Veteran Family Program (VFP)

Transcript

Maysem slide: What is the Veteran Family Program?

Aaron: So, you’ve probably heard about the Veteran Family Program and you’re wondering what it is, how to access it and how it can benefit your family.
The program is funded by Veterans Affairs Canada, or VAC, and it supports the unique needs of medically releasing CAF members, medically released Veterans and their families.
As your family journeys from military to post-service life you can turn to the VFP for information, referral and a menu of Transition Programs designed and delivered to support your overall health and well-being.

The video you are watching should answer most of your questions. If we miss something, I’ll be back at the end with contact information.
And don’t worry, we only use six acronyms in this video and I’ve already used three! As we go along we’ll let you know what they stand for. Listen for this sound. Sonar ping. When you hear Sonar ping. Have your paper and pen ready to catch important information and those last four acronyms!

Subtitle: Aaron Sabourin, Veteran Family Program Manager

Maysem slide: Where can you access the Veteran Family Program?  

Vicki: No matter where your family lives before, during or after transition you can access the VFP:

  1. You can just Walk-In to one of 32 local Military Family Resource Centres, known as *MFRCs, across the country. MFRCs deliver the VFP to eligible families right in your community.

At your local MFRC you can connect with a *Veteran Family Program Coordinator, or VFPC. These coordinators are information and referral specialists. They’ll help you find programs and services that meet the needs of your family as you transition.

  1. Go Online at *CAFconnection.ca. This website is mobile friendly, so it provides access to VFP resources anywhere, anytime. You’ll find the information you need under headings, like: medically releasing CAF member, medically released Veteran, families and a section specifically for caregivers and their needs. And be sure to visit the Frequently Asked Questions section for answers to your most common questions.

From the national CAFconnection.ca homepage you can easily click on a link and be taken to your nearest MFRC’s web page. There, you’ll find local contact information, program descriptions and schedules.

  1. When you aren’t sure where to turn you can always call the Family Information Line, known as FIL. Trained counsellors will answer the phone. They offer confidential, bilingual and free services, providing information, support, referrals and crisis management to the military community. *Call the Family Information Line at 1-800-866-4546, or if it’s easier you can email at FIL@CAFCONNECTION.CA.

Maysem slide: How can the Veteran Family Program help?

Aaron: Now that you know how to access the program, how can it help you if your family is finding it difficult to transition from military to post-service life?

Vicki: So what happens when you walk into an MFRC?

You’ll meet with a VFP Coordinator or VFPC information and referral specialist.  No matter if you are still in the Forces, or a released Veteran they will lead your family through an intake interview, asking basic questions about your transition experience. They will work with you to help identify your family’s transition needs, then develop a family care plan to help you on your journey. They understand that every family is different and every journey is unique.

They will help you to get organized, guide you to education and awareness programs, services and resources you may not be aware of. They’ll tell you about the support groups, workshops, programs and services that are available to you at the MFRC and in your community.

Vicki: The Veteran Family Journal is a tool for identifying your needs and navigating your personal transition journey. This three ring binder,. Is not only a source of information, it’s also a place to keep personal notes, contact information and reference materials, like forms, checklists and guides.

Provided to you by your VFP Coordinator you’ll find the Journal includes both national and local resources as well as an extended family care plan template for you to fill out. Your Journal will be unique to your family. Ask your VFPC about the Veteran Family Journal and how you can make the best use of it on your transition journey.   

Maysem slide: Moving forward with the Veteran Family Program

Aaron: So, did you catch all the acronyms? If you are medically releasing from the CAF or you are a medically released Veteran, bring your family and come and visit us at a Military Family Resource Centre.

Introduce yourself to your local Veteran Family Program Coordinator and let them know what your needs are. Don’t forget to visit CAFconnection.ca to check out the VFP Frequently Asked Questions. I’m sure you’ll find the answers you are looking for. The Family Information Line counsellors are always ready to listen and support you was well. We’re here to help.
Cut to contact slide

Subtitle: The Veteran Family Program is funded by Veterans Affairs Canada.

Download video (.mp4 23.2 MB)

Maysem slide: What is the Veteran Family Program?

Aaron: So, you’ve probably heard about the Veteran Family Program and you’re wondering what it is, how to access it and how it can benefit your family.
The program is funded by Veterans Affairs Canada, or VAC, and it supports the unique needs of medically releasing CAF members, medically released Veterans and their families.
As your family journeys from military to post-service life you can turn to the VFP for information, referral and a menu of Transition Programs designed and delivered to support your overall health and well-being.

The video you are watching should answer most of your questions. If we miss something, I’ll be back at the end with contact information.
And don’t worry, we only use six acronyms in this video and I’ve already used three! As we go along we’ll let you know what they stand for. Listen for this sound. Sonar ping. When you hear Sonar ping. Have your paper and pen ready to catch important information and those last four acronyms!

Subtitle: Aaron Sabourin, Veteran Family Program Manager

Maysem slide: Where can you access the Veteran Family Program?  

Vicki: No matter where your family lives before, during or after transition you can access the VFP:

  1. You can just Walk-In to one of 32 local Military Family Resource Centres, known as *MFRCs, across the country. MFRCs deliver the VFP to eligible families right in your community.

At your local MFRC you can connect with a *Veteran Family Program Coordinator, or VFPC. These coordinators are information and referral specialists. They’ll help you find programs and services that meet the needs of your family as you transition.

  1. Go Online at *CAFconnection.ca. This website is mobile friendly, so it provides access to VFP resources anywhere, anytime. You’ll find the information you need under headings, like: medically releasing CAF member, medically released Veteran, families and a section specifically for caregivers and their needs. And be sure to visit the Frequently Asked Questions section for answers to your most common questions.

From the national CAFconnection.ca homepage you can easily click on a link and be taken to your nearest MFRC’s web page. There, you’ll find local contact information, program descriptions and schedules.

  1. When you aren’t sure where to turn you can always call the Family Information Line, known as FIL. Trained counsellors will answer the phone. They offer confidential, bilingual and free services, providing information, support, referrals and crisis management to the military community. *Call the Family Information Line at 1-800-866-4546, or if it’s easier you can email at FIL@CAFCONNECTION.CA.

Maysem slide: How can the Veteran Family Program help?

Aaron: Now that you know how to access the program, how can it help you if your family is finding it difficult to transition from military to post-service life?

Vicki: So what happens when you walk into an MFRC?

You’ll meet with a VFP Coordinator or VFPC information and referral specialist.  No matter if you are still in the Forces, or a released Veteran they will lead your family through an intake interview, asking basic questions about your transition experience. They will work with you to help identify your family’s transition needs, then develop a family care plan to help you on your journey. They understand that every family is different and every journey is unique.

They will help you to get organized, guide you to education and awareness programs, services and resources you may not be aware of. They’ll tell you about the support groups, workshops, programs and services that are available to you at the MFRC and in your community.

Vicki: The Veteran Family Journal is a tool for identifying your needs and navigating your personal transition journey. This three ring binder,. Is not only a source of information, it’s also a place to keep personal notes, contact information and reference materials, like forms, checklists and guides.

Provided to you by your VFP Coordinator you’ll find the Journal includes both national and local resources as well as an extended family care plan template for you to fill out. Your Journal will be unique to your family. Ask your VFPC about the Veteran Family Journal and how you can make the best use of it on your transition journey.   

Maysem slide: Moving forward with the Veteran Family Program

Aaron: So, did you catch all the acronyms? If you are medically releasing from the CAF or you are a medically released Veteran, bring your family and come and visit us at a Military Family Resource Centre.

Introduce yourself to your local Veteran Family Program Coordinator and let them know what your needs are. Don’t forget to visit CAFconnection.ca to check out the VFP Frequently Asked Questions. I’m sure you’ll find the answers you are looking for. The Family Information Line counsellors are always ready to listen and support you was well. We’re here to help.
Cut to contact slide

Subtitle: The Veteran Family Program is funded by Veterans Affairs Canada.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: