Results: what we achieved

Programs

Program 1.0: Defence Combat and Support Operations

Description

The Defence Combat and Support Operations Program delivers military power in combat, security, stability and surveillance operations in response to armed threats, or potential armed aggression, for the purpose of protecting Canadian sovereignty, upholding the values of Canadians, and defending the interests of the Government of Canada. Results are achieved through this Program by the application of Defence capabilities in domestic, continental and international domains, either independently or in combination with allies, where the primary focus is to inflict military effects against threats.

The term Defence capability is a collective term that refers to the ability of a military force to achieve a desired effect against a threat during the execution of a Defence operation (or the delivery of a Defence service) by executing tasks according to understood concepts, doctrine and standards. The military forces delivered by Defence are composed of force elements which are organizational entities that are in-turn composed of members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), and in some cases personnel from the Department of National Defence (DND).

Force elements integrate people, with specialized information and expertise, materiel (e.g., equipment, platforms, and weapon systems) and in some cases real property, so that capabilities can be applied against threats. Force elements have different sizes and compositions according to the capabilities they must apply during an operation.

This Program is underpinned by the National Defence Act, defence policy, international treaties and agreements, membership in international organizations, and direction received from the Government of Canada. The sub-programs beneath this Program target a range of threats across a variety of operational contexts via different delivery mechanisms in different geographic regions.

Results

All DND/CAF operations are only conducted as, and when, directed by the Government of Canada.

In 2017-18, the DND/CAF met its commitment to ensure Canada remains strong at home and secure in North America and engaged in the world. The DND/CAF worked closely with and provided support to federal partners in response to numerous domestic crises, maintained the defence of North America in partnership with the US through the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), and made a valuable contribution to international peace and security alongside allies in deployed operations around the world. The DND/CAF progressed Tri-Command continental defence initiatives in conjunction with NORAD and USNORTHCOMFootnote x including collaborative planning, exercises and staff talks.

The DND/CAF provided predictive, actionable intelligence to the Government of Canada through an improved intelligence production process that linked together daily and weekly verbal briefings with written daily reports and longer assessments that were better suited to the needs of decision-makers. This included new formats and a modernized look and feel with improved graphics. The first Integrated Mission Team was created, which strengthened the cooperation between all-source (entities which produce intelligence analysis from various sources) and single-source (entities which gather one type of information only e.g. signals intelligence) organizations with noticeable benefits in intelligence production. This achievement is an important element of Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE), in line with evolving defence intelligence priorities such as cyber and focusing on geographical locations such as Africa. The DND/CAF also expanded the strategic warning function in Canadian Forces Intelligence Command (CFINTCOM) and the broader Defence Intelligence Enterprise. This provides clear and concise communication about specific dangers to Canadian or Allied interests in sufficient time to provide a decision maker the opportunity to avoid or mitigate the impact of that danger, gaining recognition and appreciation from clients and partners. The DND/CAF leveraged technological advances and increased the resiliency against cyber threats.

Space effects continued to be fully integrated into all domestic and international operations via the Canadian Space Operations Centre (CANSpOC) and deployed forward Joint Space Support Teams. Unclassified Remote-Sensing Situational Awareness (URSA) systems provided support to international Task Force operations.

Conduct surveillance and control Canadian territory and approaches

SSE, released in June 2017, placed a renewed focus on surveillance and control of Canadian territory and approaches, particularly the Arctic region. This is a fundamental component of Canada's new approach to defence under the "Anticipate" and "Adapt" pillars. The DND/CAF are fully engaged with the United States on renewing our capability to surveil our Northern Approaches through the first-ever binational Analysis of Alternatives process. The research completed as part of this process, in concert with what is being done through the Canadian-led All Domain Situational Awareness project, will keep both governments informed of the options available to renew and improve capability currently provided by the North Warning System.

The CAF continued to maintain a year-round presence in Canada’s north through activities and was a host of joint exercises and sovereignty operations. This presence was maintained by Joint Task Force (North) (JTFN), the CAF’s northern headquarters in Yellowknife, NT, and the contributions of the Canadian Rangers in communities across the North. The CAF also conducted several exercises and sovereignty operations in the high, western, and eastern Arctic, for the purposes of:

  • Asserting Canada’s sovereignty in the region;
  • Strengthening CAF capabilities to conduct Arctic operations; and
  • Improving the CAF’s ability to work with government partners in response to Northern safety and security issues.

Operation NANOOK

Nunavut and Labrador: Operation NANOOK is the CAF signature Northern operation, which serves to reinforce the CAF as an expert and key partner in Arctic safety, security, and defence in Canada’s North. Through this activity, the CAF works to enhance its ability to operate in the North, while improving coordination among whole-of-government partners in response to safety and security issues. In August 2017, Operation NANOOK brought together nearly 900 CAF members, including Regular Force and Canadian Rangers, and civilian partners from all levels of government, as well as community members and other stakeholders.

In Nunavut, Joint Task Force (North) led activities focused on exercising the full range of crisis response and consequence management activities necessary to respond to an overwhelming emergency in an isolated community. A number of federal departments, agencies, and organizations participated, including Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, Parks Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Additionally, representatives from the Canadian Red Cross, the Government of Nunavut and the territory’s Emergency Management team, and the Hamlet of Rankin Inlet brought important perspectives to enrich the exercise.

In Labrador, Joint Task Force (Atlantic) led a response to a security scenario. Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) units engaged with communities along the McKenzie River, while conducting strategic small-boat operations in the region. The CAF conducted key leadership engagement events in Northern Quebec and Labrador communities, including Voisey’s Bay, Nain, Goose Bay, and Saglek, with representatives from government departments, as well as community and business leaders.

In addition to these engagements, the CAF coordinated Arctic activities in 2017 with the Canadian Coast Guard and Transport Canada to ensure broader surveillance and control of the Arctic and the maritime approaches to North America. The CAF also worked to advance bilateral defence relationships with key Arctic partners, including through discussions with Denmark’s Joint Arctic Command to enhance coordination on activities in the Eastern Arctic approaches where practicable.


Operation NANOOK

Members of 38 Canadian Brigade Group practice water maneuvers in an assault boat near Rankin Inlet, NU during Operation NANOOK on 18 August 2017.

Photo by: Corporal Dominic Duchesne-Beaulieu


Operation LIMPID

Operation LIMPID is the CAF mission to detect threats to Canada’s security as early as possible. In FY 2017-18, the DND/CAF worked with Marine Security Operations Centre partners to effectively track and surveil vessels transiting Arctic waters. With the support of our six regional joint task forces of Canadian Joint Operations Command, the CAF maintained a persistent physical presence in the North. The DND/CAF, through the Regional Joint Operations Centres in support of Joint Task Force Commanders, contributed significantly to the maintenance of the recognized maritime picture (RMP), which provides a comprehensive, recognized (i.e., fused, evaluated and publicized) interpretation of maritime activity within a geographic area and contributes directly to broader maritime domain awareness. Furthermore, we continued to count on the important contribution of our Canadian Rangers as our eyes and ears in the sparsely settled northern, coastal and isolated areas of Canada.

Description of figure follows

Ocean water breaks over the bow of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) EDMONTON while sailing in the Pacific Ocean during Operation LIMPID, on 16 August 2017.

Photo: Corporal Andre Maillet, Canadian Forces Combat Camera


Protect Canadians and Canadian interests against threats to North America

Maintain Canada’s strong commitment to NORAD

Canada continued to meet its commitment to the defence of North America by working in collaboration with the United States through North American Aerospace Defense (NORAD) to provide aerospace warning, aerospace control and maritime warning in the defence of our shared continent. Canada also continued ongoing efforts with the United States to ensure that NORAD remains fit for purpose in the face of the contemporary threat environment, by ensuring that we invest in the right technologies, have the right command relationship and tools to predict threats and protect our shared interests. The CAF effectively exercised and enhanced Canadian sovereignty; ensured the monitoring of Canada’s air, land and sea approaches; and delivered on Canada’s strong commitment to NORAD. Highlights from 2017-18 include:

  • Delivered on assigned domestic and continental missions to protect Canadians at home and ensure North America is secure;
  • Canadian Element NORAD personnel and resources operated from Deployed Operating Bases and Forward Operating Locations to ensure the CAF was prepared to execute the assigned NORAD missions against the spectrum of continental threats;
  • To test NORAD’s response to a variety of unknown aircraft flying in Canada and the United States, the CAF participated in binational AMALGAM ARROW, AMALGAM MUTE and FALCON VIRGO exercises;
  • To promote the NORAD Commander’s intent in Ottawa and enhance strategic coordination and collaboration, development work was completed to establish a NORAD Office within the National Defence Headquarters;
  • As part of NORAD Modernization, Canada’s defence policy SSE Initiative 111, the CAF continued with research and development investments in the All Domain Situation Awareness Science and Technology Program; and
  • Pan-CAF participation continued in the Canada-United States binational Northern Approaches Surveillance Analysis of Alternatives program to evaluate material and non-material solutions to replace the capability provided by the North Warning System.

