Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more - Departmental Results Report 2016-2017

Canada Arts Presentation Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Arts Presentation Fund

Start date

2001-02

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1: Arts, Sub-Program 1.1.1: Canada Arts Presentation Fund

Description

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund gives Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations. The Canada Arts Presentation Fund also supports emerging presenters and presenter support organizations whose activities target underserved communities or artistic practices. The goal is to allow Canadians from all regions of the country to engage in and value a variety of professional artistic experiences. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund and Contributions under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016–17, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) helped to further the Department’s goal of providing Canadians with access to a wide variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities through the delivery of 541 grants and 136 contributions to arts presenters and presenter support organizations. The CAPF achieved its targets to offer a variety of professional artistic experiences to Canadians. Organizations supported by the CAPF presented a variety of disciplines: music (71% of all supported organizations presented music as part of their activities); dance (39%); theatre (45%); visual arts (9%); literature (10%); and media arts (9%) in more than 268 communities across the country. These results are consistent with those achieved in previous years.

The percentages of supported organizations that reached out to underserved communities in 2016–17 were: 21% to ethnocultural communities, 58% to young audiences, 16% to Aboriginal communities, and 29% to official language minority communities; this is consistent with the results achieved in 2015-16 with slight increases to Aboriginal communities and young audiences.

The following examples illustrate results achieved by organizations and activities funded by the CAPF in 2016–17:

  • katingavik inuit arts festival (St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador)
    In October 2016, the Nunatsiavut Government presented the katingavik inuit arts festival in St. John’s, Newfoundland, bringing together musicians (classical, folk, popular), performance artists, filmmakers, visual artists, tradition bearers and academics from across Nunatsiavut, Inuit Nunangat and beyond for four days of Inuit-centred arts festival programming. Activities included the diversity of Inuit cultural expressions and practices (contemporary, historic, and traditional) and enabled exchanges of arts, culture, and knowledge through a variety of activities including music concerts, film screenings and discussion, photo exhibitions and workshops. The CAPF contributed $50,000 to the katingavik inuit arts festival in 2016-2017.

  • Festival Montréal complètement cirque (Montréal, Quebec)
    Each year, la Cité des arts du cirque organizes the Festival Montréal complètement cirque as well as year-round performances that present the work of 200 professional artists specializing in circus arts from Québec, other provinces and internationally. The ten-day festival includes 15 performances of circus arts, music, dance, and theatre and a wide range of audience development activities. The CAPF awarded $100,000 to la Cité des arts du cirque for their activities in 2016-2017.

Audits completed or planned

An audit of the CAPF was conducted in 2015-16. The results of the audit were released in 2016-17.

Evaluations completed or planned

A grouped Arts Evaluation (Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Canada Cultural Investment Fund) was completed in 2014–15 (approved in August 2014). The next grouped evaluation is planned for completion in 2019-2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

In addition to ongoing activities, such as posting current guidelines on the website and guiding applicants by phone, email and site visits, the CAPF also engages with program stakeholders throughout the year by attending relevant conferences and showcasing events, and by holding meetings with representatives from the arts presentation community.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

8,919,926

9,516,354

13,500,000

13,429,116

13,429,116

-70,884

Total contributions

19,489,289

23,373,182

18,477,742

17,512,462

17,512,462

-965,280

Total program

28,409,215

32,889,536

31,977,742

30,941,578

30,941,578

-1,036,164

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of ($1.0M) is mainly due to two external transfers: 1. ($0.2M) to National Arts Centre Corporation for the 2017 edition of the biennial event "Zones Théâtrales", which has the mandate to showcase professional theatre from Canadian francophone communities and the regions of Quebec; 2. ($0.1M) to Canada Council for the Arts to support multilateral cooperation French-language theatre projects, as well as to ensure Canada’s participation in meetings of the Commission internationale du théâtre francophone. Within the program's authorities, ($0.7M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Start date

2001-02

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1: Arts, Sub-Program 1.1.2: Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Description

The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund seeks to improve the physical conditions for the arts and heritage related to creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The fund also aims to increase and improve access for Canadians to performing arts, visual arts, media arts, and to museum collections and heritage exhibitions. To achieve these objectives, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund provides financial assistance in the form of grants and contributions for infrastructure projects for professional, not-for-profit arts and heritage organizations, as well as municipal and provincial governments and agencies with a mandate for arts and heritage, and equivalent Indigenous peoples' organizations. The goal is to provide Canadians in all regions, including underserved communities, with access to new or improved arts and heritage spaces in their communities for creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Contributions under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016-17, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF) helped to further the Department’s goal of improving physical conditions for arts and heritage organizations across the country.

Budget 2016 invested an additional $164.8 million for 2016-17 and 2017-18 in the CCSF, which led to a significant increase in the number of projects supported by the program. In total:

  • The CCSF supported 247 new or improved arts and heritage facilities.
  • Sixty per cent of CCSF-funded projects in 2016-17 targeted underserved communities, exceeding the target of 40%. This compares with 56% in 2015-16, and 66% in 2014-15.

The CCSF supported projects that build Canadians’ knowledge of Canada, including its history, symbols, and cultures. For example, the CCSF invested $4.5 million to create the Kenojuak Cultural Centre, located in Cape Dorset, Nunavut. A multipurpose facility, the Kenojuak Cultural Centre and Print Shop will be home to permanent and temporary exhibition galleries, purpose-built artists’ studios with facilities for lithography, etching, drawing and stone cutting, and an Elder/community gathering space.

Audits completed or planned

A preliminary audit survey was completed in 2016-17. A program audit is planned for 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned

A grouped Arts Evaluation (Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Canada Cultural Investment Fund) was completed in 2014–15 (approved in August 2014). The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2019–2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients through activities such as updating regional investment strategies, interacting with recipients, site visits and posting current guidelines on the website.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

1,050,990

2,371,893

5,000,000

4,741,463

4,741,462

-258,538

Total contributions

23,867,477

21,813,455

20,358,613

100,064,737

100,064,737

79,706,124

Total program

24,918,467

24,185,348

25,358,613

104,806,200

104,806,199

79,447,586

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $79.4M is mainly explained by the $82.1M in new funding for social infrastructure projects (Budget 2016). Also, from within the program's authorities, ($2.7M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Canada Arts Training Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Arts Training Fund

Start date

1997-98

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1: Arts, Sub-Program 1.1.3: Canada Arts Training Fund

Description

The Canada Arts Training Fund contributes to the development of Canadian creators and future cultural leaders of the Canadian arts sector by supporting the training of artists with high potential through institutions that offer training of the highest calibre. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit institutions that specialize in delivering focused, intensive and practice-based arts studies. These schools offer professional training at the highest level in disciplines such as dance, theatre, circus arts, visual arts and music (opera, orchestral), etc. It also provides financial support to training in Indigenous and ethnocultural artistic practices. Canadians and the world benefit from high-quality artistic achievements by Canadian artists trained in Canada at institutions funded through the Fund. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions under the Canada Arts Training Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016–17, the Canada Arts Training Fund (CATF) helped to further the Department’s goal of training artists with high potential through the delivery of 39 contributions, supporting Canada’s top arts training schools specializing in a wide variety of artistic disciplines.

The 2015–16 annual survey of recipients (most recent data available) found that 80% of graduates are working professionally in their field in Canada or abroad, which surpassed the target of 75% and follows the trend of previous years. This success rate is representative of the high quality of training offered by CATF recipients – pre‑eminent institutions of proven national significance.

Furthermore, graduates are recognized for their excellence through awards, nominations, and professional and community activities as illustrated by the following example:

Since their inception in 1886, the programs and curriculum of The Royal Conservatory have helped to train many internationally acclaimed artists. In 2017, the Glenn Gould School piano student and Calgary native Jan Lisiecki, 18, was nominated for the first JUNO Award of his career. Emma Meinrenken, a 13 year old violinist, earned an international award by receiving a Jury Prize at the International Jascha Heifetz Competition for Violinists. Annie Zhou, 15, was chosen by CBC Music as Canada’s next piano superstar.

