within the context of this increasing diversity, over the past several years, Canadian attitudes about immigration have remained consistent or grown noticeably more positive. A 2016 national survey of Canadian public opinion about immigration and citizenshipFootnote 4 examined data and trends over more than 30 years and concluded that most Canadians continue to believe that immigration is good for the economy. In a separate national survey the same year,Footnote 5 respondents were asked an open-ended question about what makes Canada unique. The number one response was multiculturalism/diversity (43%), followed by land/geography (17%) and freedom/democracy (14%).Footnote 6 A total of 59% of respondents viewed multiculturalism as a defining characteristic of Canada, the third most popular answer after the health care system (84%) and land/geography (63%).Footnote 7 While such findings are encouraging, it remains important to continue to monitor sentiments around multiculturalism, diversity and inclusion within Canada, in an evolving context.

According to the most recent data from the "Victimization cycle of Statistics Canada's General Social Survey", approximately 17% of immigrants surveyed reported that they had experienced discrimination and approximately 20% of individuals who self-identified as a visible minority reported experiencing discrimination in the five years preceding the survey. Immigrant respondents reported feeling that they were discriminated against for their ethnicity or culture (54%), race or skin colour (47%) or language (31%). Visible minority respondents reported that they were discriminated against because of their race or skin colour (63%). Respondents who identified as Arab (29%), Black (27%) or Latin American (26%) were the most likely to report experiencing discrimination.Footnote 8

"In Canada, diversity is a source of strength and a fundamental pillar of our country's success. While we have made important progress in the fight against racism and racial discrimination in recent decades, much work still needs to be done. Far too many people around the world continue to be denied their most basic human rights simply because of the colour of their skin or their ethnic background."

- Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, March 21, 2017

It is important to acknowledge the continuing challenges that visible minority groups face in Canada. In 2016, 48% of all police-reported hate crimes were motivated by hatred of a race or ethnicity. Police reported that crimes specifically motivated by a hatred of race or ethnicity increased 4% from the previous year. Approximately 27% of hate crimes targeting religion and 45% targeting ethnicity were violent. These statistics highlight the challenges that continue to exist for racialized communities in Canada. Footnote 9

The annual operation of the Multiculturalism Act

The Multiculturalism Act (the Act) ensures that federal programs, policies and services are reflective and responsive to Canada's multicultural reality. All federal institutions have a vital role in implementing Canada's multiculturalism policy by encouraging and assisting individuals, organizations and institutions to embody the multicultural reality of Canada in their activities. The Act requires the Minister responsible for Multiculturalism to report annually on how these federal institutions were able to meet that obligations.

Part one of this report provides a summary of the achievements of the Multiculturalism Program within the Department of Canadian Heritage, and its contributions to the implementation of Canada's multiculturalism policy. It illustrates examples of activities demonstrating how Canadian Heritage and its portfolio institutions advanced the principles of the Act between April 1, 2017 and March 31, 2018.

Part two of this report summarizes how other federal institutions met their obligations in implementing the Multiculturalism Act during the same time period. Through the use of targeted indicators, this section demonstrates how federal institutions are applying the requirements of the Act and highlights a series of best practices that respond to the multicultural heritage of Canadians.

Part one: the Multiculturalism Program 2017-2018

The Multiculturalism Program has three main objectives, established in 2010:

  • To build an integrated, socially cohesive society by promoting intercultural and interfaith understanding; fostering civic memory, pride and respect for democratic values; and, promoting equal opportunity for individuals of all origins;
  • To improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population by assisting federal and public institutions to become more responsive to diversity by integrating multiculturalism into their policy and program development and service delivery; and
  • To actively engage in discussions on multiculturalism at the international level, promoting Canadian approaches as a successful model while contributing to an international policy dialogue on issues related to multiculturalism.

Five areas of activity are carried out by the Program to deliver on its objectives:

  • Grants and contributions – Inter-actionFootnote 10 provides grants and contributions funding for events and projects.
  • Strategic policy – the Program develops policy proposals and Cabinet strategies to meet Departmental and Government priorities and commitments.
  • Public outreach and promotion – the Program conducts outreach and educates the public about multiculturalism heritage initiatives such as Asian Heritage Month, Black History Month and Multiculturalism Day to increase awareness, understanding and public dialogue about multiculturalism in Canada.
  • Support to federal and public institutions – the Program supports federal institutions to meet their obligations under the Multiculturalism Act and leads the Multiculturalism Champions' Network. The Network is a community of practice that allows federal institutions to share challenges, best practices, and resources to better implement the Act.
  • International engagement – the Program supports Canada's participation in international agreements and bodies, such as the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination and the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

Key commitments and priorities:

The Government of Canada has demonstrated its commitment to strengthening multiculturalism by fostering equity, diversity and inclusion throughout the public service and Canada. Over the last year, a number of events have taken place which have reinforced and supported the work of the Multiculturalism Program. The following provides an overview of key Government and Departmental commitments and priorities:

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage study on Systemic Racism and Religious Discrimination

The Government of Canada was pleased to provide its response to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage study on Systemic Racism and Religious Discrimination that looked at how the Government could develop an approach to reducing or eliminating systemic racism and religious discrimination, including Islamophobia, in Canada. The Committee heard from 77 witnesses and received 34 briefs. Over 14 meetings were held between September 18 and November 8, 2017, resulting in the tabling of a final report that included over 30 recommendations. Many of these were consistent with observations made by the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) in its 2017 report and directly related to the need to develop a new federal approach to anti-racism and discrimination informed through engagement with civil society, grassroots organizations, and interfaith groups. On June 1, 2018 the Government tabled its response to the report, highlighting Budget 2018 commitments and existing initiatives.

Budget 2018

Budget 2018 committed $23 million over two years to increase funding for the Multiculturalism Program. Of this, $2 million was provided for cross-country engagement on a new national anti-racism approach, and $21 million in incremental funding was provided to address racism and discrimination, with a focus on Indigenous Peoples and racialized women and girls. The Department committed to carry out 22 in-person engagement sessions across Canada in the fall of 2018, and made the structural adjustments required to deliver additional grants and contributions for community capacity building and for projects and events that address racism and discrimination faced by diverse communities across Canada. Budget 2018 also provided $19 million to enhance local community supports for Black Canadian youth. Of this funding, $9 million was allocated to the Department of Canadian Heritage over three years and $10 million was allocated to the Public Health Agency of Canada over five years to develop research in support of more culturally focused mental health programs in Black Canadian communities.

Program evaluation

In an effort to further strengthen the Multiculturalism Program, an internal evaluation was completed covering the period from April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2017. It highlighted the continued relevance of the Program and presented six recommendations to improve efficiency and effectiveness as well as its design, delivery and measurement of results. The evaluation recommended a realignment of the Program governance structure in order to better deliver on priorities, and that the Program review its data collection instruments to better report on results. The evaluation equally recommended that the Program develop new funding guidelines for both projects and events to allow them to address the needs of targeted communities and enable the Program to better support emergent local and regional needs.Footnote 11

A. Inter-action – grants and contributions

The Government of Canada supported the socio-economic participation of individuals and communities through the Multiculturalism Program's Inter-Action grants and contributions funding for Projects and Events.

Inter-action projects component

The Projects component provided funding for national longer-term or multi-year projects to support community development and engagement initiatives that fostered an integrated, socially cohesive society. In 2017-2018, a total of $5.1 million was spent on projects that: worked towards the elimination of discrimination, racism and prejudice; provided opportunities for youth community engagement; and, brought people together through art, culture or sport.

Inter-action events component

The Events component provided funding to community-based events that fostered intercultural and/or interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, and respect for core democratic values. In 2017-2018, a total of $2.9 million was spent in Canadian communities on regional Inter-Action Events.

Inter-action projects and events highlights of 2017 – 2018

Examples of events and projects funded in 2017-2018 across Canada are highlighted below.

Organization: Armenian Holy Apostolic Church Canadian Diocese
Project title: Celebrating Our Diversity Now
Location: National
Project description: The goal of the project was to promote tolerance and diversity through engagement and interaction between youth leaders and clergy from various religious communities in Canada, and to establish the Canadian Inter-Regional Interfaith Youth Network to ensure long-term sustainability.

Organization: Council of Agencies Serving South Asians
Project title: The Intercultural Collaborative
Location: Ontario
Project description: The project delivered anti-racism and leadership development training and a series of sub-projects to a variety of communities. It worked to eliminate racism and discrimination through arts, sports, and youth engagement.

Organization: Montreal Holocaust Museum
Project title: Beyond the Walls
Location: Montreal
Project description: This multifaceted project brought together the pedagogical expertise of the Montreal Holocaust Museum, teachers and their associations, Holocaust education centres and various Canadian communities and organizations to improve educational support for the teaching of the Holocaust and human rights in Canada.

Organization: Edmonton Centre for Race and Culture
Project title: Unheard Youth Voices
Location: Alberta
Project description: The project focused on bringing together various migrant and Canadian-born groups including South Asian, Filipino and Chinese communities and encouraging connections between culturally, racially and linguistically diverse youth groups. Participants engaged in workshops on subjects such as racism and discrimination and explored what these concepts meant in their everyday lives.

Organization: African-Canadian Resource Network Saskatchewan Inc.
Project title: African Canadian Resource Network Community Initiative Against Racism, Sexism and Religious Discrimination.
Location: Saskatchewan
Project description: The project identified, exposed and addressed the human, social and economic cost of the intersection of racism, sexism and religious discrimination experienced within and by Canadian communities of African descent. It engaged in public education, awareness and empowering individuals, community organizations and institutions towards positive change.

Organization: Support for Refugee and Immigrant Families in Estrie
Event title: Civic engagement of immigrant youth, an antidote to social discrimination
Location: Quebec
Event description: The event aimed to promote intercultural dialogue and respect among participants. Event activities targeted young people from immigrant (Bhutanese, Nepalese, African, Arab and Latin American cultural communities) and Quebec families in order to educate and develop awareness among ethno-cultural communities, with the goal of reducing prejudice and discrimination towards immigrants.

Organization: Centre for Social Innovation
Event title: How to be an Ally Anti-Blackness at the Intersections: Racism, Resistance and Resilience
Location: Ontario
Event description: The event included a panel discussion that explored the experiences of diverse Black Canadians at the intersections of race, sexuality, gender, faith, ability, class and beyond. Other topics were also explored, such as Indigenous protocols and Indigenous cultural sensitivity, anti-oppression and pro-liberation frameworks, and demystifying the experience of transgendered people.

Organization: Regional Connections Inc.
Event title: CultureFest (2018)
Location: Manitoba
Event description: CultureFest offered ethno-cultural groups an opportunity to share highlights of their cultures through food, music, dance, art and artifacts. The goal of the event was to raise awareness of the diversity of newcomers in the region, foster understanding between cultural groups, and continue the work of creating welcoming communities that provide safe spaces where all can learn about and appreciate their neighbors.

Organization: The Calgary Fireworks Festival Society
Event title: GlobalFest Human Rights Forum
Location: Alberta
Event description: The event featured a Human Rights Forum based on the topic, "Back to Basics: Healing racism and discrimination through community living". During the final reception, organizers engaged smaller groups in conversations on issues related to reducing racism and discrimination.

Paul Yuzyk Youth Initiative for Multiculturalism

The Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism was created to commemorate the late Senator Yuzyk's legacy in establishing multiculturalism as one of the fundamental characteristics of Canadian heritage and identity. Recast for 2017-2018 as the Paul Yuzyk Youth Initiative for Multiculturalism, it continues to inspire young leaders to advance the objectives and intent of multiculturalism in‎ communities throughout Canada. The new funding initiative awarded micro-grants of up to $1000 to youth 18-24 years old who developed projects that promoted diversity and inclusion, empowering these young leaders to address racism and discrimination in their communities. The initiative was launched on February 22, 2018, and received approximately 70 applications by April 20, 2018.

B. Multiculturalism policy

The Multiculturalism Program's Policy directorate works in collaboration with its funding program to support the overall objectives of the Act throughout Canada. In 2017-2018, Multiculturalism Policy led the development of the Government's response to the February 2018 report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, "Taking Action Against Systemic Racism and Religious Discrimination Including Islamophobia", leading the coordination of federal institutions' efforts to address the report's recommendations. Multiculturalism Policy also developed the response to the recommendations of the internal program evaluation, which have been instrumental in realigning the program's governance structure, data collection instruments, and performance measurement architecture.

C. Public outreach and promotions

The Multiculturalism Program provides a number of diverse public outreach and promotional activities designed to engage Canadians on issues related to multiculturalism in order to promote intercultural and interfaith understanding. Examples of activities undertaken by the Program in2017-2018 include:

Asian Heritage Month and Black History Month

The Multiculturalism Program's direct public outreach and promotional activities included the Government of Canada's 2017 Asian Heritage Month Campaign and the 2018 Black History Month campaigns. For both campaigns, the Minister of Canadian Heritage hosted receptions in the National Capital Region that were attended by invited guests and stakeholders. These receptions featured education and awareness as themes and had relevant speeches, performances, displays, and the distribution of educational materials. The events were livestreamed on social media for the public to take part in. Each campaign had a social media strategy that included an e-mail blast to teachers, schools and libraries, as well as the retweeting of campaign content from other government departments so that users could follow how other federal institutions were celebrating.

Campaigns included a downloadable educational poster that highlighted campaign themes. Posters were made available to schools, libraries, museums, and the general public upon request. The Government of Canada's Asian Heritage Month and Black History Month webpages were also updated with educational content and information.

Asian Heritage Month - Past and Present, Celebrating the Contributions of Asian Canadians: Canada 150

2017 Asian Heritage Month poster, titled "Celebrating the Contributions of Asian Canadians: Asian Heritage Month 2017"

"Whether from East Asia, South Asia, Western Asia, Southeast Asia or the Middle East, Asian Canadians have helped our country prosper and grow. They have made their mark on every aspect of life in Canada, from the arts and sciences to sport, business and government—an example of how our diversity strengthens and enriches us all."

- Statement by Minister Joly on Asian Heritage Month, May 1, 2017

In May 2002, the Government of Canada signed an official declaration to designate May as Asian Heritage Month, a motion proposed by Senator Vivienne Poy.Footnote 12 It honours the contributions that Asian Canadians continue to make to this country and celebrates the diversity, history and culture of people with Asian ancestry. Throughout the month, Canadians are invited to take part in events that pay tribute to the legacy of Canadians of Asian heritage. The theme for the Government of Canada's 2017 Asian Heritage Month Campaign also commemorated contributions by Canadians of Asian descent throughout Canada's 150-year history through its theme, Past and Present, Celebrating the Contributions of Asian Canadians: Canada 150. The event also looked forward, towards the future growth and development of Canada and the important role this culturally rich and diverse group of Canadians have in our country's success.

Black History Month - Black Canadian Women: Stories of Strength, Courage and Vision

For the past 20 years, Canadians have been invited to participate in Black History Month activities that honor the legacy of Black Canadians past and present. Canadians celebrate the many achievements and contributions of Black Canadians towards making Canada a more culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation. In February 2008, Senator Donald Oliver, the first Black man appointed to the Senate, introduced the Motion to Recognize Contributions of Black Canadians and February as Black History Month.Footnote 13 It received unanimous approval, and was thereby adopted on March 4, 2008.

2018 Black History Month Celebration

For 2018, the theme of the Government of Canada's Black History Month campaign was Black Canadian Women: Stories of Strength, Courage and Vision. The campaign paid tribute to the strength, courage and vision shown by so many Black Canadian women throughout history. Furthermore, the Multiculturalism Program facilitated public access to On the Road North, a travelling exhibit for community organizations and Canadian Heritage's Regional Offices in five locations across Canada (Ottawa, Gatineau, Montréal, Whitby, and Winnipeg).

2018 Black History Month poster titled "Black Canadian Women: Stories of Strength, Courage and Vision"

International Decade for People of African Descent

On January 30, 2018 the Government of Canada announced its support for the International Decade for People of African Descent. Recognition of the International Decade is consistent with the Government's commitment to ensuring a better future for Black Canadians.

"Today is an important day for Canada. Our commitment to the International Decade will help us better address the very real and unique challenges that Black Canadians face, and bring us closer to a more just and inclusive country."

—Statement by the Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, January 30, 2018

As proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly, the theme for the International Decade is, People of African descent: recognition, justice and development.Footnote 14 The objectives of Canada's multiculturalism policy as set out in the Multiculturalism Act are well-aligned with those of the International Decade for People of African Descent, which are to highlight the important contributions made by people of African descent to our society, to support concrete measures to promote their full inclusion and to combat racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia.

Multiculturalism Day

Multiculturalism Day is celebrated yearly on June 27. This year, it included a number of events across Canada that allowed communities to showcase their pride and strengthened understanding of our shared history.

"Canadians come from every corner of the world, speak two official languages and hundreds more, practice many faiths, and represent many cultures. Multiculturalism is at the heart of Canada's heritage and identity – and as Canadians, we recognize that our differences make us strong."

—Statement by the Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, June 27, 2017

Three major events were highlighted that reflected and embodied Canada's diversity and the rich ethno-cultural fabric of Canadian society. The Department of Canadian Heritage worked with Canada Place in Vancouver, the Harbourfront Centre in Toronto, and Francofolies in Montréal to deliver these events. Daytime multidisciplinary family programming included live musical performances, workshops, roaming performers and child and youth zones, and picnic areas and food kiosks serving various traditional foods were available. Evening mainstage shows featured performances by ethno-cultural, Francophone, and Indigenous artists celebrating the many diverse communities and cultures of Canada.

D. Domestic partnerships and international engagements

The Multiculturalism Program supports Canada's role in its implementation of international conventions that are aligned with the Multiculturalism Act and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. These international conventions include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

The Program supports and engages with the following domestic and international organizations throughout the year:

Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund

The Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund is funded through a $10 million endowment from the Government of Canada to the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Tara Shevchenko. It was established to support projects which commemorate and recognize communities affected by First World War internment in Canada. In 2017-18, the Fund supported the award-winning documentary, That Never Happened: Canada's First National Internment Operations. This film premiered at the Cave & Basin National Historic Site, one of the 24 internment camp locations. The Endowment Council also approved 26 grants totaling $487,478 aimed at educating Canadians about Canada's wartime measures. These included: academic and research papers on the First World War Internment and the law; a national art exhibit; a national historical exhibit; awareness campaigns; a university students' internment conference in Banff, Alberta; and an internee cemetery restoration of the Morrissey Cemetery in British Columbia. A digital map was created on the www.internmentcanada.ca website which contains over 12,000 newspaper articles from 1913 to 1920.

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

The Canadian Race Relations Foundation was created in 1996 by an Act of Parliament, as part of the Government of Canada's redress for its unjust treatment of Japanese Canadians during and after World War II. The Foundation was created to foster racial harmony and cross-cultural understanding as a means to eliminate racism. It develops and delivers diversity, equity, and human rights education and training within a race relations framework. The Foundation holds an annual National Conference and Awards of Excellence ceremony, recognizing the outstanding initiatives in Canadian race relations work. As well, the Foundation holds the annual Canada Lecture which features distinguished Canadian speakers and provides a forum for discussing best practices and challenges in confronting and eliminating racism.

In 2017-2018 the Canadian Race Relations Foundation delivered its "Canada beyond 150: A Promise to our Children" initiative. The initiative convened a series of national conversations on issues related to race and discrimination, developed a national youth network and brought together faith leaders and Indigenous communities to address reconciliation in Canada.

The Global Centre for Pluralism

During the 2017-2018 fiscal year the Global Centre for Pluralism moved into its new headquarters at 330 Sussex Drive in Ottawa and hosted a launch event. Coinciding with Canada's sesquicentennial celebrations, the Centre implemented a year-long program of events highlighting their work and the importance of pluralism. The Centre launched two new publications series: Intersections - Practicing Pluralism and Accounting for Change in Diverse Societies. In November 2017, the Centre held the inaugural ceremony for its Global Pluralism Award to highlight the achievements of ten pluralism champions from around the world. Also, the Centre hosted the second annual Global Pluralism Think Tank with researchers from five continents to review and advance the Centre's pluralism lens framework

International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination

The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination is a United Nations Convention that promotes and encourages universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinction based on race, sex, language or religion. Canada's discussions with the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) provide an opportunity to look at our work objectively and to improve initiatives in order to combat racism.Footnote 15

In 2017-18 the Department of Canadian Heritage consulted with federal and provincial partners regarding progress in responding to CERD's recommendations in preparation for Canada's appearance before it to discuss Canada's 21st to 23rd periodic reports. Canada's report outlines the implementation of the ICERD in Canada. The CERD examined Canada's report and presented its recommendations and concerns in the form of Concluding Observations. Canada's reports to CERDFootnote 16 and CERD's Concluding Observations are available on the United Nations websiteFootnote 17.

International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

Initiated in 1998, the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) is a coalition of member countries governed by the principles expressed in the Declaration of the Stockholm International Forum on the Holocaust (Stockholm Declaration). Canada became the 27th member of IHRA in 2009.

On September 27, 2017, Canada unveiled the National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa. The monument serves as a reminder to future generations to keep the lessons of history alive in our nation's consciousness. In January 2018, Canada submitted its first Country Report to IHRA. It covers the six-year period from 2011 to 2017 and contains information on general activities, as well as activities on Holocaust education, remembrance, research, and denial and its relation to antisemitism. The report provides an opportunity for Canada to reiterate its commitment to the principles of the Stockholm Declaration as well as to outline achievements and challenges in this regard.

E. Canadian Heritage and Portfolio Organizations: enhancing the multiculturalism mandate

The Department of Canadian Heritage and portfolio organizations have been leaders in advancing the Government's priority of diversity and inclusion. They work to fulfill the mandate of preserving and enhancing multiculturalism by promoting and recognizing Canadians' ethno-cultural diversity in their programs, policies and services. Canadian Heritage and portfolio organizations play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. The Department supports culture, the arts, heritage, official languages, citizen engagement and participation, youth and sport initiatives and Indigenous languages and cultures. It is through these programs and those of its many portfolio agencies that Canadian Heritage promotes and builds multiculturalism and diversity in Canada.

Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Fund

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Fund provides funding that supports local arts and culture in Canada through mediums such as festivals, events and projects featuring local artists, artisans and heritage performers. During 2017-2018, themes surrounding multiculturalism and diversity were highlighted. In 2017, for instance, the Fund supported the 50th edition of the Toronto Caribbean Carnival. Celebrating diversity and multiculturalism, the programming included Caribbean music, dance and street performances which promoted the work of 12,500 local artists. With the help of 600 volunteers, the event hosted an audience of 1,250,000 people over the course of 28 days. The Fund has supported this event since 2009-2010. The Mosaïq Multicultural Festival in Moncton, New Brunswick, has also been funded since 2009-2010. It is a unique and colorful celebration of Moncton's diversity. The programming includes various ethno-cultural music and dance performances, an Indigenous drum circle, cultural showcases, and music and dance workshops. For many newcomers, Mosaïq is an important way to stay connected to their roots as well as experience and share their own culture with their neighbours.

Canada 150

2017 Canada 150 Celebration on Parliament Hill, featuring the Prime Minister of Canada.

The Department of Canadian Heritage marked the 150th anniversary of Confederation by helping Canadians join together and celebrate essential elements of the Canadian spirit. Canada 150 supported community initiatives such as the renewal of community infrastructure, community-based events and activities that highlighted Canada as an inclusive and diverse society, efforts towards reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians, engaging youth, and reaffirming the importance of environmental stewardship.Footnote 18 For the diversity segment of the Canada 150 festivities, 378 signature projects and community projects were approved.

A key example of a community project for Canada 150 is that carried out by the community of North Preston, Nova Scotia. It is the largest Black Indigenous community in Canada. Organized by the NPF Community Organization Society, the organization held local celebrations including a parade honouring local community members, past and present, who have helped shape the North Preston community. There was a block party featuring local entertainment, fireworks, and a basketball tournament. The community took pride in celebrating its heritage and Canada's 150 years.

2017 Canada 150 Celebration on Parliament Hill, featuring Parliament buildings.

The Black Cultural Society of Prince Edward Island Co-operative also hosted a community project recognizing and celebrating the contributions of Prince Edward Island's Black community. The one-day outdoor festival featured programming that was open and accessible to the entire community. The festival began with a walking tour of sites significant to the original Black and mixed race community in Charlottetown, known as "The Bog". The tour ended near the city centre at Pownal Square, where arts and heritage presentations were offered. Members of the community were invited to participate in an open mic event, whereby descendants of "The Bog" could share their knowledge, history, stories and cultural experiences. Local performers added to the programming with presentations of traditional music, and local artists demonstrated cultural art and artisanal practices. This festival provided participants an opportunity to learn about their history while actively taking part in shaping their future.

Canada Arts Training Fund

The Canada Arts Training Fund supports professional Canadian arts training institutions. The Fund contributions to 38 independent, non-profit, incorporated Canadian organizations that specialize in training artists for professional national and international artistic careers. For example, the fund supported the Sampradaya Dance Academy in Mississauga, Ontario. Founded with the vision of engaging future generations of Canadians in the rich classical dance form of Bharatanatyam, the Academy is deeply committed to time-tested traditions of teaching, practice and performance. The dance academy trains approximately 60 classical Indian dancers and is committed to excellence in the teaching, practice and performance of the Tanjavur style of Bharatanatyam.

Canada Arts Presentation Fund

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund was created in 2001 to give Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities by providing financial assistance to arts presenters to professionally present at arts festivals and performing arts series, and by supporting organizations. The fund supports approximately 650 professional arts festivals and performing arts series, and other activities related to art presentation, in more than 250 cities or communities across Canada.

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund supported the Festival du Monde Arabe de Montréal through funding " Alchimie, Création et Cultures." The 2017 edition of the festival offered a program of approximately thirty different works by artists (dance, music, theatre, visual arts and media arts) from Quebec, other Canadian provinces and abroad. In addition to this programming, a dozen activities were organized including meetings, projections, exhibitions and conferences. The Festival promoted exchange, dialogue and openness between different communities and was intended to be a place of cultural exchange between Canada, the Middle East and Maghreb countries.

The Canada Media Fund

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) is an independent not-for-profit corporation funded by the Government of Canada. It fosters and supports the creation and promotion of successful, innovative, inclusive, diverse Canadian content and software applications for current and emerging digital platforms. In 2017-2018, the Fund committed $3 million towards its Diverse Languages Program. Since 2010, the Fund has provided $16.9 million to 79 projects as part of that Program, which provides funding to support third language Canadian content productions.

Examples of current diverse programming include projects such as "Blood and Water II", a Cantonese, multi-generational serialized family drama with a crime story as its backdrop, and "Carmen: La Hija Revolucionaria", a Spanish biopic which showcases one of Canada's most successful Latino artists. The Fund has also supported "Monte Cassino: L'Abbazia Indistruttibile", a project where Italian-Canadian survivors tell the story of the Battle of Monte Cassino - one of the most important military operations of World War II.

As part of Budget 2018, the Government announced its commitment to increase its contribution to the Canada Media Fund by $172 million over five years. With this stabilized budget, there will be continued support for the creation of diverse and inclusive Canadian content on multiple platforms.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)

2017 marked the second year of the CBC's Breaking Barriers Film Fund. This fund supports the production of feature-length fiction films by women, Indigenous people and filmmakers of diverse backgrounds. The fund addresses underrepresentation by helping to share stories of communities that have traditionally been unrecognized in the film industry. It is intended to fund high-quality productions that reflect, represent and reframe the realities of diversity through story-telling stories that form the heart of the Canadian experience.

The Breaking Barriers Film Fund aims to make the CBC the lead voice for the diverse film expression, to publicize and promote the fund to audiences and industry stakeholders in Canada and around the world, to share stories through the eyes of Canadians of diverse backgrounds, to provide relevant content to the CBC and its platforms in Canada and around the world, and to demonstrate its commitment to developing diverse talent.

Canada Council for the Arts

The Canada Council for the Arts, in partnership with the Ministry for Culture of Argentina and the International Federation of Arts Councils and Culture Agencies, organized the first ever Americas Cultural Summit on May 9 to 11, 2018. The event was predominately trilingual in English, French and Spanish, with some Portuguese. In advance of the event, the Council arranged for Spanish-language training for designated employees and hired Spanish-speaking staff to liaise and coordinate with Spanish-speaking delegates and participants. These initiatives contributed to the success of the Summit, ensuring that all aspects of the event – from registration to liaison with speakers – ran smoothly and that Spanish-speaking delegates felt welcome and included. Canada Council staff also provided Portuguese interpretation on site for the Brazilian delegation. As well, the language training served to reinforce the multilingual capacities of Council staff in the longer term.

In addition to delivering grants to artists and arts organizations, an important part of the mandate of the Canada Council is to administer various prizes and awards to outstanding artists and professionals in related fields. These prizes are adjudicated by peer assessment committees that the Council composes with a view to reflecting artistic expertise as well as Canada's diversity. In 2017-18, distinguished individuals such as Lawrence Hill (Molson Prize), Yara El-Ghadban (Victor Martyn Lynch-Staunton Award) and Midi Onodera (Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts) received prizes for their outstanding artistic achievements. When high-profile prize winners from minority communities are honored on the national stage, the impact on these communities and the general public is multifold: it provides role model for the new generation of artists, presents a genuine picture of how Canada looks like today, and makes excellent and diverse arts practices available to a wide spectrum of public and audiences.

National Film Board of Canada

The National Film Board (NFB) of Canada has a mandate to create audiovisual works that make Canada and its diverse perspectives known to Canadians and the world. The Board works with filmmakers and creators from across the country to produce documentaries, animations and exceptional interactive and immersive works rooted in Canadian experiences and realities. Through its audiovisual production program, the NFB aims to reflect the views and experiences of communities that are systematically underrepresented in the media landscape, and to innovate in the creation of new forms and approaches.

As a result, the NFB is a leader in producing works that represent Canada's diversity. In 2017-2018, filmmakers from ethno-cultural, linguistic and Aboriginal communities made 58% of the NFB's content. Examples of films that highlight the Multiculturalism mandate include: "Winds of Spring" - animated film by Keyu Chen, winner of the Cinéaste recherché competition; "My Yiddish Pappy" - animated film by Eleonore Goldbergm; and "The Girls of Meru" - a documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Andrea Dorfman. Every year, NFB productions are presented at some 250 festivals around the world. In Canada, festivals provide a platform for the NFB to reach out to Canadians and showcase their productions to diverse communities.

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 aims to inspire and enable Canadians to explore the theme of immigration to Canada. The museum allows participants an opportunity to learn more about the experiences of immigrants and the contributions that they have made to Canada's culture, economy and way of life.

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 continues its tradition of offering employment opportunities to newcomers to Canada, with the "Welcome Home to Canada" program. The program provides a six-month paid term work to eligible immigrants in order to ease the newcomer's transition into the labour market. Last year the program hired nine immigrants facing various barriers. The program's success is demonstrated by the percentage of participants securing meaningful employment, attending higher education institutions or opening their businesses within six months of program completion.

Part two: implementation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act across federal institutions

Introduction

The Minister responsible for Multiculturalism is mandated to promote the implementation of the Multiculturalism Act in Canada and to support federal institutions in the implementation of the Act. Under the Act, the Minister is required to report annually on the achievements of federal institutions and how they have met their obligations set forth in the Act.

Specifically, Section 3.2 requires federal institutions to:

  1. ensure that Canadians of all origins have an equal opportunity to obtain employment and advancement in those institutions;
  2. promote policies, programs and practices that enhance the ability of individuals and communities of all origins to contribute to the continuing evolution of Canada;
  3. promote policies, programs and practices that enhance the understanding of and respect for the diversity of the members of Canadian society;
  4. collect statistical data in order to enable the development of policies, programs and practices that are sensitive and responsive to the multicultural reality of Canada;
  5. make use, as appropriate, of the language skills and cultural understanding of individuals of all origins; and
  6. generally, carry on their activities in a manner that is sensitive and responsive to the multicultural reality of Canada.

Part Two of the Annual Report follows the structure of Section 3.2 of the Multiculturalism Act.

Using an indicator approach, the Annual Report on the Operation of the Multiculturalism Act will be able to: (1) better report on outcomes; (2) better understand and respond to the needs of departments as they implement the Multiculturalism Act; and (3) compare results from year to year to identify trends and measure progress. Best practices for federal institutions can be found under each indicator and a copy of the reporting tool can be found in Annex A.

For the 2017-2018 reporting period 117 out of 142 federal institutions provided input to this Report (please see Annex B), representing a response rate of 82%.

A. Equal opportunity to obtain employment and advancement

During the 2017-2018 fiscal year, federal institutions continued to employ a workforce reflective of Canada's diverse population. Representation within federal institutions met and in some cases exceeded the workforce availability of self-identified visible minorities outlined by Statistics Canada in 2016, which is used as a guide for the purposes of comparability.Footnote 19 A comparison of large and small federal institutionsFootnote 20 outlines the need to develop improved mechanisms to not only meet workforce availability percentages but to exceed them, so that they may better reflect the Canadian population as a whole.

Representation of visible minorities in senior executive positions

Institutions were asked to report on the proportion of employees in senior management positions belonging to a visible minority employment equity group. Federal institutions reported that 9% of their staff in senior management positions self-identified as a visible minority. This percentage is an increase of 1.8% from last year, indicating that while federal institutions are hiring more visible minorities, more work still needs to be done in order to achieve the workforce availability percentage of 9.6%.Footnote 21 The percentage of employees in senior management positions that self-identified as a visible minority was higher in large federal institutions (9.2%) as compared to smaller federal institutions (6.4 %). While representation within large institutions had almost reached the workforce availability percentage, small institutions had a gap of 3.2% (Figure 1).

Representation of visible minorities in non-senior management positions

Federal institutions were asked to provide the proportion of self-identified visible minority employees in non-senior management positions. Federal institutions reported that 14.6% of their employees self-identified as a visible minority, higher than the workforce availability of 14.2%.Footnote 22 The percentage of employees in non-senior management positions that had self-identified as a visible minority was higher in large federal institutions (14.6%) as compared to smaller federal institutions (12.5 %). These percentages demonstrate that smaller institutions have a gap of approximately 1.7% below the workforce availability percentage, signaling that gaps exist and may vary depending on size of institution (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Percentage of employees who have self-identified as belonging to a visible minority group for responding federal institutions

Federal institutions responded that 14.45% of their employees identified as belonging to a visible minority group, compared to a workforce availability percentage (WFA) of 14.2%. Federal institutions responded that 14.6% of employees in non-senior management (14.2% WFA), 9% of employees in senior management (9.6% WFA), and 12% of new hires identified as belonging to a visible minority group (13% WFA).

Representation of newly hired visible minorities

Federal institutions reported that 12% of their new hires self-identified as belonging to a visible minority group. This percentage is 1% below that of the workforce availability percentage of 13%.Footnote 23 When comparing these percentages between large and small institutions the percentage remains consistent in larger institutions while smaller institutions appear to have met the outlined workforce availability percentage (Chart 1).

Chart 1: Percentage of employees who have self-identified as belonging to a visible minority group for large versus small federal institutions

Large federal institutions responded that 14.5% and small federal institutions responded that 12% of their employees identified as belonging to a visible minority group, compared to a workforce availability percentage (WFA) of 14.2%. Large federal institutions responded that 14.6% and small federal institutions responded that 12.5% of employees in non-senior management, identified as belonging to a visible minority group (14.2% WFA). Large federal institutions responded that 9.2% and small federal institutions responded that 6.4% of senior management identified as belonging to a visible minority group (WFA 9.6%). Large federal institutions responded that 12% and small federal institutions responded that 13% of new hires identified as belonging to a visible minority group (WFA 13%).

The findings of this report confirm that federal institutions are continuing to hire a workforce that is representative of the Canadian population. However, gaps still remain and will need to be addressed in the areas of senior management and new hires. The results point to the need for increased measures to address equitable representation and upward progression of visible minorities across occupational groups and levels in the public service. For many institutions workforce availability percentages are viewed as targets versus a minimum percentage that should be exceeded.Footnote 24

The numbers reflected in the Annual Report demonstrate that 14.45% of employees other than new hires self-identify as belonging to a visible minority group. This is comparable with figures reported under the Treasury Board's Employment Equity Report insofar as the Annual Report did not report on "new hires", considering this information was incomplete amongst many institutions having submitted responses to the Annual Report. As a result "new hires" were removed and calculated separately.Footnote 25

Initiatives federal institutions have undertaken to address and/or reduce obstacles preventing ethnic, racial and religious minorities from obtaining advancement or employment

Seventy percent of reporting federal institutions indicated that they have developed initiatives, practices, polices, and programs to address and/or reduce obstacles for racialized, ethno-cultural and/or religious minorities in the workplace. Of the 117 reporting federal institutions, 21% indicated that they had not developed any mechanisms to address and reduce obstacles using standard human resource tools available to them, and 9% of federal institutions provided no information (Figure 2).

Figure 2: federal institutions with initiatives to address and/or reduce obstacles to visible minority employees in the workplace

Seventy percent of federal institutions reported developing initiatives, practices, polices, and programs to address and/or reduce obstacles for racialized, ethno-cultural and/or religious minorities in the workplace, 21% of federal institutions reported not developing any initiatives, while 9% provided no information.

Most federal institutions reported using a variety of initiatives, practices, polices, and programs to address and/or reduce obstacles for racialized, ethno-cultural and/or religious minorities in the workplace, such as: diversity and inclusion/employment equity plans/strategies and training, name-blind and targeted recruitment, committees and networks (Chart 2).

Chart 2: types of initiatives that federal institutions have undertaken to address and/or reduce obstacles to employment

List of the types of initiatives that federal institutions have undertaken to address and/or reduce obstacles to employment:
diversity and inclusion/employment equity plans/strategies 35%; training - unconscious bias, diversity and inclusion, cultural competency 28%; targeted recruitment 26%; diversity and inclusion/employment equity committee's and networks 11%; employment systems and policies review to identify barriers and challenges to employment 11%; consultation and outreach with employee's and ethno-cultural communities 9%; job advertisements - statements encouraging applications from targeted communities 8%; internships/mentorships 6%; name blind recruitment 5%; inclusion of diversity and inclusion objectives in management performance agreements 5%; data analytics - to identify gaps in classification groups for EE hiring 4%; implementation of quiet room/prayer and meditation room 2%; representation on employment boards 2%; and self-identification campaign 2%.

The use of multiple approaches indicates that efforts to address employment equity gaps have been taken seriously within most federal institutions and may contribute to addressing employment equity gaps overtime.