Support to our partners in the fight against organized crime 

Operation MARTILLO and Operation CARIBBE

Operation CARIBBE is Canada’s contribution to Operation MARTILLO, a US-led Joint Interagency Task Force-South effort by the nations of the Western Hemisphere and Europe. Canada met its commitment to continue working with partners in the multinational campaign (Operation MARTILLO) to fight illicit trafficking by transnational organized crime in the Caribbean Basin, the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the coastal waters of Central America. Highlights from the FY 2017-18 include:

  • CAF aircraft, vessels, and personnel directly contributed to the US Coast Guard seizing or disrupting approximately 11.6 metric tonnes of illicit drugs this fiscal year. The CAF deployed two RCAF CP-140 Aurora maritime patrol aircraft and six RCN vessels on Operation CARIBBE. These vessels were on patrol for 200 days and included five maritime coastal defence vessels, HMC Ships SASKATOON, NANAIMO, MONCTON, EDMONTON and WHITEHORSE; and one frigate, HMCS OTTAWA.

Contribute to peace and security on the international stage

 Maintain Canada's strong commitment to NATO           

Canada’s commitment to NATO is ongoing and has no end date. Commitments include enabling the continuous focus on the implementation actions resulting from the North Atlantic Council and NATO Summit decisions and direction on improving transparency and accountability in resource management. In addition, Canada is committed to increased transparency and accountability in the deliberation of the Resources Policy and Planning Board (RPPB) and coordination of issues in the Budget, Investment, Military Committee's Working Group on Logistics and Resources (MCWG (L&R)) as well as Conference on National Armament Directors (CNAD).

The following NATO commitment activities occurred during FY 2017-18:

  • Five CAF members continued their contribution to logistical and headquarters support functions in Pristina, Kosovo on Operation KOBOLD; and
  • The designated Canadian Task Force Commander also served as the chief of the NATO Joint Logistics Operation Center.

Operation FREQUENCE

The CAF supported France’s mission using strategic airlift to move French military equipment and personnel between France and the Sahel region of Africa. This operation strengthens Canada–France partnership and interoperability between our forces. Operation FREQUENCE flights supported global efforts in the region against terrorism and enhanced regional stability and security. From January 2017 to August 2018, 195,700 pounds of cargo were transported in support of this mission.

Operation PROJECTION

During this deployment, the CAF’s Royal Canadian Navy deploys Ships to conduct training, exercises, and engagements with foreign navies and other international security partners, which took place in seven West African countries. Specifically, HMC Ships SUMMERSIDE and KINGSTON conducted a series of events to promote International Women’s Day. Sensitivity training was conducted with the ships’ companies prior to their deployment.

Operation REASSURANCE

The CAF continued to deploy personnel in Central and Eastern Europe, as part of NATO assurance and deterrence measures. These measures aim to reinforce NATO’s collective defence and demonstrate the strength of Allied solidarity.

  • In June 2017, Canada deployed a Land Task Force of approximately 455 personnel to Latvia: the Canadian-led NATO enhanced Forward Presence Battle Group Latvia was officially stood up during a ceremony at Camp Adazi on 19 June 2017 and became fully operational on 27 August 2017;
  • The Land Task Force (LTF) in Poland completed its three-year commitment as the LTF deployment transferred to Latvia, on 17 August 2017;
  • The RCN sustained the deployment of a Halifax-class frigate on a persistent rotational basis for exercises and operational tasks primarily with NATO’s Maritime Forces. The RCN provided 365 days of coverage with the deployment of HMC Ships ST. JOHN’s and CHARLOTTETOWN;
  • Periodically, the CAF sent a CF-188 Hornet Air Task Force to Europe to help keep NATO air space safe. From September to December 2017, about 135 CAF members and four RCAF CF-188 Hornets participated in Block 45 of NATO enhanced air policing in Romania;
  • The RCN sustained the deployment of a Maritime Task Force of 1 Frigate with an embarked RCAF CH-124 Sea King Helicopter Air Detachment;
  • From May to June 2017, Air Task Force-Iceland contributed to NATO Airborne Surveillance and Interception Capabilities to meet Iceland's Peacetime Preparedness Needs mission; during which six RCAF CF-18 Hornets provided a continuous air surveillance and interception capability; and
  • Air Task Force-Romania also conducted several activities in support of local communities, including delivering donations to an orphanage.

Operation REASSURANCE

Description of figure follows

The air detachment crew members aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Charlottetown prepare the recovery of the CH-124 Sea King helicopter into the hanger during Operation REASSURANCE on October 6 2017.

Photo: Corporal J.W.S. Houck, Canadian Forces Combat Camera


Conduct counter-terrorism in the maritime environment

Operation ARTEMIS

On 13 April 2017, Canada handed over command of Combined Task Force 150 (CTF 150) to France. This was Canada’s third time commanding CTF 150, the multinational maritime security and counter-terrorism task force located in the greater Middle East region. On 29 May 2017, the Government of Canada announced an extension of Canada’s contribution to the CTF 150 to 30 April 2021. The CAF continued to play a leadership role including the provision of a Commander and associated Headquarters staff every 2 years, the last rotation being December 2016 - April 2017. The RCN generated staff to augment the Australian led CTF 150 rotation, from December 2017 - May 2018.

Operation PASSEX

The CAF participated in two one-day PASSEX (training events where two or more navies rendez-vous at sea and conduct basic communication and maneuvering serials) events with the United States Coast Guard and Secretariat de Marina (Mexican Navy) on route to Operation CARIBBE deployments in the Eastern Pacific to meet its North American Maritime Security Initiative Pacific Exercise 2017.

Build relationships and engage with other nations

We maintained Operational Support Hubs (OSH) in overseas locations, which are selected with care to provide a safe and secure environment in an airport, or a seaport, or both that are capable of handling movements of people, materiel, equipment and supplies. The CAF continued to have OSHs in Europe, Kuwait, Latin America and the Caribbean and are in the process of establishing an OSH in the city of Dakar, Senegal in West Africa.

In FY 2017-18, the Military Training and Cooperation Program (MTCP) undertook approximately 100 cooperative training and military professional development projects in Canada and abroad, including courses, exercises, and expert visits. Through the MTCP, approximately 1,450 sponsored foreign participants, nominated by the ministries of defence of 56 developing non-NATO member countries, were trained via these activities. This allowed Canada's defence attachés, diplomats, senior civilian and military representatives to establish and maintain bilateral relations to support departmental and governmental aims and priorities.

Canada has increased engagement and presence in the Asia-Pacific region. In FY 2017-18, Canada continued to support peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula through engagement with the United States, Japan, Korea, and other partners. Moreover, Canada increased engagement with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations through hosting the Defence Officials Dialogue in Ottawa, and we cohosted the Peacekeeping Dialogue in Vietnam and a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence event with the Philippines in Manila.

The DND/CAF continued to work closely with Global Affairs Canada to ensure that DND/CAF priorities were and continue to be incorporated into the Government of Canada’s foreign policy objectives and global engagement on key issues.

Results achieved

Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016–17 Actual
results
2015–16 Actual
results
The application of Canadian Defence and Security capabilities continuously protects the sovereignty of Canada, the values of Canadians and the interests of the Government of Canada against risks imposed by armed threats. Percentage of Defence Combat and Support Operations that have successfully achieved their operational objectives. 90-100% March 2018 98.5% 98% 97%

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017-18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
1,204,608,692 1,204,608,692 1,799,231,651 1,722,029,393 517,420,701

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

  2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
Military – Regular Force 6,799 6,663 (136)
Civilian 964 802 (162)
TOTAL 7,763 7,465 (298)

Note: Planned figures may not add up to total due to rounding.

For more information on previous fiscal year results, see the Departmental Results Report on our Reports and Publications web pageFootnote xi.

Information on the department of National Defence’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xii.

Program 2.0: Defence Services and Contributions to Government

Description

The Defence Services and Contributions to Government Program aims to support the delivery of Canadian Government safety and security initiatives and encourage recognition and pride in Canada and the Canadian military. This is accomplished through the provision of unique Defence services in support of other elements of Government or the Canadian public.

To encourage and share pride and awareness of Canada’s military heritage, contributions, and leadership, Defence provides unique services and opportunities for outreach, awareness, preservation and development. Defence unique services also include operations conducted to ensure or enhance the security, safety, stability and/or well-being of Canadians, or international populations in peril, in accordance with Canadian values and the interests of the Canadian Government, in situations where there may be a need to defend against armed threats but where this is not the primary focus.

The operations are delivered through the employment of force elements to achieve a desired effect within specific contexts through execution of tasks according to understood concepts, doctrine and standards. The force elements delivered by Defence are organizational entities which are composed of members of the Canadian Armed Forces and in some cases personnel from the Department of National Defence. Force elements have different sizes and compositions according to the capabilities they must apply during an operation.

Defence remains consistently ready to employ force elements under this Program; however, significant operations do not always occur every fiscal year.

Results

All DND/CAF operations are only conducted as, and when, directed by the Government of Canada.

In FY 2017-18, the Defence Team met its search and rescue obligations and responded to natural disasters and humanitarian crises, where over 4,600 CAF troops helped Canadians as they recovered from floods and fires. In response to floods, the CAF evacuated community residents from Kashechewan First Nation and Mud Lake, Newfoundland; and, helped Quebec’s flood relief efforts in five regions. The CAF also assisted with flood relief in St. John, New Brunswick and in Ontario and with evacuations and managing the wildfire situation in British Columbia and northern Manitoba.

Respond to Coalition needs to dismantle and defeat Daesh

Operation IMPACT| Middle East

Canada extended its military engagement against Daesh in Iraq and Syria under Operation IMPACT until 31 March 2019.

