Departmental Evaluation Plan 2021-22 to 2025-26

Evaluation Services Directorate
June 23, 2021

On this page

List of tables

Alternate format

Departmental Evaluation Plan 2021-22 to 2025-26 [PDF version - 1.02 MB]

List of acronyms and abbreviations

BCP
Business Continuity Plan
CR
Core Responsibility
DRR
Departmental Results Report
DM
Deputy Minister
DP
Departmental Plan
DRF
Departmental Results Framework
ESD
Evaluation Services Directorate
FAA
Financial Administration Act
GBA+
Gender-Based Analysis Plus
Gs&Cs
Grants and Contributions
MC
Memoranda to Cabinet
OCAE
Office of the Chief Audit Executive
PCH
Canadian Heritage
PIP
Performance Information Profile
PPU
Professional Practice Unit
The Plan
Departmental Evaluation Plan
TBS
Treasury Board Secretariat
TB
Treasury Board

Deputy Minister’s message

I approve the Departmental Evaluation Plan of the Department of Canadian Heritage (PCH) for the fiscal years 2021-22 to 2025-26, which I submit to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) as required by the Policy on Results (2016).

I confirm that this five-year rolling Departmental Evaluation Plan:

Canadian Heritage has a broad mandate and plays an important role in the lives of Canadians. The Department supports cultural industries, the arts, sports, official languages, Indigenous languages, diversity and inclusion, as well as youth.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the work of Canadian Heritage as it has responded by delivering the $500 million Emergency Support Fund announced by Minister Guilbeault in the spring of 2020. Plans outlined in Budget 2021 highlight the Government of Canada’s continued attention on addressing the impacts of COVID-19 including the important role of PCH in stabilizing sectors that are a major driver of the Canadian economy.

As communicated with TBS in August 2020, PCH was not able to fully respect the timelines for some FAA-required evaluations in 2020-21 due to its focus on the response to the pandemic and delays related to the activation of its Business Continuity Plan (BCP). Despite these pressures, I continue to recognize the need to have useful evaluation results to support evidence-based decision. This current Plan outlines key priorities for the evaluation function and presents adjusted dates for projects with the aim of respecting requirements as much as possible moving forward.

I will ensure that this Plan is updated annually and I will provide information about its implementation to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as required.

I am confident that a strong evaluation function contributes to the improvement of the Department’s many programs and initiatives, enabling Canadians to create, share and participate in a diverse and inclusive society.

Original signed by:

Isabelle Mondou
Deputy Minister
Canadian Heritage

1. Introduction

This document describes the Canadian Heritage (PCH) five-year rolling Departmental Evaluation Plan (the Plan), developed in accordance to the Financial Administration Act (FAA) and the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Policy on Results.

The purpose of the Plan is to ensure that the Department meets evaluation-related accountability obligations as well as senior management information needs. It clearly presents the scope of the evaluations planned for the period of 2021-22 to 2025-26 and, as required by the FAA, it ensures that the Department will evaluate grant and contribution (Gs&Cs) programs with five-year average actual expenditures of $5 million or greater per year. The Plan also includes evaluations required to address commitments made through Treasury Board (TB) Submissions. It examines the need to evaluate Gs&Cs programs with five-year average actual expenditures of less than $5 million per year based on risks and senior management needs.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the work of PCH over the past year. The Department immediately responded by providing support measures and financial relief for the culture, heritage and sport sectors as part of the $500 million Emergency Support Fund announced in the spring of 2020. To be respectful of the need for PCH to focus on its response, the Evaluation Services Directorate (ESD) was not fully able to engage with programs and many evaluation commitments planned in 2020-21 were delayed. PCH has prioritized these delayed evaluations mandated by the FAA in the current Plan, and some other projects have been rescheduled. However, the schedule remains ambitious, to compensate for the delays that occurred in 2020-21.

Over the coming year, the Head of Evaluation will maintain strong communication with senior management to ensure that evaluation timing and design meet the Policy requirements and information needs of each program. As the pandemic continues to unfold and as PCH focuses on implementing the priorities outlined in Budget 2021 for the arts, heritage and sports sectors in Canada, the Department will re-evaluate its evaluation schedule and communicate any changes to TBS as needed.

2. Departmental context

2.1. Canadian Heritage mandate and role

Canadian Heritage is the federal department that, along with its portfolio organizations, plays a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians.

The Department’s mandate is set out in the Department of Canadian Heritage Act and focuses on strengthening and promoting “Canadian identity and values, cultural development, and heritage.” The Act also provides for jurisdiction over human rights; multiculturalism; arts; cultural industries and heritage; sports; official languages; State ceremonial and Canadian symbols; broadcasting; conservation, export and import of cultural property; and national libraries, archives and museums.

Departmental activities are focused on programs and policies that promote an environment where Canadians can experience dynamic cultural expressions, celebrate their history and heritage, and build strong communities.

The Prime Minister gave the Minister of Canadian Heritage the mandate to celebrate Canada’s heritage and promote Canada’s cultural and creative industries, to bring Canadians together and strengthen the social fabric of our country and our communities, to promote and support amateur sport, to support our athletes as they represent Canada at various competitions, to encourage young people to be active and participate in sport, and to preserve and revitalize Indigenous languagesFootnote 1. The mandate of the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth is to support the Government’s work to build a country where every person has equal opportunity to succeed by championing the full breadth of Canada’s vibrant diversity and advancing greater inclusionFootnote 2. Finally, the mandate of the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages is to safeguard and promote Canada’s two Official LanguagesFootnote 3.

The Departmental Results Framework, implemented in November 2017, sets out five core responsibilities (CRs) that reflect the Department’s mandateFootnote 4. The five CRs and programs, described in PCH’s 2021-22 Program Inventory, are presented in Appendix 1.

According to the 2021-22 Main Estimates, PCH plans to spend more than $1.53 billion on programs, policies, initiatives and services. This figure is expected to be adjusted based on the plans announced in Budget 2021, which includes significant additional funding for PCH. Total forecasted spending for 2021-22 is outlined in the table below, based on the Department’s CRs and internal services.

Table 1: PCH 2021-22 Main Estimates
Core responsibilities Expenditure forecasts
CR1 – Creativity, Arts and Culture $495,939,870
CR2 – Heritage and Celebration $99,828,478
CR3 – Sport $248,100,659
CR4 – Diversity and Inclusion $153,821,012
CR5 – Official Languages $454,761,725
Internal Services $84,128,073
Total budget $1,536,579,817

Source: Canadian Heritage – 2021-22 Departmental Plan. The figures include the following expenditures: salaries, operations and maintenance, capital, statutory expenditures, Gs&Cs and the cost of employee benefit plans.

3. Evaluation Function at Canadian Heritage

3.1. Governance structure

The Assistant Deputy Minister of the Strategic Policy, Planning and Corporate Affairs sector assumes the role of Head of Evaluation and reports on evaluation activities directly to the PCH Executive Committee.

The Head of Evaluation ensures that the Plan, evaluation reports and the results of monitoring the implementation of management action plans in response to evaluation recommendations are submitted in a timely manner to the Executive Committee, chaired by the DM, for review, endorsement and approval.

The Head of Evaluation and the Director General of the Planning, Evaluation and Research Branch are supported by the ESD.

3.2. Neutral Assessment

The Policy on Results states that the neutrality of the evaluation function should be assessed at least once every five years. PCH has implemented the three recommendations of the most recent PCH neutral assessment completed in March 2019. These recommendations concerned streamlining the governance structure for evaluation, exploring the possibility that the evaluation function be located with the Office of the Chief Audit Executive (OCAE), and improving the evaluation planning process.

The next neutral assessment is scheduled for 2023-24.

3.3. Role of the Evaluation Services Directorate

The mandate of the ESD is to provide quality and timely evaluations to support accountability, decision-making, expenditure management, continuous program improvement and policy development at PCH. In addition, the ESD provides advisory services to the Department’s senior management in a variety of areas, including the preparation of Memoranda to Cabinet (MC), TB Submissions and performance measurement activities.

The ESD carries out activities to support and strengthen the Department’s evaluation function through its Professional Practices Unit (PPU). The PPU has planning, accountability, and internal and external liaison responsibilities, and develops tools and guidance documents to ensure the function’s effectiveness and efficiency.

The ESD supports the Department in demonstrating results for Canadians by conducting program evaluations. By publishing evaluation reports and providing timely consultation and guidance, the ESD fulfills its role of providing evidence to inform decision-making and support program improvement.

