Supporting information on lower-level programs

Official title: Supporting information on lower-level programs – 2017-18 Departmental plan

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the Employment and Social Development Canada website.

On this page

Program: Service Network Supporting Government Departments

In this section

Sub-Program: Government of Canada Telephone General Enquiries Services

Description

Government of Canada telephone general enquiries services support Canadians through 1 800 O-Canada as well as its customized information services. 1 800 O-Canada provides a single point of contact for all Canadians to access quick, up-to-date government information over the phone. It acts as the first point of contact for general information on all Government of Canada programs, services and initiatives; it supports key government priorities and messaging, including those outlined in the Budget and Speech from the Throne; and it supports the Government's communication needs in crisis situations. Customized information services provide support to Canadians on behalf of Government of Canada programs and services that require a service delivery partner to meet their communication needs, which can include ongoing requirements, targeted campaigns and temporary needs in crisis situations. Canadians who require specialized or client-specific information on programs are connected or are directed to appropriate online resources, program call centres or in-person resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
20,441,005 20,441,005 20,441,005
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
17 17 17
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Canadians have easy, fast and convenient access to up-to-date government information over the phone as a first point of contact for general information on all Government of Canada programs, services and initiatives. Percentage of general enquiry calls answered by a 1 800 O-Canada agent within 18 seconds

Data source:
Administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 86% 80% 76%
1 800 O-Canada information completeness, relevancy and accuracy assessment

Data source:
Administrative data

85% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 90.7%

Sub-Program: Government of Canada Internet Presence

Description

The Government of Canada Internet presence supports Canadians by providing easy, fast and convenient access to information and services online. Through Service Canada, ESDC is the principal publisher for a single Government of Canada website, Canada.ca. The site provides an enhanced user experience; citizen-centric, theme-based content; and a common and enhanced Government of Canada search. Canadians can locate detailed information on the programs and services offered through ESDC, as well as general information on all Government of Canada programs and services. Through Service Canada, ESDC also provides Canadians with a simple and secure online portal that brings together a number of services and allows clients to, among other things, view and update their personal information and transact securely with ESDC.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
18,587,767 16,087,767 16,087,767

The plan spending shown in the table above includes: Principal Publisher, My Service Canada Account and ESDC Web services.

Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
147 147 147
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Canadians have easy, fast and convenient access to information and services online. Percentage usability rating for Canada.ca

Data source: Administrative data

To be determined March 31, 2018 Not available Not available Not available
When needed, Canadians have easy, fast and convenient access to information and services through a secure online portal. Percentage usability rating for the Service Canada secure online portal

Data source: Administrative data

To be determined March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 80.8

Sub-Program: In-Person Points of Service

Description

In-person points of service support the delivery of services and information for the Government of Canada. They provide information on how to self-serve, client authentication and identification, and services for clients who require one-on-one assistance. Canadians who require specialized or client-specific information for programs like Employment Insurance, the Canada Pension Plan or Old Age Security are directed to appropriate online resources and program call centres. Canadians have access to in-person points of service within reasonable distances from where they live through Service Canada Centres and scheduled outreach locations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
22,009,040 22,025,284 22,025,284
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
225 225 225
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Canadians have access to program information and in-person services and have opportunities to self-serve. Percentage of clients served in-person who received assistance within 25 minutes

Data source: Administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 81.8% 83.5% 83.8%

Program: Delivery of Services for Other Government of Canada Programs

In this section

Sub-Program: Passport

Description

Through Service Canada, ESDC delivers the Passport program on behalf of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Service Canada is the provider of domestic passport service delivery within Canada through all service delivery channels. Service delivery includes provision of information, intake of applications, validation of identity, production of passports and their distribution to eligible applicants, on time and error free.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18* Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
176,513,838 - -
* Resources for passport services were approved for 2017–18. As the resources are sunsetting in 2018–19, the Department will seek authorities from Treasury Board for the delivery of passport services for 2018–19 and future years.
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18* 2018–19 2019–20
2,226 - -
* FTEs for passport services were approved for 2017–18. The Department will seek authorities from Treasury Board for the delivery of passport services for 2018–19 and future years.
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Canadians can obtain a passport within Canada in a timely manner. Percentage of travel documents and other passport services processed within standards*

Data source: Administrative data

90% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 99.8%

*See Service standards for passport services

Sub-Program: Other Government Department Programs

Description

Services provided on behalf of other Government of Canada programs include assistance to Canadians, provision of basic and detailed program and service information, application intake and review for completeness, client authentication and validation of identity documents, quick and direct access to specialized agents within other government departments, and provision of space in the service delivery network for other departments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
1,678,540 1,681,622 1,684,751
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
12 12 12
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Canadians can access programs and services delivered on behalf of other Government of Canada departments. Number of in-person service requests on behalf of other Government of Canada departments

Data source: Administrative data

To be determined March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 390,300

Program: Skills and Employment

In this section

Sub-Program: Employment Insurance

Description

The Employment Insurance (EI) program provides temporary income support to unemployed workers while they look for employment or to upgrade their skills. The EI program also provides special benefits to workers who take time off work due to specific life events (illness; pregnancy; caring for a newborn or newly adopted child, a critically ill child, or a family member who is seriously ill with a significant risk of death). Workers receive EI benefits only if they have paid premiums in the past year and meet qualifying and entitlement conditions. Self-employed workers may participate in EI and receive special benefits. The EI program is governed by Part I of the Employment Insurance Act and associated Regulations. The Canada Employment Insurance Commission monitors and assists the Department in managing the program. Service Canada's role is to provide timely and accurate EI benefit payments and services, and to support EI clients through each stage of the service delivery process by providing benefit information, responding to enquiries, assisting employers, processing claims and providing the means to appeal decisions; conducting client authentication and identification; and preventing, detecting and deterring fraud and abuse.

This program is funded through the EI Operating Account.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
20,564,250,355 20,240,565,126 20,542,824,904
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
7,501 6,868 6,774
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Workers in an adjustment situation have access to temporary financial assistance. Proportion of regular Employment Insurance claimants who do not exhaust all their weeks of benefits (Time lag in availability of data)

Data source: Administrative data

75% March 31, 2018 65.7% 65.3% 64.8%
Proportion of regular Employment Insurance claimants who receive benefits and are not frequent claimants (Time lag in availability of data)

Data source: Administrative data

75% March 31, 2018 76.6% 77.3% 78.5%
Proportion of the full year of Employment Insurance maternity and parental benefits used by parents of newborns (Time lag in availability of data)

Data source: Administrative data

90% March 31, 2018 93.8% 94.2% 93.8%
Eligible Canadians receive a SIN in a timely manner. Percentage of SINs issued in one in-person visit (based on complete application with all supporting documentation) 90% March 31, 2018 99.4% 99.2% 99.2%
Employment Insurance applicants receive a benefit payment or a non-payment notification in a timely manner. Percentage of EI benefit payments or non-payment notifications issued within 28 days of filing

Data source: Administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 69.3% 72.3% 83.8%
Clients making requests for reconsideration of Employment Insurance decisions receive a reconsideration decision in a timely manner. Percentage of request-for-reconsideration decisions finalized within 30 days of the request being received

Data source: Administrative data

70% March 31, 2018 66.4% 45.4% 56.1%
Eligible Employment Insurance applicants receive a benefit payment in the right amount. Percentage of payment accuracy of Employment Insurance

Data source: Administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 95.4% 95.5% 93.5%
Canadians have access to EI information through specialized call centres. Percentage of specialized calls answered by an EI agent within 10 minutes

Data source: Administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not available* 45% 37%

* The service standard was revised as of 2014-15. No results are available for 2013-14.

Sub-Program: Labour Market Development Agreements

Description

Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDAs) are established under Part II of the Employment Insurance Act to help unemployed Canadians to develop a skilled labour force that meets the needs of employers. The main objective of Part II is to maintain a sustainable Employment Insurance (EI) system by getting clients back to work quickly. Activities delivered under Part II of the Employment Insurance Act help unemployed individuals in Canada, particularly those who are eligible for EI, prepare for, find and maintain suitable employment. Under the umbrella of Employment Benefits and Support Measures (EBSMs), these activities include similar programs designed and delivered by provinces and territories under LMDAs.

This program is funded through Part II of the Employment Insurance Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
2,146,079,776 2,146,079,776 2,146,079,775
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
40 40 40
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Through Labour Market Development Agreements, provinces and territories provide EI-eligible clients with unemployment benefits and all unemployed Canadians with employment services. Number of insured clients employed following an employment program benefit or service intervention

Data source: Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report

Provinces and territories set targets* March 31, 2018 171,956 173,593 Not available
Proportion of insured clients who are employed following the completion of their benefit or service intervention**

Data source: Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report

Provinces and territories set targets* March 31, 2018 58.9% 53.6% 54.7%

*Provinces and territories have jurisdiction over setting performance targets for programming funded under Labour Market Development Agreements.

** Number of insured clients employed, excluding group services and apprentices (who are not case managed), divided by the number of action plans closed.

Sub-Program: Canada Job Fund Agreements

Description

Under the Canada Job Fund (CJF) Agreements, the Government of Canada transfers funds to support provinces and territories to deliver programs and services to increase labour force participation and help Canadians develop the skills necessary to find and keep a job. The CJF consists of three streams: the Canada Job Grant to encourage greater employer involvement and investment in training by providing financial assistance to employers on a cost-shared basis in order to help Canadians develop the skills needed for available jobs; Employer-Sponsored Training to support employer involvement in and contribution to demand-driven training programs and incentives; and Employment Services and Supports to enhance labour market participation of Canadians, with priority given to the unemployed ineligible for Employment Insurance benefits and to low-skilled employed workers. A separate six-year agreement was signed with Quebec that does not include the delivery of the Canada Job Grant, recognizing that the core principles behind the Canada Job Grant are already embedded in Quebec's training system. These Agreements complement other provincial and territorial employment and skills training programs funded by the Government of Canada, for example, under the Labour Market Development Agreements and the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Canada Job Fund Agreements.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
501,918,544 501,918,544 501,918,544
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
17 17 17
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Increase labour market participation of Canadians through funding for provincial/territorial programs that aim to help them develop the skills necessary to find and keep a job, and increase employer involvement/ investment in skills training. Number of participants benefiting from programs covered under the Canada Job Fund

Data source: Administrative data

Provinces and territories set targets* March 31, 2018 Not applicable 362,000 Not available***
Average employer contribution to the Canada Job Grant in a given year

Data source: Administrative data

Provinces and territories set targets* March 31, 2018 Not applicable $1110** Not available***
Change in employment status of participants benefiting from programs covered under the Canada Job Fund

Data source: Administrative data

Provinces and territories set targets* March 31, 2018 Not applicable Not available Not available***

* Provinces and territories are responsible for setting performance targets for programming funded under Canada Job Fund Agreements.
**The average employer contribution to the Canada Job Grant is updated for 2014-15 from $480 to $1110 based on now complete information provided through provincial/territorial annual performance and financial reports.
*** Provincial/Territorial reporting is not currently available and will be published in the next report.
Note: Targets may need to be adjusted as ESDC transitions to the next generation of labour market transfer agreements.

Sub-Program: Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities

Description

In recognition of the barriers faced by persons with disabilities in the labour market, the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities are designed to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities by enhancing their employability, increasing employment opportunities and demonstrating the best possible results for Canadians. This program transfers funds to provinces and territories under bilateral agreements for programs and services. Provinces and territories agree to match the federal contribution. As the needs of persons with disabilities may differ between jurisdictions, provinces and territories have flexibility to determine the design and delivery of programming in the following five priority areas: education and training; employment participation; employment opportunities; connecting employers and persons with disabilities; and building knowledge. These programs and services for persons with disabilities complement other provincial and territorial employment and skills training programs funded by the Government of Canada (e.g. Labour Market Development Agreements and the Canada Job Fund Agreements).

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
222,895,461 222,895,461 222,895,461
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
7 7 7
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Improve the employment outcomes for persons with disabilities by enhancing their employability, increasing employment opportunities available to them, and demonstrating the best possible results for Canadians. Number of client interventions to enhance employability

Data source: Administrative data

300,000 March 31, 2018 Approximately 300,000 Approximately 352,000** Not available*

* Not Available as there is a one year time lag in data availability.
** Number of clients served is taken from provincial and territorial annual reports for 2014-15. ESDC is currently waiting for confirmation from one jurisdiction of the number of clients served.
Note – targets may need to be adjusted as ESDC transitions to the next generation of labour market transfer agreements.

Sub-Program: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Description

The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities assists persons with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. It supports persons with disabilities in overcoming barriers to participation in the Canadian labour market, and it supports employers to hire persons with disabilities. This program supports a wide range of programs and services, including job search supports, pre-employability services, wage subsidies, work placements and employer awareness initiatives to encourage employers to hire persons with disabilities. The Opportunities Fund is delivered across the country by Service Canada Centres, in partnership with organizations in the community.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
44,240,732 41,165,732 41,165,732
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
45 45 45
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Persons with disabilities have enhanced their employability, obtained employment, become self-employed or returned to school. Number of clients with enhanced employability

Data source: Administrative data

4,579 March 31, 2018 3,942 3,075 3,133
Number of clients employed or self-employed

Data source: Administrative data

2,035 March 31, 2018 Not available as this is a new/modified indicator. Not available as this is a new/modified indicator. 1,950

Sub-Program: Youth Employment Strategy

Description

The Youth Employment Strategy helps youth aged 15 to 30 get the career information and gain the skills, work experience and abilities they need to find and maintain employment. The Youth Employment Strategy is an ESDC-led horizontal initiative involving 10 other federal departments and agencies that assist youth in making a successful transition into today's changing labour market. The Youth Employment Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus, and Summer Work Experience, which includes Canada Summer Jobs. This program is delivered nationally, regionally and locally via funding instruments such as contribution agreements and direct delivery methods.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Youth Employment Strategy.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
360,566,790 360,610,475 247,746,759
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
393 376 327
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences, and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school. Number of clients served who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year

Data source: Administrative data

78,383*

(Canada Summer Jobs =70,000, Career Focus =2,083, Skills Link =6,300)

March 31, 2018 46,706 42,595 42,279
Number of clients employed or self-employed

Data source: Administrative data

4,608 March 31, 2018 6,475** 5,133** 5,469

* In light of new incremental investments made in the federal Youth Employment Strategy (namely the Canada Summer Jobs program), the 2017-18 client target is significantly higher compared to historical years.
**In the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities, historical results for this indicator were incorrectly reported as 3, 942 for 2013-14 and 3,075 for 2014-15. These figures have been corrected to reflect the actual historical results for 2013-14 and 2014-15.

Sub-Program: Targeted Initiative for Older Workers

(Program sunsets March 31, 2017 – will not be included in the 2017-18 Departmental Plan)

Sub-Program: Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities

Description

The Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities is an integral component of the Government of Canada's strategy for official languages as expressed in the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–18: Education, Immigration, Communities. This program aims to enhance the development and vitality of official language minority communities by strengthening their capacity in the areas of human resources and community economic development, and by promoting partnerships at all levels, including with federal partners. This program provides funds to official language minority communities in every province and territory to support professional local capacity to deliver services and supports to job seekers, businesses and communities; generate strategic partnerships; spur investment; and consolidate efforts and resources to take action on community priorities. The Enabling Fund is designed so that official language minority communities can plan and implement community-specific development initiatives and better access a range of labour market services and programs. In addition to contributing to community development, the Enabling Fund allows the Department to deliver on its commitments and obligations related to the Official Languages Act.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
13,715,065 13,773,077 13,773,077
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
15 15 15
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Official language minority communities are better able to implement and sustain community economic and human resource development. Amount invested by non-Enabling Fund funded partners* for every dollar invested by the Enabling Fund in community economic development and human resources development

Data source: Administrative data

$2** March 31, 2018 Not applicable New indicator in 2014-15, results not available. $1.84

* Not-for-profit groups, private-sector organizations and other governmental partners.
** Two dollars invested for each dollar allocated official language minority communities through the Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities Program.

Sub-Program: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy

Description

Indigenous communities have historically experienced significantly higher rates of unemployment, lower rates of labour force participation and higher rates of social assistance than other Canadian communities. The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) aims to increase Indigenous participation in the Canadian labour market, ensuring that First Nations, Inuit and Métis people are engaged in sustainable, meaningful employment. Funding from the Strategy supports Indigenous service delivery organizations, which deliver employment and training services through over 600 points of service across Canada. ASETS is linked to the Employment Insurance Act, which enables Indigenous groups to deliver programs similar to those established by Part II of the Act. Currently, ASETS supports labour market obligations specified in Treaty and Self-Government Agreements that are in place with some Indigenous groups. Transfer payments are managed through contribution agreements with Indigenous organizations. ASETS is also linked to the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative, as the funding flows through the ASETS network to agreement holders, to help increase the supply of quality child care services in First Nations and Inuit communities to a level comparable to what is available for the general population. This is done to support First Nations and Inuit early childhood development, as well as to provide child care for First Nations and Inuit caregivers so that they may work and/or participate in job training and skills development programs.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
379,218,785 367,070,476 366,895,476
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
218 189 189
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
An increasing number of Indigenous people are employed and integrated into the Canadian labour market. Number of clients who obtained employment following service intervention(s)

Data source: Administrative data

14,000-16,500 March 31, 2018 18,017 20,274 19,687*

* Due to technical delays in reporting results, the historical data have been revised from what was previously reported in the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report to reflect updated results.

Sub-Program: Skills and Partnership Fund

Description

As a complement to the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, the Skills and Partnership Fund (SPF) is a demand-driven, partnership-based program that supports government priorities through strategic partnerships that fund projects that contribute to the skills development and training-to-employment of Indigenous workers towards long-term, meaningful employment. The SPF encourages innovations in Indigenous training-to-employment and service delivery, including new approaches to labour market training, and improving employment outcomes for Indigenous people. This is done by supporting innovative projects to prepare and train Indigenous people for the demands of the Canadian labour market, requiring the development of partnerships and leveraging of private-sector and federal-provincial-territorial funding to maximize SPF investments and testing new service delivery models to embed long-term program improvements.

Funding recipients deliver supports and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis people to help them develop the necessary skills and job training to secure jobs. This program focuses on emerging or untapped economic development opportunities to meet the needs of high-demand sectors, as well as areas with skills shortages. Attention is given to ensuring that partnerships are in place prior to project initiation and that projects are responsive to demonstrated need with supports in the areas of training-to-employment, skills development and service innovation.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Skills and Partnership Fund.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
57,635,336 57,635,336 57,635,336
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
74 74 74
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16**
An increasing number of Indigenous people are employed and integrated into the Canadian labour market Number of clients who obtained employment following service intervention(s)

Data source: Administrative data

1,600 March 31, 2018 3,195 5,007 1,772*

* Due to technical delays in reporting results,the historical data have been revised from what was previously reported in the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report to reflect updated results.
**The SPF program was scheduled to sunset in March 2015, but a limited number of projects were extended for 2015-16 pending the launch of the renewed program.

Sub-Program: First Nations Job Fund

(Program sunsets March 31, 2017 – will not be included in the 2017-18 Departmental Plan)

Sub-Program: Job Bank

Description

Job Bank provides timely and relevant labour market information on employment opportunities across Canada to help workers find suitable employment and help employers find suitable workers. This program targets employers, individuals (e.g. job seekers, unemployed Canadians, students, newcomers and potential immigrants), career practitioners (e.g. employment and vocational counselling organizations, education/learning institutions, and community organizations) and government analysts and decision makers (including federal-provincial/territorial government organizations and programs, ESDC/Service Canada). Job Bank offers a free and bilingual job website, delivered in collaboration with provinces and territories, which allows employers to post available job opportunities and job seekers to search for jobs. In addition, Job Bank includes a variety of economic, labour market and demographic reports, including occupational profiles and projections. This program is legislated by subsections 60(1) and (2) of the Employment Insurance Act; subsection 58(c) of the Employment Insurance Regulations (National Employment Service); and Convention 88 of the International Labour Organization.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
20,558,111 20,558,111 20,558,111
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
222 222 222
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Labour market information responds to the needs of students, workers, employers, policy makers, governments and stakeholder organizations. Number of active employers using Job Bank

Data source: Administrative data

50,000 active employers on Job Bank March 31, 2018 Not available Not available

Active employers on Job Bank: 47,995

Indirect employers on Job Bank: 82,756

Total: 130,751*

Percentage of people who report finding a job as a result of Job Alerts

Data source: Administrative data

19% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 7.1% (54,078**)
Number of jobs matched to individuals

Data source: Administrative data

175,000 March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 77,465
Number of job postings disseminated through Job Bank and related tools

Data source: Administrative data

1,250,000 March 31, 2018 Not available Not available

Total: 1,252,139

Directly from Job Bank: 319,066 (25.5%)

From other government sources: 623,389 (49.8%)

From private job boards: 309,684 (24.7%)

Number of website visits

Data source: Administrative data

70,000,000 March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 67,372,234
Number of new job search service subscribers (Job Match and Job Alerts)

Data source: Administrative data

100,000 new Job Match users

250,000 new Job Alerts subscriber

March 31, 2018 Not available Not available

New Job Match users: 179,442

New Job Alerts subscribers: 212,520

Percentage of job postings for which employers reported filling a vacancy as a result of Job Bank (based on the employers who reported filling a vacancy)

Data source: Administrative data

42% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 42%
Number of wage and employment outlooks updated on a yearly basis for all economic regions, provinces/territories and nationally

Data source: Administrative data

Wage data***: 15,000

Employment outlooks***: 16,000

March 31, 2018

Wage data: 21,000

Employment outlooks: 12,000

Wage data: 16,500

Employment outlooks: 18,500

Wage data: 15,500

Employment outlooks: 16,500

* Active employers are those who have a Job Bank account and used the Job Bank for Employers module within the specified timeframe. Indirect employers are those whose jobs are supplied to Job Bank through a feed from another job board.
** In 2015-16 the indicator was reported as a number instead of a percentage. Starting in 2017-18, the indicator will be reported as a percentage
*** Please note that the move to the new National Occupational Classification (NOC) reduced the total number of occupations for each level of geography

Sub-Program: Sectoral Initiatives Program

Description

The Sectoral Initiatives Program is a grants and contributions program with the objective of addressing current and future skills shortages by supporting the development and distribution of sector-specific labour market intelligence, national occupational standards, and skills certification and accreditation systems. The mandate is to help industry identify, forecast and address human resources and skills issues through partnership-based projects for key sectors of the Canadian economy to help ease labour mobility and labour market adjustment.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Sectoral Initiatives Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
31,509,583 31,509,583 31,509,583
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
44 44 44
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Sectoral stakeholders benefit from industry-validated sectoral intelligence products, national occupational standards, and certification and accreditation programs. Number of labour market intelligence reports or forecasting systems, national occupational standards, certification and accreditation regimes developed or updated via Sectoral Initiatives Program projects

Data source: Administrative Data

Reports: 80

Forecasting systems: 10

National occupations standards (NOS): 45

Certification: 20

Accreditation programs: 10

March 31, 2018 Baseline year

Reports: 85

Forecasting systems: 12

NOS: 50

Certification: 36

Accreditation programs: 22

Reports: 131

Forecasting systems: 42

NOS (including e-competencies): 147

Certification: 42

Accreditation programs: 2

*Note: Targets are based on historical data and take into account the long-term nature of the projects and cyclical nature of the program. A decrease in the number of products in a particular fiscal year may simply indicate that new projects are starting while a significant increase may indicate several projects have been completed in that year.

Sub-Program: Literacy and Essential Skills

Description

The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills (OLES) aims to help adult Canadians improve their literacy and essential skills to better prepare for, get and keep a job, and adapt and succeed at work. As such, OLES is working closely with provincial and territorial governments to support the integration of essential skills into employment and training programs, which they in large part deliver, and for which they are further supported by federal labour market transfers such as the Canada Job Fund and Labour Market Development Agreements.

Particular emphasis is placed on supporting individuals with low skills and facing multiple barriers to employment such as Indigenous people, youth, and official language minority communities (OLMCs). Accordingly, OLES is working horizontally with other ESDC programs such as the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, the Youth Employment Strategy and the Enabling Fund for OLMCs. OLES is also partnering with other government departments, such as Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada, to enhance the availability of essential skills supports for those most in need (e.g. newcomers).

The literacy and essential skills grants and contributions appropriation is from both the Consolidated Revenue Fund – Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills (ALLESP) and Employment Insurance Part II – National Essential Skills Initiative (NESI). Funding is used to make strategic investments in transformative projects to replicate and scale up proven approaches to skills upgrading across Canada and to develop innovative approaches to improve the quality of employment and training supports that are more responsive to employer and worker needs.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program. The program also links with the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–18.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
28,921,263 32,421,263 32,421,263
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
51 51 51
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Adult Canadians have the literacy and essential skills they need to do their job, adapt and succeed in the labour market and contribute to their communities and families. Number of Canadians having accessed essential skills training or supports

Data source: Administrative Data

13,000 – 17,500 March 31, 2018 Not available 8,779 14,204
Number of organizations supporting essential skills training and development

Data source: Administrative Data

450 - 500 March 31, 2018 Not available 400 225

Sub-Program: Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship (Red Seal Program)

Description

Tradespeople are a key component of the highly skilled workforce that supports Canadian competitiveness. Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship targets skilled trades workers and registered apprentices, working with jurisdictions through the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA) to deliver the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program. The CCDA is comprised of the apprenticeship authorities from each province and territory and representatives from ESDC. The Red Seal Program helps to develop a highly qualified, productive and mobile skilled trades workforce by developing high-quality Red Seal products, including Red Seal occupational standards and interprovincial examinations for the trades in collaboration with industry. Tradespersons who meet the Red Seal standards receive a Red Seal endorsement on their provincial/territorial trade certificates.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
14,629,155 14,629,155 14,629,155

Note: Planned spending includes funding for the Flexibility and Innovation in Apprenticeship Technical Training (FIATT) pilot.

Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
46 46 46
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
The Red Seal Program is recognized by industry as a standard for certification of competency in the skilled trades. Percentage of Red Seal occupational standards that are up-to-date and reflect labour market needs

Data source: Red Seal Product Development Service Standards

100% March 31, 2018 96% 96% 88%*
Through increased progression in the first two years of an apprenticeship program, completions are enhanced in the designated Red Seal trades. Percentage of apprentices covered by a Red Seal trade

Data source: Registered Apprenticeship Information System, Statistics Canada

75% March 31, 2018 2013: 77% 2014: 78% 2015: Not available**
Percentage of apprentices who complete an apprenticeship program and obtain certification in a Red Seal trade

Data source: Registered Apprenticeship Information System, Statistics Canada***

50% March 31, 2018 2013: 48% 2014: 54% 2015: Not available

*To achieve greater efficiencies in collaboration with industry, the CCDA has aligned consultations on the development of Red Seal occupational standards with the harmonization of apprenticeship training. This is being done to be effectively meet the Forum of Labour Market Ministers commitments of 30 trades harmonized covering 90% of apprenticeships by 2020. In doing so, however, there are some low-usage trades' standards that are not being updated as frequently.
**The Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) is an annual survey that is released on an 18-month delay. The 2014 RAIS was released in September 2016.
*** This indicator is calculated by dividing the number of individuals who registered in an apprenticeship program five years previously (i.e. 2009) by the number of individuals who completed their program and obtained certification this year (i.e. 2014). A five-year time period is used for the calculation as data indicates that this is the average length of time required to complete an apprenticeship program.

Sub-Program: Apprenticeship Grants

Description

Apprenticeship grants are incentives to attract Canadians to the trades and to assist apprentices in the Red Seal trades to progress and complete their training. This program targets eligible Canadian citizens, permanent residents and protected persons who are out of high school and are registered apprentices in one of the 56 designated Red Seal trades. It is comprised of two grants: the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, a taxable cash grant of $1,000 per year for registered apprentices (up to a maximum of $2,000 per apprentice) who have successfully completed the technical and on-the-job training requirements for the first or second year/level of an apprenticeship program; and the Apprenticeship Completion Grant, an additional $2,000 taxable cash grant to registered apprentices upon completion of apprenticeship training and receipt of journeyperson certification. Eligibility for this program is tied to the Red Seal trades, as the Red Seal represents a standard of excellence that promotes the mobility of skilled tradespeople based on national standards. Delivery of apprenticeship grants to eligible registered apprentices involves responding to calls for information, collecting and processing applications, issuing payments and monitoring accuracy of payments.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Apprenticeship Grants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
120,588,634 120,588,634 120,588,634
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
72 72 72
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Participant progression in and completion of an apprenticeship program in a designated Red Seal trade is increased. Number of Incentive Grants issued

Data source: Administrative Data

50,300 March 31, 2018 52,376 52,166 52,415
Number of Completion Grants issued

Data source: Administrative Data

24,300 March 31, 2018 22,256 24,043 24,210
Apprenticeship Incentive Grant applicants receive a payment, or a non-payment notification, in a timely manner. Percentage of initial Apprenticeship Incentive Grant payments or non-payment notifications issued within 28 days

Data source: administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 98.7% 97% 99%
Apprenticeship Completion Grant applicants receive a payment, or a non-payment notification, in a timely manner. Percentage of initial Apprenticeship Completion Grant payments or non-payment notifications issued within 28 days

Data source: administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 99.3% 98% 99%

Sub-Program: Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Description

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) targets internationally trained professionals and tradespersons, working with provincial and territorial governments and various organizations (such as regulatory bodies, national associations and credential assessment agencies) to facilitate credential recognition processes and ensure they are fair, consistent, transparent and timely. This program provides strategic financial support to its stakeholders through contribution agreements for key high-demand professions and skilled trades as well as other occupations to ensure that professionals and tradespersons who have obtained their credentials in another country can fully use their skills in Canada's labour market. In order to streamline foreign credential recognition processes, this program facilitates national coordination among provinces and territories and other partners. The FCRP also works to implement domestic labour mobility initiatives, and complements the Agreement on Internal Trade, by facilitating national coordination among partners and reducing barriers faced by workers in regulated occupations as they pursue employment opportunities across the country.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
26,798,149 26,798,149 26,798,149
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
45 45 45
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
The labour market needs of immigrant workers, employers and other stakeholders are met. Portion of skilled immigrants in regulated occupations targeted by systemic foreign credential recognition interventions

Data source: Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Statistics Canada and administrative data

78% March 31, 2018 78% 80% 80%

Sub-Program: Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Description

The Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program plays a key role in supporting Canada's economic growth by enabling employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to fill short-term labour needs when Canadians and permanent residents are not available. This program is regulated through the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and is administered in partnership with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), through its Service Canada processing centres, assesses applications from employers requesting permission to hire temporary foreign workers and conducts Labour Market Impact Assessments to determine the likely effect these workers would have on the Canadian labour market. The Program assesses the impact by looking at available labour market information for the region and the occupation, the employers' recruitment and advertisement efforts, wages and working conditions, labour shortages and the transfer of skills and knowledge to Canadians. In addition, Service Canada responds to questions about the Program through Employer Contact Centres and via the Internet.

ESDC works closely with IRCC, the CBSA and the provinces and territories, through appropriate information sharing agreements, to monitor and share information that has an impact on the integrity of both the TFW Program and the International Mobility Program (IMP), which is led by IRCC. Service Canada conducts inspections for the TFW Program and, on behalf of IRCC, for the IMP. In Quebec, the TFW Program is administered in partnership with the Province.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
26,959,445 26,959,445 26,959,445
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
315 315 315
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Employers are provided with timely access to foreign workers when a genuine need exists. Percentage of eligible applications received during the fiscal year that are processed within 10 business days

Data source: Administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not available* Not available* 87.9%
Employers comply with the conditions and requirements of the Program. Percentage of employers receiving a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment to undergo an inspection

Data source: Administrative data

25% March 31, 2018 Not available* Not available* 25.7%
Canadians have access to Temporary Foreign Worker Program information through the Employer Contact Centre within the specialized call centres. Percentage of specialized calls answered by an Employer Contact Centre agent within 10 minutes

Data source: administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not available** 91% 81%

* No performance data available prior to 2015-16 as 2014-15 was an implementation year.
** New performance measure in 2014-15.

Sub-Program: Student Work-Integrated Learning Program

Description

The Student Work-Integrated Learning Program (SWILP) is a contributions program with the objective of supporting the establishment of sustainable multi-stakeholder partnerships, involving employers and post-secondary education (PSE) institutions that work collaboratively to create quality work-integrated learning (WIL) opportunities for PSE students in high-demand fields of the economy, and the development of innovative strategies to foster a culture of WIL in Canada.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Student Work-Integrated Learning Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
17,624,179 6,875,918 5,865,237
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
15 8 8
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Sustained multi-stakeholder partnerships, involving employers and PSE institutions continue to develop WIL opportunities for more PSE students and better align the technical, foundational, entrepreneurial and "work-ready" skills of PSE students. Number of work-integrated learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and business fields Baseline year March 31, 2018 Not applicable. Not applicable Not applicable

Program: Learning

In this section

Sub-Program: Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program

Description

The Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program provides repayable loans and non-repayable grants to help Canadians finance their participation in post-secondary education. Recipients of these loans and grants include full- and part-time students, students from low- and middle-income families, students with dependants and students with permanent disabilities. The Program also offers apprenticeship loans targeting apprentices registered in a Red Seal trade to help cover the cost of technical training. Apprentices registered in a Red Seal trade apprenticeship are able to apply for loans of up to $4,000 per period of technical training. Students and apprentices who receive loans also have access to debt management measures if they are experiencing financial difficulty in repaying their loans. These are managed in partnership with the participating provinces and territories, educational institutions and agencies, financial aid administrators, financial institutions and a service provider. Activities are enabled by the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, the Canada Student Loans Act and the Apprentice Loans Act and related Regulations. Provinces and territories that do not participate in this program are provided with an alternative payment to fund similar programs and services.

The Program uses funding from the following transfer payments:

  • Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program – Interest Payments and Liabilities (Statutory)
  • Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program – Direct Financing Arrangement (Statutory)
  • Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program – Canada Student Grants Program (Statutory)
  • Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program –Canada Apprentice Loans (Statutory)
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
1,972,346,785 2,048,297,129 2,134,406,229

* The increase in Planned Spending is due to the Budget 2016 measures to the Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program to make post-secondary education more affordable for low- and middle-income families.

Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
239 239 239
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Clients are satisfied with the quality of services they receive. Percentage of in-study and in-repayment borrowers who are satisfied with the overall loan experience provided by the Canada Loans and Grants for Students and Apprentices Program

Data source: CLGSAP Client Satisfaction Survey

78-80% March 31, 2018 81% 84% 83%
Apprentices registered in Red Seal trades benefit from financing for apprenticeship training. Number of Red Seal apprentices who received Canada Apprentice Loans

Data source: CLGSAP administrative data

Not applicable* Not applicable* Not available Not available 2015–16: 15,700 (Baseline year)

*As a need-based Program, a target is not set.

Sub-Program: Canada Education Savings Program

Description

The Government of Canada encourages Canadians to use Registered Education Savings Plans (RESP) to save for a child's post-secondary education. The Department administers two education savings incentives linked to RESPs:

  1. The Canada Education Savings Grant consists of a basic grant of 20% on the first $2,500 in annual personal contributions to an RESP (this grant is available to all Canadians regardless of their family income), as well as the Additional Canada Education Savings Grant, which consists of:
    1. 10% on the first $500 of annual personal contributions for children from families with a net income between $45,282* and $90,563*; or,
    2. 20% on the first $500 of annual personal contributions for children from families with net incomes of $45,282* or less.

    *Net family income levels are subject to annual indexing for inflation.

    The Canada Education Savings Grant is available until the calendar year in which the beneficiary turns 17, and the maximum lifetime amount, including the Additional Canada Education Savings Grant, is $7,200.

  2. The Canada Learning Bond is available for children from low-income families born in 2004 or later and provides an initial payment of $500 plus $100 for each year of eligibility, up to age 15, for a maximum of $2,000. Personal contributions are not required to receive the Canada Learning Bond.

These incentives are delivered through an alternative service delivery arrangement with financial institutions, banks, mutual fund companies and scholarship foundations. These incentives complement the Canada Student Loans Program and other labour market and skills development programs offered by the Department. Funding and activities in support of these incentives are governed by the Canada Education Savings Act and related Regulations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
996,729,808 1,025,729,808 1,050,729,808
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
109 109 109
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Children under 18 have savings for post-secondary education in RESPs. Number of new beneficiaries for the Canada Learning Bond

Data source: administrative data

130,000 December 31, 2017 106,205 107,669 109,813
Number of new beneficiaries for the Canada Education Savings Grant

Data source: administrative data

269,000* December 31, 2017 287,000 281,000 296,000
Percentage of children under 18 (in the current calendar year) who have ever received a Canada Education Savings Grant

Data source: administrative data

51.5% December 31, 2017 2013: 47.3% 2014: 48.7% 2015: 50.1%
Low-income families open RESPs for their children's post-secondary education. Percentage of eligible children in the current calendar year who have ever received a Canada Learning Bond

Data source: administrative data

35.4% December 31, 2017 2013: 29.8% 2014: 31.5% 2015: 33.1%

*The target for new beneficiaries who will receive the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) in 2017 is lower than in previous years (269,000 children). Given that more than half the population (51.5% by 2017) has already received this incentive, there will be fewer new children added every year moving forward. In keeping with this trend, the number of new beneficiaries receiving the CESG will continue to decrease over time.

Program: Labour

In this section

Sub-Program: Labour Relations

Description

This program seeks to promote and sustain cooperative workplace relations in federally regulated workplaces, which cover strategically important sectors of the economy, including banking; telecommunications; broadcasting; air transportation; interprovincial rail, road and pipeline transportation; shipping; uranium mining and nuclear facilities; grain handling along with workplaces in the territories, Aboriginal public administration and some Crown corporations. The program provides mediation and conciliation services to assist employers and unions in achieving collective agreements without resorting to a work stoppage. It offers dispute prevention and relationship development assistance to parties in the form of skills development training, facilitation services and grievance mediation. This program also appoints arbitrators for grievances under Part I of the Canada Labour Code, for unjust dismissal and wage recovery appeals under Part III of the Code and appeals under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
16,711,057 16,711,057 16,711,057
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
136 136 136
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Labour relations are cooperative Percentage of labour disputes settled under Part I (Industrial Relations) of the Canada Labour Code without work stoppages, where parties were assisted by the Labour Program officers

Data source: Administrative data

92% March 31, 2018 97% 95% 94%

Sub-Program: Workplace Health and Safety

Description

This program seeks to promote and sustain safe workplaces in the federal jurisdiction (interprovincial transportation, post office and courier companies, telecommunications, banking, grain handling, nuclear facilities, federal Crown corporations, federal public service and Aboriginal governments and their employees). It seeks to ensure federal employers' compliance with relevant occupational health and safety standards through employer and employee cooperation to ensure healthy and safe workplaces in targeted high-risk industries. It also provides income support and rehabilitation support to injured federal workers and merchant seamen.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
195,511,846 195,511,846 195,511,846
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
270 270 270
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Sub-programs will be phased out in the Departmental Results Framework. No indicator will be provided. Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Sub-Sub-Program: Occupational Health and Safety

Description

The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Program aims to reduce work-related accidents and illnesses in federal jurisdiction workplaces The development and amendments to legislation and regulations under the Canada Labour Code is the responsibility of the OHS Program to ensure that workplaces are keeping up to the demands of the evolving workforce. The role is to create tools that assist employers and employees to understand their duties and rights under the Code. Tools include promotional material and proactive advice to employers on how to comply with the Code. Conducting inspections and investigations, issuing directions and, if necessary, initiating prosecutions are some of the many ways the program reduces workplace related accidents. Further, under the Labour Funding Program, a grant is disbursed that supports federal workplace health and safety objectives linked to Part II of the Canada Labour Code.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
21,519,701 21,519,701 21,519,701
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
208 208 208
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Workplaces are safe and healthy Percentage of all Occupational Health and Safety activities devoted to prevention

Data source: LA2000

60% March 31, 2018 Not applicable* Not applicable* Not applicable*

*2016-17 is the baseline year.

Sub-Sub-Program: Federal Workers' Compensation

Description

This program oversees income maintenance, medical benefits, support of the return to work process and vocational rehabilitation services to workers in the federal public sector who sustain an occupational injury or illness. It also provides benefits to injured merchant seamen, survivors of employees slain on duty and inmates. The program ensures compliance with federal statutes through collaboration with federal employers, employees and provincial workers' compensation boards. Shorter reporting times will result in earlier intervention and, subsequently, quicker returns to work, positively influencing worker productivity and social and financial costs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
173,992,145 173,992,145 173,992,145
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
62 62 62
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Government employees who sustain an occupational injury or illness have timely access to the compensation, benefits and remedies to which they are entitled under the Government Employees Compensation Act Percentage of claims forwarded to workers' compensation boards within 15 days from the date the claim is received by the Labour Program

Data source: National Injury Compensation System

80% March 31, 2018 95% 71% 74%

Sub-Program: Labour Standards and Equity

Description

This program seeks to promote and sustain fair and equitable workplaces in the federal jurisdiction (interprovincial transportation, post office and courier companies, telecommunications, banking, grain handling, nuclear facilities, federal Crown corporations, companies that have contracts with the federal government, and some First Nations employers and employees). The program administers and enforces labour standards through education and compliance activities. It also seeks to identify and eliminate barriers to employment for the four designated groups (women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities) in the federal jurisdiction. The program also reduces the economic insecurity of workers through the protection of wages and vacation, severance and termination pay when their employer declares bankruptcy or becomes subject to receivership

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
67,528,964 67,528,964 67,528,964
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
198 198 198
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Sub-programs will be phased out in the Departmental Results Framework. No indicator will be provided. Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Sub-Sub-Program: Labour Standards

Description

This program seeks to support fair and equitable workplaces through the administration and enforcement of labour standards (Part III of the Canada Labour Code) that define minimum conditions of employment in the federal jurisdiction. The program also develops educational materials to assist employers and workers in understanding their rights and obligations; provides advice to employers and workers who have questions about their rights and responsibilities; and engages in proactive inspections of employer records to verify compliance, while targeting those employers with a history of non compliance. The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service contributes to the dispute resolution process when it becomes necessary to appoint adjudicators to hear unjust dismissal complaints and referees to hear wage recovery appeals under Part III of the Canada Labour Code.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
14,775,222 14,775,222 14,775,222
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
159 159 159
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Employment standards are met

Percentage of all Labour Standards activities devoted to prevention

Data source: LA2000

10% March 31, 2018 Not applicable* Not applicable* Not applicable*

Percentage annual (year-over-year) decrease of monetary complaints backlog**

Data source: LA2000

10% March 31, 2018 Not applicable* Not applicable* Not applicable*

*2016-17 is the baseline year.
** Backlog refers to complaints that are over 180 days.

Sub-Sub-Program: Workplace Equity

Description

This program helps to achieve equitable representation in workplaces by requiring federally regulated private-sector employers and federal contractors to identify and eliminate employment barriers for the four designated groups (women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities) under the Employment Equity Act. It also seeks to prevent the emergence of future employment barriers and to foster a climate of equity in these organizations by enforcing the Employment Equity Act through mandatory employer reporting as well as engagement initiatives. The program administers the Legislated Employment Equity Program and the Federal Contractors Program in order to support the federal government's objectives and policies on employment equity. In addition, the program manages the Workplace Opportunities: Removing Barriers to Equity grant and contribution program which supports federally regulated private-sector employers covered by the Employment Equity Act in their efforts to improve designated group representation through partnerships and industry-tailored strategies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
1,562,826 1,562,826 1,562,826
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
14 14 14
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Workplaces are diverse and inclusive

Percentage of federally regulated private-sector employers whose representation equals or surpasses Canadian labour market availability for 2+ designated groups or who demonstrated progress towards representation since the previous reporting period

Data source: Workplace Equity Information Management System

65% September 1, 2017 Not applicable* Not applicable* Not applicable*
Percentage of employment equity reports that are in compliance with the reporting requirements of the Act

Data source: Workplace Equity Information Management System

95% September 1, 2017 Not applicable* Not applicable* Not applicable*
Percentage of required compliance assessments (under the Federal Contractors Program) completed within six months of initiation

Data source: Workplace Equity Information Management System

90% September 1, 2017 Not available Not available Not available

*2016-17 is the baseline year.

Sub-Sub-Program: Wage Earner Protection Program

Description

This program is designed to reduce the economic insecurity of Canadian workers who are owed unpaid wages and vacation, termination and severance pay when their employer declares bankruptcy or becomes subject to receivership. Individuals can receive an amount of up to four weeks' maximum insurable earnings under the Employment Insurance Act. Service Canada's delivery of Wage Earner Protection Program payments involves answering program queries by telephone, the Internet and at in-person points of service; collecting and processing applications; issuing notifications of initial payments or non-payment decisions; collecting and processing reconsiderations of initial decisions; collecting and processing requests for review by the Minister; and monitoring claims for accuracy. When eligible individuals receive payments under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act, they sign over their rights as creditors of the employer to the federal government to the extent of the Wage Earner Protection Program payment. Applicants who disagree with the initial eligibility decision can request a review by the Minister within 30 days of the initial decision and file a request for appeal within 60 days of the review decision. The appeals are handled by an independent adjudicator appointed by the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The federal government seeks recovery of the amounts as the creditor of the employer in the bankruptcy or receivership process. This program covers workers in all labour jurisdictions.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Wage Earner Protection Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
51,190,916 51,190,916 51,190,916
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
25 25 25
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Wage Earner Protection Program applicants receive a payment, or a non-payment notification, in a timely manner. Percentage of initial Wage Earner Protection Program payments and non-payment notifications issued within 35* calendar days

Data source: Common System for Grants and Contributions and administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**

* The indicator was modified in 2016-17 by changing the service standard from 42 days to 35 days. As a result, historical results are not available.

** 2016-17 is the baseline year.

Sub-Program: International Labour Affairs

Description

This program seeks to protect Canadian workers and employers from unfair competition from other countries with poor labour standards or lax labour law enforcement. The program negotiates international labour standards that reflect Canadian values and oversees Canada's participation in international labour forums. This program also promotes fundamental labour rights internationally to support equitable growth and social stability in developing countries, protect human rights and contribute to reducing the growing global divide between rich and poor. The program negotiates and implements international labour cooperation agreements and other frameworks and provides technical assistance to partner countries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
5,732,912 5,732,912 5,732,912
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
34 34 34
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Increased respect by partner countries for fundamental international labour principles. Number of agreements, instruments, action plan and joint activities adopted, undertaken or implemented to strengthen respect for international labour standards

Data source: Administrative data

5 March 31, 2018 Not available Not available Not available

Program: Income Security

In this section

Sub-Program: Old Age Security

Description

The Old Age Security (OAS) program is one of the cornerstones of Canada's public retirement income system. The objective of the OAS program is to provide a base upon which individuals can add income from other sources, such as the Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan, employer-sponsored pension plans and personal registered retirement savings plans, as well as investments and personal savings, to address their particular financial circumstances. The OAS program provides the basic OAS pension to all eligible seniors aged 65 and over who meet the legal status and residence requirements; the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) to low-income OAS recipients; as well as the Allowances for low-income individuals aged 60 to 64 who are the spouses or common-law partners of GIS recipients, or who are widows or widowers. Service Canada's delivery of OAS benefits involves answering program queries through specialized call centres, via the Internet and at in-person points of service; collecting and processing applications and issuing payments; monitoring decisions and payments for accuracy; administering requests for reconsideration of a decision; conducting client authentication and identification; and preventing, detecting and deterring fraud and abuse.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payments:

  • Old Age Security pension
  • Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • Allowances
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
51,311,551,110 54,206,567,405 57,256,304,556
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
1,730 1,721 1,580
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Canada's eligible seniors receive the Old Age Security pension benefits to which they are entitled. Percentage of seniors receiving the Old Age Security pension in relation to the total number of eligible seniors (Old Age Security take-up rate)

Data source: Statistics Canada Longitudinal Administrative Databank

98% March 31, 2018 2011: 98.2% 2012: 98.2% 2013: 98.0%*
Percentage of seniors receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement in relation to the total number of eligible seniors (Guaranteed Income Supplement take-up rate)

Data source: Statistics Canada, custom tabulation from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank

90% March 31, 2018 2011: 90.2% 2012: 86.1% 2013: 85.2%
Eligible Old Age Security pension applicants receive a benefit payment in the right amount and in a timely manner. Percentage of Old Age Security basic benefits paid within the first month of entitlement

Data source: administrative data

90% March 31, 2018 92.4% 88.0% 88.4%
Percentage of payment accuracy of Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement/Allowance and Allowance for the Survivor

Data source: administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 99.7% 99.9% 98.6%
Canadians have access to Old Age Security information through specialized call centres. Percentage of specialized calls answered by a Canada Pension Plan/Old Age Security agent within 10 minutes

Data source: administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not available** 96% 86%

* Since July 2013, seniors have the option to defer receipt of their OAS pension in exchange for higher benefits at a later date. The OAS take-up rate can therefore be underestimated.
** The Service standard was revised as of 2014-15. No results are available for 2013-14.

Sub-Program: Canada Pension Plan

Description

The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is an income security plan that is funded by the contributions of employees, employers and self-employed persons as well as the revenue earned on CPP investments. The CPP covers virtually all employed and self-employed persons in Canada, excluding Quebec, which operates its own comprehensive plan, the Quebec Pension Plan. The CPP is a main pillar of Canada's retirement income system. In addition, it provides monthly income benefits in the event of the death of the contributor. More than 5 million people receive benefits. The CPP is a statutory program that is governed by the federal government and the provinces. It is enabled by the CPP legislation and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act. Applicants must meet the eligibility criteria in order to receive benefits. Service Canada's delivery of CPP benefits involves answering program queries through specialized call centres, via the Internet and at in-person points of service; collecting and processing applications and issuing payments; monitoring decisions and payments for accuracy; administering requests for reconsideration of a decision; conducting client authentication and identification; and preventing, detecting and deterring fraud and abuse.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
41,458,800,285 43,713,878,317 46,120,898,409
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
1,497 1,557 1,001
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Eligible Canada Pension Plan contributors are provided with a measure of income security in the event of retirement. Proportion of new retirement pension beneficiaries who are in the following age groups (60–64, 65, 66+)

Data source: Canada Pension Plan Administrative Database

  • Actuarial reductions: 65%
  • No actuarial adjustment: 30%
  • Actuarial increases: 5%
March 31, 2018
  • (60-64): 65.3%
  • (65): 30.1%
  • (66+): 4.7%
  • (60-64): 65.1%
  • (65): 29.5%
  • (66+): 5.4%*
  • (60-64): 64.7%
  • (65): 29.4%
  • (66+): 5.9%
Percentage of Canada Pension Plan contributors aged 70+ not receiving retirement benefits

Data source: Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions

1% March 31, 2018 2012: 1% 2013: 1% 2014: 1%
Eligible survivors and/or dependent children of deceased Canada Pension Plan contributors are protected against loss of earnings in the event of a contributor's death. Percentage of Canada Pension Plan contributors who have contributory coverage for survivor benefits

Data source: Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions

75% March 31, 2018 2012: 75.2% 2013: 74.9% 2014: 73.8%
Eligible Canada Pension Plan retirement applicants receive a benefit payment in the right amount and in a timely manner. Percentage of Canada Pension Plan retirement benefits paid within the first month of entitlement

Data source: administrative data

90% March 31, 2018 96.6% 91.1% 94.8%
Percentage of payment accuracy of Canada Pension Plan

Data source: administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 99.7% 99.9% 99.9%
Canadians have access to Canada Pension Plan information through specialized call centres. Percentage of specialized calls answered by a Canada Pension Plan/Old Age Security agent within 10 minutes

Data source: administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not available* 96% 86%

* Service standard was revised as of 2014-15. No results are available for 2013-14.

Sub-Program: Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits

Description

The Canada Pension Plan Disability (CPPD) benefit is designed to provide partial income replacement to eligible CPP contributors who are under age 65 with a severe and prolonged disability, as defined in the Canada Pension Plan legislation. There are two eligibility criteria for the CPPD program. First, applicants must have made contributions to the program in four of the last six years, with minimum levels of earnings in each of these years, or three of the last six years for those with 25 or more years of contributions. Second, they must demonstrate that their physical or mental disability prevents them from working regularly at any job that is substantially gainful, and that it is long-term and of indefinite duration or is likely to result in death. Children of CPPD beneficiaries are also eligible for a flat-rate monthly benefit up to the age of 18, or up to age 25 if attending school full-time. Service Canada's delivery of CPPD benefits involves answering program queries through specialized call centres, via the Internet and at in-person points of service; collecting and processing applications and issuing payments; monitoring decisions and payments for accuracy; administering requests for reconsideration of a decision; conducting client authentication and identification; and preventing, detecting and deterring fraud and abuse.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
4,583,760,675 4,750,085,405 4,888,397,146
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
1,253 1,265 1,031
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Eligible working-age Canadians with severe and prolonged disabilities have a measure of income security. Percentage of Canada Pension Plan contributors who have contributory coverage for Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits

Data source: Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions

68% March 31, 2018 68% 67% 67%
Percentage of beneficiaries who cease to receive the benefit each year due to a return to work

Data source: CPP administrative database

Contextual indicator Not applicable (contextual indicator) 7.7% 7.6% 6.1%*
Canada Pension Plan-Disability benefit applicants receive a benefit payment decision in a timely manner. Percentage of Canada Pension Plan Disability initial application decisions made within 120 calendar days of receipt of a completed application

Data source: administrative data

80%** (Revised from 75%) March 31, 2018 81.2% 80.8% 86.1%
Percentage of CPP Disability terminal illness application decisions made within 5 business days of receipt of a completed application

Data source: administrative data

95%** March 31, 2018 Not available Not available Not available
Percentage of CPP Disability grave condition application decisions made within 30 calendar days of receipt of a completed application

Data source: administrative data

80%** March 31, 2018 Not available Not available Not available
Clients making requests for reconsideration of Canada Pension Plan Disability decisions receive a reconsideration decision in a timely manner. Percentage of decisions made within 120 calendar days of receipt of the reconsideration request

Data source: administrative data

80%** (Revised from 70%) March 31, 2018 79.8% 78.3% 80.8%
Canadians have access to Canada Pension Plan-Disability benefit information through specialized call centres. Percentage of specialized calls answered by a Canada Pension Plan/Old Age Security agent within 10 minutes

Data source: administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not available*** 96% 86%

* Total beneficiaries who leave the benefit each year to return to work relative to total beneficiaries who leave the benefit each year (return to work, are deceased, the CPP retirement benefit).
** The Department reviewed its CPP Disability service standards in 2016-17. The targets for both the CPP Disability initial decision and reconsideration decision service standards were increased to 80%, and two new service standards for "terminal illness" and "grave condition" application decisions were created. Changes were publically announced on October 31, 2016.
*** The Service Standard was revised as of 2014-15. No results are available for 2013-14.

Sub-Program: Canada Disability Savings Program

Description

The Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) was introduced in 2008 to help people with disabilities improve their long-term financial security by providing a tool to encourage them and their families save for the future. Complementary to the RDSP, the Canada Disability Savings Grants and Canada Disability Savings Bonds provide additional support to encourage savings.

Canadian residents with a Social Insurance Number who are eligible for the federal Disability Tax Credit can open an RDSP until the end of the calendar year in which they reach 59 years of age. Once an RDSP is opened, the beneficiary may receive grants and bonds until the end of the calendar year in which the beneficiary reaches 49 years of age.

Assets held in and payments received from RDSPs will not affect the eligibility for federal benefits, such as the Canada Child Benefit, the Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax Credit, Old Age Security and Employment Insurance.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
574,981,112 651,981,112 731,081,112
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
24 24 24
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
People with severe and prolonged disabilities have a measure of long-term financial security. Percentage of individuals (aged 0–49) eligible for the Disability Tax Credit who have a Registered Disability Savings Plan 28%** December 31, 2017* 17.2% 16.4% 22.1%
Percentage of Registered Disability Savings Plan beneficiaries (aged 0–49) receiving a Canada Disability Savings Grant and/or a Canada Disability Savings Bond 81% December 31, 2017* 84% 83% 83.5%
Percentage of Registered Disability Savings Plan beneficiaries (aged 0–49) of low to modest income who receive both a Registered Disability Savings Bond and a Registered Disability Savings Grant 57% December 31, 2017* Not available Not available 57.2%

* The Canada Disability Savings Program is now reporting by calendar year.
** For 2016-17 the target was 15%. Current results indicate that as of March 31, 2016 we have reached 22.1%. Projections from future growth allow us to project that we will reach at least 28% by the end of 2017.
*** Data source originates from the Canada Disability Saving Program Administrative Database and Canada Revenue Agency Disability Tax Credit data

Sub-Program: National Child Benefit

Description

This program has been eliminated and replaced by the Canada Child Benefit (CCB). Responsibility for the CCB has been transferred to the Canada Revenue Agency

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
180,944 180,944 180,944
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
2 2 2

Program: Social Development

In this section

Sub-Program: Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Description

Homeless individuals and families can face a wide range of personal, financial and social challenges. Addressing these challenges in a sustainable manner requires the coordinated action of a number of partners, including the federal government. The objective of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy is to support the implementation of effective, sustainable and community-based solutions to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada. As a community-based strategy, it provides grant and contribution funding to communities and service providers across the country with a focus on the Housing First approach. Housing First involves giving people who are homeless a place to live first, and then providing other necessary supports, such as addiction treatment, to help them stabilize their lives and work toward recovery and reintegration into the community. Federal funds are directed toward community priorities, which are identified through an inclusive community planning process involving officials from all levels of government, community stakeholders, and the private and voluntary sectors.

These services target individuals, families and Aboriginal people who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless in major urban centres, rural communities and the North. Complementary activities under the Strategy include promoting data development and collection; disseminating knowledge among communities, partners and stakeholders; and exploring innovative approaches to homelessness such as social enterprise (businesses that support a social good). Funding to not-for-profit organizations, municipal governments, and Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations assists communities to more effectively address homelessness issues and supports activities to help alleviate and prevent homelessness across Canada.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Homelessness Partnering Strategy.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
174,650,829 121,298,705 3,560,768
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
150 133 26
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Housing stability is created for homeless individuals and those at risk of becoming homeless. Reduction in the usage of emergency shelters, as measured by number of "bednights" utilized

Data source: National Homelessness Information System (NHIS)*

15% reduction from 2013 baseline 17-18 4,970,010 5,057,813 Not available**
Reduction in the estimated number of shelter users who are episodically or chronically homeless

Data source: National Homelessness Information System (NHIS)*

20% reduction from 2013 baseline 17-18 1,988 1,866 1,983 (a 0.3% reduction***)

*Shelter data is available on a calendar year basis.
**There is a lag in data availability. Complete shelter data from 2015 will not be available until winter 2017.
***There was a 6.1% reduction from 2013 to 2014 and a 6.3% increase from 2014 to 2015, which essentially negated the gains from 2013 to 2014. Overall, when comparing 2015 to the 2013 baseline, there has been a 0.3% reduction in the number of chronic and episodic shelter users.

Sub-Program: Social Development Partnerships Program

Description

The Social Development Partnerships Program makes strategic investments to support government priorities related to children and families, people with disabilities, the voluntary sector, official language minority communities and other vulnerable populations by playing a unique role in furthering broad social goals. It provides an opportunity to work in partnership with social not-for-profit organizations to help improve the life outcomes of these target groups. Activities funded by the program are expected to lead to the development and sharing of knowledge of existing and emerging social issues; the creation of collaboration, partnerships, alliances and networks; and the development of approaches to respond to existing and emerging social issues. Over the long term, program support for these activities will help the not-for-profit sector and partners be more effective in addressing existing and emerging social issues, and will help target populations have access to information, programs and services tailored to their unique needs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
34,380,994 34,380,994 34,380,994
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
132 132 132
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Not-for-profit sector and partners have improved capacity to respond to existing and emerging social issues for target populations. Percentage of Social Development Partnerships Program projects that leverage funds from non-federal partners 90% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 79.4%*

*In the last fiscal year, only the Children and Families component of the SDPP had mandated leveraging. From 2016-17 onward leveraging of funds was not mandatory for SDPPD recipients, but was an encouraged practice for the SDPPD.

Sub-Sub-Program: Children and Families

Description

Children and families can face unique personal, social and economic pressures that challenge their ability to adapt and thrive. As a result, families may experience a diminished quality of life, with limited ability to participate in the workplace or to contribute to their communities. With the objective of supporting the creation of more responsive programs, services or tools to better serve the diverse needs of children and their families, particularly those living in disadvantaged circumstances, the Children and Families program makes strategic grant- and contribution-based investments. Grant and contribution funding supports projects in the not-for-profit sector to meet the social needs and aspirations of children and families and of other vulnerable populations. The program is moving toward a delivery model based on third-party intermediaries that have expertise on the ground in communities. Funding recipients are also encouraged to find new partners across the private and public sectors to complement federal money in order to maximize the effect of interventions on complex social issues at the community level. This component is also the source of funding for official language minority communities, Canada's Volunteer, and the analysis and dissemination of the General Social Survey-Giving, Volunteering and Participating.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Social Development Partnerships Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
16,227,168 16,227,168 16,227,168
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
64 64 64
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Not-for-profit organizations have improved capacity to respond to existing and emerging social issues related to children and families. Percentage of Social Development Partnerships Program's (projects) – Children and Families component that leverage funds from non-federal partners

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

90% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 100%
Not-for-profit organizations have improved services for children, families and other vulnerable individuals. Amount invested by non-federal partners for every dollar invested through Social Development Partnerships Program – Children and Families component

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

$1.50 March 31, 2018 Not available Not available $3 (based on various funding ratios)
Number of children, families or other vulnerable individuals who directly benefitted from the services provided by the Social Development Partnerships Program projects.

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

Baseline year March 31, 2019 Not available* Not available* Not available*

* This indicator is new as of 2017-18; therefore, there are no historical data.

Sub-Sub-Program: Disability

Description

The Disability component of the Social Development Partnerships Program, supports projects intended to improve the participation and integration of people with disabilities in all aspects of Canadian society with respect to social inclusion. Canadians with disabilities can face unique personal, social and economic barriers to participation. With the objective of promoting the social inclusion and full participation of Canadians with disabilities in learning, work and community life by increasing the effectiveness of the not-for-profit sector, this program makes strategic grant- and contribution-based investments. Funded projects support a wide range of initiatives that address social issues and barriers that confront people with disabilities. Funding recipients are encouraged to find new partners across the private and public sectors to complement federal money in order to maximize the effect of interventions on complex social issues.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Social Development Partnerships Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
18,153,826 18,153,826 18,153,826
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
68 68 68
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Not-for-profit organizations have improved capacity to respond to existing and emerging social issues related to disabilities. Percentage of Social Development Partnerships Program – Disability component projects that leverage funds from non-federal partners

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

90% March 31, 2018 Not available Not available 63.1%*
Amount invested by non-federal partners for every dollar invested through Social Development Partnerships Program- Disabilities Component

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

$0.15 March 31, 2018 Not available Not available $0.16

*During the 2015–16 period, 12 out of 19 organizations funded from the 2012 call for proposals and unsolicited proposals reported leveraged funds (either cash or in-kind) from other sources than federal partners.

Sub-Program: New Horizons for Seniors Program

Description

The growth in the population of seniors in Canada is accelerating, with the total number of seniors projected to reach approximately 10 million by 2036. This presents both opportunities and risks for seniors and their communities. Empowering seniors, encouraging them to share their knowledge, skills and experience with others in the community, and enhancing seniors' social well-being and community vitality are goals of the New Horizons for Seniors Program. The Program provides grants and contributions funding for projects led or inspired by seniors who want to make a difference in the lives of others and in their communities. The Program has five objectives: promoting volunteerism among seniors and other generations; engaging seniors in the community through the mentoring of others; expanding awareness of elder abuse, including financial abuse; supporting the social participation and inclusion of seniors; and providing capital assistance for new and existing community projects and programs for seniors. Community-based projects are typically eligible to receive up to $25,000 in grant funding per project for up to one year. Pan-Canadian projects are eligible to receive up to $750,000 for up to three years, to address the social isolation of seniors through social innovation approaches, partnerships and a focus on outcomes. To test elements of the Social Partnerships Agenda in the New Horizons for Seniors Program, pilot projects involving the leveraging of funds commenced in 2014–15 for a period of two years. This program is complemented by a range of policies, programs and services targeted at seniors, such as the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security and the National Seniors Council.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: New Horizons for Seniors Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
49,289,168 49,289,168 49,289,168
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
54 54 54
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Communities have the capacity to address local issues by engaging seniors. Total number of New Horizons for Seniors Program projects that received funding.

Data source: Common System for Grants and Contributions (CSGC) and Administrative Data-project reports

1850 March 31, 2018 1,776 1,921 1934

Sub-Program: Universal Child Care Benefit

Description

This program has been eliminated and replaced by the Canada Child Benefit (CCB). Responsibility for the CCB has been transferred to the Canada Revenue Agency

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18* Planned Spending 2018–19* Planned Spending 2019–20* Planned Spending
24,415,874 12,415,874 715,874

* The decrease in Planned Spending is due to the elimination of the Universal Child Care Benefit and its replacement by the new Canada Child Benefit.

Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
4 4 4

Sub-Program: Enabling Accessibility Fund

Description

People with disabilities often experience barriers to their full participation and inclusion in activities of everyday living. The objective of the Enabling Accessibility Fund is to improve accessibility, remove barriers and enable Canadians with disabilities to participate in and contribute to their community. The Fund supports the capital costs of construction and renovations related to improving accessibility and safety for people with disabilities in Canadian communities and workplaces. Grants or contributions are provided to eligible recipients for capital cost projects that increase access for people with disabilities to their programs and services, which in turn can create an equal opportunity for people with disabilities to participate in community activities or access employment opportunities.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Enabling Accessibility Fund.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
17,013,372 15,013,372 15,013,372
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
13 13 13
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Recipient organizations have accessible facilities, technologies and transportation. Number of communities with funded projects

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

215 March 31, 2018 159 175 200*
Dollar amount of funds leveraged (cash and/or in-kind) by other sources of funding for every dollar invested through Enabling Accessibility Fund funding

Data source: Administrative Data-project reports

$0.35** March 31, 2018 $0.68 $0.80 $0.81

* Previous calculation error in the Departmental Performance Report, revised from 203 to 200
** Combined 2016 CFP (Community Accessibility Stream and Workplace Accessibility Stream) with 35% mandatory leveraging for both streams.

Sub-Program: Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children

Description

The Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children (PMMC) is an income support grant available to eligible parents who have suffered a loss of income as a result of taking time away from work to cope with the death or disappearance of their child (or children) under the age of 18 as a result of a probable Criminal Code offence. Service Canada's delivery of PMMC benefits involves answering program queries, collecting and processing applications, and issuing payments.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending 2019–20 Planned Spending
11,251,166 11,251,166 11,251,166
Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18 2018–19 2019–20
11 11 11
Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
The financial burden on parents of children who are deceased or missing due to a probable Criminal Code offence and who take time away from work to cope with the tragic situation is eased. Proportion of successful applicants

Data source: Administrative Data

Not applicable Not applicable 67% 73%* 46%
Average number of weeks paid per incidence

Data source: Administrative Data

Not applicable Not applicable 35 35 35
Parents receive an initial benefit payment or a non-payment notification in a timely manner. Percentage of initial Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children payments or non-payment notifications issued within 35 calendar days.

Data source: Common System for Grants and Contributions administrative data

90% March 31, 2018 100% 93%* 100%

* The historical data have been updated to more accurately reflect program performance. Due to the nature of financial transactions, historical numbers can change.

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