Highlights from FY 2017-18 include the following:

  • Canada had approximately 20 personnel deployed periodically to Besmaya to provide counter–Improvised Explosive Device (IED) training to Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) under the NATO flag;
  • A Canadian-led Role 2 Medical Facility was operated in Erbil, Iraq to meet our commitment to provide lifesaving medical and surgical care to support Coalition forces;
  • Two RCAF Hercules aircrafts were deployed to support the movement of Coalition personnel and cargo/materials;
  • The CAF provided advice and assistance to ISF, supporting the liberation of Mosul and Hawija; and
  • Canada deployed Canadian Training and Assistance Teams to Jordan and Lebanon in support of regional capacity-building efforts.

Operation IMPACT | Middle East

Description of this image follows

Photo has been digitally altered for operational security. A Royal Canadian Engineer from the Explosive Threat Training Team (ET3) (middle) instructs Iraqi soldiers on how to use the hook and line kit during Operation IMPACT on November 28 2017.

Photo: Operation IMPACT, Canadian Forces Combat Camera


Support Ukraine to maintain sovereignty, security and stability

Operation UNIFIER | Ukraine

In collaboration with Global Affairs Canada, approximately 200 CAF personnel continued to provide capacity-building training in Ukraine, focused on areas such as small-team training, explosive ordnance disposal, military policing, medical training, and modernizing logistics. The Joint Task Force - Ukraine trained approximately 3,000 Ukrainian soldiers this reporting year in 40 training serials spanning all lines of effort. This engagement enabled Ukrainian forces to defend their country’s sovereignty and contributed to regional and international stability. On 6 March 2017, the Government of Canada announced the extension of Operation UNIFIER until the end of March 2019.

Canada hosted Exercise Precise Response

Canada hosted Exercise Precise Response in July 2017 at Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) Suffield, Alberta as part of the NATO Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) defence training. This exercise included 420 personnel from 11 nations which enabled:

  • The conduct of operations in a multinational task force construct;
  • The validation of operational mechanisms; and
  • The rotational lead nation for NATO's Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) to obtain the required training and certification for the role.

Make a meaningful contribution to peace operations

The DND/CAF has tracked opportunities for the deployment of the specific capabilities and accompanying personnel that were pledged at the United Nations Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial in Vancouver in November 2017. Through Operation PRESENCE, Canada will deploy approximately 250 personnel and up to 10 staff officers to the UN peacekeeping mission in Mali (MINUSMA), with operations starting in August 2018.

Operation PRESENCE

The CAF is supporting the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) with 56 contributing and partner countries in an effort to bring sustainable peace and stability to Mali and the Sahel. This is part of the Government of Canada’s overall efforts to help set conditions for durable peace, development, and prosperity in Mali. The core mission is providing MINUSMA with a 24/7 helicopter aeromedical evacuation capability in support of UN forces and in support of MINUSMA headquarters. When possible, the CAF provides transport for troops, equipment, supplies, and also provides logistic support to the mission. On 24 June, 2018, the first members of the theatre activation team arrived in Mali. For more information, please see the Operation PRESENCE – MaliFootnote xiii web page.

Operation RENAISSANCE

Internationally, the CAF supported Operation RENAISSANCE in response to hurricanes HARVEY in the US, and IRMA and MARIA in the Caribbean; capturing imagery of affected areas, providing airlift support to partner nations, and distributed humanitarian supplies within the area of operations. The CAF also transported humanitarian supplies from Canada to the British Virgin Islands and then brought Canadian Entitled Persons (CEPs) back to Toronto. As well, we supported France by transporting equipment and supplies from Bordeaux to Guadeloupe and then flew 66 CEPs from St. Maarten and the Turks and Caicos to Toronto.

The RCAF deployed 1 x CH-124 Sea King helicopter, 1 x CP-140 Aurora, 2 x CC-130J Hercules, and 1 x CC-177 Globemaster aircraft for short and long-haul transport in and to the region, and for aerial photography to survey damage on affected islands;

  • The Air Task Force evacuated about 300 people and transported about 847,000 lbs of cargo, and responded to the aftermath of the hurricanes;
  • The RCN deployed HMCS St. John’s; and
  • Canadian Joint Operations Command deployed a disaster command and liaison team from the 1st Canadian Division Headquarters.

Operation RENAISSANCE

A damaged building is visible on the island of Dominica during a reconnaissance activity as a part of Operation RENIASSANCE-IRMA, on 24 September 2017.

Photo: Master Corporal Chris Ringius, Canadian Forces Combat Camera


Additionally, in FY 2017-18, the DND/CAF participated domestically to Operation LENTUS, in response to British Columbia forest fires, and provided air lift evacuation of people from the First Nation WAWAKAPEWIN reserve in Ontario, and Operation ELEMENT, the CAF support to the influx of asylum seekers crossing to Canada from United State in the province of Quebec.

Operation ELEMENT

From 4 August to 12 December 2017, due to an influx of asylum seekers near Lacolle, Quebec, the CAF responded to a Request for Assistance, which resulted in the deployment of approximately 110 Canadian Army regular and reserve force members and 19 vehicles to establish accommodation infrastructure including tents, heaters and lighting. At its peak, there were 1,200 bed spaces available between two locations in Lacolle, Quebec and Cornwall, Ontario.

Operation LENTUS

From July to September 2017, the significant CAF commitment to British Columbia and Manitoba included support to firefighting operations, evacuation of residents, transport of first responders, delivery of supplies and aid to isolated communities. As a result:

  • The Canadian Army deployed over 2000 regular and reserve force members;
  • The RCAF employed 2 x CC-130J Hercules, 1 x CC-177 Globemaster III, 3 x CC-130H Hercules, 2 x CH-147F Chinook and 3 x CH-146 Griffon helicopters; and
  • The RCN made available / deployed 1 x CH-124 Sea King helicopter.

Our military members continued to provide support to United Nations peace support operations and other multinational endeavors in the Middle East through the following operations:

  • The CAF participated in the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO) for Operation JADE;
  • The CAF continued to contribute to its role in the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) in the Sinai Peninsula of Egypt for Operation CALUMET; and
  • As Canada’s contribution to the multinational counter-terrorism efforts in the Middle East, North Africa, and Southeast Asia, 16 CAF members continued to serve on Operation FOUNDATION.

Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) and Gender Perspectives

We have continued to work towards full integration and are incorporating Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) and gender perspectives into policy planning, execution and evaluation, as per UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and other related resolutions. Military and civilian employees undergo GBA+ training. The CAF has established Gender Advisors at the strategic level and at operational commands and Gender Focal Points are deployed on all named missions.  A network of Gender Focal Points have been implemented at the unit level. Ongoing directions on GBA+ and gender perspectives are included in Exercise and Operational Orders, guidance documents, reporting processes and lessons learned.

Work together to save lives – Search and Rescue 

In FY 2017-18, there were 9,281 search and rescue (SAR) cases, of which 2,069 cases had a final classification of 1 (Distress) or 2 (Imminent Distress). All joint rescue coordination centre SAR cases were conducted through to a conclusion or handover to an appropriate agency and all incidents were handled effectively.

The 2,069 cases generated 969 tasking for the RCAF air assets. SAR squadrons remained strategically located to provide the most effective response, including in the Arctic. There were 29 missions where a secondary SAR asset was tasked, and for 11 of those missions, the primary SAR asset was unable to complete the mission due to weather or serviceability concerns. In other cases, joint rescue coordination centers utilized assets of opportunity, including civilian aircraft and vessels that were available in order to resolve cases quickly and efficiently.

The RCN remained ready to respond to those in distress anywhere in Canada with a ready duty ship, which is constantly at 8 hours notice to move.

Enhance Canadian safety and security through Defence services 

Two key activities that contributed to the success of the department’s efforts to anticipate, prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from all kinds of hazards - natural, human-induced and technological were the following:

  • Working with governmental partners and accessing collaborative networks; and
  • Supporting innovators who can contribute science and technology (S&T) solutions to public safety and security challenges.

The department contributed S&T efforts that both enhanced and strengthened responses to natural, human-induced and technological threats through:

  • Bolstering science related to identification security (biometrics, facial recognition, etc.);
  • Exploiting data science applications for public safety and security purposes; and
  • Various efforts to counter extremism and terrorism.

Many of these efforts were conducted via the Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP), which funds collaborations within the Government of Canada and with external partners to develop knowledge and tools, and provide advice that will help protect Canada, its people, and institutions. Ongoing investments focus on enhancing Canada's resilience to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives threats; protecting our borders; enhancing the resilience of Canada’s critical infrastructure and cyberspace; and improving emergency response capabilities and interoperability. Ultimately, these investments provided Canadians with greater resilience to global and domestic public safety and security threats throughout the 2017-18 fiscal year.

Foster pride in our Canadian military heritage 

The DND/CAF provided support to events such as the 150th anniversary of Canada in 2017, along with the 100th anniversaries of Battles of Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele, and finally the 75th anniversary of Dieppe raid. The DND/CAF assisted in showcasing the Invictus Games as an important event in marking the 150th Anniversary of Confederation, while raising visibility of, and appreciation for ill and injured military members from all nations. CAF participation continued the legacy of CAF support to sporting events held at the national level in coordination with a Whole of Government approach.