3.4. Priorities of the Evaluation Services Directorate

Based on feedback gathered through consultation with senior management, the ESD will focus on two horizontal priorities across its projects in 2021-22. First, it will apply a Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) lens as well as a broader lens of diversity and inclusion, including accessibility and consideration of equity-deserving groups. ESD will identify and implement measures that recognize the importance of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. Second, evaluation projects will include context and examine the effects of the pandemic on PCH’s programs, stakeholders, recipients and responsibilities.

In addition, the ESD will continue to:

3.5. Organizational structure and resource planning

The ESD currently has funding for 24 full-time equivalents (FTE). The ESD also hires students annually to support its activities and provide capacity development opportunities.

Given current and emerging evaluation needs of the Department, the ESD will implement changes to its organizational structure in 2021-22. ESD is facing human resources challenges including attracting and retaining evaluation professionals within a competitive environment, further intensified by the pandemic. Organizational changes and staffing activities will improve the ability of the ESD to address TBS and FAA requirements as well as to deliver timely, useful information and analysis to support senior management decision-making.

The ESD will continue to strengthen evaluation internal capacity through recruitment, professional development and training. The ESD is committed to contributing to a diverse workforce through recruitment and succession planning to address employment equity priorities of government. This also is part of its strategy to better address evaluation questions related to diversity, inclusion and reconciliation. The ESD supports the professionalization of the evaluation function by enabling employees to obtain the Credentialed Evaluator designation through the Canadian Evaluation Society’s Professional Designation Program. Two ESD employees have obtained the designation.

To fulfill its mandate, the ESD conducts careful planning and draws upon internal evaluation resources as well as the services of external consultants. In planning evaluations, the ESD considers the required and available resources, the expected duration of each project based on the level of risk and complexity, and the needs identified during consultations with senior management and program management. Following this analysis, ESD may call on the services of one of the five prequalified evaluation consulting firms under a multi-year contract developed following a procurement process.

3.6. Financial resources dedicated to the evaluation function

Since 2016-17, the ESD has a permanent budget allocated to evaluation projects. The following table provides an overview of planned evaluation and human resource expenditures for 2021-22. In addition to these salary and operational budget amounts, the ESD will receive funding from sectors for specific projects that were negotiated as part of program funding request processes.

Table 2: ESD planned budget for 2021-22
Expenditure type Estimated budget (March 2021)
Salary (A-Base) $2,163,065
Non-salary expenditures $588,874
Total $2,751,939
Full-time equivalentsTable 2 note * 23.3

Table 2 notes

Table 2 note *

Including students and employees who will be hired throughout the year

Return to table 2 note * referrer

3.7. Evaluation project management and resource optimization

To successfully carry out its activities, the ESD will continue to implement strategies that provide relevant, high quality, timely and cost-effective evaluation products and services. In 2021-22, the ESD will focus on addressing evaluations put on hold due to the pandemic.

The ESD leverages the expertise of other internal services, such as the Policy Research Group and the Financial Management Branch (financial planning and Gs&Cs Centre of Expertise). Targeted external resources are hired to conduct specialized studies or meet temporary needs. This hybrid approach provides flexibility and supports ESD in the implementation of the Plan. Other elements of its strategic approach include:

4. Key achievements in 2020-21

The pandemic affected the ability of PCH to complete all of the evaluations planned for 2020-21. The Department immediately focused its attention on the delivery of Gs&Cs, including the COVID-19 Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Given that the work of the ESD is reliant in part on the participation of program officials, recipients and other stakeholders, whose focus remains mainly on addressing the impact of COVID-19, it was necessary to adjust timelines for many projects. In addition, with the activation of the BCP, the ESD was required to restrict its access to the remote network for a number of months. As noted previously, the DM informed the TBS in August 2020 of changes to the Evaluation Plan, particularly that the Department would not be able to meet its requirements under section 42.1 (1) of the FAA, in light of the pandemic.

As part of the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Plan, the ESD worked on 13 evaluation projects covering 17 programs and initiatives in 2020-21. Of these, ESD completed only two evaluations due to delays caused by the global pandemic (see Table 3 below). Eleven projects will continue in 2021-22 (see Table 4 under Section 6).