Results from internal Public Opinion Research conducted in 2015-16 (most recent data available) indicate that ninety-one percent of employers rated graduates of CATF funded institutions as being well prepared for professional careers, surpassing the target set at 80%. This attests to the high quality of the training provided by the funded institutions that foster excellence in the arts.

Audits completed or planned

No audit was planned or completed in 2016–17.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation of CATF was completed in 2013–14 (approved in January 2014). The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2018–19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients through activities such as regular communications, site visits of funded training programs and posting current guidelines on the website. As of 2015, applications for funding are submitted through an online system. The Program also conducts public opinion research of performing arts employers every four to five years.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016 -17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total contributions

22,750,000

22,719,000

22,779,440

22,721,000

22,721,000

-58,440

Total program

22,750,000

22,719,000

22,779,440

22,721,000

22,721,000

-58,440

Comment(s) on variance(s)

Funding was fully spent as planned.

Canada Cultural Investment Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Cultural Investment Fund

Start date

2001-02

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1: Arts, Sub-Program 1.1.4: Canada Cultural Investment Fund

Description

The Canada Cultural Investment Fund helps arts and heritage organizations build and diversify their revenue streams, improve their business practices, and assists them in being better rooted and recognized in their communities. This is achieved through three components. The Endowment Incentives component provides grants to match private sector funds raised on behalf of professional, not-for-profit arts organizations. The Strategic Initiatives component provides financial assistance to projects that strengthen business practices of multiple partner organizations. The Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations is a rarely used component which allows the federal government to partner with other levels of government and the private sector to help an arts organization move from near bankruptcy to sustainability if they have an appropriate business strategy. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Cultural Investment Fund and Contributions under the Canada Cultural Investment Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016–17, the Strategic Initiatives component of the Canada Cultural Investment Fund (CCIF) achieved its expected results by funding projects that developed an average of 25 tools to strengthen the business practices and diversify the revenue streams of arts and heritage organizations. This result is consistent with those achieved in the previous year. In 2016-17, seven (7) Strategic Initiatives projects were approved for a total of $1,017,378.

The following example illustrates results achieved by an organization and activities funded by the Strategic Initiatives component in 2016-17:

The Cultural Human Resources Council, in collaboration with a national Steering Committee made up of cultural leaders from across the country, is implementing the “Talent to Lead” project to support succession planning and future management of Canada’s cultural organizations. This two-year initiative is a targeted mentorship program that is preparing a cohort of mid-level cultural managers to fill senior management positions at a national level in order to strengthen the administrative capabilities of Canada's key cultural organizations. The project has paired 30 Anglophone mentees and 12 Francophone mentees with mentors. Early results indicate a very high level of satisfaction, with 80-85% of participants of the first two webinars reporting a good or very good overall experience.

In 2016–17, the Endowment Incentives component disbursed $19.2 million to the endowment funds of 110 professional arts organizations. Private sector donations were $21.4 million, surpassing the target of $20 million. The component was able to match 89.7 cents for each eligible dollar raised by the private sector.

Since its inception in 2001, the Endowment Incentives component has contributed $231 million to the long-term financial health of 217 arts organizations, leveraging $298 million in donations from the private sector for a total combined investment of $529 million in arts organizations' endowment funds across Canada. Of the private sector donations to benefit arts organizations in 2016-17, $11.2 million (50%) was donated by individuals, $4.5 million (20%) from foundations, $4.6 million (21%) from beneficiary arts organizations own private funds, and $1.9 million (9%) from corporations and other groups.

Audits completed or planned

No audit was completed or planned in 2016-17.

Evaluations completed or planned

A grouped Arts Evaluation (Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Canada Cultural Investment Fund) was completed in 2014–15 (approved in August 2014). The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2019–2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients through activities such as meetings with representatives from the arts and heritage sector, posting guidelines on the website and liaising with applicants about component funding requirements. The Program works with regional offices to convene meetings throughout the country with the sector, stakeholders and potential applicants to talk about the Program and answer questions from the community.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

19,038,432

17,729,525

20,000,000

19,266,900

19,266,900

-733,100

Total contributions

2,930,978

1,195,605

1,972,205

2,704,505

2,704,505

732,300

Total program

21,969,410

18,925,130

21,972,205

21,971,405

21,971,405

-800

Comment(s) on variance(s)

From within the program's authorities, $0.7M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada Media Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Media Fund

Start date

2010-11

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Cultural Industries, Sub-Program 1.2.2: Canada Media Fund

Description

The Canada Media Fund is funded by the Government of Canada and the cable, satellite distributors and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). It supports the creation of digital content across multiple platforms such as television, wireless devices or the Internet. The Canada Media Fund focuses investments on the creation of content Canadians want, and harnesses the opportunities provided by new technologies to deliver content to Canadians where and when they want it. Organizations supported by the Canada Media Fund include, but are not limited to, Canadian television and digital media production companies. Canadians as consumers of convergent programs and creators of leading-edge content and applications represent the ultimate target group. Indigenous communities, official language minority communities and other diverse language groups are also targeted by specific production funding envelopes. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions under the Canada Media Fund.

Results 2016-17

According to data from 2015–16*, the Canada Media Fund (CMF) Sub-Program exceeded all of its targets for the number of projects funded through its two funding streams. Through the Experimental Stream, which encourages the development of innovative digital media content and software applications, the CMF funded a total of 104 which is 44 above the target. This result demonstrates an ongoing demand for support to create innovative interactive digital media content and software applications.

Results for the Convergent Stream, which supports the creation of high quality Canadian television programs and value-added digital convergent content available on at least one other platform, reported 2,190 million hours tuned in for CMF -supported English-language television productions in 2015–16, an increase of 1.9% from the 2,148 million hours tuned in in 2014–15. It also reported 1,364 million hours tuned in for CMF -supported French-language television productions for the same period compared to the 1,314 million hours in 2014–15, an increase of 3.8%. These results demonstrate that CMF -supported productions continue to be successful with Canadian audiences.

Audits completed or planned

The last audit was completed in March 2013. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation covering the period from 2010-11 to 2013-14 (approved July, 2015) revealed that the program is the most important source of funding for Canadian digital content in underrepresented genres (drama, documentaries, broadcasts for children and youth, variety shows and performing arts). The report found that the CMF continues to be the best tool for the government to support Canadian television and digital content but that it operates in a complex ecosystem of Canadian media. The evaluation recommends that Canadian Heritage continue working closely with the CMF to encourage them in the implementation of their recommendations.

The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2020-21.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Canada Media Fund corporation is required to conduct ongoing, formal, meaningful consultations.

*The data reflects results from the previous year, because the CMF reports its data each year in the fall. Results for 2016-17 will be available on October 31, 2017.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total contributions

134,146,077

134,146,077

134,146,077

134,146,077

134,146,077

0

Total program

134,146,077

134,146,077

134,146,077

134,146,077

134,146,077

0

Comment(s) on variance(s)

Funding was fully spent as planned.

Canada Music Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Music Fund

Start date

2001-02

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Cultural Industries, Sub-Program 1.2.5: Canada Music Fund

Description

The Canada Music Fund supports the activities of Canadian music creators, artists and entrepreneurs aimed at increasing the creation of and access to a diversity of Canadian music for audiences everywhere by enhancing the sector's ability to compete in domestic and international markets. This support is delivered through the following components: 1) Music Entrepreneur, which provides funding to Canadian music entrepreneurs as well as not-for-profit national service organizations in support of the creation, publishing, production, distribution or marketing of Canadian music, including touring related activities; 2) New Musical Works, which provides funding to Canadian music artists and entrepreneurs for the creation, publishing, production, distribution or marketing of Canadian music, including touring related activities, music showcases and business development activities; 3) Collective Initiatives, which provides funding to Canadian not-for-profit organizations as well as music entrepreneurs in support of a diverse range of collective activities aiming to enhance the visibility and accessibility of Canadian music; and 4) Canadian Music Memories, which provides funding for the preservation of Canada's musical heritage for future generations. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Music Fund and Contributions under the Canada Music Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016–17, the Canada Music Fund (CMF) helped to further the Department’s goal of supporting the creation and dissemination of Canadian cultural content through:

  • Contributions to 19 Canadian sound recording firms, 15 Canadian music publishing firms and 4 Canadian music industry associations through the Music Entrepreneur Component (MEC);
  • Two contributions to two third-party administrators (FACTOR for the English-language market and Musicaction for the French-language market) for the delivery of the New Musical Works (NMW) and Collective Initiatives components; and
  • A Memorandum of Understanding with Library and Archives Canada to carry out activities related to the preservation of Canada’s musical heritage as part of the Canadian Music Memories component.