Invest in our youth

The DND/CAF strengthened awareness and support for our Youth Program to reinforce recent organizational changes and prepare to close the renewal initiative for the Cadet and Junior Canadian Rangers programs. Highlights from FY 2017-18 include the following:

  • The department’s Youth Program (Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers) has been strategically reflected in the new defence policy, SSE, and to Defence’s Departmental Results Framework (DRF). This resulted in a dedicated SSE Initiative and the Departmental Result “Youth in Canada are provided with experience and opportunities that enable a successful transition to adulthood”;
  • A Chief of the Defence Staff directive was released on 2 February 2018. This directive will reinforce the control and supervision of the Canadian Cadet Organizations (CCO) and the command and control of the Cadet Organizations Administration and Training Service (COATS) Reserve Forces. Additionally, it will contribute to an effective and efficient CAF staffing and organizational structure; and
  • Although the Renewal of the Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers was formally closed-out as a Defence Renewal initiative, work continued in support of the third and final phase of the initiative; the implementation considerations of the many Renewal related recommendations and the preparations to adopt a management approach that is more focused on continuous improvement. This will ensure that our programs continue to be challenging, rewarding, safe and appealing, and that youth and their communities are strengthened by the benefits the programs offer.

Results achieved

Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016–17 Actual
results
2015–16 Actual
results
The application of Defence capabilities and services reduces the risk to the safety, security and prosperity of Canada, and to the stability of foreign populations. Percentage of Defence Service Operations and Defence Services that successfully met their objectives. 90-100% March 2018 100% 100% 99%

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017-18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
431,792,517 431,792,517 483,435,309 490,966,733 59,174,216

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

  2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
Military – Regular Force 1,433 1,327 (106)
Civilian 289 257 (32)
TOTAL 1,722 1,584 (138)

Note: Planned figures may not add up to total due to rounding.

Information on the department of National Defence’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase Footnote xiv .

Program 3.0: Defence Ready Force Element Production

Description

The Defence Ready Force Element Production Program produces and renews force elements on a continual basis for use in Defence Combat and Support Operations, as well as for the delivery of Defence Services and Contributions to Government, in order to increase the likelihood of success and decrease risk of failure in the defence of Canada and promotion of Canadian interests. Results are delivered by assembling force elements from the fundamental elements of Defence capability (i.e., military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and, in some cases, real property), and integrating them through various training and certification programs so that they have the requisite amount of readiness in order to fulfill predefined roles within the operations for which they are destined.

The term readiness refers to the volume, endurance, responsiveness and capability attributes of force elements that are not employed. These attributes are used to determine the degree of risk that would be associated with assigning them to fulfill perspective role(s) within on-going or contingency operations. The force elements produced by the Defence Ready Force Elements Production Program are organized into portfolios according to the maritime, land, aerospace and special operations environments in which they operate. There are also portfolios for force elements that operate jointly across these domains and force elements that provide common support functions.

Across these portfolios, force elements are produced to meet readiness targets. These readiness targets ensure that production can be sustained over short- and medium-term time horizons and that the number of force elements available for employment in on-going and contingency operations is in accordance with acceptable levels of operational risk.

Results

Ready our forces - improve agility and responsiveness 

In FY 2017-18, we completed 13 Science and Technology (S&T) projects that informed CAF leaders in preparation for international engagements and strategic discussions with Pacific Rim Chiefs of Defence Staff in Canada. In addition, the projects contributed to the design and implementation of a methodology to (1) assess the value of joint exercises to the DND/CAF, and (2) select a portfolio of joint exercises that provides the maximum value to the DND/CAF.

Royal Canadian Navy 

In the reporting period, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) ensured Canada’s naval force was a rapidly deployable, highly flexible and versatile instrument of national power that continually provided the Government of Canada with maritime defence options in support of national objectives. The RCN was postured to undertake and provide results against any of the eight missions assigned to the CAF through SSE, and satisfied, on time, each demand to globally deploy naval forces.

The RCN participated in numerous joint and inter-operability deployments which were crucial to maintaining the ability to command, join and integrate into large multinational naval forces. Of note were several significant operations and missions: FORMIDABLE SHIELD 17 demonstrated NATO’s ability to defend its members from ballistic missile threats while advancing interoperability in sophisticated command and control, tactical development and weapons firing; JOINT WARRIOR 17.2 focused on joint and combined training and interoperability in anti-submarine warfare, mine warfare and live-firing activities; participation of command and control staff in Operation ARTEMIS demonstrated Canada’s commitment to peace and security in the Middle East, while emphasizing the RCN’s ability to command multinational naval forces; Operation REASSURANCE, where the RCN ensured continuous presence for the entire reporting period by deploying HMCS CHARLOTTETOWN and HMCS ST. JOHN’s in succession, demonstrating Canada’s resolve and readiness to bolster NATO; and Operation PROJECTION, which represented excellent opportunities to gain readiness experience globally with Canadian partners while also imparting valuable experience through capacity building and training. Contributing to Operation PROJECTION, the RCN deployed two frigates to the Indo-Asian Pacific region, and two patrol vessels to West Africa, building experience in operating in these regions and enhancing relationships with partners and allies while improving overall RCN readiness.

In FY 2017-18, the RCN submarine service achieved a high degree of readiness, resulting in a powerful demonstration of Canada’s submarine capacity and proving the RCN’s ability to project naval strength. HMCS CHICOUTIMI completed a 197-day deployment in the Asia-Pacific region, marking the first Canadian submarine patrol in the region in 50 years. This signaled the strategic importance of the region to Canada, and showcased the RCN’s ability to operate with strategic partners. Demonstrating the RCN’s ability to simultaneously deploy two submarines in different operational theatres, HMCS WINDSOR was deployed in the Euro-Atlantic region, contributing to regional security and developing anti-submarine warfare skills with NATO allies. With the completion of the Halifax-class ship modernization, the RCN sustained 12 frigates, all of which have reintegrated into the fleet and have returned to a steady operational tempo. The interim Auxiliary Oil Replenishment ship, MV Asterix began operating with the RCN, mitigating a capability gap and enhancing naval at-sea fleet sustainment which directly enabled global readiness. Supported by its tremendous team of Regular, Reserve and Civilian personnel, in FY 2017-18, the RCN delivered combat effective naval forces ready to support Canadian interests at home and abroad.

Canadian Army

The Canadian Army (CA) is made up of Regular and Reserve Forces, Canadian Rangers and civilian personnel who work together to provide Canada with a reliable and responsive range of military capabilities that deliver decisive land power in the achievement of Canadian defence objectives. Through its Managed Readiness Plan, the Army’s flexibility and depth ensures it can scale its forces across the full continuum of operations. Throughout FY 2017-18, the CA remained ready to defend Canada and North America and to contribute to international peace and security.

Strengthening the Army Reserve (ARes) is a high priority for the CA in order to increase the Army’s readiness. To that end, during FY 2017-18, specific tactical tasks and responsibilities to establish a tangible operational contribution of the ARes were assigned, particularly addressing specific capabilities such as mortar, direct fire, and pioneers.

In addition to programmed training for operations in Latvia, Ukraine and Iraq, CA individual and collective training in FY 2017-18 established the conditions for the RCAF led mission in Mali. Domestic and international operations and exercises with our partners in the Arctic, South America, Europe, the Middle East and throughout the Pacific Rim were executed to enhance the ability of the CA to operate with allies on a global scale. The CA sought to better align foundation training, high-readiness training and interoperability training activities to SSE Ready Land Forces outputs; this initial work towards Departmental Results Framework (DRF) alignment established the basis for enhanced future measurement and reporting on the effectiveness and efficiency of training conducted by the CA.

During FY 2017-18, the CA had more than 20 projects in implementation that will deliver new or enhanced capabilities to the troops. Most notable are the following:

  • Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS), which will help address logistic fleet issues;
  • Light Armoured Vehicle III Upgrade, the backbone of the CA armoured vehicle fleet;
  • Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV), will provide much increased protection and mobility to various elements of the CA;
  • The Integrated Soldier System Project (ISSP), aimed at improving soldier performance through enhanced situational awareness, began delivery to depot; and
  • The New Canadian Ranger Rifle project completed final acceptance activities in March 2018, with subsequent delivery to depot.

Royal Canadian Air Force

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) continually ensures it is ready to defend and protect Canadian and North American airspace in partnership with the United States as well as contribute to international peace and security. Throughout 2017-18, the RCAF participated in multiple joint and/or combined exercises to maintain our immediate and high readiness forces. These exercises spanned the globe and tested the RCAF’s ability to support both domestic operations (i.e. NATIONAL SAREX (search and rescue exercise)), which tested the ability of our search and rescue (SAR) team to respond to scenarios involving water, land, mountain rescue, and major air disaster situations), and expeditionary operations (i.e. Exercise JOINT WARRIOR), which demonstrated the RCAF’s ability to work in a maritime environment. This included several NATO allies, and highlighted Canada's continued commitment to NATO. These exercises resulted in an Air Force capable of responding to a demand anywhere in the world, across the spectrum of operations. Further, the training conducted with other nations and coalitions, places the RCAF in a position where it can seamlessly operate with NORAD, NATO, the UN, and several other coalitions.

In addition to deploying full RCAF elements to train, the RCAF was active in the development of future training opportunities through deploying observers on international exercises, such as ULCHI FREEDOM GUARDIAN in Korea. These long term opportunities support the RCAF in maintaining its relevance in the ever changing global security environment, and will allow us to grow our reputation beyond our usual allies.

With regards to ensuring that the RCAF is equipped to effectively deliver on the full spectrum of operations, in FY 2017-18, the RCAF made significant progress in developing the CH‑148 Cyclones weapon system which is set to replace the CH-124 Sea King as Canada’s main ship-borne maritime helicopter. By January 2018, the RCAF had received eight CH-148 Cyclones in Block 1 configuration. Three CH-148 Cyclones in Block 2 configuration arrived at Shearwater starting in March 2018. The first round of aircrew conversion training was completed in 2017 for pilots at 406 Maritime Operational Training Squadron in 12 Wing Shearwater, Nova Scotia, in preparation for operational employment on the CH‑148 Cyclone.

The RCAF also continued to make progress on developing the capacity of its team by continuing its efforts to increase and accelerate training of technicians and aircrew. Maintenance capacity and related elements (documentation, software, etc.) continued to improve, providing better support to increasingly more complex deployed operations.

Additional key milestones in readying the RCAF were achieved in FY 2017-18, which include:

  • The CAF’s Sapphire satellite continued to contribute observations to the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN), improving space situational awareness; and 
  • The Polar Epsilon 2 project started construction of new receiver stations and upgrades to processing facilities in preparation for the RADARSAT Constellation Mission launch in the fall 2018 which will better inform the requirements for future surveillance from space capabilities, such as the Defence Enhanced Surveillance from the Space Program.

The RCAF worked closely with allied defence organizations to develop and implement coalition programs on Space Situational Awareness and Earth Observation. An interim ground station was established to ensure continued access to space-based Search and Rescue transponder signals. Moreover, Mercury Global Anchor stations continued to be built in Ottawa, Great Village and Esquimalt as part of the Mercury Global projects that aims to procure Military Satellite Communications terminals to connect deployed Headquarters with National Headquarters. The building of the stations involved a contract for Strategic Deployable Terminals that was awarded to General Dynamic Mission Systems Canada.

Special Operations Forces

Canadian Special Operations Forces Command (CANSOFCOM) maintained its role as a highly-skilled, multi-purpose force, prepared to operate domestically or abroad as individuals, small teams or larger force elements, into situations posing a threat to national interests. CANSOFCOM achieved success through the preparation and maintenance of very high-readiness forces and Command and Control of its operational activities around the Globe. CANSOFCOM contributed to National Defence’s priorities through long-term investment in equipment and infrastructure, by ensuring defence resource stewardship and affordability, and by investing in our people and strengthening the Defence Team.

CANSOFCOM maintained a global presence, deploying forces in the Middle East, in the Caribbean, Africa and South East Asia. Special operations forces engagements leveraged relationships with other government departments, allies and partners to ensure a coordinated and collaborative approach to realize Government of Canada National Security and Defence objectives. Global engagements over the last year have covered a wide variety of activities, to include contributions to multinational coalitions, capacity building through bilateral and multinational forums, key leader engagements, multinational training activities, as well as the maintenance of a strong international liaison network. CANSOFCOM continued to support the Global Coalition to Counter Daesh through the provision of a Special Operations Task Force dedicated to training, advising, and assisting the Iraqi Security Forces.

CANSOFCOM continued to meet its Force Development mandate by conducting activities that develop special operations forces (SOF) capabilities. CANSOFCOM also sponsored an ambitious Science and Technology / Research and Development program aimed at enabling, facilitating and supporting the development and acquisition of innovative technology, examples of which include stand-off chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear identification sensors, individual ballistic protection and new night vision technologies to serve SOF specific purposes.

Joint and common forces 

The DND/CAF met its commitment to maintain joint capabilities to ensure the CAF is able to meet the government’s defence expectations through advancements of our mission preparedness. In FY 2017-18, the main joint exercise conducted was Exercise JOINTEX. CAF members from 1st Canadian Division, RCN, CA and RCAF participated in exercise JOINTEX, a keystone CAF force posture and readiness activity to evaluate and confirm operational mission preparedness. The exercise was aimed at formalizing a new targeting capability within the CAF.

Other exercises of note that took place in FY 2017-18 include:

READY RENAISSANCE, conducted annually to prepare 1st Canadian Division Headquarters and assigned CAF units to deploy the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) on an international humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) mission.

VIGILANT SHIELD, conducted annually in conjunction with various US commands. The exercise concerns preparedness to work continentally in the Defence of North America and involves the coordination of planning and command and control amongst the involved headquarters.

Naval Exercise FORMIDABLE SHIELD 17 ran from 24 September to 17 October 2017. This exercise was an integrated air and missile defence (IAMD) task group where the task group successfully intercepted simulated missile targets proving NATO interoperability for collective defence. The exercise involved 14 vessels, 10 aircraft and approximately 3,300 personnel from eight nations.

The RCN and the RCAF participated in a Joint Littoral Training Exercise (JOLTEX 17). Surface-to-surface missile launch capabilities were exercised and the CAFs ability to identify, evaluate and prosecute threats, to meet the Chief of Defence Staff’s objectives that support the defence policy of Strong, Secure and Engaged continued to be developed.

The RCAF and the RCN participated in Exercise JOINT WARRIOR 17.2 off the coast of the UK on 30 September 2017. The exercise included several NATO allies which demonstrated Canada's continued commitment to NATO.

For more information on military exercisesFootnote xv, visit our web site.

Results achieved

Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016–17 Actual
results
2015–16 Actual
results
There exists a sufficient and balanced portfolio of operationally ready force elements that can participate in Defence Operations and deliver Defence services. Percentage of occurrences that Forces at High Readiness were available to respond when demanded, as tasked in Force Posture and Readiness (FP&R). 70-100% March 2018 96.5% 95% 95%

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017-18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
3,366,635,148 3,366,635,148 4,352,535,094 4,553,169,159 1,186,534,011

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

  2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
Military – Regular Force 24,580 24,953 373
Civilian 3,449 1,794 (1,655)
TOTAL 28,029 26,747 (1,282)

Note: Planned figures may not add up to total due to rounding.

Information on the department of National Defence’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase Footnote xvi .

Program 4.0: Defence Capability Element Production

Description

The Defence Capability Element Production Program aims to sustain Defence by producing and maintaining portfolios of the fundamental Defence capability elements so that they are continuously available in the appropriate quantity, combination and condition to sustain the chain of programs delivered by Defence, from the Defence Capability Development and Research Program through to the Defence Ready Force Elements Production Program.

These programs collectively give Defence the ability to conduct Defence Combat and Support Operations as well as deliver Defence Services and Contributions to Government.

The primary elements of Defence capability are military personnel, materiel and information systems, information, and real property. A fundamental focus of the Defence Capability Elements Production Program is to provide an adequate and sustained supply of individual military personnel and materiel in the near-term and over long-term time horizons so that they can be integrated to produce force elements within the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program.

Results are achieved through subordinate programs, each of which focuses on a separate portfolio: military personnel and organization; materiel; real property; or information systems. A lifecycle approach is used to manage each portfolio. The essential aspects of the lifecycle approach are sub-sub-programs that provide the principle lifecycle functions: introduction into service; maintenance, upgrade and supply; release from service; portfolio management; and overarching co-ordination and control. The character of activity that occurs within each of these primary functions depends on the portfolio of entities being produced and therefore the desegregation of the lifecycle functions into sub-sub-programs is unique to each portfolio.

The authority for this Program is derived from the National Defence Act and related Government direction, such as the defence policy.

Results

The Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) remain committed to providing a harassment-free workplace and one that promotes teamwork, mutual respect and fairness for all. The DND/CAF Harassment Prevention and Resolution Policy guides members and employees in preventing, addressing and resolving harassment situations.

Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services continue to offer a wide variety of ongoing essential services, programs and many activities at multiple locations, including family care programs, mental health clinics, recreation facilities, and community integration support to ensure that our troops, Veterans and their families are well looked after.

Improve military recruitment, training and retention 

Actions are taken, in accordance with Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE), with a view to achieving the goal of generating a force of 101,500 talented and diverse members who are prepared to meet the challenges of our rapidly evolving security environment.

As Employment Equity goals remain an integral and important part of all CAF recruitment initiatives, the CAF continued to focus efforts on attracting Canada’s diverse population and quality recruits from across the country. These recruitment measures and practices will help to ensure that an environment that promotes inclusiveness and fosters both personal and professional growth will be maintained.

Recruitment

New recruiting initiatives were implemented to improve our recruiting efforts, including the development and delivery of a targeted advertising campaign, aligned with Government of Canada departmental branding and communications directives. Key recruitment efforts and priorities have supported ongoing efforts to address recruitment deficiencies and improve the efficiency and transparency to applicants. All efforts have been underpinned by initiatives to ensure that hidden barriers to Employment Equity groups are removed.

Throughout FY 2017-18, the CAF remained focused on attracting new, quality applicants into military service with the intention to enroll desired applicants rapidly and efficiently. Recruiting efforts were successful in increasing the number of files for women applying to the CAF, as the overall percentage of women in the CAF increased to 15.4% at the end of the fiscal year.

During FY 2017-18, the Canadian Army (CA) assumed full responsibility for the recruitment of its Army Reserve (Ares) component in order to increase their effective strength. A more efficient recruitment process was put in place in order to complete the enrolment of recruits in terms of days rather than months. At the end of FY 2017-18, the number of recruits surpassed attrition in personnel and recruitment efforts continue to gain momentum.

Training

The Individual Training and Education (IT&E) system under the Modernization campaign continued to evolve. Ongoing efforts were and continue to be made to streamline initial training to better predict when a member can be expected to be qualified for their chosen occupation.