Table 3: Evaluation projects conducted and completed in 2020-21
No. Evaluation Title Approval date Publication date
1 Canada 150 August 20, 2020 December 17, 2020
2 Evaluation of Interdepartmental Coordination (in relation to section 42 of the Official Languages Act) March 3, 2021 Expected by June 30, 2021

Status as of March 31, 2021

In 2020-21, despite the pandemic, the ESD provided advisory services in a variety of areas, including feedback and advice on the preparation of MC and TB Submissions. It also contributed to other planning and performance documents and activities including the Departmental Plan (DP), the Departmental Results Report (DRR), the Program Terms and Conditions, and updates to the PCH Departmental Results Framework (DRF).

In accordance with the Policy, the ESD conducted follow-up activities with program officials to assess progress in implementing approved management action plans in response to evaluation recommendations. The ESD reports the results of these follow-up activities to the Executive Committee once to twice a year.

Strengthened collaboration with the OCAE continued in 2020-21. In 2019-20, the ESD aligned its recommendation monitoring process with that of the OCAE to allow joint and timely status updates on the implementation of recommendations to senior management. Programs continue to assess and provide updates on the status of implementation of recommendations but with streamlined requirements.

The ESD worked with the PCH Policy Research Group to conduct post-evaluation project surveys with program officials. The surveys provided feedback from programs on the utility of evaluations by focusing on the following areas: relationships, processes and reports, value, and project management. Overall, the results of the past year showed a good satisfaction rating (88% of respondents).

In addition, ESD developed a preliminary guide for the evaluation of equity at PCH. Its purpose is to guide PCH in its efforts to assess the progress of programs in meeting commitments to equity-deserving groups and in meeting the increasingly complex demands of diversity and inclusion, in particular concerning the notions of accessibility, anti-racism, reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians, GBA+ and LGBTQ2. Ultimately, this guide provides a framework for PCH evaluators to incorporate equity issues into departmental evaluations.

The ESD also conducted various corporate activities, such as the mid-year Plan review, the analysis of dashboard data for monitoring evaluation project, planning activities, monitoring of the status of evaluation projects, and the development of several work tools and templates. The ESD also participated in the Data Strategy Working Group, the COVID Working Group, the Sustainable Development Goals Working Group, the Planner's Networking Group, and other working groups aiming to share best practices and improve evaluation tools.

Finally, in response to COVID-19, the ESD supported a number of strategic initiatives. It worked with the Strategic Planning Directorate in developing a logic model and a performance measurement framework for the funding received by PCH in response to the pandemic through the Emergency Support Fund for Culture, Heritage and Sport Organizations.

The ESD developed an evaluation framework that will guide a discretionary evaluation of the Department of Canadian Heritage regarding its internal and external mobilization and adaptation in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The evaluation is planned for 2022-23.

The ESD also supported the Department in developing a survey for funding applicants regarding the Emergency Support Fund for Culture, Heritage and Sport Organizations.

5. Overview of the annual planning exercise

In accordance with TB requirements, the ESD conducts an annual planning exercise to identify evaluation projects that will be conducted during the next five-year evaluation cycle. The key steps are to identify the evaluation universe, plan the process, consult, prioritize the evaluation projects and obtain approval for the Plan (for more details, see Appendix 2). The Directorate collaborated with the OCAE, in particular to identify projects that could be conducted jointly, as well as to share the schedules of the two functions with the aim of reducing potential overlaps or excessive burden on programsFootnote 5.

6. Planned evaluation projects for 2021-22 to 2025-26

6.1. Scope of direct program spending

The evaluation plan provides coverage for 93% of the Department’s total expenditures for 2021-22, including 100% of the expenditures of ongoing Gs&Cs programs subject to evaluation in accordance with the requirements of section 42.1 of the FAA.

6.2. Schedule for 2021-22 to 2025-26

The evaluation schedule (detailed in Appendix 3) lists all evaluation projects that PCH will carry out from 2021-22 to 2025-26. As required, over the next five years, coverage will include all ongoing Gs&Cs programs with five-year average actual expenditures of $5 million or greater per year, as well as evaluations consistent with TB Submission commitments. In addition to the planned evaluation dates, the schedule indicates the expected program expenditures, the level of risk associated with the program, the mandatory completion date under the FAA, when applicable, and the planned audit dates for the next three years.