In 2016–17, the CMF provided album production support which resulted in 502 albums, produced and released by MEC recipients (117 albums released in the previous year) or by NMW recipients (385 production projects approved in 2016–17). This represents an increase of almost 5% compared to the average number of recordings supported in the previous five years (480).The albums spanned a variety of genres, such as rock (26%), pop (16 %), roots & folk (15 %), urban & worldbeat (12 %), classical (8 %), jazz (6 %) and country (6 %).

NMW supported 104 production projects by French-language artists and 281 by English-language artists. For MEC supported productions, 19 were French-language, 64 English-language and 34 were instrumental or in other languages.

In 2016-17, through the initiative “Showcasing Canada’s Cultural Industries To The World”, an additional investment of $2.075 million allowed the CMF to implement close to 180 additional NMW projects focused on touring and promotion of Canadian artists on the international markets as well as 45 additional collectives showcases which benefited nearly 150 Canadian artists. The additional investment also allowed the CMF to increase the budget, and thus the quality, of previously planned projects including activities surrounding key partnerships with events with proven track records for collective promotion; new activities at big international events; and international trade missions. Furthermore, an additional 180 foreign buyers participated in trade missions in Canada due to the increased funding.

In total, NMW helped Canadian artists connect with audiences at home and abroad by providing marketing, touring and showcasing support to nearly 2,500 projects in 2016-17 and close to 300 projects were funded through the Collective Initiatives component.

In 2016, 21.8% of sales generated by the top 2,000 albums in Canada were by Canadian artists. The domestic market share of albums by CMF -supported artists was 8.0 % in 2016. (Note that the data source for the market share calculations changed in 2016. Comparisons with prior years is therefore not advised). Sales of recordings by Canadian artists released by MEC recipients are used to measure the CMF's international performance. In 2016-17, the international market accounted for 39% of all album sales of MEC-supported music, an increase compared to 25% the previous year. The international sales of MEC-supported music reached 0.6 million units, falling short of the set target of 1 million, due in large part to global consumption patterns rapidly shifting from purchasing to streaming of music.

Indeed, streaming continues to establish itself as the next generation of digital music consumption and CMF recipients are at the forefront of this transformation. 2016-17 MEC recipients reported over 863 million streams of Canadian music, a 135 % increase over the previous year and 317% more than two years ago. Digital download purchases continue to decrease in 2016-17, with sales of digital albums by Canadian artists decreasing by 9% over the previous year and sales of digital tracks by Canadian artists falling by 21%.

In 2016-17, the talent of CMF-supported artists was recognized at national and international award ceremonies. In fact, two-thirds (64%) of 2017 Juno award recipients had benefited from CMF funding at some point in their career, including Canadian Hall of Fame inductee Sarah McLachlan and the Allan Waters Humanitarian Award winner Buffy Sainte-Marie. Several CMF-supported artists were also nominated for international awards including PartyNextDoor, and Tory Lanez who both received Grammy award nominations. Not only was The Weeknd nominated for a Brit award in 2017, he also earned himself 2 mentions in the Guinness World Records for: Most Streamed Album on Spotify in One Year and Most Consecutive Weeks in the Top 10 of Billboard’s Hot 100 by a Solo Male Artist. Of the 10 albums shortlisted for the 2016 Polaris Music Prize (Polaris Music Prize rewards the most critically acclaimed album of the year by a Canadian artist regardless of music genre or sales) eight were by artists that received CMF support at one point in their career.

Audits completed or planned

There were no audits completed in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2014-15 (approved in July 2015). The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

When the program application guide for each funding stream is released, the Department communicates with potential and past recipients in the following ways:

  • Posting the application guide and application forms on the program website;
  • Emailing organizations identified as potential applicants notifying them that application documents are available;
  • Emailing professional associations for which members are targeted by the transfer payment program notifying them that application documents are available;
  • Emailing third party administrators of the New Musical Works component so that they can post on their websites that the application forms are available;
  • Sending reminder emails shortly in advance of the funding application deadline.

The Department also engages with program stakeholders throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Guiding applicants by phone and email (including toll-free phone number and program e-mail address available to applicants and recipients);
  • Attending industry conferences and holding meetings with industry representatives.
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

0

0

2,000,000

0

0

-2,000,000

Total contributions

23,557,050

23,684,854

22,299,231

26,240,731

26,240,731

3,941,500

Total program

23,557,050

23,684,854

24,299,231

26,240,731

26,240,731

1,941,500

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $1.9M is explained by the $2.1M in new funding to support the promotion of Canadian artists and cultural industries abroad (Budget 2016) and the transfer of ($0.4M) to Library and Archives of Canada in support of the acquisition, access and preservation of Canadian sound recordings. From within the program's authorities, ($2.0M) was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada Book Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Book Fund

Start date

2010-11

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Cultural Industries, Sub-Program 1.2.6: Canada Book Fund

Description

The Canada Book Fund supports the activities of Canadian book publishers and other sectors of the book industry to ensure access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books. This support is delivered through the following streams of funding: 1) Support for Publishers, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the ongoing production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector; 2) Support for Organizations, which provides funding to develop the Canadian book industry and the market for its products by assisting industry associations and related organizations to undertake collective projects offering broad benefits to the industry and, ultimately, to readers everywhere. This Sub-Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Book Fund and Contributions under the Canada Book Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016-17, the Canada Book Fund (CBF) supported the publication of 6,533 new Canadian-authored titles, in both physical and digital format. While the result is a 6% decrease from 2015-16’s 6,973, it is still 9% above the 6,000 target. (It should be noted that the 2015-16 result was an outlier. Since 2010-11, the median number of new Canadian-authored titles is under 6,500). Of the 6,533 titles in 2016-17, 57% were published in French (56% in 2015-16), 40% were published in English (41% in 2015-16) and 3% in both official languages or in another language (3% in 2015-16). With respect to genre, 76% were trade titles (82% in 2015-16), 18% were educational titles (11% in 2015-16) and 6% were scholarly titles (7% in 2015-16).

The $366 million in sales of Canadian-authored books by CBF recipients (around $261 million in Canada and approximately $105 million abroad) is 4.6% above the $350 million target. The result for 2016-17 constitutes a decrease from last year's figure of $373 million ($278 million in Canada and $95 million abroad). The decline in sales over the last few years may be attributed to decreasing domestic book prices and the weak global economy, among other possible factors.

Funding from the CBF helped around 300 businesses and not-for-profit organizations in the Canadian book industry to undertake initiatives in publishing, marketing, professional development, technology-driven collective projects and other areas in support of departmental objectives.

The CBF continued to support a broad range of industry activities across the country, including the work of 250 Canadian-owned publishers, in more than 80 Canadian towns and cities, which directly employ close to 2,500 Canadians. Publishers supported by the CBF realized an aggregate profit margin of 4.2%, which is consistent with results from recent years (since 2010-11, the median aggregate profit margin is also 4.2%).

Overall, the results speak not only to the economic impact of the sector, but also to its strong capacity to continue to deliver a range of Canadian content to consumers everywhere.

Audits completed or planned

There were no audits completed in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2014-15 (approved in July 2014). The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

When the program application guide for each funding stream component is released, the Department communicates with potential applicants and past recipients in the following ways:

  • Posting application information on the program website.
  • Emailing organizations identified as potential applicants notifying them that application documents are available and underlining key program changes.
  • Sending reminder emails shortly in advance of the funding application deadline.

The Department also engages with stakeholders throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Guiding applicants by phone and email (including toll-free phone number and program email address available to program applicants and recipients);
  • Emailing the directorate newsletter at least once a year.
  • Holding annual stakeholder consultations and other meetings with potential applicants and recipients;
  • Attending industry events to improve the visibility and understanding of the program.
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

1,824,174

1,686,995

8,300,000

1,674,487

1,674,486

-6,625,514

Total contributions

34,208,972

34,865,958

28,366,301

35,328,323

35,328,323

6,962,022

Total program

36,033,146

36,552,953

36,666,301

37,002,810

37,002,809

336,508

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $0.3M is mainly as a result of the $0.5M in new funding received to support the promotion of Canadian artists and cultural industries abroad (Budget 2016). From within the program's authorities, ($6.6M) was transferred from grants to contributions.

Canada Periodical Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Periodical Fund

Start date

2010-11

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Cultural Industries, Sub-Program 1.2.7: Canada Periodical Fund

Description

The Canada Periodical Fund supports the activities of Canadian magazine and non-daily newspaper publishers and organizations to ensure that Canadians have access to diverse Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers. The Fund is delivered through the following components: 1) Aid to Publishers, which provides formula funding to Canadian print magazines and non-daily newspapers for publishing activities, such as distribution, content creation, online activities and business development; 2) Business Innovation, which provides funding to print magazines and digital periodicals for business development and innovation projects; and 3) Collective Initiatives, which provides funding to Canadian magazines and non-daily newspaper organizations for industry-wide projects to increase the overall sustainability of the Canadian magazine and non-daily newspaper industries. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Periodical Fund and Contributions under the Canada Periodical Fund.

Results 2016-17

In 2016–17, the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) supported the publication of 790 print and digital periodicals from across Canada. This was 5.3% over target (target set was 750) but represents a decrease of 2.6% from the previous year in which 811 titles were supported. While the number of funded titles has declined, diversity of titles has remained relatively stable with 52 ethno-cultural, 29 official language minority communities and 17 Indigenous publications supported. In addition, the CPF subsidized the production of content in a variety of different languages: 70.8% of titles were published in English, 20.3% in French, and the remainder in both English and French or in other languages.

CPF-supported titles continued to reach millions of Canadian households, distributing over 170 million copies this year. This was 13.3% above target (target set was 150 million copies) but represents a 10.5% decline since 2015-16 when 190 million copies were distributed. These results are consistent with overall declines in the magazine and newspaper industries, and targets for both expected results were adjusted this year to reflect changing industry realities.

The largest component of the program, Aid to Publishers, supported 747 print periodicals of which 378 were magazines and 369 were non-daily newspapers. Of these periodicals, 539 were published in English, 147 in French, and 61 in both English and French, or another language. Periodicals funded by the program also catered to a variety of distinct Canadian communities including Indigenous (16), official language minority (29) and ethno-cultural (44) communities. These results are consistent with the previous year

2016-17 was another challenging year for the magazine and newspaper industries, both of which faced strong competition from digital media for readers and advertisers. To better assist the digital segment of the industry, the program introduced a pilot project this year, supporting the launch of 10 digital-only periodical start-ups. The initiative has received positive feedback from the industry and will be continued in 2017–18

In addition, to address declining circulation trends and expand access to the program, the CPF has decreased circulation eligibility requirements for 2017-18. This change is expected to enable the program to support a larger number of new, diverse and specialized periodicals.

Audits completed or planned

There were no audits completed in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2014-15. The next evaluation is planned for 2018-19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

When the program application guide for each funding stream is released, the Department communicates with potential and past recipients in the following ways:

  • Posting the application guide and application forms on the program website;
  • Emailing recent recipients and organizations identified as potential applicants, notifying them that application documents are available;
  • Sending reminder emails shortly in advance of the funding application deadline;
  • Engaging with industry organizations so that they publicize program information to their members.

The Department also engages with program stakeholders throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Guiding applicants by phone and email (including toll-free phone number and program e-mail address available to applicants and recipients);
  • Holding informal meetings with various stakeholders to explain how the CPF works and to listen to issues and concerns;
  • Attending various industry events to improve the visibility and understanding of the program;
  • Updating the CPF website with news and program information
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual spending 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

67,338,313

69,803,639

72,775,054

70,094,060

70,094,059

-2,680,995

Total contributions

2,998,607

3,208,165

1,999,544

4,190,582

4,190,581

2,191,037

Total program

70,336,920

73,011,804

74,774,598

74,284,642

74,284,640

-489,958

Comment(s) on variance(s)

From within the program's authorities, $2.2M was transferred from Grants to Contributions while ($0.5M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

TV5

Name of transfer payment program

TV5

Start date

1990-91

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2009-10

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Cultural Industries, Sub-Program 1.2.10: TV5

Description

TV5 supports the international TV5 partnership with France, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Switzerland, Québec and Canada. TV5 enables Canadian productions to be presented around the world through TV5MONDE. Moreover, through TV5 Québec Canada, it provides Canadians with access to a rich diversity of programming from the international Francophonie. This Sub-Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grant to TV5MONDE and Contribution to TV5 Québec Canada.

Results 2016-17

TV5 MONDE reached 318 million households in 2016, an increase in comparison to 291 million households reached in 2015. The presence of 9.86 percent Canadian content on TV5MONDE in 2016-17 provided visibility on the international scene to artisans in the Canadian audiovisual industry. The percentage of Canadian content shown on TV5MONDE remains stable and has surpassed the target of 7 percent

In 2016-17, TV5 programming in Canada continued to offer Canadians unique access to international Francophone content with 81.2 percent of its programming coming from international Francophone partners, a result consistent with previous years. In March 2017, the chain reached 10.7 million households in Canada, compared to 10.3 in March 2016. TV5 Québec Canada maintained its market share (data available for Québec only) with 1.5 percent of total audience in the demographic group of television viewers aged 2 years and older.

Audits completed or planned

No audit took place in 2015-2016. There are no audits planned at the moment.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2014-15 (approved in November 2014). The next audit is planned to be completed in 2018-19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Only two beneficiaries are admissible to the TV5 program, namely TV5MONDE and TV5 Québec Canada.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

6,599,119

7,922,730

8,000,000

7,177,817

7,177,817

-822,183

Total contributions

3,243,670

2,745,200

2,960,900

2,960,900

2,960,898

-2

Total program

9,842,789

10,667,930

10,960,900

10,138,717

10,138,715

-822,185

Comment(s) on variance(s)

From within the program's authorities, $0.8M was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Museums Assistance Program

Name of transfer payment program

Museums Assistance Program

Start date

1972-73

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-12

Strategic outcome

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Heritage, Sub-Program 1.3.1: Museums Assistance Program

Description

The Museums Assistance Program (MAP) supports heritage institutions and workers in the preservation and presentation of heritage collections. MAP provides financial assistance to Canadian museums and related institutions for activities that facilitate Canadians’ access to our heritage, foster the preservation of Canada’s cultural heritage, including the preservation of representative collections of Indigenous cultural heritage, and foster professional knowledge, skills and practices related to key museum functions. In support of the Youth Employment Strategy, MAP helps heritage organizations to create summer employment and internship opportunities for Canadian youth through the heritage components of Young Canada Works. MAP also provides grants through the Movable Cultural Property Program to assist designated institutions in acquiring cultural property threatened with export or available on international markets. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Museums Assistance Program and Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program.