In August 2016, the Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) ordered a Special Staff Assistance Visit to the Royal Military College (RMC) of Canada in order to assess and understand the situation as a result of growing concerns with the prevailing climate at the college. The report made 79 recommendations which combined with an additional 11 CDS-directed items resulted in a total of 90 items for implementation. These items have been grouped into the following seven lines of effort: Student Life; Staff; Training and Leadership; Governance; RMC Specific; Support; and Policy. Working groups were convened and the majority of the recommendations (54 of the 90) were actioned in the first year. The remaining 36 items are in progress but are constrained by institutional processes which require multiple years to fully implement (such as establishment changes, infrastructure, finance, policy etc). In addition, the CAF has accepted and is addressing all 7 related recommendations made by the Auditor General in the 2017 Fall ReportFootnote xvii on the Royal Military College of Canada.

The department continued to focus on the digitization and alignment of Personnel Generation Requirements, IT&E control documents, Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR), and efficiency enhancements to the Defence Learning Network and delivery. The intent is to integrate the IT&E solutions with Military Command Software to provide the visibility and connectivity to support defence analytics and Defence’s Departmental Results Framework.

Retention

Work is ongoing to monitor and evaluate all aspects of CAF attrition for both the Regular and Reserve forces, which will allow DND to better inform senior leaders of the best options for retention initiatives and strategies. This will ensure CAF members remain qualified, competent and motivated, with a final goal of reducing unhealthy attrition and improving career management, family support, mental health and wellness support to our members.

The department continued to support military spouse career development through the Military Family Services Program, including online career training and resources, entrepreneurship development and online career counseling services. Development of the Comprehensive Military Family Plan has begun and will help ensure spouses have adequate resources and support to sustain ongoing careers with the aim of encouraging retention of our CAF members by reducing the financial burden created by a one-income household.

Foster an inclusive and respectful workplace

Implement the CAF diversity strategy

The research on attitudes towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, queer, and 2-spirit (LGBTQ2S) members commenced with the expectation that the results would be available in 2 years’ time. The Action Plan of the CAF Diversity Strategy was put in place during FY 2017-18. The Action Plan is one of the tools used to understand and promote diversity and inclusion as a core institutional value across the CAF.

Address and eliminate harmful and inappropriate sexual behaviour 

Operation HONOUR

Operation HONOUR is the CAF operation aimed at eliminating harmful and inappropriate sexual behaviour, while enhancing support to victims as a key institutional priority, and will remain so indefinitely. The CAF have expanded support programs to include better liaison and access to subject matter experts from initial care to reporting throughout any investigation and legal processes, to the end. Victim support services have been enhanced through the first-ever dedicated independent support centre for CAF members through the Sexual Misconduct Response CentreFootnote xviii(SMRC), which launched 24/7 services on 24 July 2017. The SMRC also has a Military Police Liaison Officer who can provide advice and inform the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS) for potential investigative action by specialized teams of investigators with the Sexual Offence Response Team (SORT) where, or as warranted. Victims are supported in a confidential manner in line with leading best practices across the country.

Research, Performance Measurement, Education and Training are ongoing and are critical to the CAF’s efforts to create a culture of dignity and respect for all. Extensive internal and external research and data collection was conducted, as well as tracking and analysis of incidents, with plans to implement a follow up Statistics Canada Survey with the CAF in the fall of 2018. Several successful education and training products were developed and implemented to increase awareness, enhance response and help create the foundation for prevention and the desired culture change. A mobile application “Respect in the CAF” was rolled out in July 2017 to provide readily available and easily accessible tools and information for awareness, understanding, support, response and prevention.

Support health and wellness

Develop a suicide prevention strategy

The CAF and Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) Joint Suicide Prevention Strategy was officially announced on 5 October 2017. This joint strategy includes guidelines for CAF/VAC collaboration along seven lines of effort and leverages existing programs, projects, and initiatives (e.g., Mental Fitness and Suicide Awareness training offered by Health Promotion) to reduce risk factors, and build resilience in the CAF and Veteran communities.

Improve the transition to civilian life - working with Veterans Affairs Canada 

Work is on-going to improve the support given to all CAF members as they transition from military to civilian life. DND is collaborating with VAC to implement the new transitional support, while also strengthening the relationship between our two departments. Work also continued toward renewing the Joint Personnel Support Unit (JPSU) in order to create a new CAF Transition Group. An extensive review of Veteran's financial benefits and the system under which they are administered has been undertaken, which will enhance our ability to better anticipate the future needs of transitioning CAF members, Veterans, and their families while upholding the principles of care, compassion and respect.

Ensure Canada’s military is well-equipped 

The DND/CAF continued to acquire and support the materiel and equipment required by the CAF to ensure that Defence materiel capability elements are available in the quantity, mix and condition needed to support operations and to achieve force posture and readiness requirements to protect and defend Canadian sovereignty, North America, and our allies.

In addition, with regards to specific equipment, Defence continues to actively work with the Australian Government to purchase 18 Australian F-18 fighter aircraft to supplement the fleet of RCAF CF-18 fighter aircraft until the permanent replacement is in place and fully operational.

Improve Defence procurement

The Minister of National Defence continued to collaborate with Public Services and Procurement Canada to streamline defence procurement. Phase 2 of the Increased Contracting Authority for National Defence is being rolled out to procurement staff and planning for Phase 3 of transfer of authority is underway.

In FY 2017-18, the department made advancements in professionalizing the procurement workforce. On-line courses in Materiel Management reached over 20,000 learners. There were 3 Project Management Professional Development seminars organized during the fiscal year with the goal of facilitating informal learning and professional development based on current project management trends. Approximately 300 project management practitioners and procurement staff attended each of these seminars. Formal masters’ level university studies in Complex Project Leadership and certificate-level university studies in Complex Project and Procurement Leadership were sponsored for DND procurement staff. There were 52 Project Management Competency qualifications awarded, for a total of 442 qualified individuals within DND by end of that year.

The department fully launched the tri-departmental Sustainment Initiative involving Defence, Public Services and Procurement Canada and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada to provide innovative solutions to the in-service support of equipment fleets. Participating departments co-signed a joint statement to practitioners outlining the significant milestones and successful pilot programs achieved to date under the Sustainment Initiative.

Deliver real property programs and services

DND has developed and implemented Real Property systems, processes and strategies based on the Infrastructure Environment Business Modernization project. We have implemented the Infrastructure Environment Resource Information System that ensures the correct support mechanisms are in place to manage, monitor and evolve functionality. We have also developed an integrated platform that enables multiple users to share data for multiple business purposes. The Real Property Spatial Data Warehouse is a central repository and system of record for DND land, infrastructure, and building data with a series of tools for validating, populating and visualizing the data.

Additionally, DND has developed a service strategy outlining our commitment to achieving excellence in service delivery. The strategy articulates the services we provide, the people we serve, how service management is governed, delivery, and how results are measured.

Optimize portfolio usage and assets

DND exceeded its target of the percentage of real property assets portfolio which is reduced in a timely manner, indicating positive movement towards the completion of our goal.

DND continued its work to deliver on its commitments including working to modernize defence infrastructure to improve affordability and sustainability, meet new capability support requirements, reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), and support military personnel through a number of programs:

Federal Infrastructure Investment Program (FIIP) projects that contributed to supporting the troops and families and reserve forces, health and safety, and support to CAF military operations, included:

  • Approximately 100 residential housing units (RHUs) constructed and 1,300 RHUs renovated;
  •  $130 million was invested in 86 armouries across the country;
  • 16 airfield and hangar projects were completed;
  • $55 million was invested in Health and Safety projects;
  • A new Peace Support Training Centre was built in Kingston and an Ammunition Transit Facility in Borden; and
  • The construction of a new Health Centre in Cold Lake is well advanced because of FIIP funding.

Infra2016 2-year stimulus program spearheaded by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat:

  • $65 million invested in assessment and remediation projects;
  • 50 million (rounded figure) invested in military housing recapitalization and betterments; and
  • 41 residential housing units (RHUs) were constructed.

Energy Program:

  • Smart Buildings Initiative launched with the National Research Council;
  • Feasibility studies for new Energy Performance Contracts at CFB Greenwood and CFB Esquimalt were finalized; and
  • A $24.8 million Energy Performance contract was executed for CFB Petawawa; collectively anticipated to reduce DND’s GHG emissions by nearly 13,000 tonnes/year.

Unexploded Explosive Ordnance (UXO) project:

  • Schools Program – outreach at 30 schools in Vernon, Churchill, Calgary, and Lac St. Pierre to educate and provide safety awareness to those living in or near UXO affected areas;
  • Community outreach in Vernon (Armstrong Fair), and North Vancouver (former Blair Rifle Range); and
  • 43 Confirmed UXO affected sites.

Contaminated Sites:

  • 255 contaminated sites were identified by the department where action is required;
  • 149 sites were closed as they were either remediated or assessed to confirm that they no longer meet all the criteria required to record a liability; and
  • The departmental contaminated site estimated liability was reduced by 8% based on the recorded liability of FY 2016-17.

Renew nation-to-nation relationships with Indigenous peoples

During the reporting period, DND increased its focus on renewing the nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous peoples. Additional resources and increased effort were dedicated to activities that support reconciliation. These activities included a focus on implementing modern treaties, fulfilling the duty to consult with Indigenous communities and opening the door to a wider array of discussions with our Indigenous partners.

DND works closely with Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs (CIRNA) when modern treaties are negotiated with Indigenous communities. Key DND interests include access (for both harvesting on DND lands and for DND access to Indigenous lands), and land selection in the treaty process. DND supports CIRNA with all treaties under development, but was directly involved in 13 negotiations.

In 2017-18, DND became directly involved in 16 Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination (RIRSD) discussions. At these tables, Canada and Indigenous groups explored new ideas and ways to reach agreements that will recognize the rights of Indigenous groups and advance their vision of self-determination for the benefit of their communities and all Canadians. For example, DND and the Canadian Army held positive discussions with the Tl’esqox to discuss their interests in the Chilcotin Military Training Area.

Also in 2017-18, DND worked with Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs to deliver training across the country focused on engaging and consulting with Indigenous communities. This training provides participants with an understanding of Aboriginal and treaty rights, how these rights intersect with the mandates of DND/CAF, and how to respect these rights.

DND consults with Indigenous communities for a variety of reasons. During 2017-18, DND met on an ongoing basis with the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations to discuss the disposal of Royal Roads in Colwood, British Columbia. DND also held several negotiation meetings with the Tsuut’ina Nation and Okanagan Indian Band in relation to their respective claim related to unexploded explosive ordnance on their reserve lands. The parties are still negotiating.

Consultations between DND and the Treaty One First Nations led to an Agreement in Principle being reached in March 2018 for the planned sale and transfer of the Kapyong Barracks property. DND continues to work closely with the Treaty One First Nations to develop and ratify a Final Settlement Agreement for the Kapyong Barracks.


Exercise guidance and leadership

In FY 2017-18, Defence launched the Defence Energy and Environment Strategy (DEES), through which the department continues to contribute to the Government of Canada’s Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and to exercise leadership to support Canada’s vision for sustainable development. The DEES marks a new integrated policy perspective on energy, as a strategic capability, vital for DND’s domestic and deployed operations, and environmental issues. Consisting of 18 energy and environmental targets, the DEES provides a common vision and goals to help Defence better manage energy and the environment. The DEES sets out DND’s plan for meeting the federal greenhouse gas emissions target of a 40 percent reduction below 2005 levels by 2030. As of FY 2017-18, DND has reduced its departmental greenhouse gas emissions by 31 percent and the department is well on its way to achieving the 2030 target.


For details on the DEES, please see the full strategy on the following websiteFootnote xix .

Improve service delivery for Canadian Armed Forces housing 

In June 2017, the Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) approved a renewed operational requirement for military residential housing confirming the ongoing need for housing at all Base/Wing locations in Canada. As a result the Canadian Forces Housing Agency (CFHA) is establishing a housing requirement (number of housing units) for each location based on the CDS’ operational requirement for housing. The housing requirement will form the basis for the updated investment plan for military housing.

In support of Canada`s defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE) the CFHA accelerated the development of its long-term residential accommodation plan to meet the operational requirement and accommodation policy.

Infrastructure improvements, including military housing, were identified as a priority in Budget 2016, including Infra2016 funding listed in the “Optimize portfolio usage and assets” section of this Program’s results. As of July 2018, the CFHA’s housing condition data showed that 86.9% of the housing units assessed are rated at average or better condition.

Ensure Canada’s military is well supported by information systems

During FY 2017-18, the Defence IM/IT Programme maintained strategic and operational level command and control of information systems in support of both, domestic and deployed CAF operations. Reliable IM/IT was delivered within the National Capital Region and to designated client groups and met its commitment to IM/IT capabilities outlined in the departmental plan. Highlights from FY 2017-18 include:

  • The Cyber Division organization and command and control structure were established to continue the evolution of operational IM/IT capabilities in support of cyber activities;
  • Essential services were established in accordance with operational priorities and new cyber and joint communication information system capabilities were designed and implemented;
  • Initial operating capability and expenditure authority were achieved, along with entering the optional analysis phase for two capability projects;
  • Work advanced on 53 IM/IT projects under $5M including new, legacy and in-flight capabilities;
  • Ten projects were effectively delivered and are now in use; and
  • Testing and evaluation was conducted on many commercial products to validate their features and their merit for potential future deployment on the various DND/CAF networks and services.

A new organization has been created to assist the DND/CAF in evolving towards a culture that facilitates evidence-based decision making and will therefore evolve an essential business intelligence and analytics capability under Defence Program Analytics. With coordinated effort, the Defence Team will adopt an enterprise approach to drive analytics implementation throughout the DND/CAF to better enable performance management at all levels to ensure SSE delivery.

The Defence IM/IT Programme governance, noted in the Defence RenewalFootnote xx plan, has been completed and met all the intended objectives. Committees and processes were put in place to support and determine the highest priority IM/IT capability requirements and to enable their completion through direction and investment towards IM/IT initiatives, projects and activities. IM/IT improvements have been institutionalized and the focus is to continuously improve.

Ensure defence safety, protection and security

The CAF ensured activities were conducted safely throughout Operation/Mission Orders as per safety requirements, direction and guidance included for each exercise. The level of risk associated for all activities continues to be identified and discussed with leadership prior to a decision. The process is further supported via in-theatre visits, as required. The CAF continued to ensure force protection levels were appropriate to the threat environment and were directed and implemented accordingly.

Nuclear Safety

DND fulfilled Health Canada’s expectation for radon testing of buildings and Residential Housing Units (RHUs) were performed and resulted in less than 1% of the portfolio requiring remediation.

Fire Safety

DND/CAF have a strong fire safety program in place to protect their infrastructure, personnel and equipment from fire risks and to preserve operational capabilities. DND reports on this program through the Defence Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report.

Improvised explosive device disposal

The Canadian Armed Forces Joint Counter Explosive Threat Task Force on behalf of the CAF functional authority, and the Commander of the Canadian Army, supported the United Nations (UN) Department of Peacekeeping Operations by hosting and participating in several writing boards to develop new UN Counter Improvised Explosive Device[s] (CIED) manuals and training materials. We also implemented those materials by supporting pre-deployment training of personnel from various Troop Contributing Nations.

1974 Valcartier cadets grenade incident 

The DND/CAF continued to provide support to the victims of the 1974 Valcartier cadets’ grenade incident. DND has ensured eligible individuals have received details of the financial recognition application process and  health care support available to them and how it may be accessed. The CAF remain highly engaged in coordinating the financial recognition and health care for eligible members who currently require support. An updated letterFootnote xxi from the Minister of National Defence was released in April 2018.

For additional information, please refer to the following links:

Results achieved

Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual
results
Suitable Defence capability elements are available in a mix and condition that enables Defence to be prepared for and execute operations. Percentage of Defence Capability Elements that are suitable to Defence needs. 90-100% March 2018 85.61% 85% 83%

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)

12,805,778,437

12,826,660,194

15,912,486,736

15,075,983,869

2,249,323,675

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

   2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
Military – Regular Force 32,134 31,945 (189)
Civilian 15,919 16,353 434
TOTAL 48,053 48,298 245

Note: Planned figures may not add up to total due to rounding.

Information on the department of National Defence’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase Footnote xxv .

Program 5.0: Defence Capability Development and Research

Description

The Defence Capability Development and Research Program seeks to provide the analytical bases and knowledge to anticipate foreseeable changes in the threat and security environment and to determine the associated demand for Defence capabilities across near- and long-term time horizons in order to enable evidence-based strategic decisions that align the introduction, modification and divestment of Defence capabilities and guide the application of existing capabilities with an acceptable levels of risk.

Results are achieved by: establishing and monitoring the fulfillment of near-term targets for readying force elements and conducting Defence operations; identifying lessons from past operations; assessing defence and security trends; developing and integrating new knowledge and systems/methods for conducting operations; developing approaches and conducting Defence capability analyses at strategic, operational and tactical levels; present to future capability assessments; designing and assessing defence alternatives; providing Defence capability oversight and expertise; and Defence capability use planning for sustainable Defence capabilities in future time horizons.

As such, this Program sustains Defence by providing key products and services to the Defence Capability Element Production Program, the Defence Ready Force Element Production Program and parts of the Defence Combat and Support Operations, and Defence Services and Contributions to Government programs.

This Program also directly enables the management and oversight of Defence as a whole.

Results

During FY 2017-18 the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) have:

  • Developed a tool to optimize investment portfolios to deliver the best value for money;
  • Identified candidate areas across the organization that provide the best value for the Capital Investment Program Plan;
  • Implemented software to support SSE Investment Plan Change Proposals; and
  • Designed a process to determine how to allocate resources for the Defence Team Establishment Plan in an environment of changing requirements and priorities.

In support of emerging requirements identified by the Chief of Defence Staff (CDS), 26 strategic analysis reports were produced in FY 2017-18. On the basis of these studies and in combination with strategic estimates as well as intelligence and policy inputs, the CAF produced the 2018 Strategic Outlook that formed the basis for the 2018 CDS Force Posture and Readiness (FP&R) Directive. Additionally, the readiness states for all CAF named operations underwent an extensive review and reissue of the FP&R directive, which went into effect in early 2018. DND used the Capital Investment Program Plan Review to further streamline the Defence procurement process and make improvements to the Defence Acquisition Guide to better ensure the delivery of the right equipment to the Forces and the creation of economic opportunities and jobs in Canada.

Develop new capabilities - cyber and space

DND supported Public Safety Canada throughout the development of their new National Cyber Security Strategy. This included attending meetings and providing input to their draft strategy and associated initiatives. Additionally, we have:

  • Provided support in the investment for new capabilities for Space Situational Awareness by providing technical advice;
  • Provided assistance in the evaluation of Cyber Security tools for major cyber operational capability development projects;
  • Provided a demonstration of novel Science and Technology (S&T) cyber and cyber-electromagnetic activities (CEMA) tools;
  • Contributed to the development of new national-level cyber protection tool; and
  • Optimized Information Operations and Cyber security activities through research and development opportunities.