To meet the needs expressed by the programs while also recognizing the ESD internal capacity and the flexibility of the Policy on Results, this present schedule reflects a number of changes compared to the Plan approved in 2020-21. The Policy does not require periodic evaluations for programs with five-year average actual expenditures of less than $5 million per year. The Department has only four Gs&Cs programs in this category, two of which have commitments made in TB Submissions. Taking advantage of this flexibility, some evaluations have been set aside.

To focus attention on the first two years of the Plan, Table 4 below presents the projects planned for 2021-22 and 2022-23. These projects include evaluations initiated in previous years that will continue (11) and those that will begin this fiscal year (5), as well as the projects planned to start in 2022-23 (8 including 2 in reserve). The plan includes two horizontal evaluations, one led by PCH and the other by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), which will be ongoing during 2021-22. Note that the Gs&Cs programs exempted from FAA section 42.1 as a result of their five-year actual expenditures being less than $5 million per year are presented in bold print in Table 4.

Table 4: Evaluation projects for 2021-22 to 2022-23
Program name FAA mandatory date Start date Projected end date
Evaluation projects carried over and continuing in 2021-22
Capital Experience N/A June 2018 November 2021
Museums Assistance Program December 2020 July 2019 July 2021
Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program March 2021 September 2019 October 2021
Exchanges Canada February 2021 September 2019 December 2021
Hosting ProgramTable 4 note * March 2021 October 2019 September 2021
Sport Support ProgramTable 4 note * March 2021 October 2019 September 2021
Athlete Assistance ProgramTable 4 note * March 2021 October 2019 September 2021
Canada Media Fund July 2020 January 2019 August 2021
Canada Periodical Fund June 2020 January 2020 November 2021
Development of Official-Language Communities ProgramTable 4 note * May 2022 September 2020 May 2022
Enhancement of Official Languages ProgramTable 4 note * May 2022 September 2020 May 2022
Horizontal evaluation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in Our FutureFootnote 6 N/A September 2020 May 2022
Horizontal evaluation of the Youth Employment Skills Strategy (led by ESDC) February 2025 December 2020 February 2025
Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage October 2021 March 2021 May 2022
Evaluation projects to be launched in 2021-22
Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives ProgramTable 4 note * March 2023 July 2021 January 2023
Anti-Racism Action ProgramTable 4 note * November 2025 July 2021 January 2023
Broadcasting and Digital Communications: Digital Citizen Initiative N/A September 2021 November 2022
International Trade: Creative Export Strategy September 2023 September 2021 November 2022
Celebration and Commemoration Program March 2023 October 2021 December 2022
Local Journalism Initiative April 2024 January 2022 March 2023
Evaluation projects to be launched in 2022-23
The Department of Canadian Heritage’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic (in reserve) N/A May 2022 April 2023
Human Rights ProgramTable 4 note * N/A August 2022 January 2024
Court Challenges ProgramTable 4 note *Footnote 7 N/A August 2022 January 2024
Canada Arts Training FundTable 4 note * February 2024 September 2022 November 2023
Canada Arts Presentation FundTable 4 note * August 2024 September 2022 November 2023
Canada History Fund (in reserve) N/A October 2022 October 2023
Harbourfront Centre Funding Program September 2023 January 2023 June 2023
Canada Book Fund July 2024 February 2023 April 2024
Canada Music Fund July 2024 February 2023 April 2024
TV5 October 2024 March 2023 May 2024

Table 4 notes

Table 4 note *

Grouped evaluation

Return to table 4 first note * referrer

Appendix 1 – 2021-22 Program InventoryFootnote 8

Core responsibilities and program inventory Components
Core responsibility 1 - Creativity, Arts and Culture
  1. Arts

1.1 Canada Arts Presentation Fund

1.2 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

1.3 Canada Arts Training Fund

1.4 Canada Cultural Investment Fund

1.5 Harbourfront Centre Funding Program

  1. Cultural Marketplace Framework

2.1 Broadcasting and Digital Communications (including the Digital Citizen Initiative)

2.2 Film and Video Policies

2.3 Creative Marketplace and Innovation

2.4 International Trade (including the Creative Export Strategy)

2.5 Cultural Sector Investment Review

  1. Support and Development of Cultural Industries

3.1 Canada Media Fund

3.2 Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credits

3.3 TV5

3.4 Canada Book Fund

3.5 Canada Periodical Fund

3.6 Canada Music Fund

3.7 Local Journalism Initiative

Core responsibility 2 - Heritage and Celebration
  1. National Celebrations, Commemorations and Symbols

4.1 State Ceremonial and Protocol

4.2 Capital Experience

4.3 Celebration and Commemoration Program

  1. Community Engagement and Heritage
5.1 Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage
  1. Preservation and Access to Heritage

6.1 Museums Assistance Program

6.2 Canadian Heritage Information Network

6.3 Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program

6.4 Canadian Conservation Institute

6.5 Movable Cultural Property Program

  1. Learning About Canadian History
7.1 Canada History Fund
Core responsibility 3 - Sport
  1. Sport Development and High Performance

8.1 Athlete Assistance Program

8.2 Sport Support Program

8.3 Hosting Program

Core responsibility 4 - Diversity and Inclusion
  1. Multiculturalism

9.1 Community Support, Multiculturalism, and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program

9.2 Anti-Racism Action Program

  1. Human Rights

10.1 Human Rights Program (including the Court Challenges Program)

10.2 LGBTQ2 Secretariat

  1. Indigenous Languages and Cultures
11.1 Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program
  1. Youth Engagement

12.1 Exchanges Canada Program

12.2 Youth Take Charge

12.3 Youth Secretariat

Core responsibility 5 - Official Languages
  1. Official Languages

13.1 Development of Official Languages Communities Program

13.2 Enhancement of Official Languages Program

13.3 Official Languages Coordination Program

Appendix 2 – Annual planning exercise

Appendix 2: Annual planning exercise – text version

Overview of the Planning Exercise: in compliance with the Treasury Board’s requirements, the Evaluation Services Directorate undertakes an annual planning exercise to determine which evaluation projects will be conducted during the next five-year evaluation cycle.

  1. Evaluation Universe: the evaluation universe is the starting point for planning. The 2021-2022 program directory, which indicates the Department’s direct program spending, and the Departmental Results Framework, were used as a basis for determining the evaluation universe to give us an overview of all the mandatory and potential “evaluable” units.
  2. Planning Process:
    1. consultation of relevant documents (Policy on Results Interim GuidanceFootnote 9, Departmental Plan, Departmental Risk Profile, Performance Information Profiles) used as a reference to account for the environmental context and determine the potential changes and additions.
    2. risk evaluation for planning purposes to update program information.
    3. preparation of the Annual Reference Level Update for the coming year.
    4. analysis of mandatory evaluations under the Financial Administration Act and commitments stemming from Treasury Board submissions, compared with discretionary evaluations in accordance with the flexibility offered by the Directive on Results.
  3. Consultations: the Evaluation Services Directorate has conducted consultations with the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Office of the Chief Audit Executive, Program’s senior management and other federal departments and agencies. The objective was to set departmental priorities with regard to evaluation and take into consideration the specific needs and concerns expressed by the partners.
  4. Prioritization of evaluation projects: risk evaluation for purposes of planning evaluation projects and consultations, keeping in mind the review of documents to be used to update the five-year evaluation schedule. They are also used to ensure the balanced distribution of resources and efforts, as well as to meet the requirements of the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  5. Approval:
    1. the draft plan is submitted to the Director of the Evaluation Services Directorate, the Director General and the Head of Evaluation.
    2. the plan is submitted to the Executive Committee, which can recommend it for approval by the Deputy Minister.
    3. the plan is forwarded to the Treasury Board Secretariat and posted on the canada.ca site.

Appendix 3 – Schedule of evaluations for 2021-22 to 2025-26

This evaluation schedule was developed based on the following: the Plan for 2020-21 to 2024-25; legislation; commitments made in TB Submissions; consultations with program management, representatives from TBS and federal departments and agencies; coordination with the OCAE; and updated reference levels obtained from the Financial Management Branch.

The level of risk for planning evaluation projects is based on the following six factors: (1) the program’s relative importance (in terms of budget); (2) performance management capacity and soundness of the program theory; (3) program complexity; (4) responsiveness – public interest and visibility; (5) preparedness for the evaluation; and (6) specific information needs of the program or senior management. The level of overall risk is of utmost importance in determining the level of effort and resources needed to conduct evaluation projects.

While taking the programs’ specific needs and concerns into consideration, these timelines reflect departmental evaluation priorities and risks during this current context of an ongoing pandemic.

In the tables on the following pages, projects exempted from section 42.1 of the FAA in accordance with the Policy on Results are presented in bold print.

Table 5: Cultural Affairs
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
1 CR1 Canada Arts Presentation Fund (grouped 1,2) $38,569,578 Moderate - August 2019
(2019-20)
August 2024
(2024-25)
- - Start
September 2022
End
November 2023
- -
2 CR1 Canada Arts Training Fund (grouped 1,2) $23,817,755 Moderate - February 2019
(2018-19)
February 2024
(2023-24)
- - Start
September 2022
End
November 2023
- -
3 CR1 Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (grouped 3,4) $60,168,557 Moderate - August 2019
(2019-20)
August 2024
(2024-25)
- - - Start
April 2023
End
June 2024
-
4 CR1 Canada Cultural Investment Fund (grouped 3, 4) $23,482,387 Moderate - August 2019
(2019-20)
August 2024
(2024-25)
- - - Start
April 2023
End
June 2024
-
5 CR1 Harbourfront Centre Funding Program $6,558,260 Moderate 2022-23 September 2018
(2018-19)
September 2023
(2023-24)
- - Start
January 2023
End
June 2023
- -
6 CR1 Canada Media Fund $135,242,569 Moderate - July 2015
(2015-16)
July 2020
(2020-21)
Started
January 2019
End
August 2021
- - - -
7 CR1 International Trade: Creative Export Strategy $15,371,029 High 2021-22
(Frankfurt Book Fair)
Never evaluated September 2023
(2023-24)
- Start
September 2021
End
November 2022
- - -
8 CR1 Broadcasting and Digital Communications: The Digital Citizenship Initiative $8,669,185 Moderate - Never evaluated - - Start
September 2021
End
November 2022
- - -
9 CR1 Film and Video Policies $1,936,517 - - Never evaluated - - - - - - -
10 CR1 Creative Marketplace and Innovation $1,947,147 - - Never evaluated - - - - - - -
11 CR1 Cultural Sector Investment Review $1,175,300 - - Never evaluated - - - - - - -
12 CR1 Canada Music Fund $28,484,720 Moderate - July 2019
(2019-20)
July 2024
(2024-25)
- - Start
February 2023
- End
April 2024
-
13 CR1 Canada Book Fund $46,110,632 Moderate - July 2019
(2019-20)
July 2024
(2024-25)
- - Start
February 2023
- End
April 2024
-
14 CR1 Canada Periodical Fund $79,036,597 Moderate - June 2015
(2015-16)
June 2020
(2020-21)
Started
January 2020
End
November 2021
- - - -
15 CR1 TV5 $13,585,854 Moderate - October 2019
(2019-20)
October 2024
(2024-25)
- - Start
March 2023
- End
May 2024
-
16 CR1 Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credits (in reserve) $1,208, 941 Moderate - September 2008
(2008-09)
- - - - Start
April 2023
End
June 2024
-
17 CR1 Local Journalism Initiative Footnote 10 $10,574,842 High 2022-23 Never evaluated April 2024
(2024-25)
- Start
January 2022
End
March 2023
- - -
Table 6: Community and Identity
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
18 CR2 Canada History Fund (in reserve) $4,228, 776 Low - July 2015
(2015-16)
- - - Start
October 2022
End
October 2023
- -
19 CR4 Exchanges Canada Program $20,469,521 Moderate - February 2016
(2015-16)
February 2021
(2020-21)
Started
September 2019
End
December 2021
- - - -
20 CR4 Youth Take Charge (in reserve) $2,141, 648 Moderate - December 2015
(2015-16)
- - - - Start
June 2023
End
January 2025
-
21 CR4 Youth Secretariat $1,399,602 Moderate - Never evaluated - - - - - - -
22 CR2 Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage $22,793,751 Moderate - October 2016
(2016-17)
October 2021
(2021-22)
Started
March 2021
- End
May 2022
- - -
23 CR4 Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program $92,520,212 High - March 2016
(2016-17)
March 2021
(2020-2021)
Started
September 2019
End
October 2021
- - - -
24 CR4 Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program (grouped 24 and 25) $23,093,461 High 2022-23 March 2018
(2017-18)
March 2023
(2022-23)
- Start
July 2021
End
January 2023
- - -
25 CR4 Anti-Racism Action Program (grouped 24 and 25) $7,971,712 High - Never evaluated November 2025
(2025-26)
- Start
July 2021
End
January 2023
- - -
Table 7: Official Languages, Heritage and Regions
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
26 CR2 Museums Assistance Program $18,479,498 Moderate - December 2015
(2015-16)
December 2020
(2020-21)
Started
July 2019
End
July 2021
- - - -
27 CR2 Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program (in reserve) $295,439 Low - December 2016
(2016-17)
- - - - Start
October 2023
End
September 2024
-
28 CR2 Canadian Conservation Institute (grouped 28, 29 – in reserve) $10,816,855 Moderate - July 2017
(2017-18)
- - - - - Start
July 2024
End
March 2026
29 CR2 Canadian Heritage Information Network (grouped 28, 29 – in reserve) $3,104,542 Moderate - December 2014
(2014-15)
- - - - - Start
July 2024
End
March 2026
30 CR2 Movable Cultural Property Program (in reserve) $1,553,203 Moderate - March 2016
(2016-17)
- - - - - Start
August 2024
End
January 2026
31 CR5 Development of Official-Language Communities Program (grouped 31, 32) $315,148,622 High 2021-22 May 2017
(2017-18)
May 2022
(2022-23)
Started
September 2020
- End
May 2022
- - -
32 CR5 Enhancement of Official Languages Program (grouped 31, 32) $133,484,582 High - May 2017
(2017-18)
May 2022
(2022-23)
Started
September 2020
- End
May 2022
- - -
33 CR5 Horizontal Evaluation of the Action Plan for Official Languages – 2018-2023: Investing in Our Future Footnote 11 - Moderate - Roadmap Mai 2017
(2017-18)
- Started
September 2020
- End
May 2022
- - -
Table 8: Sport, Major Events and Commemorations
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
34 CR2 Celebration and Commemoration Program $14,866,023 Moderate - March 2018
(2017-18)
March 2023
(2022-23)
Started
October 2021
End
December 2022
- - -
35 CR2 Capital Experience $17,159,238 Moderate 2022-23 Never evaluated - Started
June 2018
End
November 2021
- - - -
36 CR2 State Ceremonial and Protocol (federal grant program for Lieutenant Governors)Footnote 12 $6,531,153 Moderate - May 2018
(2018-19)
- - - - - - -
37 CR3 Hosting Program (grouped 37, 38, 39) $29,791,066 High - March 2016
(2015-16)
March 2021
(2020-21)
Started
October 2019
End
September 2021
- - - -
38 CR3 Sport Support Program (grouped 37, 38, 39) $184,699,667 High 2022-23 March 2016
(2015-16)
March 2021
(2020-21)
Started
October 2019
End
September 2021
- - - -
39 CR3 Athlete Assistance Program (grouped 37, 38, 39) $33,554,281 High - March 2016
(2015-16)
March 2021
(2020-21)
Started
October 2019
End
September 2021
- - - -
Table 9: Strategic Policy, Planning and Corporate Affairs
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
40 CR4 Human Rights Program (grouped 40, 41) $6,523,384 High 2021-22 March 2015
(2014-15)
- - - Start
August 2022
End
January 2024
- -
41 CR4 Court Challenges ProgramFootnote 13 (grouped 40, 41) Included in #40 High Included in #40 Former program February 2003
(2002-03)
- - - Start
August 2022
End
January 2024
- -
42 CR4 LGBTQ2 Secretariat $2,446 Moderate - Never evaluated - - - - - - -
Table 10: Internal Services
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
43 - Internal ServicesFootnote 14 $84,128,074 - - - - - - - - - -
Table 11: Other
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
44 - The Department of Canadian Heritage’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic (in reserve) - - - Never evaluated - - - Start
May 2022
End
April 2023
- -
Table 12: Horizontal Initiatives from other Government Departments
# CR Program name Planned spending (2021-22) Evaluation risk level Audits planned 2021-22 to 2023-24 Last evaluation date Mandatory FAA date Start date prior to 2021-22 Year 1 2021-22 Year 2 2022-23 Year 3 2023-24 Year 4 2024-25 Year 5 2025-26
45 - Horizontal evaluation of the Youth Employment Skills Strategy (evaluation led by ESDC / PCH Young Canada Works) - - - February 2020
(2019-20)
February 2025
(2024-25)
Start
December 2020
- - - End
February 2025
-

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2021.
Catalogue No.: CH1-39E-PDF
ISSN: 2561-018X

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: