Departmental Evaluation Plan 2019-2020 to 2023-2024

Deputy Minister’s Message

I approve the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Departmental Evaluation Plan for fiscal years 2019-20 to 2023-24, which I submitted to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as required by the Policy on Results.

I confirm that this five-year rolling Departmental Evaluation Plan:

I will ensure that this plan is updated annually and I will provide information about its implementation to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as required.

I am confident that the evaluations will contribute to the improvement of Canadian Heritage programs.

Original signed by:

Hélène Laurendeau
Deputy Minister
Canadian Heritage

On this page

List of tables

List of acronyms and abbreviations

CR
Core responsibility
DM
Deputy Minister
DP
Departmental plan
DPS
Direct program spending
FAA
Financial Administration Act
EXCOM
Executive Committee
ESD
Evaluation Services Directorate
FTE
Full-time equivalent
GCMP
Grants and Contributions Modernization Project
Gs&Cs
Grants and contributions
MC
Memoranda to Cabinet
N/A
Not available
OCAE
Office of the Chief Audit Executive
PCH
Canadian Heritage
PPU
Professional Practices Unit
TB
Treasury Board

1. Introduction

This document describes Canadian Heritage’s (PCH) five-year Departmental Evaluation Plan (the Plan) developed in accordance with legislative and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) requirements.

The purpose of the Plan is to ensure that the Department meets its evaluation-related accountability obligations while developing a strategic plan for the evaluation function. The plan is also an important management tool for the Head of Evaluation and supports the Deputy Minister (DM) in fulfilling her obligations under the Financial Administration Act (FAA) and the Treasury Board (TB) policy suite related to evaluation.

In accordance with the Policy on Results, the document clearly presents the scope of the evaluations planned for the period of 2019-20 to 2023-24. The plan ensures that PCH will undertake evaluations of grants and contributions (Gs&Cs) programs with five-year average actual expenditures equal to or greater than $5 million per year. The plan also includes evaluations that are consistent with the commitments made through TB submissions. It also examines the need to evaluate Gs&Cs programs with five-year average actual expenditures of less than $5 million per year to use the flexibility provided by the Policy on Results. The Head of Evaluation will continue to work with senior management to ensure that evaluation design meets the policy requirements and key management/stakeholder information needs associated with each program.

2. Departmental context

2.1. PCH mandate and role

Canadian Heritage is the federal department that, along with its portfolio organizations, plays a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians.

The Department’s mandate is set out in the Department of Canadian Heritage Act and focuses on strengthening and promoting “Canadian identity and values, cultural development, and heritage.” The Act includes the specific responsibilities of the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism, the Minister of Science and Sport, and the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie, as set out in federal statutes and regulations, as well as in Orders in Council.Footnote 1

Departmental activities are largely structured by programs and policies that promote an environment where Canadians can experience dynamic cultural expressions, celebrate their history and heritage, and build strong communities. The Department invests in the future by supporting the arts, our two official languages, Indigenous languages, our athletes and the sport system.

The Departmental Results Framework, implemented in November 2017, sets out five core responsibilities (CRs) that reflect the Department’s mandate.Footnote 2 The five CRs and programs, described in PCH’s 2019-20 program inventory, are presented in Appendix 1.

According to the 2019-20 Main Estimates, PCH plans to spend more than $1.41 billion on programs, policies, initiatives and services, nearly 85% of which will go directly to recipients through transfer payments. Total forecasted spending for 2019-20 is outlined in the table below, based on the Department’s CRs and internal services.

Table 1: PCH 2019-20 main estimates
Core Responsibilities Expenditure Forecasts
CR1: Creativity, arts and culture $474,894,788
CR2: Heritage and celebration $100,278,571
CR3: Sport $231,116,623
CR4: Diversity and inclusion $100,241,414
CR5: Official languages $435,398,291
Internal services $74,179,084
Total budget $1,416,108,771

Source: Departmental plan 2019-20 – Canadian heritage. The figures include the following expenditures: salaries, operations and maintenance, capital, statutory expenditures, Gs&Cs and the cost of employee benefit plans.

The Prime Minister has mandated the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism to implement the government’s plan to strengthen and promote Canada’s cultural and creative industries, celebrate our diversity and promote greater inclusion.Footnote 3 The Minister of Sport and Persons with DisabilitiesFootnote 4 has been mandated to promote Canadians’ health through sport and recreation, and to ensure greater accessibility and opportunities for Canadians with disabilities.Footnote 5 Finally, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie has been mandated to promote and stimulate tourism in Canada, and to harness the full economic potential of this key sector of the economy, as well as protect and promote both official languages and ensure Canada’s strong and sustained involvement in the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.Footnote 6

These mandates are based mainly on the following:

3. Evaluation Services Directorate at PCH

3.1. Role of the evaluation function at PCH

The mandate of the Evaluation Services Directorate (ESD) is to provide quality and timely evaluations to support accountability, decision-making, expenditure management, continuous program improvement and policy development at PCH. In addition, ESD provides advisory services to the Department’s senior management in a variety of areas, including the preparation of memoranda to Cabinet (MCs), TB submissions and performance measurement activities.

In addition to its main activities, undertaking evaluation projects, ESD carries out various activities to support and strengthen the Department’s evaluation function through its Professional Practices Unit (PPU). The PPU has planning, reporting, and internal and external liaison responsibilities, and develops tools and guidance documents to ensure the function’s effectiveness and efficiency.

ESD supports the Department effectively in demonstrating results for Canadians by conducting program evaluations. By publishing evaluation reports and providing timely consultation and guidance, ESD fulfills its role of providing evidence to inform decision-making and support program improvement.

3.2. Governance structure for evaluation

The Assistant Deputy Minister of the Strategic Policy, Planning and Corporate Affairs sector assumes the role of Head of Evaluation at PCH.

The Head of Evaluation and the Director General of the Strategic Policy, Planning and Research Branch are supported by the ESD Director and staff. The Head of Evaluation ensures that the plan, evaluation reports and the results of monitoring the implementation of management’s action plans in response to evaluation recommendations are submitted in a timely manner to the Executive Committee, chaired by the DM, for review and approval, and then proceed for the DM’s approval.

3.3. ESD priorities

To fulfill its mandate, ESD will focus on the following priorities in 2019-20, while supporting PCH and Government of Canada priorities.

  • Timely delivery of high-quality evaluations, within budget and in accordance with professional standards, to support decision making and meet legal and TB requirements.
  • Enhance ESD capacity by investing in human resources and promoting an innovative thinking environment.
  • Ensure timely public release of evaluation reports.
  • Encourage the timely implementation of management action plans in response to evaluation recommendations.

3.4. Organizational structure and resources planning

The ESD currently has 19.75 full-time equivalents, including 14 FTEs dedicated exclusively to fulfilling commitments made in the Plan. The other employees are part of the PPU and the office of the Director.

ESD will continue to build internal evaluation capacity through, among other things, professional development, training and recruitment. To fulfill its mandate, ESD takes into account the required and available resources, and the duration of each evaluation project, based on the level of risk and complexity. Given the ambitious plan for 2019-20, ESD will continue to hire experienced employees while leveraging external resources to carry out the Plan.

3.5. Financial resources dedicated to the evaluation function

The permanent budget allocated to evaluation projects, in effect since 2016-17, provides greater stability to ESD. The following table provides an overview of planned evaluation expenditures and human resources for 2019-20.

Table 2: ESD planned budget for 2019-20
Expenditure Type Estimated Budget
Salary (A-Base) $2,102,814
Non-salary* $619,765
Total $2,722,579
Full-time equivalents** 24.75

*Operating budget, not allocated to Plan execution
**Including employees who will be hired throughout the year

3.6. Evaluation project management and resource optimization

ESD is committed to always looking for cost-effective ways to conduct evaluations. In carrying out its evaluation projects, ESD uses the expertise of other internal services, such as the Policy Research Group and the Financial Management Branch (financial planning and Gs&Cs centre of expertise). Targeted external resources are also hired to conduct specialized studies or meet temporary needs. This hybrid approach ensures ESD’s nimbleness and value added.

To successfully carry out its activities, ESD will continue to implement strategies to provide relevant, high-quality, timely and cost-effective evaluation products and services. These strategies include, but are not limited to:

4. Key achievements in 2018-19

As part of the 2018-19 to 2022-23 Plan, ESD worked on 13 evaluation projects covering 15 programs and initiatives. Of these, 3 projects have been completed (see Table 3 below) and 10 will continue in 2019-20 (see Table 5).

Table 3: evaluation projects conducted and completed in 2018-19
No. Program Name Approval Date Publication Date
1 State Ceremonial and Protocol (federal Lieutenant Governor’s Program) Approved in May 2018 September 5, 2018
2 Harbourfront Centre funding program Approved in September 2018 December 14, 2018
3 Canada Arts Training Fund Approved in February 2019 Upcoming

Status as of March 31, 2019

ESD provided advisory services in a variety of areas, including feedback and advice on the preparation of 31 MCs and 25 TB submissions regarding initiatives or programs led by PCH and by other departments in which PCH was involved. It also helped update performance information profiles, as well as other planning and performance documents (for example, departmental plan (DP), departmental results report, program terms and conditions, and departmental risk profile).

In accordance with the Policy, ESD conducts follow-up activities with program officials to assess progress in implementing approved management action plans in response to evaluation recommendations. ESD reports the results of these monitoring activities to the Executive Committee twice a year.

ESD mandated the Policy Research Group to conduct a post-evaluation project survey to gather feedback on the relevance and use of evaluations, focusing on the following areas: relationships, process and reporting, relevance and management of evaluation projects.

Once again, ESD conducted a series of workshops for federal officials to improve their understanding of experimental methods and promote their practical use in a wide range of government policies and programs. Based on feedback from participants in the first series of workshops, ESD offered the workshops free of charge in a new format with modified content. They included a presentation by representatives from a PCH program on their experimental project and a hands-on workshop on experience design to meet their needs in the workplace. The second series was aimed at all PCH employees. Employees from other federal government departments also participated.

ESD conducted various activities such as: the mid-year review of the Plan; the response to planning activities (integrated business plan, management accountability framework, etc.); monthly monitoring of the status of evaluation projects using a dashboard; the response to access to information and privacy requests; and activities related to the publication of evaluation reports on canada.ca in both official languages.

5. An overview of the annual planning exercise

In accordance with TB requirements, ESD conducts an annual planning exercise to identify evaluation projects that will be conducted during the next five-year evaluation cycle. The key stages are to identify the evaluation universe, plan the process, consult, prioritize the evaluation projects and obtain approval of the plan (for more details, see Appendix 2).

6. Planned evaluation projects for 2019-20 to 2023-24

6.1. Scope of direct program spending (DPS)

In accordance with the Policy, the Plan for 2019-20 to 2023-24 clearly presents the expenses that will be covered by the evaluations during the next five-year cycle. As shown in Table 4 below, the evaluations planned over the next five years achieve 99%coverage of the DPS. The amounts correspond with those presented in the main estimates, in accordance with the 2019-20 MP. Expenditures for policy activitiesFootnote 7 and expenditures related to the support of legal services, equivalent to 1% of the DPS, are not covered in this planning cycle. The development of an evaluation framework and the approach to evaluating policy activities is in progress. Once these activities are completed, Policy activities will be considered in the Plan.

Table 4: overview of total coverage of DPS, by fiscal year
Fiscal year Amount Coverage
Total forecast DPS $1,416,108,771 100%
Year 1: 2019-20* $298,639,029 21%
Year 2: 2020-21 $489,489,860 35%
Year 3: 2021-22 $22,246,814 2%
Year 4: 2022-23 $487,139,952 34%
Year 5: 2023-24 $37,834,208 3%
Total direct program spending** $1,335,349,863 94%
Internal services*** $62,484,744 5%

*Year 1 includes the amount for the internal communications services currently under evaluation.
**Policy activities (Cultural Sector Investment Review, broadcasting and digital communications, Copyright Policy, Trade and Negotiation Policy, Film and Video Policy) are not included in this planning cycle.
***Legal services are also not included since the minimum amount indicated in PCH’s budget represents the administrative staff in place to support legal services; therefore, they were excluded. Additionally, the amount for the communications service has also been removed from the total since it is already captured in Year 1.

6.2. Schedule for 2019-20 to 2023-24

The evaluation schedule (detailed in Appendix 3) lists all evaluation projects that PCH will carry out from 2019-20 to 2023-24. Over the next five years, coverage includes ongoing Gs&Cs programs (with five-year average actual expenditures equal to or greater than $5 million per year, and some with five-year average actual expenditures of less than $5 million per year), evaluations that are consistent with TB submission commitments, programs without Gs&Cs components, internal services (reserved), and PCH’s participation in the horizontal evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy, led by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC).

In addition to the planned evaluation dates, the schedule indicates the following for each sub-program and initiative to be evaluated: the expected program expenditures, the level of risk associated with the program (see Appendix 3) for evaluation planning purposes, as well as the planned audit dates for the next three years.

Table 5 below presents the projects initiated in the previous year that will continue in 2019-20 (n=10) and those that will begin in 2019-20 (n=8), 18 evaluation projects involving 22 programs and initiatives, including three internal services and one horizontal evaluation led by another department, will be ongoing during this fiscal year. In compliance with the Policy on Results, the Plan considers the evaluation of Gs&Cs programs exempted from FAA section 42.1, as a result of their five-year actual expenditures being lower than five million dollars per year (those are presented in bold in Table 5).

Table 5: evaluation projects for 2019-20 and 2020-21

Evaluation projects carried out in 2018 19 and continuing in 2019-20
No Program Name Latest Approval Date Start Date Projected End Date
1 Youth Employment StrategyFootnote 8 N/A May 2016 January 2020
2 150th Anniversary of ConfederationFootnote 9 N/A March 2017 July 2019
3 TV5 November 2014 March 2017 June 2019
4 Canada Arts Presentation Fund* August 2014 May 2017 August 2019
4 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund* August 2014 May 2017 August 2019
4 Canada Cultural Investment Fund* August 2014 May 2017 August 2019
5 Canada Book Fund July 2014 May 2018 July 2019
6 Canada Music Fund July 2014 May 2018 July 2019
7 Official Languages Coordination Program (B. Interdepartmental Coordination - section 42 of the Official Languages Act) October 2005 June 2018 September 2019
8 Capital Experience Never been evaluated August 2018 January 2020
9 Communications (internal service) Never been evaluated September 2018 October 2019
10 Canada Media Fund July 2015 January 2019 April 2020

* Grouped evaluation

Evaluation projects to be launched in 2019-20
No Program Name Latest Approval Date Start Date Projected End Date
1 Canada Periodical Fund June 2015 June 2019 May 2020
2 Museums Assistance Program December 2015 July 2019 March 2020
3 Aboriginal Peoples’ Program March 2016 September 2019 March 2020
4 Exchanges Canada Program February 2016 September 2019 November 2020
5 Hosting Program* March 2016 October 2019 December 2020
5 Sport Support Program* March 2016 October 2019 December 2020
5 Athlete Assistance Program* March 2016 October 2019 December 2020
6 Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage October 2016 January 2020 March 2021
7 Grants and Contributions Modernization Project - jointly with the audit (in reserve)** Never been evaluated To be confirmed To be confirmed
8 Information Technology (in reserve) Never been evaluated To be confirmed To be confirmed

* Grouped evaluation
** Evaluation suggested by the TBS

Evaluation projects to be launched in 2020-21
No Program Name Latest Approval Date Start Date Projected End Date
1 Canada History Fund July 2015 May 2020 April 2021
2 Development of Official-Language Communities Program* May 2017 May 2020 February 2022
2 Enhancement of Official Languages Program* May 2017 May 2020 February 2022
3 Official Languages Coordination Program (including the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in Our Future)Footnote 10 May 2017 May 2020 February 2022
4 Creative Export Strategy Never been evaluated July 2020 December 2021
5 Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program March 2018 January 2021 June 2022

* Grouped evaluation

6.2.1. Changes to the Plan schedule

Some changes have been made to the Plan from last year to address the needs expressed by the programs and ESD’s internal capacity, and to better reflect the flexibility of the Policy on Results. The key changes are as follows:

6.3. Planning other activities in 2019-20

In 2019-20, ESD will continue to carry out other activities to support the function and the Department. These activities are briefly described below and have been taken into account in planning and resource decisions.

