Future Force Design

Description

Develop and design the future force through a deep understanding of the future operating environment and security risks to Canada and Canadian interests. Enhance Defence’s ability to identify, prevent, adapt and respond to a wide range of contingencies through collaborative innovation networks and advanced research.

Planning highlights

The future security environment presents a vast array of complex defence and security challenges that transcend national borders. In order to keep pace with our allies, and potential adversaries, it is imperative that the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) prioritize efforts to design our future force.

Future force planning is a long-term and continuous activity that seeks to address future threats and defence and security challenges with innovative solutions to defence capability requirements. This will be accomplished through the Capability Based Planning Process, which produces the Force Capability Plan. The Force Capability Plan directs force development activities across the CAF over time such that capability investment can be delivered as planned under SSE. In this manner, the Force Capability Plan guides and bounds the Capital Investment Program Plan Review prioritization and serves to align capability development activities.

Effective Innovation is critical for modern armed forces operating in a highly complex, increasingly contested global security environment. To be successful, Department of National Defence (DND) must exploit every type of advantage. This means promoting innovation across all National Defence organizations not only regarding new technologies, such as the emerging space and cyber domains, but also including the modernization of the business of defence.

Through the Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security Program, we are supporting innovation by complementing our existing research programs with a business model that will increase access and engagement to innovators within the academic and private sector research and development communities. This program will foster an environment that challenges innovators to develop solutions to defence and security, allowing a diversity of innovators to approach challenges from different perspectives enabling National Defence to select the approach that best supports our objectives and capability.

Departmental Result 4.1 – Defence capabilities are designed to meet future threats

  • Advance work to examine the force structure to ensure we have the right balance of regular, reserve and civilian members in the right roles and missions. This work includes developing a new vision for the Reserve Force in order to enhance its capabilities and role within the CAF.
  • Develop and implement a range of remotely piloted systems including the necessary policy direction that will respect Canada’s obligations under domestic and international law, and the appropriate doctrine for armed and unarmed systems.
  • Continue to work closely with Public Safety to inform and advance their new Cyber Security Strategy and, in collaboration with other government departments, continue to develop and refine a security framework for cyber threats. This will include working with our allies to strengthen our approach to collective defence and the employment of cyber capabilities.
  • Advance research in the future of cyber warfare to improve and strengthen both defensive and offensive capabilities.
  • Improve the alignment of Canadian efforts between our Capability Based Planning Process and the NATO Defence Planning Process.
  • Continued participation in the Five Eyes: Quinquepartite Combined Joint Warfare Conference activities related to the Future Operating Environment.
  • In close coordination and cooperation with the United States Department of Defense, ensure DND and the CAF are able to conduct future surveillance, detection and warning activities to meet NORAD commitments through the joint efforts to renew the North Warning System, a component of the North America Surveillance Network.
  • Continue to be an active partner with the United States Department of Defense in the development, fielding and utilization of future systems of systems, including improved interoperability and compatibility, to ensure NORAD is able to provide adequate warning and defence against attacks on either country.
  • Enhance intelligence collection, analysis and fusion capabilities to provide the analytical basis and knowledge to anticipate foreseeable changes in the threat and security environment and to determine the associated demand for capabilities across near- and long-term time horizons. These capabilities will enable evidence-based strategic decisions that align the introduction, modification and divestment of capabilities and guide the application of existing capabilities.
  • Conceive and design joint communications and information systems, specifically for integrated information and telecommunications, integrating existing and future assets into a networked, joint system-of-systems that will enable the flow of information among multiple, interconnected platforms and operational headquarters.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014-15 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results
4.1 Defence capabilities are designed to meet future threats Extent to which the Future Security Environment assessment remains valid 2/3 on a 3 point rating* 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

Degree to which future security assessments and capability deductions remain coherent with those of our allies and partners 2/3 on a 3 point rating** 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

Degree to which future capabilities required to ensure an operational advantage over defence and security threats have been accounted for in defence plans 2/3 on a 3 point rating** 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

Notes:

  1. * Based on a 3 point rated assessment where: a rating of 1 indicates the Future Security Environment (FSE) Assessment is published on time or remains valid; a rating of 2 indicates the FSE Assessment) requires minor amendments due to changes in societal, technological and related defence and security trends; a rating of 3 indicates the FSE Assessment requires significant amendments due to changes in societal, technological and related defence and security trends.
  2. ** Based on a 3 point rated assessment where: a rating of 1indicates the Force Capability Plan (FCP) and Departmental Investment Plan are published on time or remain valid; a rating of 2 indicates the FCP and Departmental Investment Plan require minor amendments due to changes in defence policy, the Future Security Environment (FSE) and/or the Future Operating Environment (FOE); a rating of 3 indicates the FCP and Departmental Investment Plan require notable amendments due to changes in defence policy, the FSE and/or the FOE.
  3. For more information about National Defence performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase xxxii.

Joint Non-munitions Effects Experiment

Photo: Operators from the Canadian Army's 21 Electronic Warfare Regiment simulating offensive electronic warfare operations against virtual forces during the JNEX-1 experiments.

Experimentation efforts are found across the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, and conducted in cooperation with allies, industry and academia. Experimentation is a key contribution to the resolution of strategic problems and the development of force capabilities, such as joint targeting.

For example, the CAF’s Targeting Capability Implementation Team has been working with Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and Canadian and Australian experts since 2015 to develop non-munition targeting capabilities through a series of Joint Non-munitions Effects Experiments (JNEX) that will run until March 2020. Each of the JNEX phases progress from discovery, hypothesis to demonstration, and assessment with current and future JNEXs comprising of a series of experiments, workshops, studies, comprehensive modelling and simulation scenarios.

The first JNEX (JNEX-1) allowed the Canadian Forces Warfare Centre (CFWC) to experiment and validate for the first time the CAF’s targeting process using non-munitions-based effects at the joint operational level. It also assisted in the identification of capability requirements and concepts for incorporation in the CAF Joint Targeting Doctrine and Lessons Learned processes. These ongoing experiments help DND/CAF minimize expenses and mitigate the hazards associated with developing and testing the electronic warfare and other non-munition capabilities targeting process in the real world. Dedicated CAF resources for JNEX include a part time experimentation manager, a part time data scientist, subject matter experts and $216,000 in funding for fiscal year 2018-19.

Departmental Result 4.2 – Defence and security challenges are addressed through innovative solutions

  • Advance the implementation of the new Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security Program to address defence and security challenges by recruiting innovators, industry, academia and other organizations to provide innovative solutions.
  • Prioritize Arctic Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance as a defence research and development priority to produce innovative solutions to surveillance challenges in the North.
  • Contribute science and technology related activities and knowledge expertise to whole-of-government initiatives and special event planning, such as the 2018 G7 Summit.
  • Examine alternative energy options and their potential use for operations including reducing electrical energy consumption at deployed camps, using cleaner fuels, designing more efficient soldier equipment, and providing more efficient power solutions for operations.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014-15 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results
4.2 Defence and security challenges are addressed through innovative solutions % of initiatives and projects that are supported by Defence Science and Technology To be determined by 31 March 2019 To be determined by 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Avaiable

New indicator as of 2018-19

% of Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) projects that resulted in useful advice, adoption, integration or eventual procurement of a new defence and security capability 20% or greater 31 March 2022 Not Available Not Available

Not Avaiable

New indicator as of 2018-19

Note: For more information about National Defence performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase xxxiii.

Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS)

Photo: (left) Leila Ahad, Group Leader - Climatic and Vibration Engineering, Quality Engineering Test Establishment, Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel); (right) Captain Jennifer Faubert, Combat Camera, Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs).

As outlined in Strong, Secure, Engaged, Canada’s defence policy, IDEaS commits to investing $1.6 billion in innovations for defence and security over the next 20 years. The program fosters an open innovation ecosystem to provide creative thinkers with the structure and support to drive their science and technology solutions, which will help assist in solving some of Canada’s toughest defence and security challenges.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2020-21
Planned spending
788,242,040 788,242,040 834,546,932 842,046,649

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020-21
Planned full-time equivalents
3,268.00 3,280.45 3,292.89

Note: Financial, human resources and performance information for the National Defence’s Program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase xxxiv.

Page details

Date modified: