Ready Forces

Description

Field combat ready forces able to succeed in an unpredictable and complex security environment in the conduct of concurrent operations associated with all mandated missions.

Planning highlights

Our success in achieving the missions assigned by the Government of Canada is directly related to our ability to provide first-class training and capabilities to our Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members.

Readiness begins with the issuance of the Chief of the Defence Staff Directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness. This is the mechanism by which the Chief of Defence Staff directs the CAF to organize, train and equip personnel to be ready to respond to Government of Canada direction and execute concurrent operations as outlined in Strong, Secure, Engaged.

Force Posture and Readiness direction ensures force elements (individual or collective units or capabilities) are trained and postured in accordance with established readiness levels. Readiness levels are achieved through individual training (training individual CAF members), collective training (training teams to work together) and validation activities (assessments), equipment servicing and readiness management.

Readiness levels will be achieved, in accordance with the managed readiness plan, through the preparation of equipment required for training and operations and the execution of individual and collective training. Together, these will culminate in the operational delivery of the CAF’s capabilities across a broad mission set. Mission sets include defence diplomacy, collaborating with other government departments and agencies in support of domestic defence and security, rapid provision of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, peace support operations and combat operations.

Our managed readiness programs are deliberately organized to ensure the CAF is trained and adequately equipped for a scalable, agile, responsive and interoperable force both domestically with civil authorities and other government departments, and internationally with allies and partners.

The Joint Managed Readiness Program will ensure the readiness of the CAF to conduct concurrent operations through the participation and execution of specific Canadian and international exercises and training.

Departmental Result 2.1 - Canadian Armed Forces are ready to conduct concurrent operations

  • The CAF will generate and sustain high readiness naval, land, air and special operations forces and joint capabilities to meet Force Posture and Readiness levels directed by the Chief of the Defence Staff and the concurrent mission requirements of Strong, Secure, Engaged. Throughout 2018-19, we will progress a number of initiatives to improve readiness, including:
    • Rebuild maritime sustainment capability through the services of an interim Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment ship and transition the first Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship, HMCS Harry DeWolf, into the fleet;
    • Integrate more reserves into the total force so they can play a greater role on domestic and international operations. Restructure the Primary Reserve to create a purpose built organization that is designed to deliver roles, functions and capabilities on a full time basis using part-time personnel;
    • Integrate new and replacement capabilities into the RCAF structure, including the interim fighter fleet, the CH-148 Cyclone (replacing the CH-124 Sea King), the CC-295 fixed wing search and rescue aircraft, and stand-up a new Search and Rescue Training Centre in 19 Wing Comox, British Columbia, where Royal Canadian Air Force aircrew, search and rescue technicians, and maintenance personnel will be trained for the newly-acquired fixed-wing search and rescue aircraft; and
    • Advance the integration of our space-based capabilities with the next generation of Canadian Earth-observation satellites, known as the RADARSAT Constellation Mission, set to launch in 2018 to support whole-of-government surveillance needs including monitoring ice flows within Canada’s coastal waters; providing surveillance of Canada’s ocean approaches; monitoring environmental conditions, such as floods and forest fires; and managing and mapping natural resources in Canada and around the world.
  • Conduct joint exercises, such as JOINTEX and VIGILANT SHIELD, with other government departments and multinational allies to enhance integration and interoperability, including:
    • Interrelated command and control between CAF and United States forces in the defence of North America;
    • Maritime interoperability between Canadian, American and Mexican forces in response to maritime threats along the Pacific Coast and the Gulf of Mexico;
    • Integration of Command and Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance and strategic and operational targeting processes and theatre staging and support within a Five Eyes environment;
    • Employment and defence of NATO network segments for a Canadian Joint Task Force within a NATO full spectrum operation;
    • Whole-of-government and non-government agency interoperability in consequence management for a domestic security event; and
    • Command and control, and cooperation with Arctic nations, including the United States, in the conduct of Arctic search and rescue.

For more information, refer to the following websites:

Planned results
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014-15 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results
2.1 Canadian Armed Forces are ready to conduct concurrent operations % of operations that are capable of being conducted concurrently 100% 31 March 2025-26 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

% of force elements that are ready for operations in accordance with established targets To be determined by 31 March 2019 To be determined by 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

Note: For more information about National Defence performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase xxiii.


JOINTEX

JOINTEX is an enduring DND and CAF annual series of joint capability development and collective training exercises. It is intended to demonstrate the abilities of a Canadian-led Multinational Joint Integrated Task Force Headquarters in the planning and conduct of coalition operations in a joint, inter-agency, multinational and public environment. JOINTEX is designed to transform the way the CAF train, develop and learn to prepare for future operations.

Photo credit: Leading Seaman Peter Frew, Formation Imaging Services Halifax

Photo: 26 October 2015 - HNLMS TROMP (left) and HMCS ATHABASKAN (3rd from left) conduct a Replenishment at Sea with ESPS CANTABRIA (2nd from left), during Exercise JOINTEX 15 as part of NATO's Trident Juncture 15, on 26 October, 2015. The NRP VASCO DA GAMA (right) sails across in the background.

Departmental Result 2.2 – Military equipment is ready for training and operations

The development and sustainment of capabilities needed to undertake the operations and exercises that take place in Canada and around the world depend on having the necessary trained personnel and military equipment – aircraft, ships, vehicles and weapons – in good working condition and at a certain level of readiness. This means that once equipment is made available, it is maintained in serviceable, or reliable, condition for use by the CAF. Equipment maintenance and repair involves civilian and military personnel and private sector firms. Spending in this area makes a significant contribution to the Canadian economy every year.

In response to the fall 2016 Reports of the Auditor General of Canada, the department has put in place performance measures to assess the serviceability and availability of maritime, land and aerospace fleets. While equipment will be made available for use by the different military environments through the Defence Acquisition Programs and the Equipment Support Program, the serviceability of equipment for training and operations is ensured by the Ready Forces Programs where minor repairs are addressed.

The availability and serviceability of the various key equipment fleets of the CAF will be monitored this year to further improve on our measurement of the availability and serviceability of equipment and its contribution to ensuring the readiness of our forces and the effective delivery of operations. Where the forces cannot use key equipment because it is not available or serviceable, they may be less ready to safely conduct operations. As such, these indicator are important in expressing the amount of risk being absorbed by the forces as they conduct training and operations.

Planned results
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014-15 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results
2.2 Military equipment is ready for training and operations % of maritime key fleets that are serviceable to meet training and readiness requirements 90% or greater* 31 March 2019 Not Available 94% 89%
% of land fleets that are serviceable to meet training and readiness requirements 80% or greater* 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

% of aerospace fleets that are serviceable to meet training and readiness requirements 85% or greater* 31 March 2019 Not Available Not Available

Not Available

New indicator as of 2018-19

Notes:

  1. *A portion of the fleet will normally be subject to repairs due to the use of the fleets and thus not be serviceable. As such, a target of 100% would not reflect a realistic goal. A healthy fleet should however reflect a low proportion of the fleet that is unserviceable in order to ensure that the appropriate level of training and readiness can be provided.
  2. For more information about National Defence performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase xxiv.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19 Main Estimates 2018-19 Planned spending 2019-20 Planned spending 2020-21 Planned spending
8,854,401,407 8,854,401,407 8,936,076,386 9,053,578,753
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents 2020-21 Planned full-time equivalents
44,055.17 44,339.40 44,623.63

Note: Financial, human resources and performance information for the National Defence’s Program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase xxv.

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