6.3.1. Advisory services

ESD will continue to respond to requests for evaluation advisory services to facilitate the review of MCs and TB submissions, including the respective results appendices. ESD will therefore play a role in the conceptualization and design stages of new programs to ensure that program theory is sound and well articulated or, in the midterm stages of a program’s life cycle, to assess whether it is on track to achieve the expected results.

6.3.2. Head of Evaluation’s Annual Report

The third edition of the PCH Head of Evaluation’s Annual Report will be completed in 2019-20. This report will support the government’s commitment to results-based management and evidence-based decision-making, in accordance with the 2016 TB Policy on Results.

6.3.3. Policy auditFootnote 12

In accordance with the Risk-Based Audit Plan for 2018-19 to 2020-21, the OCAE audited the implementation of the Policy on Results. The objective was to provide assurance on the management control framework put in place by PCH to achieve the expected results of the Policy on Results.

In general, the audit concluded that PCH has put in place a management control framework to implement the requirements of the policy and results directive. With respect to evaluation, it was noted that ESD is using the new flexibility in the Policy, and is exploring how to achieve efficiencies in order to allocate more of its resources to better respond to departmental priorities and risks. According to the audit report, on the maturity scale of this control framework, evaluation services are at the upper end.

The audit identified opportunities for improvement in terms of performance measurement capacity, governance, resource allocation and monitoring. All six recommendations have been accepted and will be implemented in 2019 and 2020.

Appendix 1 – 2019-20 Program Inventory

Core responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Program Inventory Components
Arts
  • Canada Arts Presentation Fund
  • Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
  • Canada Arts Training Fund
  • Canada Cultural Investment Fund
  • Harbourfront Centre Funding Program
Cultural marketplace framework
  • Broadcasting and digital communications
  • Copyright Policy
  • Film and Video Policy
  • Trade and Negotiation Policy
  • Cultural Sector Investment Review
Cultural industries support and development
  • Canada Media Fund
  • Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credits
  • TV5
  • Canada Book Fund
  • Canada Periodical Fund
  • Canada Music Fund
  • Canada’s Creative Export Strategy
Core responsibility 2: Heritage and Celebration
Program Inventory Components
National celebrations, commemorations and symbols
  • State Ceremonial and Protocol
  • Capital Experience
  • Celebrations and Commemoration Program
Community engagement and heritage
  • Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage
Preservation and access to heritage
  • Museums Assistance Program
  • Canadian Conservation Institute / Canadian Heritage Information Network
  • Canadian Travelling Indemnification Program
  • Movable Cultural Property Program
Learning about Canadian history
  • Canada History Fund
Core responsibility 3: Sport
Program Inventory Components
Sport development and high performance
  • Athlete Assistance Program
  • Sport Support Program
  • Hosting Program
Core responsibility 4: Diversity and Inclusion
Program Inventory Components
Multiculturalism
  • Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program
Human rights
  • Human Rights Program
  • Court Challenges Program
Aboriginal languages and cultures
  • Aboriginal Peoples’ Program
Youth engagement
  • Exchanges Canada Program
  • Youth Take Charge
Core responsibility 5: Official Languages
Program Inventory Components
Official languages
  • Development of Official-Language Communities Program
  • Enhancement of Official Languages Program
  • Official Languages Coordination Program

Appendix 2 – Annual planning exercise

Overview of planning exercise
Appendix 2 – Annual planning exercise – text version

Overview of the Planning Exercise: in compliance with the Treasury Board’s requirements, the Evaluation Services Directorate undertakes an annual planning exercise to determine which evaluation projects will be conducted during the next five-year evaluation cycle.

  1. Evaluation Universe: the evaluation universe is the starting point for planning. The 2019-2020 program directory, which indicates the Department’s direct program spending, and the Departmental Results Framework, were used as a basis for determining the evaluation universe to give us an overview of all the mandatory and potential “evaluable” units.
  2. Planning Process:
    1. consultation of relevant documents (Policy on Results Interim GuidanceFootnote 13, Departmental Plan, Departmental Risk Profile, Performance Information Profiles) used as a reference to account for the environmental context and determine the potential changes and additions.
    2. risk evaluation for planning purposes to update program information.
    3. preparation of the Annual Reference Level Update for the coming year.
    4. analysis of mandatory evaluations under the Financial Administration Act and commitments stemming from Treasury Board submissions, compared with discretionary evaluations in accordance with the flexibility offered by the Directive on Results.
  3. Consultations: the Evaluation Services Directorate has conducted consultations with the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Office of the Chief Audit Executive, some targeted programs and other federal departments and agencies. The objective was to set departmental priorities with regard to evaluation and take into consideration the specific needs and concerns expressed by the partners.
  4. Prioritization of evaluation projects: risk evaluation for purposes of planning evaluation projects and consultations, keeping in mind the review of documents to be used to update the five-year evaluation schedule. They are also used to ensure the balanced distribution of resources and efforts, as well as to meet the requirements of the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  5. Approval:
    1. the draft plan is submitted to the Director of the Evaluation Services Directorate, the Director General and the Head of Evaluation.
    2. the plan is submitted to the Results, Integrated Planning and Evaluation Committee for approval and to the Executive Committee, which can recommend it for approval by the Deputy Minister.
    3. the plan is forwarded to the Treasury Board Secretariat and posted on the canada.ca site.

Appendix 3 – Schedule of evaluations for 2019-20 to 2023-24

This evaluation schedule was developed based on the following: the Plan for 2018-19 to 2022-23; legislation; TB requirements; commitments made in TB submissions; consultations with program management, representatives from TBS and federal departments and agencies; coordination with the OCAE; information provided in risk fiches for program evaluation purposes; and updated reference levels obtained from the Financial Management Branch.

The level of risk for planning evaluation projects is based on the following six factors: (1) the program’s relative importance (in terms of budget); (2) performance management capacity and soundness of the program theory; (3) program complexity; (4) responsiveness – public interest and visibility; (5) preparedness for the evaluation; and (6) specific information needs of the program or senior management. The level of overall risk is of utmost importance in determining the level of effort and resources needed to conduct evaluation projects.

The timelines thus established reflect departmental evaluation priorities and risks, while taking the programs’ specific needs and concerns into consideration.

In the tables on the following pages, projects exempted from section 42.1 of the FAA in accordance with the Policy on Results are presented in bold.

Table 6: Cultural Affairs
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk Level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
1 CR1 Canada Arts Presentation Fund (Grouped 1, 2 and 4) 37,965,970 Moderate Started in May 2017 End August 2019
2 CR1 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund Fund (Grouped 1, 2 and 4) 60,649,843 Moderate 2018-2019 Started in May 2017 End August 2019
3 CR1 Canada Arts Training Fund 24,284,885 Moderate Start September 2022 End November 2023
4 CR1 Canada Cultural Investment Fund (Grouped 1, 2 and 4) 24,810,353 Moderate Started in May 2017 End August 2019
5 CR1 Harbourfront Centre Funding Program 5,158,449 Moderate 2020-2021 Start
April 2022
End
June 2023
6 CR1 Canada Media Fund 135,096,590 Moderate Started in January 2019 End April 2020
7 CR1 Creative Export Strategy 13,841,241 High Start July 2020 End December 2021
8 CR1 Canada Music Fund 28,536,334 Moderate Started in May 2018 End July 2019
9 CR1 Canada Book Fund 40,055,606 Moderate Started in May 2018 End July 2019
10 CR1 Canada Periodical Fund 80,740,499 High 2020-2021
(in reserve)
Start June 2019 End May 2020
11 CR1 TV5 11,575,472 Moderate Started in May 2017 End June 2019
Table 7: Citizenship, Heritage and Regions
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk Level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
12 CR2 Museums Assistance Program 20,555,855 Moderate

Start July 2019

End March 2020

13 CR2 Canada Travelling Exhibition Indemnification Program 319,013 Low Start October 2023
14 CR2 Canadian Conservation Institute / Canadian Heritage Information Network 11,773,360 Moderate Report expected in spring 2019 Start July 2021 End December 2022
15 CR2 Movable Cultural Property Program 1,069,218 Moderate Start August 2022
16 CR2 Canada History Fund 8,405,573 Low Start May 2020 End April 2021
17 CR4 Exchanges Canada Program 20,459,534 Moderate Start September 2019 End November 2020
18 CR4 Youth Take Charge 3,920,498 Low Start June 2021 End May 2022
19 CR2 Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage 22,076,614 Moderate Start January 2020 End March 2021
20 CR4 Aboriginal People’s Program (includes the Aboriginal Languages Initiative) 44,374,879 High

Start Sept. 2019

End March 2020

21 CR4 Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program 24,164,847 High 2021-2022 Start January 2021 End
June 2022
22 CR5 Development of Official-Language Communities Program (Grouped 22 and 23) 295,218,801 High 2020-2021 Start May 2020 End February 2022
23 CR5 Enhancement of Official Languages Program (Grouped 22 and 23) 135,258,332 High Start May 2020 End February 2022
24 CR5 Official Languages Coordination Program (including the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in Our Future)Footnote 14 N/A Start May 2020 End February 2022
25 CR5 Official Languages Coordination Program (Interdepartmental Coordination - section 42 of the OLA) 4,921,158 Moderate Started in June 2018 End September 2019
Table 8: Sport, Major Events and Commemorations
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk Level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
26 CR2 Celebrations and Commemoration Program 16,804,114 Moderate Start October 2021 End December 2022
27 CR2 Capital Experience 13,915,192 Moderate 2020-2021 Started in August 2018 End January 2020
28 CR2 State Ceremonial and Protocol (federal Lieutenant Governor’s Program)* 5,359,632 Moderate
29 CR3 Hosting Program (Grouped 29, 30, 31) 32,354,703 Moderate Start October 2019 End December 2020
30 CR3 Sport Support Program (Grouped 29, 30, 31) 165,268,235 Moderate Start October 2019 End December 2020
31 CR3 Athlete Assistance Program (Grouped 29, 30, 31) 33,493,685 Moderate Start October 2019 End December 2020

*In accordance with the Policy on Results, the EXCOM has planned the end of the next evaluation in 2028. This decision is based on the evaluation results as well as the program’s low risk. The directorate of Evaluation Services could revise the evaluation calendar if changes were to occur in the environment or the program context.

Table 9: Strategic Policy, Planning and Corporate Affairs
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
32 CR4 Human Rights Program 7,321,656 High 2020-2021 Start September 2022
33 N/A Court Challenges Program (Included in #32) Footnote 15 Included in #32 High Included in #32 Start September 2022
Table 10: other
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk Level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
34 N/A 150th Anniversary of ConfederationFootnote 16 Started in
March 2017
End March 2019
35 N/A Grants and Contributions Modernization Project (joint project with Audit) Start to be confirmed
Table 11: internal Services
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk Level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
36 N/A Communications 11,278,367 N/A 2019-2020 Started in September 2018 End October 2019
37 N/A Information Technology (in reserve) 11,009,963 N/A 2019-2020 (in reserve) Start to be confirmed
38 N/A Other internal servicesFootnote 17 47,584,001 N/A
Table 12: horizontal Initiatives with Other Federal Departments
# CR Program Name Planned Spending (DP 2019—2020) ($) Evaluation Risk Level Planned Audits 2019—2020 to 2021—2022 Start Date Prior to 2019—2020 YEAR 1 2019—2020 YEAR 2 2020—2021 YEAR 3 2021—2022 YEAR 4 2022—2023 YEAR 5 2023—2024
39 N/A Youth Employment Strategy (evaluation managed by Employment and Social Development Canada / PCH Young Canada Works) Started in May 2016 End January 2020

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2019.
Catalogue No.: CH1-39E-PDF
ISSN No.: 2561-018X

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