Table 1 : Best practice(s) - to address and/or reduce obstacles that prevent ethnic, racial and religious minorities from entering into the workplace
Name of federal institutions Best practice(s)
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation The organization has undertaken a number of activities to address and/or reduce obstacles that prevent ethnic, racial and religious minorities from entering and progressing through the institution such as: a human resources policy review, targeted recruitment strategies, people analytics (data), implementation of an in-house diversity index, and ensuring that diversity and inclusion objectives are written into performance agreements.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research The institution conducted a focused review of their applicant tracking software. The software has allowed the institution to gather better business intelligence on trends, gaps and areas for improvement. The results of the analysis led to recommendations such as linking the institution's talent management strategy to a targeted diversity recruitment initiative and a review of the applicant screening process for unintentional bias. The new program has led to the development of an inclusive interview strategy and cultural awareness training.
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission The institution has implemented diversity and inclusion objectives into executive performance agreements. Hiring managers are encouraged to use name-blind hiring practices in selection processes. As well, all hiring committee representatives are required to take anti-bias training, and all employees are provided with inclusion/inclusivity training. Resources have been developed and provided to all employees through the institution's intranet.
Department of Finance Canada The department leveraged the student work experience program and held a university and mid-level recruitment campaign for certain EC-level positions. They also implemented a name-blind assessment approach from the initial application process through to the phone interview and conducted targeted recruitment of visible minority candidates. Further, the department undertook a corporate governance review where they reviewed their corporate governance as it pertained to diversity and inclusion and have ensured that diversity and inclusion remains a key priority by naming a senior executive member as Diversity Champion.

Anti-discrimination and anti-racism training

Federal institutions were asked to report on the types of activities implemented to foster a diverse and inclusive workplace. The Annual Report requests that federal institutions report on the number of employees that have participated in anti-discrimination and anti-racism training.

Figure 3: federal institutions that have provided anti-discrimination/racism training

Seventy-two percent of federal institutions reported that they had provided anti-racism/discrimination training to employees, 17% did not provide training, and 11% provided no information.

Seventy-two percent of federal institutions reported that they had provided anti-discrimination and anti-racism training to their employees. This percentage is higher than the 61.8% reported in the 2016-2017 Management Accountability Framework government-wide report.Footnote 26 This indicates a positive upward trend in diversity and inclusion training. Anti-discrimination and anti-racism training was incorporated in the following courses offered by federal institutions: Cultural Competency, Diversity and Inclusion, Employment Equity, Gender Based Assessment (GBA+), Harassment and Discrimination, Human Rights in the Workplace, Orientation/Onboarding, Code of Conduct, Creating a Respectful Workplace, Unconscious Bias Awareness, and Values and Ethics. There were also various armchair discussions provided by the Canada School for the Public Service (Chart 3). Of the 117 responding institutions, 17% reported that they had not provided anti-discrimination and anti-racism training and 11% provided no information (Figure 3).

Chart 3: types of anti-racism/discrimination training attended

List of the types of anti-racism/discrimination training attended by employees: 
diversity and inclusion training 44%; respectful workplace training 36%; unconscious bias awareness training 21%; harassment and discrimination training 12%; values and ethics 11%; cultural competency training 9%; employment equity training 4%; new employee orientation/onboarding 4%; GBA+ training 3%; and human rights in the workplace training 2%.

Anti-discrimination/racism training was also delivered through facilitated partnerships with community and public institutions to provide targeted training through online and workshop formats. While training that incorporates anti-discrimination/racism elements is useful, continued delivery of training solely focused on anti-discrimination/racism is encouraged. For instance many federal institutions reported providing unconscious bias training to employees. This training is essential to developing an awareness of the biases that may impede the development of a respectful workplace. However, unconscious bias training should be seen as part of a suite of training programs that help to make employees aware of situations that may affect their judgement and cannot be seen as a substitute for anti-racism training that develops a deepened awareness of underlying systemic issues in the workplace and beyond.

Table 2 : best practice(s) - anti-discrimination/racism training provided by federal institutions
Name of federal institutions Best practice(s)
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Cultural Competency Training was provided by the New Brunswick Multicultural Council with trainers from the local immigrant settlement associations. Sessions were designed to allow participants to better understand or anticipate some of the cultural differences that might be encountered when welcoming newcomers to our communities. Sessions promoted cultural awareness and aimed to help employees gain cultural competency.
Canada Border Service Agency Diversity and Race Relations training was provided to all Canada Border Service Agency employees who interact directly with internal or external clients. It provided awareness, knowledge and strategies on managing diversity and race relations.
Canada Council for the Arts Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace was a mandatory class for all employees and was provided by the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion. The course aimed to sensitize employees to diversity and inclusion in the workplace and beyond through the introduction of fundamental concepts and practical exercises. It included an overview of employment equity, definition of key terms, analysis of one's own dimension of diversity and an overview of how biases operate. The curriculum highlighted the intentional or unintentional aspects of prejudice and how they impact the way human beings react to differences such as race, religions, gender and sexual orientation.
Canada Revenue Agency Diversity - Our Differences, Our Similarities is an online course offered to all employees. The goal of the training was to allow participants to gain an awareness of key concepts related to diversity, provide strategies that employees can apply on the job, and was a vehicle towards creating positive conversations in the workplace about diversity.
Justice Canada The Negotiation in an Intercultural and International Context course focused on building the negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, and intercultural and multicultural competencies of lawyers. This course provided insight into the concept of culture and how it can influence negotiations, especially in intercultural and multicultural negotiation processes. It built on the basic concepts for the course of interest-based negotiation.

Promotion of events that highlight and inform employees of racism/discrimination

Federal institutions are obliged to educate employees about racial, ethnic and religious diversity in the workplace and were asked to provide information about their participation in the active promotion of events that informed employees of racism and/or discrimination.

Of the 117 respondents, approximately 87% reported that they actively promote these events (Figure 4).

Figure 4: active promotion of events which inform employees about racial, ethnic and religious diversity in the workplace

Eighty-seven percent of federal institutions reported that they had engaged in the active promotion of events to inform employees about racial, ethnic and religious diversity in the workplace, 9% reported having no events, 2% did not respond, and 2% provided insufficient information.

National and international commemorative events that federal institutions reported celebrating were also analyzed. These include the days and events that were most often recognized and promoted within the workplace in terms of educating employees with a diversity, inclusion and/or multiculturalism lens. Of the events that federal institutions specifically listed, Black History Month (29%) was celebrated the most along with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (17%), Asian Heritage Month (16%), and Multiculturalism Day (12%). Institutions also reported celebrating other national events (23%) and international events (3%) focused on racial, ethnic and religious diversity (Figure 5).

Figure 5: commemorative events most celebrated

Federal institutions reported that they had celebrated the following commemorative events: Black History Month (29%) was celebrated the most along with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (17%), Asian Heritage Month (16%), and Multiculturalism Day (12%). Institutions also reported celebrating other national events (23%) and international events (3%) focused on racial, ethnic and religious diversity.

The media by which federal institutions promoted events were also analyzed, based on specific examples that were provided, in order to understand how federal institutions are reaching out to employees. The results demonstrated that institutions reach out to employees in multiple ways, such as information sessions, discussion panels, conferences and lunch and learns. Respondents also indicated leveraging their departmental champions, committees and networks (16%) as well as communications, including email bulletins and newsletters (16%). Institutional intranet posting was also common (15%), with promotional materials and toolkits (6%) and social media (5%) being the least-used methods (Figure 6).

Figure 6: categories of promotional activities used by federal institutions

Federal institutions reported using the following activities to promote multiculturalism: departmental champions, committees and networks 16%; promotional materials and toolkits (including exhibits) 6%; intranet 15%; information sessions, panels, conferences, lunch n' learn/ awards/forums/workshop/courses 42%; communications such as email, bulletins/newsletters 16%; social media 5%.
Table 3 : best practice(s) - active promotion anti-racism and anti-discrimination events
Name of federal institution Best practice(s)
Bank of Canada The unveiling of the new $10 note featuring Viola Desmond took place in Halifax, Nova Scotia, during Black History Month in February and officially on International Women's Day, March 8th, 2018.
International Development Research Centre (IDRC) During International Development Week, February 4-10, 2018, IDRC celebrated "Partners for a better world," with a seven-day social media campaign (Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn) highlighting the many ways partnerships unlock innovations, resources and expertise to improve the lives of those in the developing world from a variety of different racial, ethnic and religious backgrounds.
Natural Resources Canada (NRC) NRC held an Interfaith Panel in recognition of the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on March 21st. An interfaith panel discussion was hosted entitled "Breaking down Barriers – Building an Inclusive Workplace". A Rabbi, an Imam, a Priest and a Sikh leader formed a panel aimed at increasing awareness, sensitivity and appreciation of differences and fostering respectful and inclusive workplaces.
Statistics Canada For the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, Statistics Canada hosted three presentations about changing demographics, diversity and inclusion, and fairness in recruitment processes. After the event, an article on building a more inclusive society was published in Statistics Canada's employee newsletter (@StatCan).
2018 Unveiling of the Canada 150 commemorative $10 bank note

Number of complaints, the communication of rights and the complaint process

Approximately 94% of federal institutions communicated employee rights and the complaints process as it relates to racism and discrimination and 74% reported that they had received no complaints (Figure 7). Twenty-two percent of institutions reported receiving complaints related to racism and discrimination during this fiscal year, representing an average of 1.1 complaints per reporting institution. Seventeen percent of federal institutions reported having resolved complaints, while 19% indicated that they had ongoing complaints.

Of note, while 74% of federal institutions indicated that they received no complaints, it does not necessarily mean that harassment and discrimination had not taken place in those workplaces. Employees may not always feel safe or comfortable bringing forward incidents of harassment and discrimination, or they may feel intimidated by the process. More emphasis needs to be placed on collecting data to proactively provide direction on the types of incidences coming forward, which will determine the development and types of tools needed to enhance the process.Footnote 27

Figure 7: federal institutions that have communicated to employees their rights and the complaints process related to racism and discrimination

Ninety-four percent of federal institutions reported that they had communicated to employees their rights and the complaints process related to racism and discrimination, 4% reported that they did not and 2 percent provided no information.

Federal institutions used many communication methods to inform employees about their rights and the complaints process such as the intranet, training, emails, staff meetings, policies, resources and toolkits, unions, newsletters and a telephone resource line. A list of communication methods used can be found in chart 4.

Chart 4: types of communication methods used to inform employees about their rights and the complaints process related to racism and discrimination

List of communication methods used to inform employees about their rights and the complaints process related to racism and discrimination are: 
intranet 71%; training 56%; e-mail communications with employees 37%; all staff/team meetings 27%; policies 25%; resources/toolkits 20%; union/joint union and management meetings/collective agreements 10%; news bulletin/newsletter 7%; performance review/employee agreements 6%; data management systems 3%; information sessions 3%; education and awareness campaign 3%; shared directory /server/ GCdocs 3%; broadcast news 2%; bulletin board/ communication boards 2%; employee assistance program 2%; harassment prevention program 1%; and telephone resource line 1%.

According to the 2017 Public Service Employee Annual Survey (PSES), 22% of employees reported experiencing harassment on the job and 12% of employees reported experiencing discrimination on the job in the past 2 years. These experiences resulted primarily from interactions with co-workers (50%) and individuals with authority (64%).Footnote 28 The percentages have risen from those reflected in the 2014 PSES. These results could reflect that more public service employees are reporting incidents of harassment and discrimination, indicating that education and training measures taken by departments are working. Training helps to develop a common understanding among employees about harassment and discrimination, educates them about how to identify it, and the resources needed to combat it.Footnote 29

Table 4 : best practice(s) - federal institutions that are communicating employee rights and the complaints process related to racism and discrimination
Name of federal institutions Best practice(s)
Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces The department has developed Integrated Conflict and Complaint Mechanism offices which are open in various locations. The office is a simplified and integrated complaint / conflict system. Complainants meet with a professionally trained conflict/complaint mechanism service (CCMS) agent to learn about their rights, responsibilities and options in a safe and respectful environment. They can provide services in person, by video-conference, or by telephone.
Royal Canadian Mint (RCM) The Mint develops and sends all-staff communiqués with specific information on how, and to whom, they may report misconduct without fear of reprisal. The RCM's Code of Conduct, Disclosure of Wrongdoing and Violence in the Workplace, Harassment and Discrimination policies are also located on the intranet. The institution ensures that messages related to harassment and discrimination are addressed at town hall meetings, intranet, weekly e-newsletters and communication boards.
Natural Resources Canada (NRC) The NRC has developed an intranet site called ''The Source'' which makes accessible all the tools developed by Treasury Board Secretariat as well as information from their Centre of Expertise in Values and Ethics. The institution's intranet site is available to all employees, including employees located in regions. Complaints processes for harassment, discrimination and violence in the workplace have been presented to, and discussed with, union representatives through regularly scheduled informal meetings.
National Energy Board (NEB) The NEB ensures that information related to harassment and discrimination is provided to employees through its intranet site, team and all staff meetings, Joint Union and Management training sessions, training products, lunch and learns and mandatory training.
National Arts Centre (NAC) The NAC provides information related to harassment and discrimination by providing employees information through emails, senior management committee meetings, and team meetings. The institution has developed a poster campaign titled "Tell Someone" and provides regular emails to employees about issues related to harassment and discrimination in the workplace.
Health Canada Employee rights and information about the complaint process have been communicated through: the institution's intranet site; broadcast news, which is a daily news update sent to all employees; Deputy Minister's messages via e-mail to all employees; respect in the workplace resources and toolkits; and, training sessions.
Global Affairs Canada Information related to harassment and discrimination is provided to employees through their intranet site, workshops, town halls, onboarding of new hires, team meetings, training, and toolkits.

B. Enhance the ability of individuals and communities to contribute to the continuing evolution of canada

Federal institutions have continued serving Canadians through the development and delivery of policies, programs, practices and services. They aim to contribute to the continued shaping and evolution of Canadian society by empowering Canadians and enhancing the capacity of individuals to succeed in their communities.

Application of multiculturalism lensFootnote 30 in the development of policies, programs, practices and services

The majority of federal institutions report applying a multiculturalism lens when developing or implementing policies, programs, practices and services (84%). A multiculturalism lens requires taking into account the perspectives of cultural, ethnic, linguistic, racial and religious communities. Of the remaining federal institutions, 3% reported that they did not apply a multiculturalism lens (Figure 8).

Figure 8: federal institutions that applied a multicultural lens in the development of programs, policies, practices and services

Eighty-four percent of federal institutions reported that they had applied a multicultural lens when developing programs, policies, practices and services, while 3% reported that they did not, 8% provided no information and 5% reported that it was not applicable.

Larger institutions were more able to apply a multiculturalism lens, with 97% responding that they had integrated the lens into the development of their policies, programs, practices and services. This is relative to 70% of small institutions.

The responses varied in terms of where federal institutions used a multiculturalism lens, as the practice is not implemented to the same degree across federal institutions. Of all best practices, a multiculturalism lens was integrated in programs or services (38%), committees (25%), policies (21%), events (8%) and other (8%) (Figure 9). Most institutions felt that applying a multiculturalism lens fostered an understanding of the impacts of policies, programs, practices and services on cultural, ethnic, linguistic, racial and religious communities. Consultations with communities increased cross-cultural understanding and provided a space for communities to be heard.

Figure 9: types of best practices used by federal institutions integrating a multiculturalism lens

Federal institutions reported using the following best practices to implement a multiculturalism lens in their workplaces: programs / services 38%; committee(s) 25%; policies 21%; event(s) 8%; and other 8%.
Table 5 : best practice(s) - institutions that apply a multiculturalism lens
Name of federal institution Best practice(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Creation of a New Diverse Image Library - AAFC started to build a new diverse image library to ensure that the Department has a current bank of images reflective of the Canadian population. In order to create the image bank, AAFC solicited volunteers from its Diversity Networks to pose as models.
Canada Post Stamp Subject Selection Policy - A national Stamp Advisory Committee, comprised of Canadians from across the country who are selected for their general historic, design or philatelic knowledge, guides Canada Post in selecting stamp subjects and designs. Examples of stamps can be seen below, and they highlight prominent Black Canadians, Diwali and Eid.
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) The CRTC licenses ethnic and third-language stations as an open approach to the availability of non-Canadian, third-language services. In 2017, the CRTC also issued a call for applications for a national, multilingual, multi-ethnic television service offering third-language news and information programming that, if licensed, would receive mandatory distribution on the digital basic service (Broadcasting Notice of Consultation 2017-154).
National Film Board of Canada (NFB) The NFB.ca viewing platform, corresponding channels and thematic selections are available online and reflect the voices of different ethno-cultural communities for all Canadians. It also enables these communities to recognize themselves in the films.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) The Commissioner's Advisory Committee on Visible Minorities provides strategic advice to the Commissioner of the RCMP and the Commissioner's representatives on merit-based policies related to recruiting, training and the advancement and promotion of visible minorities.
2018 Black History Month stamp, featuring Kathleen (Kay) Livingstone
2018 Black History Month stamp, featuring Lincoln M. Alexander
2017 Canada Post stamp, featuring Diwali
2017 Canada Post stamp, recognizing Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha

Developing partnerships with stakeholders in order to promote multicultural ideals

Federal institutions reported on their ability to form partnerships with stakeholders in order to promote multicultural ideals. The majority (70%) of federal institutions reported having established partnerships with relevant bodies to promote multiculturalism, diversity and inclusion (Figure 10). The establishment of partnerships helps to promote multicultural ideals such as respect for diversity and the provision of equitable opportunities. Partnerships involve two-way information sharing and collaboration which can result in positive and innovative approaches when implementing the Multiculturalism Act.

Figure 10: federal institutions that have developed partnerships with relevant stakeholders to promote multiculturalism

Seventy percent of federal institutions reported that they had developed partnerships with relevant stakeholders to promote multiculturalism, 19% reported that they did not, 5% reported that it was not applicable and 6% provided no information.

Larger institutions (85%) were more able to develop partnerships with stakeholders as compared to smaller institutions (54%). Many smaller institutions expressed insufficient resources as one obstacle that prevented them from establishing partnerships.

A total of 41% of institutions partnered with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and/or civil society organizations, 23% partnered with federal, provincial, territorial or local governing institutions, 20% partnered with networks and associations (Figure 11). Partnerships allowed institutions to gain better insight into the needs of racial, ethnic and religious communities and helped institutions to develop programs, policies, practices and services.

Figure 11: federal institutions that have partnered with relevant bodies to promote multiculturalism

Federal institutions reported developing partnerships with the following types of organizations to promote multiculturalism: other governmental institutions 8%; multiple government institutions 5%; federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) and/or local institutions 23%; international bodies 3%, non-governmental organizations (NGOs)/civil-society organizations 41%; and networks/ associations 20%.
Table 6 : best practice(s) – organizations that have developed partnerships with relevant bodies to promote diversity
Name of federal institution Best practice(s)
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) TBS, through Employment Equity and Diversity Advisory Committee networks, has worked closely with members of the Black community in order to develop ideas on how to best support the Black community for Black History Month.
Bank of Canada The Bank of Canada partners with Indspire, a well-established charitable organization managing scholarships for Indigenous students across Canada. This partnership has made it possible to expand the Bank of Canada's outreach and promote its scholarship program in Indigenous communities beyond the head office in Ottawa, Ontario.
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) Global Affairs Canada and Dubai and Northern Emirates partnered with Dubai Arts Hub - Alserkal Avenue, which hosted a Canada 150 arts and culture two-day festival, showcasing a range of artistic works and performances representative of the Canadian mosaic.

Materials and websites translated into multiple languages

A total of 61% of federal institutions provide direct services to the public and 37% do not (Figure 12).

Figure 12: federal institutions that provide direct programs and services to the public

Sixty-one percent of federal institutions reported providing direct services to the public, 37% do not and 2% reported that it was not applicable.

Institutions that had materials translated into non-official languages mainly provided direct service to the public and responded to public interest pertaining to policies, programs, practices or services. Materials and websites which were presented in non-official languages were used to attract a wider audience and to be more accessible and inclusive. For instance, Parks Canada unveiled three historic sites and monuments commemorating Chinese Canadian History. Commemorative plaques in a third language can be linked to the history of ethno-cultural communities, thereby honouring the legacy that they bring to Canada. Other institutions offered non-official languages as a matter of procedure, in order to provide clarity in services or in a legal context. While 49.6% of federal institutions indicated that they provide materials translated into third languages, 50.4% do not.

Approximately 16% of federal institutions provided materials and websites in non-official languages regardless of whether or not they provided direct services to Canadians. Examples from these institutions indicated that some had materials translated internally for staff or at cultural events. Some also translated materials when working in an international setting, such as when operating in different countries and contexts or interacting with differing linguistic abilities.

Table 7 : best practice(s) - organizations with websites offered in non-official languages
Name of federal institution Best practice(s)
Canada Council for the Arts The Canada Council for the Arts, in partnership with the Ministry for Culture of Argentina and the International Federation of Arts Councils and Culture Agencies, organized the first Americas Cultural Summit from May 9 to 11 at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, with an accompanying trilingual web page for the summit.
Canada Post Canada Post's Priority™ Worldwide service was promoted to the South Asian, Chinese and Filipino communities, including print advertising in Punjabi, digital and print advertising in simplified and traditional Chinese, digital and print advertising in Tagalog, and radio advertising in Hindi, Punjabi, Cantonese and Mandarin.
Health Canada Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide: Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide is available in 10 different languages in addition to English and French to help Canadians make healthy food choices.
International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Research summaries are available in IDRC's digital library on its public website in 45 languages other than English or French.

Access to translators for programs and services

Approximately 37% of federal institutions that provide services to the public provide access to translators in languages other than English or French. Several institutions keep informal and unofficial lists of employees that have third non-official language capabilities and who sometimes engage in translation activities. Simultaneously, some institutions indicated that they held directories of employees who could speak a third language, so that they could ensure that the public could have access to translators if needed (Figure 13).

Figure 13: federal institutions that provide translators to the public in non-official languages

Thirty-seven percent of federal institutions reported that they provide translators to the public in non-official languages, 55% reported that they do not, 6% provided no information and 2% reported that it was not applicable.
Table 8 : best practice(s) - organizations that provide access to translators
Name of federal institution Best practice(s)
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency During trade missions, translators are hired from the destination country, in order to discuss cultural sensitivities with accuracy and precision.
Canada Lands Company At the CN Tower, Canada Lands Company has implemented a language pin program for front line staff. Through this program, employees are encouraged to proudly display which languages they speak by wearing the corresponding appropriate pin, allowing guests from around the world to easily identify a customer service representative who can better assist and communicate with them.
Employment and Social Development Canada, Service Canada Service Canada offers some multilingual in-person services for clients who are not proficient in either official language through its Service Canada Centres (SCC) and Scheduled Outreach sites.

C. Promotion of intercultural understanding

In 2017-18, federal institutions confirmed their commitment to promoting the understanding of and respect for diversity in the workplace by appointing diversity and inclusion and/or multiculturalism champions. The efforts of their champions and their roles on committees provided input into the design and development of programs, policies, practices, and services. Champions undertake activities including consulting with employees, developing education and awareness initiatives, collaborating with senior management and providing overall advice and expertise on issues.

Federal institutions with champions to promote multiculturalism and diversity in the workplace

Figure 14: federal institutions with champions that serve to promote multiculturalism in the workplace

Eighty-six percent of federal institutions reported that they had champions in place to promote multiculturalism in the workplace, 11% reported that they did not, and 3% reported that it was not applicable.

Multiculturalism and diversity champions provide advice, insight and expertise throughout institutions to ensure that programs, practices, policies and services are inclusive of all Canadians. Champions can develop plans and priorities in their institutions and develop multiculturalism awareness and education opportunities. Further, champions ensure that those employees with relevant expertise and knowledge are consulted and given opportunities to provide input into planned priorities and initiatives (Chart 5).

More than 86% of federal institutions reported having a champion in place to promote multiculturalism in the workplace. Of the 117 reporting institutions 68% reported having either a multiculturalism and/or a diversity and inclusion champion in place, while another 27% reported having an employment equity champion (Figure 14).

Chart 5: types of champions that federal institutions have in place to address issues of multiculturalism

Federal institutions reported having the following champions in place who address issues of multiculturalism: Diversity and Inclusion Champion 50%; Multiculturalism Champion 44%; Employment Equity Champion 37%; Official Languages Champion 3%; GBA+ Champion 2%; Immigration Champion 1%; Indigenous Champion 1%; Workplace Improvement 1%.

Champions through their hard work aid in the strengthening of our respectful and innovative workplaces to ensure that all employees are able to take part. Their efforts and contributions to various communities of practice help to ensure that successes, challenges and lessons learned are shared, creating vibrant workplaces.

D. Collection of statistical data to inform and enable the development of policies, programs, practices and services

Approximately 42% of federal institutions collect statistical racial, ethnic and/or religious data other than employment equity data (which all federal institutions are required to collect) to inform their internal or external policies, programs and services (Figure 15). Of the 117 federal institutions that responded, data was used to inform workforce composition and programs. Several institutions reported collaborating with Statistics Canada to develop data sets so that they may better understand the needs of Canadians, to enhance their gender based analyses, and public opinion research.

Figure 15: federal institutions that collect statistical racial, ethnic and/or religious diversity data (other than EE data) to develop and/or improve internal and/or external policies, programs, practices and services

Forty-two percent of federal institutions reported that they collect statistical racial, ethnic and/or religious diversity data (other than employment equity (EE)) to develop and/or improve internal and/or external policies, programs, practices and services, 55% reported that they did not, 2% provided no information and 1% reported that it was not applicable.

For the purposes of the Annual Report, it is important to acknowledge that all federal institutions collect and analyze racial, ethnic and/or religious statistical data through the Employment Equity Annual Report, the PSES and the Diversity and Inclusion Task Force Report. However, in an effort to better understand the effects of programs, policies, practices and services on racial, ethnic and/or religious communities in Canada, some federal institutions have gone further. Using data to understand the outcomes of specific strategies and activities for vulnerable population groups should be seen as an important element of assessing effectiveness and developing accessible programming for all Canadians.

E. Multilingual capability and use of cultural experts

Federal institutions reported on their utilization of third, or non-official languages in the workplace. According to respondents, 67% of federal institutions leveraged the multilingual capacity of their employees in order to improve the work that they carry out (Figure 16).

Figure 16: federal institutions that leverage multilingual capacities so that they may improve programs, policies, practices and services

Sixty-seven percent of federal institutions reported that they leverage the multilingual capacities of their employees so that they may improve programs, policies, practices and services, 21% reported that they did not, 5% reported that it was not applicable, and 6% provided no information.

Many institutions reported using their committees, including diversity committees, to explore third language capabilities and best practices in their use. The committees implemented recommendations to leverage multilingual capacities in programs, practices and services through, for example, the use of informal tracking lists. These lists were utilized as directories, incorporated into databases, tables and listed on the intranet. This was useful for delivering the mandate of the implicated federal institution, allowing employees to highlight their knowledge and skills, and encouraging others to learn a third language.

Several institutions also reported providing language training and classes, as well as hiring based on third language capabilities, for positions or roles requiring a third language. These capabilities were viewed along with other factors such as subject matter expertise and/or cultural expertise, consistent with the responsibility or role of the position where a third language was deemed advantageous.

Table 9 : best practice(s) – federal institutions that that access employee multilingual capability and use "cultural experts" in the development of programs, policies, and services
Name of federal institution Best practice(s)
Canadian Commercial Corporation Due to the high levels of interaction with international stakeholders, there has been a shift towards including language requirements such as Mandarin, Spanish and Arabic.
Employment and Social Development Canada, Service Canada Spanish language training: many seasonal agricultural workers entering Western Canada and Territories Region are from Mexico and speak Spanish. As a result, Citizen Services Officers working directly with these clients were given Spanish language courses to facilitate the provision of Social Insurance Numbers (SIN).
International Development Research Centre The majority of employees working in the regional offices in the developing world speak local languages which enable them to inform and improve research management with researchers in addition to maintaining and pursuing new funding partnerships.

F. Conclusion

Strengthening multiculturalism

As the Multiculturalism Act reached its 30th Anniversary, federal institutions highlighted that strategies and initiatives such as diversity and inclusion, gender-based analysis and employment equity, along with public engagement and outreach, were key contributors to helping them apply and refine a multicultural lens. Using these new and existing tools helped cultivate heightened awareness of the impact that policies, programs, practices and services have on diverse communities.

Employee initiatives

Federal institutions have made achievements in employment equity staffing through the use of multiple targeted approaches that address gaps in the workforce. Most institutions reported that they met or exceeded the workforce availability for the workforce as a whole and in non-senior management categories. However, they also identified areas where support is needed, such as: addressing barriers to recruitment, providing specific anti-racism and discrimination training, developing better outreach models that access ethno-cultural communities living in remote areas, ensuring appropriate data is collected, and making better use of reporting instruments. One key consideration in this respect is that self-identification is not mandatory, limiting institutions' ability to develop an accurate diversity picture and to develop and target specific needs areas.

The promotion of multiculturalism ideals through targeted education and awareness activities that celebrate national and international events, raise awareness of employee rights, and promote inclusion not only educate employees but serve to foster a deepened understanding of issues and needs of vulnerable communities. Overall, most federal institutions have implemented initiatives that reduce obstacles to employment, educate employees through training, developed awareness and education campaigns that address the needs of racial, ethnic, and religious minorities in the workplace. Institutions acknowledge that discrimination exists and help employees understand their rights by educating them about the various policies and processes in place that address racism and discrimination in the workplace.

Service to Canadians

Access to, and the development of, disaggregated data is needed to assess the outcomes of specific strategies and activities for diverse communities. Data, and the use of it, helps to develop policies, programs, practices, and services that are reflective of the diversity of Canadians. Most institutions reported developing partnerships with stakeholders to promote multicultural ideals and have champions in place to promote multiculturalism and diversity. Nevertheless, there is still a need to develop inclusive tools and resources such as, materials and websites translated into non-official languages, data collection and reporting tools that allow institutions to develop policies, programs, practices and services that address the needs of racial, ethnic and religious minorities in Canada.

Moving forward

While there has been progress made over the last year, opportunities exist to ensure: that focused employee diversity and anti-racism training is provided; that policies, programs and services reflect the needs of diverse communities and that barriers are addressed; and, that adequate data is collected to monitor progress.

As Canadians, it is important to appreciate our multicultural country by fostering and promoting a society where every member feels included. Moving forward, the Multiculturalism Program will continue to work to strengthen the operation of the Multiculturalism Act by supporting federal institutions as they continue to promote respect for diversity and equitable participation for all Canadians.

Annex A: 2017-2018 Multiculturalism Annual Report - reporting tool

An indicator based reporting tool that was provided to federal institutions so that they may provide information about their implementation of the Act.

Part one: about your institution:

  1. What is the name of your federal institution in both Official Languages?
  2. What is the name of the person responsible for approving this submission on behalf of your federal institution?
  3. What is the name of the contact person responsible for coordinating the submission response on behalf of your federal institution?
  4. What is the name of your institution's champion responsible for Multiculturalism?

Part two: employees of your institution:

  1. What is the total number of employees employed by your institution for the 2017-2018 fiscal year?
  2. What is the total number of employees in senior management (e.g., EX) positions for the end of 2017-2018?
  3. What is the total number of employees in non-senior management positions for the end of 2017-2018?
  4. How many new hires were employed by your federal institution in 2017-2018?

Part 3.2(a) of the Multiculturalism Act

Outcome
For Canadians of all origins to have equal opportunities in obtaining employment and advancement in federal institutions.
Key factors

This outcome is assessed through the following areas of measurement:

  • anti-racism/ discrimination measures (internal to the institution)
  • employment equity (EE) measures (as they pertain to Visible Minorities)
  1. How many employees in your organization identified as belonging to a visible minority group in senior management and executive positions?
  2. How many employees in your organization identified as belonging to a visible minority group in non-senior management / executive positions?
  3. How many new hires, employed by your federal institution, identified as belonging to a visible minority group?
  4. What initiative(s) has your federal institution carried out in order to address and/or reduce obstacles that prevent ethnic, racial and religious minorities from entering into your institution's workplace, as well as promote their upward mobility within your institution?
  5. In 2017-2018, how many employees participated in anti-racism/racial discrimination training? This number should include senior management and executives.
    • What types of anti-racism/racial, ethnic, and religious discrimination training did employee(s) attend?
  6. Does your institution celebrate, promote and support events that help to educate employees about racial, ethnic and religious diversity in the workplace?
  7. Has there been a clear communication of employee rights and the complaints process related to racism and racial discrimination/harassment within your federal institution?
    • How has employee rights and complaints process been communicated to employees?
    • What is the complaints process for racism, racial/ethnic/religious discrimination or harassment in your federal institution?
    • How does your institution address complaint(s)?
    • How many complaints did your federal intuition address related to racism and racial/ethnic/religious discrimination in 2017-2018?

Part 3.2(b) of the Multiculturalism Act

Outcome
Internal and external policies, programs, practices and services promote inclusion, diversity and equitable participation.
Key factors

This outcome is assessed through the following areas of measurement:

  • internal policies, practices, programs and services that promote inclusion, diversity and equitable participation of Canadians of all origins.
  • external policies, practices, programs, and services that promote inclusion, diversity and equitable participation of Canadians of all origins.
  • funding, resources and/ or in-kind support given to initiatives that promote inclusion, diversity and equitable participation.
  1. Has your federal institution taken into consideration the perspectives of cultural, ethnic, linguistic, racial and religious communities in the development of policies, programs, practices and services?
  2. In 2017-2018, has your institution developed partnerships with relevant stakeholders to promote multiculturalism and/or to learn more about multiculturalism communities?
  3. Does your institution provide direct programs and services to the public?
  4. Does your institution have policies, programs, practices and services (such as materials and websites) translated into languages other than English and/or French?
  5. Does your institution provide the public access to translators (other than English or French) so that they may gain a better understanding of your institutions programs, policies, practices and services (if requested)?

Part 3.2(c) of the Multiculturalism Act

Outcome
Policies, programs, practices and services promote the understanding of and respect for the diversity of Canadians.
Key factors
This outcome is assessed through all initiatives, both internal and external to the institution, that promote inter-cultural and inter-faith understanding as well as respect for diversity.
  1. Does your institution have a "Champion" in place who is responsible for issues related to Multiculturalism?

Part 3.2(d) of the Multiculturalism Act

Outcome
Development of policies, programs, practices and services make use of statistical data to ensure sensitivity and responsiveness to Canada's multicultural reality.
Key factors
This outcome is assessed through the extent to which data on the differential impact to various groups is used in the development of policies, programs, practices and services.
  1. Does your institution collect statistical racial, ethnic and religious diversity data (other than EE data) to develop and/ or improve internal and/or external policies, programs, practices and services?

Part 3.2(e) of the Multiculturalism Act

Outcome
Language skills and cultural understanding are used, as appropriate, to support the development of policies, programs, practices and services to Canadians.
Key factors
Language statistics internal to the reporting institution.
  1. Does your institution leverage the multilingual capacity (other than English or French), cultural competency and/or cultural expertise of its employees to inform and/or improve your institution's policies, programs, practices and services?

Part 3.2(f) of the Multiculturalism Act

Outcome
Institution's activities are carried out in a manner that is sensitive ad responsive to Canada's multicultural reality.
  1. Has your organization encountered and/or identified factors that foster inequities for ethnic, linguistic, racial and religious minorities in your institutions internal and/or external policies, programs, practices and services?
  2. Does your institution have additional information, examples, initiatives and/or challenges to the implementation of the Multiculturalism Act that you would like to provide?

Annex B: Federal institutions, departments and agencies reviewed for the 2017-2018 Multiculturalism Annual Report

  1. Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
  2. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  3. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  4. Atlantic Pilotage Authority
  5. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  6. Bank of Canada
  7. Business Development Bank of Canada
  8. Canada Air Transport Security Authority
  9. Canada Border Service Agency
  10. Canada Council for the Arts
  11. Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation
  12. Canada Development Investment Corporation
  13. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions
  14. Canada Lands Company
  15. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  16. Canada Newfoundland & Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board
  17. Canada Pension Plan Investment Board
  18. Canada Post
  19. Canada Revenue Agency
  20. Canada School of Public Service
  21. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  22. Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  23. Canadian Commercial Corporation
  24. Canadian Dairy Commission
  25. Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  26. Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  27. Canadian Grain Commission
  28. Canadian Human Rights Commission
  29. Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  30. Canadian Museum for Human RightsCanadian Heritage
  31. Canadian Museum of History
  32. Canadian Museum of Immigration
  33. Canadian Museum of Nature
  34. Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  35. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  36. Canadian Race Relations Foundation
  37. Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  38. Canadian Securities Transition Office
  39. Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  40. Canadian Space Agency
  41. Canadian Transportation Agency
  42. Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP
  43. Correctional Service Canada
  44. Courts Administration Service
  45. Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada
  46. Defence Construction Canada
  47. Department of Canadian Heritage
  48. Department of Finance Canada
  49. Department of Justice Canada
  50. Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces
  51. Elections Canada
  52. Employment and Social Development Canada
  53. Environment and Climate Change Canada
  54. Export Development Canada
  55. Farm Credit Canada
  56. Farm Products Council Canada
  57. Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  58. Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  59. First Nations Tax Commission
  60. Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  61. Global Affairs Canada
  62. Great Lakes Pilotage Authority
  63. Health Canada
  64. Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
  65. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  66. Indigenous Services Canada
  67. Ingenium – Canada's Museums of Science and Innovation
  68. Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
  69. International Development Research Centre
  70. Laurentian Pilotage Authority Canada
  71. Library and Archives Canada
  72. Marine Atlantic Canada
  73. Military Grievances External Review Committee
  74. Military Police Complaints Commission
  75. National Arts Centre
  76. National Capital Commission
  77. National Energy Board
  78. National Film Board of Canada
  79. National Gallery of Canada
  80. National Research Council Canada
  81. Natural Resources Canada
  82. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
  83. Office of the Auditor General of Canada
  84. Office of the Commissioner for Judicial Affairs Canada
  85. Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner
  86. Office of the Correctional Investigator Canada
  87. Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
  88. Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada
  89. Office of the Secretary to the Governor General
  90. Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada
  91. Pacific Pilotage Authority Canada
  92. Parks Canada
  93. Parole Board of Canada
  94. Patented Medicine Prices Review Board
  95. Privy Council Office
  96. Public Health Agency Canada
  97. Public Prosecution Service Canada
  98. Public Safety Canada
  99. Public Sector Pension Investment Board (PSP Investments)
  100. Public Service and Procurement Canada
  101. Royal Canadian Mint
  102. Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  103. Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee
  104. Shared Services Canada
  105. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
  106. Statistics Canada
  107. Status of Women Canada
  108. Telefilm Canada
  109. The Federal Bridge Corporation
  110. The National Battlefields Commission
  111. Transport Canada
  112. Transportation Safety Board of Canada
  113. Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
  114. Veterans Affairs Canada
  115. Veterans Review and Appeal Board
  116. Via Rail Canada
  117. Western Economic Diversification Canada
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