 Focus on surveillance and control of Canadian territory - Canadian Rangers 

We continued to focus on improving the surveillance and control in Canada's North by leveraging the Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security Program (IDEaS), to seek S&T solutions to address human performance in extreme climatic environments. The Canadian Army (CA) conducted a review of the Canadian Rangers, and have created a plan for potential growth over the next 5 years which will include a continuous review of the force structure of the Canadian Rangers as well as other capability enhancements.

Foster innovation through defence research and development

The CAF worked to identify risks pertaining to the introduction, preparation, application, modification and divestment of Defence capabilities in both the near-term and long-term horizons. In FY 2017-18 we:

  • Completed the design and development for the Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security Program (IDEaS), which was launched on 9 April 2018 alongside a first Call for Proposals for Competitive Projects;
  • Provided evidence-based recommendations for small arms modernization and improving soldier system effectiveness;
  • Improved the understanding of threats and opportunities from semi-autonomous and autonomous systems;
  • Improved our ability to use aerial intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) sensors along with unattended ground sensors (UGS) to enhance our all-source intelligence capability with a goal of delivering timely information to tactical Commanders;
  • Improved the ability to detect and mitigate explosive hazards, improved the protection of assets to conduct operations;
  • Proposed new operational concepts, assessed new land tactical weapons and capabilities, and explored the use of simulation in complex urban operations; and
  • The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) formed the Maritime Innovation Team (MIT) in fall 2017. MIT is responsible for the formulation of the RCN Innovation Program as part of the Defence Innovation Program. The Program seeks innovative solutions to address challenges faced by the RCN in the evolving security environment.

A great deal of progress was made in FY 2017-18. DND/CAF leadership continued to actively support significant Warfare Experimentation initiatives such as Joint Targeting. Other achievements include support to contingency plan development; and, interoperability initiatives such as the NATO Coalition Warrior Interoperability Experiment (CWIX) and the Joint Arctic Experiment. The RCN improved complex project management capability through advanced education and internal training which promoted all counterparts to consider alternatives to close capability gaps.

In FY 2017-18 the RCAF established the ‘Flight Deck’ in Kitchener-Waterloo. The Flight Deck is an innovation lab managed by the Royal Canadian Air Force Aerospace Warfare Centre (RAWC) that helps the RCAF in three key areas:

  • Problem Solving and Training. RAWC managed regular basecamp sessions and five sessions were completed in FY 2017-18;
  • The Flight Deck allowed the RCAF to interact with Canadian Technology Companies. The RCAF worked face-to-face with companies in Kitchener-Waterloo to solve technological problems. RAWC supported two start-up companies by sponsoring them through the Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP); and
  • The Flight Deck allowed the RCAF to engage with the Next-Generation Workforce. Six co-op students were hired to develop software solutions and assist basecamp participants with web-based software support.

Several research and development efforts that were implemented by Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) that contributed to force development, generation, readiness and employment in support of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) operations including the following:

  • Developed new force planning scenarios, improved tools for capacity to improve analysis and evaluation of serious gaming techniques;
  • Developed a Canadian Joint Capstone Concept to provide context to force development activities;
  • Worked with the Canadian Forces Warfare Centre (CFWC) and conducted a command post experiment (JNEX 2) with 50 participants resulting in the integration of additional considerations in offensive cyber operations in the CAF joint targeting cycle; and
  • Developed and tested a Collateral Effects Estimation (CEE) Framework.

Additionally, a Maritime Vignette List and Platform Capacity Tool was developed to evaluate various fleet mix options. Demonstrations occurred engaging Slow Moving Airborne Targets. Three different Rotary Targets were trialed and resulted in increased inventory of Training Airborne Targets.

Bolstering Expert Outreach

In 2017-18, DND launched efforts to implement SSE Initiative 73 which calls for increasing investment in a revamped and expanded Defence Engagement Program (DEP). The DEP is designed to engage Canadian and international academics and experts, in order to provide a flexible means for DND to receive timely and relevant policy advice on defence and security issues. During 2017-18, the Program began work on the expansion of existing activities, such as its Targeted Grant Program and Expert Briefing Series, and the trialing of new program elements, such as scholarships and collaborative networks.

Incorporate gender perspectives into Defence planning

DND/CAF has incorporated gender perspectives as a key consideration into all policy development, procurement and planning. It has established Gender Advisory capability throughout the department and has established and implemented the Joint Responsibility Centre (JRC) whose function is to ensure GBA+ is implemented throughout the department. All deploying personnel are required to complete GBA+ training in support of UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 and integration of gender perspectives.

Canada’s National Action Plan progress and reporting has occurred for the first year of release of the plan. Staffing is on-going in order to ensure capacity for integration of GBA+ throughout the wider CAF institution by 2019. 

Results achieved

Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual
results
Defence stakeholders are aware of risks pertaining to the introduction, preparation, application, modification and divestment of Defence capabilities in both the near - and long-term horizons. Percentage of score on the Defence Capability Development and Research Evaluation Index. 81-100% March 2018 N/A* 90% 85%

Note: N/A* due to change from Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) to the Departmental Results Framework (DRF) planning numbers by PAA are no longer produced.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
395,158,296 395,158,296 479,156,958 540,487,891 145,329,595

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

  2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
Military – Regular Force 1,038 941 (97)
Civilian 1,410 1,484 74
TOTAL 2,448 2,425 (23)

Note: Planned figures may not add up to total due to rounding.

Information on the department of National Defence’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xxvi.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

Financial Management and Planning

The Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) have met its commitment to develop a more effective funding strategy for Defence. The Defence Investment Plan was approved by the Treasury Board Secretariat in February 2018 and was publicly released in June 2018. The Investment Plan provides visibility into planning and management of Defence investments. It includes all approved capital projects under Canada’s defence policy. It will be refreshed annually and approved by the Treasury Board every 3 years. This will help Canadians understand how the management of these investments will now help the CAF succeed.

This document is meant to inform Canada’s defence and security industries of future investment opportunities that will generate jobs and economic growth across the country. It will also be of interest to parliamentarians, academics and engaged Canadians seeking accountability for the use of federal tax dollars, as it demonstrates National Defence’s commitment to affordability and effective resource management.

For additional information, please refer to the Defence Investment Plan 2018Footnote xxvii.

The Centre for Costing in Defence achieved a functional level in advanced costing, where all cost estimates are risk adjusted and fully comply with the Treasury Board Guideline on Cost Estimation for Capital Asset Acquisition. Additionally, over 50 staff have completed a specialized cost training program with 26 staff obtaining an internationally recognized professional costing certification.

Next generation civilian human resources

DND’s civilian human resources (HR) model continues to be modernized through the implementation of Next Generation Human Resources. HR has adopted a flexible, innovative, outcome driven culture, which is responsive to business needs and requirements, allowing DND to fully leverage talent across the country. The realignment of the workforce into four key business lines enables the organization to maximize resources while adopting a strategic approach to service delivery. This client-focused and results-oriented approach is focused on fully understanding and prioritizing SSE needs. Service standards have been communicated for staffing and classification and these are being monitored and reported on regularly.

Defence Renewal

In FY 2017-18, DND was into year four of the Defence Renewal of the five-year mandate. The project, launched in 2013 and DND has essentially met the target of this objective. Sixteen of twenty-four performance initiatives have successfully advanced. As of March 2018, a recurring impact of over $654 million dollars will have been achieved. These savings represent productivity gains and/or efficiencies which were reinvested back into the Defence Services Program to meet existing financial pressures.

Going forward, Defence RenewalFootnote xxviii will transition into a continuous improvement function.  As a legacy of Defence Renewal, it will work within the growing Defence Program Analytics Capability, and drive change through the use of Business Intelligence to drive policy and process experimentation, technology and innovation.

National Defence Headquarters move to Carling Campus

The Phase 1 moves at National Defence Headquarters (NDHQ) Carling were completed in December 2017. 3600 employees currently operating from this location. Phase 2 construction continues to progress, achieving a 75% completion rate as planned during FY 2018-19. Phase 2 personnel moves continue to be forecasted to start during FY 2018-19. The Carling Campus Project received their final approval in February 2018 and will be able to implement the construction phase 3, starting in FY 2018-19. Moves for phase 3 personnel are starting during FY 2019-20. The overall project continues to progress as planned with close out occurring at the end of FY 2019-20.

In keeping with business optimization efforts, we have started to outfit the new NDHQ with a Workplace 2.0Footnote xxix footprint. Employees can use laptops and tablets in areas that offer Wi-Fi. VOiP phones allow employees to keep one phone number even if relocated elsewhere on Campus. Management of electronic files through GCDOCs supports a paperless office and the use of multi-function devices by swiping security badges tracks/monitors individual use of printing documents.

Communications

We are leading the National Security and Defence theme on the Government of Canada’s website – Canada.ca – in collaboration with partner departments and agencies. In 2017-18, specific sections of the theme were tested with users, and improvements were made to help make it easier for users to find and access the Defence information and services they need on the Web.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
458,094,144 458,094,144 551,091,047 494,449,677 36,355,533

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

  2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
Military – Regular Force 861 743 (118)
Civilian 2,254 2,538 284
TOTAL 3,115 3,281 166

Note: Planned figures may not add up to total due to rounding.

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