Horizontal initiatives

Official title: Horizontal Initiatives - 2017-2018 Departmental Plan

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1. Youth Employment Strategy

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Youth Employment Strategy

Lead department

Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organizations

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada; Global Affairs Canada; Canadian Heritage; Environment and Climate Change Canada; Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada; National Research Council; Natural Resources Canada; Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation; Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; and Parks Canada.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2003

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)

Ongoing

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

Ongoing

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Youth Employment Strategy (YES) helps youth aged 15 to 30 gain the skills, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment. YES is an Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)-led horizontal initiative involving 10 other federal departments and agencies that assist youth in making a successful transition into today's changing labour market. YES has three program streams—Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes Canada Summer Jobs. This program is delivered nationally, regionally and locally via contribution agreements.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: YES.

Shared outcome of federal partners

The Shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • number of youth served;
  • number of youth employed / self-employed; and
  • number of youth returning to school.

Governance structures

YES has in place a Performance Measurement Strategy that represents a commitment among the 11 participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

Oversight of the YES horizontal initiative is provided through a collaborative committee structure. ESDC is responsible for facilitating coordination among the departments and agencies funding YES activities. As policy lead of this horizontal initiative, ESDC chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of the YES Interdepartmental Operations Committee and the YES Evaluation Sub-Committee.

Planning highlights

In 2017-2018, to improve opportunities for youth and support the development of a skilled and well-prepared workforce, the Department will propose:

  • Utilize recommendations stemming from the Expert Panel on Youth Employment into its program policy directions as appropriate;
  • Implementation of any new policy directions for incremental YES funding.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019-2020

Contact information

Monika Bertrand, Director General
Employment Programs and Partnerships
Skills and Employment Branch
Telephone: 819-654-3345
monika.bertrand@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau QC

Planning information

Federal organizations Link to departmental program alignment architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) ($) 2017-2018 Planned spending 2017-2018 Expected results 2017-2018 Performance indicators 2017-2018 Targets
Employment and Social Development
Canada 
Skills and Employment Career Focus Ongoing  36,792,602 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences, and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 2,083
  • Employed or self-employed: 1,458
  • Return to school: 208
  • Contribution agreements: 90
  • Funds leveraged: $18M
Skills Link Ongoing 82,257,552 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences, and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 6,300
  • Employed or self-employed: 3,150
  • Return to school: 630
  • Contribution agreements: 350
  • Funds leveraged: $22M
Canada Summer Jobs Ongoing 241,071,634 Not available Not available Clients served: 70,000
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Career Focus Program Career Focus Ongoing 1,061,850 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 64
  • Employed or self-employed: 45
  • Return to school: 18
Global Affairs Canada (a) International Youth Internship Program (IYIP) Career Focus Ongoing 1,887,562 The expected results for the IYIP include: i) increased awareness for female and male Canadian youth of the equal possibility of working internationally; ii) enhanced equal employability of female and male IYIP interns in Canada and in the field of international development; iii) improved capacity of female and male IYIP interns to contribute to international development in a gender-sensitive way
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: Not available
  • Employed or self-employed: Not available
  • Return to school: not available
Canadian Heritage (b), (c), (d) (Canadian Heritage also contributes an additional $5.0M annually through its Young Canada Works program to fund student employment positions in small and medium-sized museums.) Young Canada Works Career Focus Ongoing 695,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 69
  • Employed or self-employed: Not available
  • Return to school: Not available
Summer Work Experience Ongoing 6,429,885 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 1,270
  • Employed or self-employed:  Not available
  • Return to school:  1,270
Environment and Climate Change Canada Science Horizons Youth Internship Program (SHYIP); International Environmental Youth Corps (IEYC) Career Focus Ongoing 3,153,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 179
  • Employed or self-employed: 105
  • Return to school: 31
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada Digital Skill for Youth Internship Program (formerly the Youth Initiative Program) Career Focus Ongoing 10,152,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 970 (770 for Digital Skills and 200 for TWEP)
  • Employed or self-employed: 146 (116 for Digital Skills and 30 for TWEP)
  • Return to school: 49 (39 for Digital Skills and 10 for TWEP)
Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP) Career Focus Ongoing 3,735,717 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) Youth Employment Program (YEP) Career Focus Ongoing  5,373,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients Employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 167
  • Employed or self-employed: 125
  • Return to school: 3
Natural Resources Canada Science and Technology Internship Program Career Focus Ongoing  600,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year.
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 50
  • Employed or self-employed: 40
  • Return to school: 2
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Housing Internship Initiative for First Nations and Inuit Youth Skills Link   Ongoing  1,000,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 125
  • Employed or self-employed:12
  • Return to school: 4
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada The First Nations and Inuit Skills Link Program Skills Link   Ongoing  18,259,463 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
  • Clients served: 1,546
  • Employed or self-employed: Not available
  • Return to school: Not available
The First Nations and Inuit Summer Work Experience  Program Summer Work Experience Ongoing  8,059,637 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
Clients served: 2,503
Parks Canada Young Canada Works in National Parks and National Historic Sites Summer Work Experience Ongoing 2,000,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school
  • P1: Number of clients serviced who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year
  • P2: Number of clients employed or self-employed
  • P3: Number of clients returned to school
Clients served: 210
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable 422,528,902 Clients served:
  • Career Focus - 3,582
  • Skills Link - 7,971
  • Summer Work Experience - 72,983
  • (a) Global Affairs Canada launched a call for proposal for the International Youth Internship Program (IYIP) on November 7, 2016. The call is scheduled to close on February 7, 2017 and is valued at up to $23.6 million over four years (2017 to 2021). The critical path indicates that contribution agreements will be signed with successful applicants in late-Fall 2017. We anticipate that funding will be required in the last quarter of 2017/18 (January-March 2018). We have therefore forecasted that 25% of the total grants and contributions amount will be disbursed. Salaries remain unchanged, as full-time staff is required for the assessment and negation of the new projects. Operational cost has been estimated at 75% to ensure proper management and start of the new contribution agreements.
  • (b) O and M amounts for all YCW program streams reported under YCW SWE.
  • (c) O and M amounts reflect permanent departmental reallocations to YCW O&M budget.
  • (d) Amount includes a $19,000 permanent transfer from YCW-HO (SWE) to YCW-BCH (CF), to cover the cost of 2 science internships at CHIN.

2. Temporary Foreign Worker Program

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Lead department

Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organizations

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

June 13, 2007

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

Ongoing

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

Ongoing

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program plays a key role in supporting Canada's economic growth by enabling employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to fill short-term labour needs when Canadians and permanent residents are not available. The program is regulated through the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and is administered in partnership with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), through its Service Canada processing centres, assesses applications from employers requesting permission to hire temporary foreign workers and conducts Labour Market Impact Assessments to determine the likely effect these workers would have on the Canadian labour market. The Program assesses the impact by looking at available labour market information for the region and the occupation, the employers' recruitment and advertisement efforts, wages and working conditions, labour shortages and the transfer of skills and knowledge to Canadians. In addition, Service Canada responds to questions about the Program through Employer Contact Centres and via the Internet.

ESDC works closely with IRCC, CBSA and the provinces and territories, through appropriate information sharing agreements, to monitor and share information that has an impact on the integrity of both the TFW Program and the International Mobility Program (IMP), which is led by IRCC. Service Canada conducts inspections for the TFW Program and, on behalf of IRCC, for the IMP. In Quebec, the TFW Program is administered in partnership with the Province.

Shared outcome of federal partners

  • Canadians and permanent residents are provided with the first opportunity to fill available jobs.
  • Employers are provided with timely access to foreign workers when a genuine need exists.
  • Employers comply with the conditions and requirements of the Program.
  • Temporary migration that is consistent with federal, provincial and territorial regulations, standards and international obligations.
  • Migration significantly benefits Canada's economic, social and cultural development.

Governance structures

  • ESDC is responsible for providing a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) to employers, on the likely impact foreign workers may have on the Canadian labour market. ESDC processes LMIA applications to support the work permit application process.
  • IRCC is responsible for assessing work permit applications and authorizing the issuance of work permits to eligible temporary foreign workers.
  • Each department is responsible for the design and management of those elements of the program under its minister's responsibility.

Planning highlights

When qualified Canadians and permanent residents are not available, the TFWP can be used to fill jobs.

On January 30, 2017, the Government tabled its response to HUMA's report, in which it indicated that further action was forthcoming to make changes to the TFW Program, so that it works for all workers, for businesses, and for the Canadian economy.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2020-2021

Contact information

Janet Goulding, Director General
Temporary Foreign Worker Directorate
Skills and Employment Branch
Telephone: 819-654-3203
janet.goulding@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau QC

Planning information

Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) ($) 2017-2018 Planned spending 2017-2018 Expected results 2017-2018 Performance indicators 2017-2018 Targets
Employment and Social Development Canada  Skills and Employment Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing 33,046,342
  • Employers are provided with timely access to foreign workers when a genuine need exists
  • Employers comply with the conditions and requirements of the Program
  • Canadians have access to Temporary Foreign Worker Program information through the Employer Contact Centre within the specialized call centres
  • Percentage of eligible applications received during the fiscal year that are processed within 10 business days
  • Percentage of employers who are users of the TFW Program who undergo an inspection
  • Percentage of specialized calls answered by an Employer Contact Centre agent within 10 minutes
  • 80%
  • 25%
  • 80%
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada Temporary Resident Program Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing 18,942,438 Canada benefits from the timely entry of temporary economic residents Percentage of work permit applications (submitted overseas) finalized within the established service standard 80%
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable 51,988,780 Not available Not available

3. Early Childhood Development and Early Learning and Child Care

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Early Childhood Development and Early Learning and Child Care

Lead department(s)

Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Department of Finance Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Provincial and Territorial Governments

Start date of the horizontal initiative

Early Childhood Development: September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001

Early Learning and Child Care: April 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative

Early Childhood Development: Ongoing

Early Learning and Child Care: March 2018 (Budget 2016 funding)

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

Early Childhood Development: Ongoing

Early Learning and Child Care: $400 million for provinces and territories and $100 million for Indigenous child care and early learning on reserve.

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

Early Childhood Development: $16.1 billion transferred to provinces and territories since 2000-2001.

Early Learning and Child Care: None

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

Early Childhood Development: $16.1 billion transferred to provinces and territories since 2000-2001

Early Learning and Child Care: None

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Early Childhood Development: Not applicable

Early Learning and Child Care: None

Description of the horizontal initiative

In September 2000, federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for social services agreed to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age six) and for their parents.

The Government of Canada will transfer over $1.3 billion to provinces and territories in 2016-2017 in support of families with young children through the Canada Social Transfer. This is a notional allocation in support of early childhood development, early learning and child care, and child care spaces.

Recently, the Minister of Employment and Social Development Canada has been mandated to work with the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs to launch consultations with provinces and territories and Indigenous peoples on an Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) Framework as a first step towards delivering affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully-inclusive child care. Budget 2016 proposed to invest $500 million in 2017-2018 to support the establishment of an ELCC Framework. Of this, $100 million is for Indigenous child care and early learning on reserve. In the 2016 Fall Economic Statement the government proposes a further investment of $21.9 billion in social infrastructure over 11 years. Budget 2017 will announce further details on the allocations of the new $21.9 billion investment in social infrastructure. In order to flow funding to provinces and territories, bilateral agreements will be negotiated, while recognizing that Provinces and Territories are at different stages of development and allowing jurisdictions to identify priority areas.

Performance indicator(s)

Early Childhood Development: Not applicable.

Early Learning and Child Care: Under determination

Target(s)

Early Childhood Development: Not applicable.

Early Learning and Child Care: Signature of bilateral agreements

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Early Childhood Development: Not applicable

Early Learning and Child Care: Provinces and territories will report publically annually on their priorities and action plans.

Shared outcome of federal partners

Early Childhood Development: The objectives of the early childhood development initiative are to:

  • promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn and socially engaged and responsible; and
  • help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.

Early Learning and Child Care: The objectives of the early learning and child care initiative are to deliver affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully-inclusive child care.

Governance structures

First ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services. Federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for social services and ministers of health are responsible for commitments under the initiative.

Planning highlights

As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

The Government have committed to working with provinces, territories to create a new "Early Learning and Child Care Framework" as a first step towards delivering affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully inclusive child care.

Multilateral negotiations are underway to draft the Early Learning and Child Care Framework.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Early Childhood Development

Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement:

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care; and
  • strengthening community supports.

Each participating government committed to report to the public on early childhood development programs and initiatives, including indicators of child well-being. Information about the initiative, including the text of the first ministers' commitment, is available on the provincial and territorial websites.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the early childhood development initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Early Learning and Child Care: In this fiscal year, the following outcomes can be expected:

  • Finalisation of the Framework;
  • Conclusion of the negotiations between Governments;
  • Signature of the Federal-Provincial/Territorial bilateral agreements;
  • Publication of the Framework.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Early Childhood Development: Not applicable

Early Learning and Child Care: Not applicable

Contact information

Doug Murphy, Director General
Social Policy Directorate
Strategic and Service Policy Branch
Telephone: 613-654-3685
doug.murphy@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau QC

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