Departmental Evaluation Plan 2020-21 to 2024-25

Evaluation Services Directorate
October 31, 2020

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Departmental Evaluation Plan 2020-2021 to 2024-2025 [PDF version - 1.2 MB]

List of tables

List of acronyms and abbreviations

CR
Core Responsibility
DM
Deputy Minister
ESD
Evaluation Services Directorate
FAA
Financial Administration Act
Gs&Cs
Grants and Contributions
MC
Memoranda to Cabinet
OCAE
Office of the Chief Audit Executive
PCH
Canadian Heritage
PPU
Professional Practice Unit
TBS
Treasury Board Secretariat
TB
Treasury Board

Deputy Minister’s message

I approve the Departmental Evaluation Plan of the Department of Canadian Heritage for the fiscal years 2020-21 to 2024-25, which I submit to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat as required by the Policy on Results.

I confirm that this five-year rolling Departmental Evaluation Plan:

I will ensure that this plan is updated annually and I will provide information about its implementation to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as required.

Canadian Heritage has a broad mandate and plays an important role in the lives of Canadians. The Department supports cultural industries, the arts, sports, official and Aboriginal languages, as well as youth.

I am confident that a strong evaluation function contributes to the improvement of the Department’s many programs and initiatives, enabling Canadians to create, share and participate in a diverse and inclusive society.

Original signed by:

Hélène Laurendeau
Deputy Minister
Canadian Heritage

1. Introduction

This document describes the Canadian Heritage (PCH) five-year rolling Departmental Evaluation Plan (the Plan), developed in accordance with legislative and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) requirements.

The purpose of the Plan is to ensure that the Department meets its evaluation-related accountability obligations. The Plan is also an important management tool for the Head of Evaluation and supports the Deputy Minister (DM) in fulfilling her obligations under the Financial Administration Act (FAA) and the Treasury Board (TB) Policy Suite related to evaluation.

In accordance with the Policy on Results, the Plan clearly presents the scope of the evaluations planned for the period of 2020-21 to 2024-25 and, as required by the FAA, it ensures that the Department will evaluate grant and contribution (Gs&Cs) programs with five-year average actual expenditures of $5 million or greater per year. The Plan also includes evaluations that are consistent with the commitments made through TB Submissions. It also examines the need to evaluate Gs&Cs programs with five-year average actual expenditures of less than $5 million per year to use the flexibility provided by the Policy on Results.

The design of this edition of the Departmental Evaluation Plan was challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic that hit the world, including Canada, in the spring of 2020. In order to continue to provide essential services to Canadians, the PCH's crisis management team activated its Business Continuity Plan on March 26, 2020. Since the Evaluation Services Directorate was deemed non-essential, the team had to restrict its activities, in particular to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. This had an impact on the timelines of ongoing evaluations in the spring, as well as future evaluations, which have been adjusted accordingly, but remain subject to change depending on circumstances. The Department maintains ongoing communication with the Treasury Board Secretariat regarding the impact of the pandemic on the achievement of the evaluation plan.

The Head of Evaluation will continue to work with senior management to ensure that evaluation design meets the policy requirements and key management/stakeholder information needs associated with each program.

2. Departmental context

2.1. Canadian Heritage mandate and role

Canadian Heritage is the federal department that, along with its portfolio organizations, plays a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians.

The Department’s mandate is set out in the Department of Canadian Heritage Act and focuses on strengthening and promoting “Canadian identity and values, cultural development, and heritage.” The Act also provides for jurisdiction over human rights; multiculturalism; arts; cultural industries and heritage; sports; official languages; State ceremonial and Canadian symbols; broadcasting; conservation, export and import of cultural property; and national libraries, archives and museums.

Departmental activities are largely structured by programs and policies that promote an environment where Canadians can experience dynamic cultural expressions, celebrate their history and heritage, and build strong communities.

The Departmental Results Framework, implemented in November 2017, sets out five core responsibilities (CRs) that reflect the Department’s mandateFootnote 1. The five CRs and programs, described in PCH’s 2020-21 Program Inventory, are presented in Appendix 1.

According to the 2020-21 Main Estimates, PCH plans to spend more than $1.53 billion on programs, policies, initiatives and services. Total forecasted spending for 2020-21 is outlined in the table below, based on the Department’s CRs and internal services.

Table 1: PCH 2020-21 Main EstimatesFootnote 2
Core responsibilities Expenditure forecasts
CR1 – Creativity, Arts and Culture $513,243,111
CR2 – Heritage and Celebration $111,012,915
CR3 – Sport $249,554,510
CR4 – Diversity and Inclusion $131,234,805
CR5 – Official Languages $449,167,574
Internal Services $80,924,496
Total budget $1,535,137,411

Source: Canadian Heritage – 2020-21 Departmental Plan. The figures include the following expenditures: salaries, operations and maintenance, capital, statutory expenditures, Gs&Cs and the cost of employee benefit plans.

The Prime Minister gave the Minister of Canadian Heritage the mandate to celebrate Canada’s heritage and promote Canada’s cultural and creative industries, to bring Canadians together and strengthen the social fabric of our country and our communities, to promote and support amateur sport, to support our athletes as they represent Canada at various competitions, to encourage young people to be active and participate in sport, and to preserve and revitalize Indigenous languagesFootnote 3. The mandate of the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth is to support the Government’s work to build a country where every person has equal opportunity to succeed by championing the full breadth of Canada’s vibrant diversity and advancing greater inclusionFootnote 4. Finally, the mandate of the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages is to safeguard and promote Canada’s two Official LanguagesFootnote 5.

3. Evaluation Services Directorate at PCH

3.1. Role of the evaluation function at PCH

The mandate of the Evaluation Services Directorate (ESD) is to provide quality and timely evaluations to support accountability, decision-making, expenditure management, continuous program improvement and policy development at PCH. In addition, the ESD provides advisory services to the Department’s senior management in a variety of areas, including the preparation of Memoranda to Cabinet (MC), TB Submissions and performance measurement activities.

In addition to its primary activity of undertaking evaluation projects, the ESD carries out various activities to support and strengthen the Department’s evaluation function through its Professional Practices Unit (PPU). The PPU has planning, accountability, and internal and external liaison responsibilities, and develops tools and guidance documents to ensure the function’s effectiveness and efficiency.

The ESD supports the Department effectively in demonstrating results for Canadians by conducting program evaluations. By publishing evaluation reports and providing timely consultation and guidance, the ESD fulfills its role of providing evidence to inform decision-making and support program improvement.

3.2. Governance structure for evaluation

The Assistant Deputy Minister of the Strategic Policy, Planning and Corporate Affairs sector assumes the role of Head of Evaluation and reports on ESD activities directly to the PCH Executive Committee.

The Head of Evaluation and the Director General of the Planning, Evaluation and Research Branch are supported by the ESD Director and staff. The Head of Evaluation ensures that the Plan, evaluation reports and the results of monitoring the implementation of management action plans in response to evaluation recommendations are submitted in a timely manner to the Executive Committee, chaired by the DM, for review, endorsement and approval.

3.3. ESD priorities

To fulfill its mandate while supporting PCH and Government of Canada priorities, the ESD will focus on the following priorities in 2020-21: Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+), Aboriginal peoples, LGBTQ2 communities and accessibility.

In addition, the ESD will continue to:

3.4. Organizational structure and resource planning

The ESD currently has 20.55 full-time equivalents, 77.81% of which are dedicated exclusively to plan commitmentsFootnote 6. The other employees are part of the PPU and the office of the Director. In addition, the ESD hires several students annually to support its activities.

The ESD will continue to strengthen evaluation internal capacity through recruitment, professional development and training. Therefore, the ESD supports the professionalization of the evaluation function by enabling employees to obtain the Credentialed Evaluator designation through the Canadian Evaluation Society’s Professional Designation Program. To date, two ESD employees have obtained the designation and two others are in the process of obtaining it.

To fulfill its mandate, the ESD takes into account the required and available resources, the duration of each evaluation project based on the level of risk and complexity, and the needs identified during consultations with program officials at the time of the Plan’s development.

3.5. Financial resources dedicated to the evaluation function

Since 2016-17, the ESD has a permanent budget allocated to evaluation projects. The following table provides an overview of planned evaluation and human resource expenditures for 2020-21.

Table 2: ESD planned budget for 2020-21
Expenditure type Estimated budget (December 2019)
Salary (A-Base) $2,050,739
Non-salary expendituresTable 2 note * $984,000
Total $3,034,739
Full-time equivalentsTable 2 note ** 24

Table 2 notes

Table 2 note *

Operating budget, not allocated to Plan execution

Return to table 2 note * referrer

Table 2 note **

Including students and employees who will be hired throughout the year

Return to table 2 note ** referrer

3.6. Evaluation project management and resource optimization

The ESD uses the expertise of other internal services, such as the Policy Research Group and the Financial Management Branch (financial planning and Gs&Cs Centre of Expertise). Targeted external resources are also hired to conduct specialized studies or meet temporary needs. This hybrid approach provides flexibility and added value to the ESD.

To successfully carry out its activities, the ESD will continue to implement strategies that provide relevant, high-quality, timely and cost-effective evaluation products and services. These strategies include, but are not limited to:

4. Key achievements in 2019-20

As part of the 2019-20 to 2022-24 Plan, the ESD worked on 16 evaluation projects covering 20 programs and initiatives. Of these, six projects have been completed within FAA timelines (see Table 3 below), and ten will continue in 2020-21 (see Table 4).

Table 3: evaluation projects conducted and completed in 2019-20
No. Evaluation Title Approval date Publication date
1 Canada Arts Presentation Fund (grouped) August 20, 2019 December 17, 2019
1 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (grouped) August 20, 2019 December 17, 2019
1 Canada Cultural Investment Fund (grouped) August 20, 2019 December 17, 2019
2 Canada Music Fund July 26, 2019 February 11, 2020
3 Canada Book Fund July 31, 2019 December 11, 2019
4 Funding allocated by the Department of Canadian Heritage to the TV5 Program October 29, 2019 February 25, 2020
5 Canadian Heritage’s Communications Services November 12, 2019 February 18, 2020
6 Youth Employment Strategy (led by Employment and Social Development Canada) February 28, 2020 August 6, 2020

Status as of August 20, 2020

The ESD provided advisory services in a variety of areas, including feedback and advice on the preparation of MC and TB Submissions regarding initiatives or programs led by PCH and by other departments in which PCH was involved. It also contributed to other planning and performance documents (e.g. Departmental Plan, Departmental Results Report, Program Terms and Conditions).

In accordance with the Policy, the ESD conducts follow-up activities with program officials to assess progress in implementing approved management action plans in response to evaluation recommendations. The ESD reports the results of these follow-up activities to the Executive Committee once to twice a year.

This year, the ESD has aligned its recommendation monitoring process with that of the OCAE. The changes to this process have increased the efficiency of the evaluation function and of program officials by providing a joint and timely status update on the implementation of recommendations to senior management when mid-year results are presented to the Executive Committee. Programs thus continue to assess the status of implementation of their recommendations and to provide justifications. However, evidence is required only once the recommendation is fully implemented. The ESD now provides updates at the recommendation level, as well as on the management action plan items.

The ESD mandated the Policy Research Group to conduct a post-project survey to obtain feedback on the value and use of evaluations by focusing on the following areas: relationship, process and report, value and evaluation project management. Overall, the results of the past year showed a good satisfaction rating (100% of respondents).

The ESD also conducted various corporate activities, such as the mid-year Plan review; the development of several work tools and templates; the review of evaluation processes; the review of the Evaluation 101 presentation; the analysis of dashboard data for monitoring evaluation projects; the response to planning activities (integrated business plan, management accountability framework, etc.); monthly monitoring of the status of evaluation projects using a dashboard; the response to access to information and privacy requests; and activities related to the publication of evaluation reports on canada.ca in both official languages. The ESD also participated in the Data Strategy Working Group and the Sustainable Development Goals Working Group.

5. An overview of the annual planning exercise

In accordance with TB requirements, the ESD conducts an annual planning exercise to identify evaluation projects that will be conducted during the next five-year evaluation cycle. The key steps are to identify the evaluation universe, plan the process, consult, prioritize the evaluation projects and obtain approval for the Plan (for more details, see Appendix 2).

While continuing to work together with the OCAE, a strategic approach was used to prepare the plans this year. To ensure that the work is complementary and not redundant, attention was paid to risk level, priorities and coordination between the two functions. Some activities related to the Plan update were carried out in collaboration with the OCAE, including:

For those projects that appear on both plansFootnote 7, key documentation and interview notes will be shared between the evaluation and audit teams. The goal of this new collaborative approach is to foster greater synergy between the evaluation and audit functions and to ensure that every effort is made to reduce overlap or undue program burden.

6. Planned evaluation projects for 2020-21 to 2024-25

6.1. Scope of direct program spending

The evaluation plan provides coverage for 92% of the total expenditures for 2020-21, including 100% of the expenditures of ongoing Gs&Cs programs subject to evaluation in accordance with the requirements of section 42.1 of the FAA.

6.2. Schedule for 2020-21 to 2024-25

The evaluation schedule (detailed in Appendix 3) lists all evaluation projects that PCH will carry out from 2020-21 to 2024-25. In addition to the planned evaluation dates, the schedule indicates the following for each sub-program and initiative to be evaluated: the expected program expenditures, the level of risk associated with the program, and the planned audit dates for the next three years.

As required, over the next five years, coverage will include all ongoing Gs&Cs programs with five-year average actual expenditures of $5 million or greater per year, as well as evaluations consistent with TB Submission commitments.

The policy does not require periodic evaluations for programs with five-year average actual expenditures of less than $5 million per year. The Department has only five Gs&Cs programs in this category, three of which have commitments made in TB Submissions.

Taking advantage of this flexibility, some evaluations have been set aside or do not have a specific evaluation date within the next five years. These are programs with an average expenditure of less than $5 million that are not subject to the FAA requirement to review program relevance and effectiveness, or programs that do not have Gs&Cs expenditures.

Table 4 below presents the projects planned for 2020-21, including those initiated in the previous years that will continue this fiscal year (10) and those that will begin this fiscal year (4), as well as the projects planned to start in 2021-22 (6 including 1 in reserve). A total of 14 evaluation projects involving 17 programs and initiatives, including one horizontal evaluation led by PCH, which will be ongoing during the 2020-21 fiscal year. In compliance with the Policy on Results, the Plan considers the evaluation of Gs&Cs programs exempted from FAA section 42.1 as a result of their five-year actual expenditures being less than $5 million per year (presented in bold print in Table 4).

Table 4: evaluation projects for 2020-21 to 2021-22
Program name Latest approval date Start date Projected end date
Evaluation projects 2020-21
Canada 150 N/A March 2017 August 2020
Capital Experience N/A June 2018 April 2021
Official Languages Coordination Program (section 42 of the Official Languages Act) October 2005 June 2018 February 2021
Canada Media Fund July 2015 January 2019 December 2020
Canada Periodical Fund June 2015 January 2019 December 2020
Museums Assistance Program December 2015 July 2019 March 2021
Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program March 2016 July 2019 May 2021
Exchanges Canada February 2016 September 2019 May 2021
Hosting ProgramTable 4 note * March 2016 October 2019 August 2021
Sport Support ProgramTable 4 note * March 2016 October 2019 August 2021
Athlete Assistance ProgramTable 4 note * March 2016 October 2019 August 2021
Canada History Fund July 2015 January 2020 September 2021
Development of Official-Language Communities ProgramTable 4 note * May 2017 September 2020 May 2022
Enhancement of Official Languages ProgramTable 4 note * May 2017 September 2020 May 2022
Horizontal evaluation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in Our FutureFootnote 8 May 2017 September 2020 May 2022
International Trade: Creative Export Strategy Never been evaluated September 2020 February 2022
Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage October 2016 January 2021 October 2021
Evaluation projects 2021-22
Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program, including the Anti-Racism Action Program March 2018 April 2021 September 2022
The Department of Canadian Heritage’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic N/A June 2021 November 2022
Local Journalism Initiative (formative evaluation) N/A September 2021 September 2022
Celebration and Commemoration Program March 2018 October 2021 December 2022
Canada Arts Training Fund February 2019 September 2022 November 2023
Harbourfront Centre Funding Program (in reserve) September 2018

Table 4 notes

Table 4 note *

Grouped evaluation

Return to table 4 first note * referrer

6.2.1. Changes to the Plan schedule

Some changes have been made to last year’s Plan to address the needs of programs and the ESD’s internal capacity, and to better reflect the flexibility of the Policy on Results. The key changes are as follows:

6.3. Planning other activities in 2020-21

In addition to conducting evaluations, the ESD is involved in a wide range of activities to support and strengthen evaluation and performance measurement work. These activities are briefly described below.

COVID-19

In response to COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate (ESD) supported the Strategic Planning Directorate in developing a logic model and a performance measurement framework for the department. The performance measurement framework confirms the support received by PCH in response to the pandemic through the Emergency Support Fund for Culture, Heritage and Sport Organizations.

The ESD also played a leading role in the development of an evaluation framework that will guide a discretionary evaluation of the Department of Canadian Heritage regarding its internal and external mobilization and adaptation in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The evaluation is planned for 2021–2022.

The latter two documents were used in meetings of the COVID-19 working group chaired by the Director General of the Planning, Evaluation and Research Branch, and were presented to the COVID-19 Update committee chaired by the Head of Evaluation.

Finally, the ESD also supported the International Trade Policy group in developing a survey for funding applicants regarding the Emergency Support Fund for Culture, Heritage and Sport Organizations.

Advisory Services

In addition to providing evaluation advisory services and support for MC reviews and TB Submissions, with their respective results appendix, the ESD provides advice on the Departmental Plan, Departmental Results Reports and other related activities. The ESD also responds annually to various corporate requests, including the TBS Capacity Survey on Results functions and Statistics Canada’s Survey of Federal Science Expenditures and Personnel.

In addition, in 2020-21, the ESD is committed to working with the Strategic Planning Directorate to review the Department’s Performance Information Profiles.

Diversity and Inclusion

Where relevant, the ESD will continue its efforts to consider government priority groups, such as Aboriginal communities, official language minority communities, and Gender-based Analysis Plus target groups.

As a result of the Accessible Canada Act, the ESD will develop a methodological framework to incorporate into its evaluations accessibility issues and barriers to persons with disabilities, such as learning or communication impairments and functional limitations.

Policy on Results AuditFootnote 9

The OCAE audited the implementation of the Policy on Results. In general, the audit concluded that PCH has put in place a management control framework to implement the requirements of the policy and results directive. However, the audit identified opportunities for improvement in terms of performance measurement capacity, governance, resource allocation and monitoring. The ESD will continue to support the Strategic Planning Directorate in the implementation of its six recommendations.

Neutral Assessment

The three recommendations of the neutral assessment completed in March 2019 concerned the two-tier governance structure for evaluation, the possibility that the evaluation function be located with the OCAE, and improvements to the evaluation planning process.

The first two recommendations have been implemented. The evaluation now reports directly to the Executive Committee, which alleviated the administrative process. The evaluation function has remained within the Planning, Evaluation and Research Branch. With respect to the third recommendation, the ESD will continue to find ways to improve the planning of its evaluations, such as by analyzing dashboard data to inform the planning of future evaluation projects.

Departmental Working Groups

Continuing its support of the PCH Data Strategy, the ESD will participate in the working group and contribute to the strategy by reporting gaps identified during program evaluation.

The ESD will also continue its participation in the Sustainable Development Goals Working Group.

Appendix 1 – 2020-21 Program Inventory

Core responsibilities and program inventory Components
Core responsibility 1 - Creativity, Arts and Culture
  1. Arts

1.1 Canada Arts Presentation Fund

1.2 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

1.3 Canada Arts Training Fund

1.4 Canada Cultural Investment Fund

1.5 Harbourfront Centre Funding Program

  1. Cultural Marketplace Framework

2.1 Broadcasting and Digital Communications (including the Digital Citizen Initiative)

2.2 Film and Video Policies

2.3 Creative Marketplace and Innovation

2.4 International Trade (including the Creative Export Strategy)

2.5 Cultural Sector Investment Review

  1. Support and Development of Cultural Industries

3.1 Canada Media Fund

3.2 Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credits

3.3 TV5

3.4 Canada Book Fund

3.5 Canada Periodical Fund

3.6 Canada Music Fund

3.7 Local Journalism Initiative

Core responsibility 2 - Heritage and Celebration
  1. National Celebrations, Commemorations and Symbols

4.1 State Ceremonial and Protocol

4.2 Capital Experience

4.3 Celebration and Commemoration Program

  1. Community Engagement and Heritage
5.1 Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage
  1. Preservation and Access to Heritage

6.1 Museums Assistance Program

6.2 Canadian Heritage Information Network

6.3 Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program

6.4 Canadian Conservation Institute

6.5 Movable Cultural Property Program

  1. Learning About Canadian History
7.1 Canada History Fund
Core responsibility 3 - Sport
  1. Sport Development and High Performance

8.1 Athlete Assistance Program

8.2 Sport Support Program

8.3 Hosting Program

Core responsibility 4 - Diversity and Inclusion
  1. Multiculturalism

9.1 Community Support, Multiculturalism, and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program

9.2 Anti-Racism Action Program

  1. Human Rights

10.1 Human Rights Program (including the Court Challenges Program)

10.2 LGBTQ2 Secretariat

  1. Indigenous Languages and Cultures
11.1 Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program
  1. Youth Engagement

12.1 Exchanges Canada Program

12.2 Youth Take Charge

12.3 Youth Secretariat

Core responsibility 5 - Official Languages
  1. Official Languages

13.1 Development of Official Languages Communities Program

13.2 Enhancement of Official Languages Program

13.3 Official Languages Coordination Program

Appendix 2 – Annual planning exercise

Overview of planning exercise
Appendix 2 – Annual planning exercise – text version

Overview of the Planning Exercise: in compliance with the Treasury Board’s requirements, the Evaluation Services Directorate undertakes an annual planning exercise to determine which evaluation projects will be conducted during the next five-year evaluation cycle.

  1. Evaluation Universe: the evaluation universe is the starting point for planning. The 2020-2021 program directory, which indicates the Department’s direct program spending, and the Departmental Results Framework, were used as a basis for determining the evaluation universe to give us an overview of all the mandatory and potential “evaluable” units.
  2. Planning Process:
    1. consultation of relevant documents (Policy on Results Interim GuidanceFootnote 10, Departmental Plan, Departmental Risk Profile, Performance Information Profiles) used as a reference to account for the environmental context and determine the potential changes and additions.
    2. risk evaluation for planning purposes to update program information.
    3. preparation of the Annual Reference Level Update for the coming year.
    4. analysis of mandatory evaluations under the Financial Administration Act and commitments stemming from Treasury Board submissions, compared with discretionary evaluations in accordance with the flexibility offered by the Directive on Results.
  3. Consultations: the Evaluation Services Directorate has conducted consultations with the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Office of the Chief Audit Executive, Program’s senior management and other federal departments and agencies. The objective was to set departmental priorities with regard to evaluation and take into consideration the specific needs and concerns expressed by the partners.
  4. Prioritization of evaluation projects: risk evaluation for purposes of planning evaluation projects and consultations, keeping in mind the review of documents to be used to update the five-year evaluation schedule. They are also used to ensure the balanced distribution of resources and efforts, as well as to meet the requirements of the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  5. Approval:
    1. the draft plan is submitted to the Director of the Evaluation Services Directorate, the Director General and the Head of Evaluation.
    2. the plan is submitted to the Executive Committee, which can recommend it for approval by the Deputy Minister.
    3. the plan is forwarded to the Treasury Board Secretariat and posted on the canada.ca site.

Appendix 3 – Schedule of evaluations for 2020-21 to 2024-25

This evaluation schedule was developed based on the following: the Plan for 2019-20 to 2023-24; legislation; commitments made in TB Submissions; consultations with program management, representatives from TBS and federal departments and agencies; coordination with the OCAE; information provided in risk fiches for program evaluation purposes; and updated reference levels obtained from the Financial Management Branch.

The level of risk for planning evaluation projects is based on the following six factors: (1) the program’s relative importance (in terms of budget); (2) performance management capacity and soundness of the program theory; (3) program complexity; (4) responsiveness – public interest and visibility; (5) preparedness for the evaluation; and (6) specific information needs of the program or senior management. The level of overall risk is of utmost importance in determining the level of effort and resources needed to conduct evaluation projects.

While taking the programs’ specific needs and concerns into consideration, the timelines thus established reflect departmental evaluation priorities and risks.

In the tables on the following pages, projects exempted from section 42.1 of the FAA in accordance with the Policy on Results are presented in bold print.

Table 5: Cultural Affairs
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
1 CR1 Canada Arts Presentation Fund $46,321,589 Moderate - - - Start
March 2022
- End
May 2023
-
2 CR1 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund $60,152,530 Moderate - - - - Start
March 2023
- End
May 2024
3 CR1 Canada Arts Training Fund $24,420,455 Moderate - - - - Start
September 2022
End
November 2023
-
4 CR1 Canada Cultural Investment Fund $24,905,612 Moderate - - - - Start
March 2023
- End
May 2024
5 CR1 Harbourfront Centre Funding Program (in reserve) $5,135,418 Moderate 2022-23 - - - - - -
6 CR1 Canada Media Fund $135,485,251 Moderate - Started in
January 2019
End
December 2020
- - - -
7 CR1 International Trade: Creative Export Strategy $16,827,952 High 2020-21
(Frankfurt Book Fair)
- Start
September 2020
End
February 2022
- - -
8 CR1 Broadcasting and Digital Communications: The Digital Citizenship Initiative (in reserve) $9,953,524 Moderate - - - - - - -
9 CR1 Film and Video Policies $1,788,992 N/A - - - - - - -
10 CR1 Creative Marketplace and Innovation $72,013 N/A - - - - - - -
11 CR1 Cultural Sector Investment Review $821,511 N/A - - - - - - -
12 CR1 Canada Music Fund $38,508,539 Moderate - - - - Start
April 2022
End
April 2023
-
13 CR1 Canada Book Fund $45,078,251 Moderate - - - - Start
February 2023
- End
April 2024
14 CR1 Canada Periodical Fund $79,480,558 Moderate - Started in
January 2020
End
December 2020
- - - -
15 CR1 TV5 $13,652,881 Moderate - - - - Start
March 2023
- End
May 2024
16 CR1 Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credits $158,544 Moderate - - - - - - -
17 CR1 Local Journalism Initiative (formative evaluation) $10,479,491 High

2020-21

(in reserve)

- - Start
September 2021
End
September 2022
- -
17 CR1 Local Journalism InitiativeFootnote 11 - High - - - - - - Start
April 2024
Table 6: Community and Identity
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
18 CR2 Canada History Fund $5,013,719 Low - Started in
January 2020
- End
September 2021
- - -
19 CR4 Exchanges Canada Program $20,469,521 Moderate - Started in
September 2019
- End
May 2021
- - -
20 CR4 Youth Take ChargeFootnote 12 (in reserve) $4,938,956 Low - - - - - - -
21 CR4 Youth Secretariat $1,342,538 N/A - - - - - - -
22 CR2 Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage $29,057,375 Moderate - - Start
January 2021
End
October 2021
- - -
23 CR4 Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program $65,914,852 High - Started in
September 2019
- End
May 2021
- - -
24 CR4 Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program (grouped 24 and 25) $25,858,561 High 2022-23 - - Start
April 2021
End
September 2022
- -
25 CR4 Anti-Racism Action Program (grouped 24 and 25) $5,000,000 High - - - Start
April 2021
End
September 2022
- -
Table 7: Official Languages, Heritage and Regions
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
26 CR2 Museums Assistance Program $17,906,460 Moderate - Started in
July 2019
End
March 2021
- - - -
27 CR2 Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program (in reserve) $356,973 Low - - - - - - -
28 CR2 Canadian Conservation Institute (in reserve) (grouped 28 and 29) $10,245,020 Moderate - - - - - - -
29 CR2 Canadian Heritage Information Network (in reserve) (grouped 28 and 29) $2,506,896 Moderate - - - - - - -
30 CR2 Movable Cultural Property Program (in reserve) $443,594 Moderate - - - - - - -
31 CR5 Development of Official-Language Communities Program (grouped 31 and 32) $308,791,888 High 2021-22 - Start
September 2020
- End
May 2022
- -
32 CR5 Enhancement of Official Languages Program (grouped 31 and 32) $134,601,457 High - - Start
September 2020
- End
May 2022
- -
33 CR5 Horizontal Evaluation of the Action Plan for Official Languages – 2018-2023: Investing in Our FutureFootnote 13 N/A High - - Start
September 2020
- End
May 2022
- -
34 CR5 Official Languages Coordination Program (section 42 of the Official Languages Act) $5,774,229 Moderate - Started in
June 2018
End
February 2021
- - - -
Table 8: Sport, Major Events, Commemorations and Portfolio Affairs
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
35 CR2 Celebration and Commemoration Program $25,952,187 Moderate - - - Start
October 2021
End
December 2022
- -
36 CR2 Capital Experience $13,963,102 Moderate 2022-23 Started in
June 2018
- End
April 2021
- - -
37 CR2 State Ceremonial and Protocol (federal grant program for Lieutenant Governors)Footnote 14 $5,567,589 Moderate - - - - - - -
38 CR3

Hosting Program

(grouped 38, 39, 40)

$33,774,395 Moderate - Started in
October 2019
- End
August 2021
- - -
39 CR3 Sport Support Program (grouped 38, 39, 40) $182,225,834 Moderate 2022-23
(in reserve)
Started
October 2019
- End
August 2021
- - -
40 CR3 Athlete Assistance Program (grouped 38, 39, 40) $33,554,281 Moderate - Started
October 2019
- End
August 2021
- - -
Table 9: Strategic Policy, Planning and Corporate Affairs
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
41 CR4 Human Rights Program $6,926,880 High 2021-22 - - - - - -
42 N/A Court Challenges ProgramFootnote 15 Included in #41 High Included in #41 - - - - Start
September 2023
End
February 2025
43 CR4 LGBTQ2 Secretariat $783,497 N/A - - - - - - -
Table 10: Internal Services
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
44 N/A Internal ServicesFootnote 16 $80,924,496 N/A - - - - - - -
Table 11: Others
# CR Program name Planned spending (2020-21) Evaluation risk level Planned audits 2020-21 to 2022-23 Start date prior to 2020-21 Year 1 2020-21 Year 2 2021-22 Year 3 2022-23 Year 4 2023-24 Year 5 2024-25
45 N/A Canada 150 N/A N/A - Started
March 2017
End
August 2020
- - - -
46 N/A The Department of Canadian Heritage’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic N/A N/A - - - Start
June 2021
End
November 2022
- -

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2020
Catalogue No.: CH1-39E-PDF
ISSN: 2561-018X

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