Results 2016-17

The following are highlights of the results achieved in 2016–17 by the Museums Assistance Sub-Program’s three funding streams: (1) the Museums Assistance Program (MAP), (2) Young Canada Works - Heritage, and (3) Movable Cultural Property Grants:

  • Over 1,980 individuals attended 133 professional learning opportunities funded by the MAP. Of those who responded to the participant survey, 75% reported improvement in their knowledge, skills and practices related to key museum functions.
  • In 2016-17, YCW-Heritage received supplemental funding under Budget 2016 through the horizontal Youth Employment Strategy, led by Employment and Social Development Canada. This supplement enabled the creation of 150 additional internships for young Canadian graduates to gain professional experience in museums and related heritage organizations
  • 1,788 summerjobs and internships, funded by the Young Canada Works - Heritage programs, were provided toyoung Canadians to enable them to gain professional experience in museums and related heritage organizations.
  • The preservation of 108,402 heritage objects was supported through the MAP and Movable Cultural Property Grants. This support was primarily achieved through the funding of collections storage solutions and information management systems. Of the institutions that received MAP funding to support a collections management systems project, 100% indicated improvement in the management of their collections. Of the institutions that received MAP funding to support a storage solutions project, 100% indicated improvement in the preservation of their collections.
  • A total of 1,088,034 visitors attended travelling exhibitions supported by the MAP.
  • The MAP supported 156 venues to present exhibitions, which surpasses the target by 73%. The exhibitions were accompanied by 1,096 public programming activities and 159 public programming products.
Audits completed or planned

There were no audits conducted in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2015-16 (approved in July 2015). The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2019-2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Updated information for the MAP, Young Canada Works-Heritage Programs and Movable Cultural Property Grants is available on the Department’s website. When additional communication activities are required, the national office delivers messages through the regional offices, delivery organizations, professional associations, etc. for dissemination to targeted organizations, or directly to applicants and recipients. Department representatives also promote heritage programs by participating in national and provincial museums associations’ annual conferences. Every five years, recipients and stakeholders are invited to contribute to program evaluation exercises.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

2,944,575

2,565,649

4,663,680

1,892,778

1,892,778

-2,770,902

Total contributions

12,494,378

12,165,510

11,076,284

14,339,998

14,339,998

3,263,714

Total program

15,438,953

14,731,159

15,739,964

16,232,776

16,232,776

492,812

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $0.5M is due mainly to the influx of new funding of $1.5M for the Youth Employment Strategy (Budget 2016). From within the program's authorities, ($2.8M) was transferred from Grants to Contributions while ($1.0M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Celebration and Commemoration Program

Name of transfer payment program

Celebration and Commemoration Program

Start date

1996-97

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Attachment to Canada, Sub-Program 2.1.1: Celebration and Commemoration Program

Description

The Celebration and Commemoration Program provides funding through grants and contributions to non-governmental and community organizations for community based activities organized during the Celebrate Canada period, from June 21 to July 1. These activities celebrate National Aboriginal Day on June 21, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day on June 24, Canadian Multiculturalism Day on June 27 and Canada Day on July 1. Funding is also available for commemorations with a national scope that commemorate and celebrate nationally significant historical figures, places, events, and accomplishments. The activities that are funded build pride, promote participation in celebrations and commemorations and strengthen understanding of shared history. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration sub-program and Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration sub-program.

Results 2016-17

The Celebration and Commemoration Program (CCP) continued to create opportunities for Canadians in every province and territory to participate in Canada Day, National Aboriginal Day, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day and Multiculturalism Day. Community-level events engage communities in activities tailored to their region. A total of 1,744 community events took place between June 21 and July 1, 2016. The number of community events decreased slightly compared to 2015–16.

Since the beginning of the Canada Day Challenge in 1987, over 350,000 young Canadians from across Canada have submitted entries. In 2016, young Canadians were encouraged to share what makes them proud to be Canadian. The winners received a VIP experience to the Canada 150 celebrations on Parliament Hill in 2017. Participation rates for the Canada Day Challenge were lower than the previous year.

Participation rates in commemorations remained high and Canadians engaged in marking major anniversaries such as the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage. Projects marking this milestone included Equal Voice – Daughters of the Vote Initiative that saw 338 young women, one from each federal riding participate in a series of women’s leadership events and initiatives at each provincial, territorial and federal legislature as well as Girls Action Foundation – Community (Ex)Change, a series of skill-building workshops and a photo exhibit that reached [# reached] Canadians

CCP continued to support projects of national scope to mark significant World War anniversaries, including the 100th anniversaries of the Battles of the Somme and Beaumont-Hamel (First World War) and the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Hong Kong (Second World War).

CCP worked with other government departments and expanded the scope of commemorations through strategic alliances. Working groups on the subject of the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, the 100th anniversary of Women’s Right to Vote in Canada and the 175th Anniversary of the Birth of Sir Wilfrid Laurier were created to encourage synergies and maximise the reach and impact of planned events, activities and communications efforts. Alliances were created with various federal departments and institutions, including Status of Women Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Parks Canada, and Veterans Affairs Canada.

The Department continued to manage the Interdepartmental Commemorations Committee that brings together representatives from other departments and portfolio organizations to share information on commemoration activities and cross-promote events and activities.

In 2016-17, the Canada 150 Fund assessed over 3,000 applications and approved over $55 million for projects across Canada that create opportunities for Canadians to participate in local, regional, and national celebrations that contribute to building a sense of pride and attachment to Canada.Footnote 1.

Audits completed or planned

The last audit was completed in 2015-16 and received approval in June 2016. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the Celebration and Commemoration Program is currently underway (begun in April 2016). Expected end date: September 2017 (2017-18).

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients by posting program information and guidelines on its website and by liaising with current funding recipients and interested parties.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

5,662,564

7,910,072

47,520,000

7,667,497

7,096,736

-40,423,264

Total contributions

17,000,545

27,918,034

52,703,767

95,469,230

82,938,775

30,235,008

Total program

22,663,109

35,828,106

100,223,767

103,136,727

90,035,511

-10,188,256

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of ($10.2M) is due mainly to the influx of new funding of $3.6M to support celebrations of the 375th anniversary of Montréal, $2.5M in funding for the True Patriot Love Foundation to support the organization of the 2017 Invictus Games, a $0.3M transfer from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada to Canadian Heritage to promote public awareness and community participation in National Aboriginal Day activities and a transfer of ($0.2M) to Library and Archives Canada for the Foundational Documents Exhibit at the Library of Parliament to mark Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation. Further, there was a year-end surplus of $13.1M. Lastly, from within the program's authorities, $30.2M was transferred from Grants to Contributions while ($3.3M) were transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Exchanges Canada Program

Name of transfer payment program

Exchanges Canada Program

Start date

2000-01

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Attachment to Canada, Sub-Program 2.1.5: Exchanges Canada Program

Description

The Exchanges Canada Program provides grants and contributions in support of youth participation initiatives that allow young Canadians to learn about Canada, create linkages with each other and better appreciate the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian reality. The Program supports not-for-profit organizations to provide Canadian youth with a range of exchange and forum activities to strengthen their sense of belonging to Canada and therefore their sense of Canadian identity. The Program has two components: Youth Exchanges Canada (YEC) and Youth Forums Canada (YFC). YEC funds reciprocal homestay exchanges for youth, and also includes the Summer Work / Student Exchange sub-component, which provides summer job opportunities for 16 and 17-year-olds in their second official language. YFC enables young Canadians to connect with one another through forums, study sessions and workshops on a range of relevant topics. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects and Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative.

Results 2016-17

The Exchanges Canada Program offered opportunities for over 12,500 youth to enhance their knowledge and understanding of Canada; to create linkages with one another; and to enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Through their participation in forums and group exchanges, youth learned about Canada, its history, geography, industry, institutions, communities, cultures, and languages, and had the opportunity to connect with other youth. As a result of their participation in the Program, 92% of youth reported that they created new ties with people from other communities, 85% of youth participants reported that they enhanced their appreciation of how diverse Canada is, 87% agreed that they learned new things about Canada, and 84% reported having a better understanding of what Canadians have in common. Also, 81% reported an increased sense of attachment to Canada. In comparison to the expected results, these percentages are in line with established targets. Footnote 2.

The Exchanges Canada Program supported the Canada 150 organizational priority through its support to the Students on Ice Foundation for their project “Arctic Youth Expeditions” to commemorate the centennial of the Canadian Arctic Expedition (1913-16). The project allowed Canadian youth to learn about and experience Canada’s North, and its rich history.

Support was provided to youth exchanges and forums in 2016-17 through 21 single- and multi-year contribution agreements with not-for-profit organizations.

Audits completed or planned

There were no audits conducted in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2015-16.The next evaluation is planned for 2018-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Exchanges Canada Program sends an invitation letter annually to prospective applicants to submit a funding application to the Youth Forums Canada component of the Exchanges Canada Program. The Program works with recipients to ensure that all youth participants receive a message from the Minister congratulating them on their participation in funded projects.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

20,000

20,000

100,000

20,000

20,000

-80,000

Total contributions

17,689,072

17,882,378

17,686,359

18,310,937

18,309,465

623,106

Total program

17,709,072

17,902,378

17,786,359

18,330,937

18,329,465

543,106

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $0.5M was mainly due to the increase demand of funding and spending requests for projects that could enhance the results of the Program. For example, funding the UNAC project allowed for hundreds of youth participants to be supported in terms of participation, and the Tides Canada project will allow for a small group of Northern Indigenous youth to be able to come together in Canada’s North for a week-long forum which will have a significant positive impact on their lives.

Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage

Name of transfer payment program

Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage

Start date

2007-08

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013–14

Strategic outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Engagement and Community Participation, Sub Program 2.2.2: Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage

Description

The Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program (BCAH) provides grants and contributions in support of local festivals, community anniversaries and capital projects. Funding is made available to stakeholders presenting arts and heritage festivals and events that emphasize local engagement. Its objective is to engage citizens in their communities through performing and visual arts as well as through the expression, celebration and preservation of local historical heritage. The Program has three components: 1) Local Festivals supports recurring festivals that involve the whole community and give opportunities to local artists and artisans to engage in their communities and/or celebrate local history and heritage; 2) Community Anniversaries supports one-time commemorations through activities that celebrate a major anniversary (100 years and then increments of 25 years) of a significant local person or event; and 3) Legacy Fund supports tangible, lasting capital projects that commemorate or celebrate a major anniversary (100 years and then increments of 25 years) of a significant local person or event. This Sub-Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program and Contributions in support of the Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program.

Results 2016-17

The Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage (BCAH) Program encouraged citizens across the country to connect with one another and engage in their local communities through performing and visual arts, as well as through the expression, celebration, and preservation of local historical heritage. The Program carried out the administration of grants and contributions to local festivals, community anniversaries and community capital projects.

BCAH provided funding to 771 projects, which included 706 local festivals, 46 community anniversaries and 19 commemorative capital projects in 432 communities across the country. Based on a recipient response rate of 86%, funded projects provided opportunities for an average of 134 local artists, artisans and heritage performers per project to perform in their communities. Recipients also reported the involvement of an average of 153 volunteers per project and an average of 3,485 volunteer hours per project. Thus, BCAH funding enabled Canadians to share and celebrate the stories of their communities, through the expression and celebration and the preservation of local arts and heritage.*

For example, the Legacy Fund supported a project celebrating the 375th anniversary of Montréal where the Maison Saint-Gabriel museum constructed a “Jardin des origines” as a tribute to Indigenous women and the important role they played in the development of the country.

The Legacy Fund also supported a project commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Halifax Explosion. The project comprises the transformation of an existing commemorative park with the addition of memorial artworks and interpretative elements to better present how this tragedy shaped the history and resilience of the community.

* Most recent data: Given that final reports from recipients are compiled once per year every fall, statistics provided here reflect the 2015-16 final reports.

Audits completed or planned

The last audit was completed in 2015-16. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2016-17.The next evaluation is planned for 2019-21.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Program provides information through its website, and program officers.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

7,662,695

8,387,986

14,355,000

8,845,780

8,845,780

-5,509,220

Total contributions

7,281,841

8,287,687

3,300,000

7,436,693

7,436,693

4,136,693

Total program

14,944,536

16,675,673

17,655,000

16,282,473

16,282,473

-1,372,527

Comment(s) on variance(s)

From within the program's authorities, ($4.1M) was transferred from Grants to Contributions while ($1.4M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Aboriginal Peoples’ Program

Name of transfer payment program

Aboriginal Peoples’ Program

Start date

1971-72

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Engagement and Community Participation, Sub Program 2.2.3: Aboriginal People’s Program

Description

The Aboriginal Peoples’ Program (APP) focuses primarily on strengthening cultural identity, encouraging the full participation of Indigenous peoples in Canadian life, and supporting the continuation of Indigenous cultures and languages as living elements of Canadian society. APP programming incorporates Indigenous cultures and languages into community-driven activities designed to strengthen cultural identity. The APP provides investments that help to support the efforts of Indigenous communities to develop and deliver innovative and culturally appropriate projects, under initiatives such as the Aboriginal Languages Initiative, Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting, Scholarships and Youth Initiatives, Territorial Language Accords, National Aboriginal Day, and the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program and Contributions in support of the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program.

Results 2016-17

The Aboriginal Peoples’ Program (APP) continued to invest in core activities designed to strengthen Indigenous cultural identity and participation in Canadian society, and to revitalize and preserve Indigenous languages and cultures. The Program provided investments to Indigenous communities for projects that encourage Indigenous individuals and groups to engage in community-driven activities and incorporate Indigenous cultures and languages.

In 2015–16, the APP (Aboriginal Languages Initiative component) supported the direct participation of 5,137* people in Indigenous language activities, which exceeded the target. The decrease in the number of participants from 2014-15 (6,309 participants) can be explained by variations in the number and type of participatory activities funded per project.

In 2016–17, the APP exceeded its project target, providing funding to 107 projects that incorporated Indigenous languages, Indigenous cultures, and supported community engagement. This number of projects is similar to the number of projects funded in 2015–16 (112).

2016–17 initiatives are as follows:

Scholarships and Youth Initiatives / National Aboriginal Achievement Awards: Through an agreement, Indspire was funded to: support post-secondary scholarships for Indigenous students, and to reach high school students by holding an Indigenous Youth Career Conference in Ottawa, Ontario. The Conference took place in conjunction with the Indspire Awards Gala in Ottawa, where 14 outstanding recipients were honoured. The Gala was produced and organized by Indspire and the show broadcast on the Aboriginal Peoples’ Television Network (APTN).

Aboriginal Languages Initiative: Financial support was provided to 92 community-driven projects across Canada for the revitalization and preservation of First Nation, Métis and Inuit languages, which directly affected 5,137 participants in 2015-16.*

National Aboriginal Day: This project provided funding for the National Aboriginal Day events in the National Capital Region (June 1–21, 2016), which included celebrations, educational events for students, educators and families, and performances and events by Indigenous artists and entertainers.

Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting: Funding was provided to 15 Indigenous communication societies to: produce 78,577** hours per year of new content for radio, of which 17,806 hours per year is the production of new content in an Indigenous language; and 80 hours per year for the production of new Indigenous television content accessible to all Canadians.

Territorial Language Accords: Through two agreements, funding was provided to the Government of the Northwest Territories and the Government of Nunavut for the preservation, development and enhancement of Indigenous languages.

Audits completed or planned

There were no audits conducted in 2016-2017. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2015-16.The next evaluation, which will include the Aboriginal Languages Initiative, is planned for 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Program provides information through the departmental website and program officers. An email is sent to potential stakeholders.

* Most recent data (ALI): Given final reports are compiled once per year, the statistic provided here is from 2015–16.

**Most recent data: Given final reports are compiled once per year, the statistic provided here is from 2015–16.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

111,104

0

0

0

0

0

Total contributions

15,982,334

15,561,315

16,439,206

22,233,789

16,632,870

193,664

Total program

16,093,438

15,561,315

16,439,206

22,233,789

16,632,870

193,664

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $0.2M is explained by the following reason: new funding of $6.0M to support the provision of services in the territories in French and Indigenous Languages and ($0.2M) transfer to Indian Affairs and Northern Development for the Programs and Services Transfer Agreements for Indigenous languages to Self-governing Yukon First Nations. Lastly, there was a $5.6M in year-end surplus.

Development of Official-Language Communities Program

Name of transfer payment program

Development of Official-Language Communities Program

Start date

2009-10

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2008-09

Strategic outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.3: Official Languages, Sub-Program 2.3.1: Development of Official-Language Communities Program

Description

Pursuant to section 43 of the Official Languages Act, the Development of Official-Language Communities Program fosters the vitality of Canada’s English- and French-speaking minority communities and enables them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. The Program has three components. Through grants and contributions, the Community Life component supports the provision of activities and services for official-language minority communities by non-profit community organizations in various fields, particularly arts, culture, heritage, and youth. Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, this component also supports the provision of minority-language services by provincial and territorial governments. Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, the Minority-Language Education component supports the provision of provincial and territorial educational programs and activities in the minority official-language, at all levels of education. Through a contribution agreement with an independent public entity, the Language Rights Support component provides access to mechanisms to foster the advancement and clarification of constitutionally-guaranteed language rights. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Development of Official-Language Communities sub-program and Contributions to the Development of Official-Language Communities sub-program.

Results 2016-17

The Program continued to invest in core activities to improve access for official-language minority communities (OLMCs) to quality education and different programs and services, in their language in their communities.

The Program carried on with administration of grants and contributions to non-profit organizations to provide opportunities for OLMCs, as well as youth, to participate in activities related to arts, culture and heritage.

The Program continued to manage bilateral agreements with the provincial and territorial governments to offer OLMC members access to minority-language education and services in their community.

  • Enrolment in French and English as a second-language learning remained steady at 2.4 million in 2013–14, whereas enrolment in French immersion outside of Quebec reached 392,400 students, a steady increase of nearly 40% in 10 years. The same data shows that the provincial and territorial governments’initiatives and activities in minority language education continue to enable nearly 97% of OLMC members, aged 6 to 11 years old, who live within a 25 km of an elementary minority-language school and nearly 97% of OLMC members, of those same communities, aged 12 to 17 years old, who live within a 25 km of a secondary minority language school. These results are slightly above the target (95%) and below the 97.5% result from the 2006 Census, due to a more accurate calculation method being adopted.
  • The OLMC members continued to have access to programs and services in their language, in their communities. In fact, 86% of OLMC members were living within 25 km of a local or regional community development organization offering minority-language services and over 89% of OLMC members were living within 25 km of an arts and culture organization offering minority-language services.

The Program continued to support projects proposed by non-profit organizations and the provincial and territorial governments that have a lasting impact on the communities’ vitality and the use of the minority language.

  • Supported 641 projects with 446 community organizations and provincial and territorial governments.
  • The project, undertaken by Rendez-vous de la francophonie (RVF) in cooperation with the Canadian Foundation for Cross-Cultural Dialogue, emphasized the value of linguistic duality in Canada as a fundamental value shared by all Canadians. The only event of its kind, the RVF provided an opportunity to bring together 5.5 million people from across the country. Over a million people took part directly.
  • The project undertaken by Appartenances et rapprochements culturels par les arts (ARCA) created and implemented a grant program, managed by the Province of Manitoba, that helped Francophone organizations and community groups to have their communities benefit from art projects that promote concrete and active participation among members of the target community, or art projects that showcase Francophone artistic expression in a tangible way for all Manitobans.
Audits completed or planned

There were no audits conducted in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2012-13.The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Send call letters to client organizations and to provincial and territorial governments;

Inform client organizations on the application deadlines (Canadian Heritage website);

Offer grants and contributions to community organizations; and

Negotiate and administer agreements with provincial and territorial governments.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

6,691,936

6,556,111

33,322,973

9,557,992

9,557,992

-23,764,981

Total contributions

217,332,230

217,629,716

192,349,017

225,454,917

221,717,092

29,368,075

Total program

224,024,166

224,185,827

225,671,990

235,012,909

231,275,084

5,603,094

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $5.6M is due to incoming funding of $8.0M to support the provision of services in the Territories in French and Indigenous languages as well as a $1.0M in internal complementary funded projects. Remaining amount of $3.7M was lapsed. From within the program's authorities, ($23.8M) was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Enhancement of Official Languages Program

Name of transfer payment program

Enhancement of Official Languages Program

Start date

2009-10

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2008-09

Strategic outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.3: Official Languages, Sub-Program 2.3.2: Enhancement of Official Languages Program

Description

Pursuant to section 43 of the Official Languages Act, the Enhancement of Official Languages Program helps Canadians gain a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality, as well as an awareness of the constitutionally guaranteed language rights. The Program has three components. Through grants and contributions to non-profit organizations, the Promotion of Linguistic Duality component supports activities and projects to enhance official languages and unite Canadians, enhance the French language and culture in Canada, and increase the provision of services in both official languages from non-governmental organizations. Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, the Second-Language Learning component supports the provision of provincial and territorial programs and activities related to learning English and French, as second official languages, among young Canadians. Through a contribution with an independent public entity, the Language Rights Support component supports the provision of information and awareness activities among Canadians, especially those living in official-language minority communities, of language rights and the mechanisms for exercising those rights. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Enhancement of Official Languages Program and Contributions to the Enhancement of Official Languages Program.

Results 2016-17

The Program continued to help Canadians recognize and support linguistic duality as a fundamental value of Canadian society and to foster a mutual understanding and appreciation between English- and French-speaking Canadians.

  • Canadians continue to have a favourable opinion and an appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality. Thus, 70% of Canadians think that having two official languages in Canada is an important part of what it means to be Canadian, a higher percentage than in 2014-15 (62.4%).
  • The program continues to elaborate a free online service for learning and retaining English and French as a second language to enable all Canadians to develop their skills in their second official language.
  • The program supported the project I volunteer / Je m’implique in cooperation with Voice of English-speaking Quebec. In fact, the proposed activities recruited and involved volunteers from the English and French-speaking communities of the Quebec City region. The project offered volunteering opportunities where participants could practice and strengthen their ability to communicate in their second language, and to discover the value of bilingualism through community participation.

The Program continued to administer grants and contributions to non-profit organizations in support of initiatives that enhance official languages, unite Canadians and increase the provision of services in both official languages.

  • The Program supported 206 projects with 181 non-governmental organizations and provincial and territorial governments.

The Department funded three national language learning and development programs for young Canadians.

  • These official language bursary and assistant programs are administered by the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada.
  • The Explore programs provided 7,057 bursaries, and the Destination Clic Program provided 140 bursaries to enable young Canadians to learn or improve their second official language and enhance their first official language by learning about various communities in Canada.
  • The Odyssey Program enabled more than 300 young Canadians to work as second-language monitors schools across Canada or even as French first official-language monitors in minority schools across the country.
Audits completed or planned

There were no audits conducted in 2016-17. There are no audits planned at this time.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2012-13.The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Send call letters to client organizations and to provincial and territorial governments;

Inform client organizations on application deadlines (Canadian Heritage web site);

Offer grants and contributions to organizations for the promotion of linguistic duality and second-language learning; and

Negotiate and administer agreements with provincial and territorial governments.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

519,359

676,060

5,599,842

946,694

946,693

-4,653,149

Total contributions

116,353,219

117,791,291

105,923,289

117,322,428

117,322,428

11,399,139

Total program

116,872,578

118,467,351

111,523,131

118,269,122

118,269,121

6,745,990

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $6.7M can be mostly explained by the $6.4M in internal complementary funding for projects and by the new funding of $0.3M for Young Employment Strategy (Budget 2016). From within the program's authorities, ($4.6M) was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Multiculturalism Program

Name of transfer payment program

Multiculturalism Program

Start date

1982-1983

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-2015

Strategic Outcome

Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.4: Multiculturalism

Description

The Multiculturalism Program comprises a suite of policy, program, public engagement, public education and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada’s stance on diversity issues, grants and contributions are disbursed to successful funding applicants that seek to support the Multiculturalism Program’s objectives of building an integrated, socially cohesive society through enhanced intercultural/interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism also entails direct public outreach and promotional activities, designed to engage citizens and newcomers on multiculturalism issues (for example, Asian Heritage Month, Black History Month and the Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism). The Multiculturalism Program is also a locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions such as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Results 2016-17
  • The Inter-Action Multiculturalism Funding Program provided $1.5 million in grant payments and $3.5 million in contribution payments to support 315 initiatives that promote diversity and inclusion by encouraging positive interaction between cultural, religious and ethnic communities in Canada;
  • Inter-Action (Events Component) supported the organizational priority of Canada 150 by providing funding to the Carrefour jeunesse-emploi de Côte-des-Neiges for a collaborative project organized and produced by youth involving private sector and non-profit organizations. The project included an event in Montréal, which showcased 25 artists from diverse communities to celebrate Black History Month as well as an inter-active learning session on financial literacy;
  • With funding from the Project Component of Inter-Action, Equitas is offering a model of youth civic engagement nationally that is creating opportunities for positive youth interaction. Youth learn about the rights and responsibilities of Canadians, the importance of cultural diversity and values such as respect, equality, and acceptance, which underpin Canadian society. Youth also have opportunities to develop critical thinking skills, a sense of belonging and strategies to engage decision-makers and communities collectively on diversity issues;
  • The Project Component of Inter-Action also supported the ENSEMBLE project Empreintes citoyennes, which aims to sensitize, train and mobilize young people in the search of solutions to the problems of intolerance in their environment. Young people carry out concrete actions to improve intercommunity communication in their environment, promoting respect for diversity;
Audits completed or planned

There is an audit planned for 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation was completed in 2011-12.The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Posting program guidelines and application forms on website, as well as sending call letters to stakeholders.

The Department accepts applications for Inter-Action Events on a continuous intake basis.

* Note: Multiculturalism was transferred from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada November 4th, 2015. Multiculturalism was reported at the Program level at Canadian Heritage for the balance of 2015-16 and for 2016-17. Following this, Multiculturalism was integrated as a sub-program in 2017-18 under the Engagement & Community Participation Program.
Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants

0

653,971

0

2,371,607

2,371,598

2,371,598

Total contributions

0

1,961,377

0

5,394,522

5,394,321

5,394,321

Total program

0

2,615,348

0

7,766,129

7,765,919

7,765,919

Comment(s) on variance(s):
The overall variance of $7.8M is mostly explained by the $8.6M transfer from Citizenship and Immigration for the Grants and Contributions budget related to the Multiculturalism program to reflect the transfer of responsibilities to Canadian Heritage. From within the program's authorities, ($0.8M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Hosting Program

Name of transfer payment program

Hosting Program

Start date

1967

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

Canadians participate and excel in sport.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 3.1: Sport, Sub-Program 3.1.1: Hosting Program

Description

The Hosting Program is a key instrument in the Government of Canada’s overall approach to sport development in Canada and aims to enhance the development of sport excellence and the international profile of sport organizations by providing assistance for the hosting of the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. The Hosting Program offers Canada-at-large a planned and coordinated approach to realizing direct and significant benefits, from bidding and hosting projects in the areas of sport development, economic, social, and cultural and community impacts, across a broad range of government priorities. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions for the Games’ Hosting sub-program.

Results 2016-17

The Hosting Program provided funding to 78 International Single Sport Events. These events provided participation opportunities to over 6,901 Canadian athletes, coaches and officials.

The number reported was lower than previous years because at the time of the generation of this report, 17 of the 78 events had not yet issued their final reports.

The events also provided opportunities for at least 199 Canadians from underrepresented groups.

The number of underrepresented athletes will vary from year to year depending on the hosting cycles of major games for underrepresented groups such as the North American Indigenous Games. There were no major games focused on underrepresented groups during this reporting cycle.

Audits completed or planned

The last audit was completed in 2014-15

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation occured in 2015-16

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information through: the departmental website; formal written communication to current funding recipients and interested parties; and informal verbal and written communication between program officers and current funding recipients/interested parties.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total contributions

281,941,178

30,549,231

19,865,000

23,219,000

23,219,000

3,354,000

Total program

281,941,178

30,549,231

19,865,000

23,219,000

23,219,000

3,354,000

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $3.4M is mainly due to the travel expenditures of $3.9M related to the biennial Canada Games.

Sport Support Program

Name of transfer payment program

Sport Support Program

Start date

1961

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011–12

Strategic outcome

Canadians participate and excel in sport.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 3.1: Sport, Sub-Program 3.1.2: Sport Support Program

Description

The Sport Support Program is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Government of Canada’s commitments to the Canadian Sport Policy. Funding is aimed at developing athletes and coaches at the highest international levels; providing sound technically-based sport programming for all athletes; increasing the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport; and advancing Canadian interests and values in Canada and abroad. This funding is provided to eligible organizations in support of programming that supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions for the Sport Support sub-program.

Results 2016-17

Through the funding of the Sport Support Program, quality sport programs and services were delivered to 7,087,795 Canadians.

The Sport Support Program also provided strong policy leadership and governance support. In terms of funded sport organizations, 89% of them maintained of increased their overall organizational performance against the Accountability Performance Measures.

Audits completed or planned

The last audit was completed in 2009-10

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation occured in 2015-16

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information through: the departmental website; formal written communication to current funding recipients and interested parties; and informal verbal and written communication between program officers and current funding recipients/interested parties.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total contributions

147,701,601

148,895,558

146,315,064

146,856,428

146,856,428

541,364

Total program

147,701,601

148,895,558

146,315,064

146,856,428

146,856,428

541,364

Comment(s) on variance(s)

The overall variance of $0.5M is due to the $1.4M World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) payment and a ($0.5M) transfer to Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for research to inform policy development related to sport participation.

Athlete Assistance Program

Name of transfer payment program

Athlete Assistance Program

Start date

1971

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

Canadians participate and excel in sport.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 3.1: Sport, Sub-Program 3.1.3: Athlete Assistance Program

Description

The Athlete Assistance Program contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its support for improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events, enabling athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. To this end, the Program identifies and supports athletes already at or having the potential to be in the top sixteen in the world in their sport. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Athlete Assistance sub-program.

Results 2016-17

The Athlete Assistance Program exceeded its target for preparing Canadian high performance athletes to achieve podium level performance. In 2016-17, 419 athletes receiving AAP funding achieved a top 8 finish at the Olympics, Paralympics or World Championships.

The Athlete Assistance Program provided support to 699 current and formerly carded athletes so that they could pursue their academic goals by providing tuition grants.

Audits completed or planned

The last audit was completed in 2009-10

Evaluations completed or planned

The last evaluation occurred in 2015-16

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information to funding recipients and National Sports Organizations, through: the departmental website; formal written communication to current funding recipients and interested parties; and informal verbal and written communication between program officers and current funding recipients/interested parties. Other initiatives include: annual AAP review meetings with 85+ sport disciplines to review and confirm nominations for AAP support, review criteria for the coming year and other requirements; attendance at annual events, such as the AthletesCAN Forum or the Sport Leadership Conference in order to engage in formal and informal communication and consultation activities with sport leaders and AAP recipients or their representatives.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Planned spending
2016-17
Total authorities available for use
2016-17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2016-17 actual minus 2016-17
Planned)
Total grants

27,100,981

27,680,000

28,000,000

28,000,000

27,998,926

-1,074

Total contributions

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total program

27,100,981

27,680,000

28,000,000

28,000,000

27,998,926

-1,074

Comment(s) on variance(s)

Funding was fully spent as planned.

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