Planned results: What we want to achieve this year and beyond

Official title: ESDC 2017-2018 Departmental Plan

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Programs and priorities

Program 1.1: Service Network Supporting Government Departments

Description

This program supports Government of Canada programs by ensuring that Canadians have the information necessary to make informed choices about available programs and services, and the tools to access them, while supporting migration to preferred service channels. Canadians are able to: access information about ESDC and other Government of Canada programs and services in the most accessible and convenient way; have their questions answered quickly and accurately; and receive or be directed to the information or service they need. Under this program, information and services are delivered to Canadians through the Internet, through 1 800 O-Canada and its customized telephone services and through a network of in-person points of service.

Planning highlights

Improving in-person service

In 2017-2018, ESDC will look for opportunities to improve access to Service Canada in-person service. In addition, the Department will look for new ways to improve service based on responses received from the EI Service Quality survey, a study conducted in 2016 that focused on client experience with EI service delivery.

Client experience management

In 2017-2018, ESDC will be gathering the data and insights needed to enable a more consistent and user-friendly service experience when Canadians interact with ESDC online, in person and over the phone. We will work directly with Canadians to better understand their needs and preferences, and identify key areas for service improvement, using tools such as journey mapping to observe and document how our clients interact with us, as well as client experience testing through hands-on testing of new models and products in multiple settings. We will also continue to share the Office of Client Satisfaction's client feedback data with departmental stakeholders to inform service delivery initiatives. Finally, we will gather client feedback to measure progress and ensure that service delivery design improvements truly meet our clients' needs.

Web renewal

In 2017-2018, ESDC, in its role as principal publisher for the Government of Canada, will continue to work in conjunction with Treasury Board Secretariat to migrate priority content and websites to Canada.ca. Ongoing operational support for the Social Media Account Management Solution (SMAMS) will continue with regular webinars and information sessions to ensure institutions are leveraging the full capabilities of the functionality within the SMAMS.

Now that it has moved its programs and services web content to Canada.ca, ESDC will continue to optimize its quality throughout 2017-2018 in support of the Service Strategy and related service improvement initiatives.

eAccount initiative

In 2017-2018, the Department will make strategic investments to improve the service offerings of My Service Canada Account (MSCA) with a focus on the online offerings for EI, CPP and OAS. This will build on the interconnectivity introduced with the Canada Revenue Agency's portal. These investments will be carefully balanced in order to achieve the needed benefits for citizens while planning a transition of MSCA to the future eAccount portal. Planning and procurement activities to develop the future eAccount portal as ESDC's single online window for online services will continue.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Canadians are able to access information about Government of Canada programs and services in the most accessible and convenient way  

Percentage of Canadians with access to a Service Canada point of service within 50 km of where they live

Source: Administrative data

90%  March 31, 2018 95.9% 96.1% 96.2%

Percentage of 1 800 O-Canada calls answered

Source: Administrative data

95%  March 31, 2018 Not applicable* Not applicable* 99.5%
  • * 2015-2016 was the baseline year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 61,037,812
  • 2017-2018 Planned spending: 61,037,812
  • 2018-2019 Planned spending: 58,554,056
  • 2019-2020 Planned spending: 58,554,056

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018: 389
  • 2018-2019: 389
  • 2019-2020: 389

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Program 1.2: Delivery of Services for Other Government of Canada Programs

Description

This program provides service delivery, oversight and monitoring on behalf of other government department programs through service delivery agreements. It provides Canadians access to a range of Government of Canada programs, benefits and services in person, by phone, by mail and over the Internet through the provision of basic and detailed program and service information; application intake and review for completeness; client authentication and validation of identity documents; quick and direct access to specialized agents within the other department; and provision of space in the service delivery network for other departments. It enables a move from department and program siloes to the achievement of a seamless service delivery network, resulting in timelier, accurate and cost-effective service delivery to Canadians.

Planning highlights

Passport modernization

ESDC is working with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) on modernizing the Passport Program to increase access to services; strengthen integrity and security of the program; and to improve efficiency. Changes from a service delivery perspective, including the replacement of the current passport issuance system and the introduction of an online channel, are advancing to support the transformation.

Valuable experience was gained from preliminary testing of the new passport issuance system. The project is now exploring ways to refine processes and to improve system functionality to support a successful implementation. Other planning highlights pertaining to Passport include:

  • conducting business transformation work to prepare for new service delivery options; and
  • preparing for the deployment of a new passport issuance system.

In addition to the modernization efforts, ESDC will improve access for citizens to passport services by:

  • adding document validating services to 128 offices where passport applications are currently accepted; and
  • expanding passport services to an additional 169 offices.
Partnerships framework

The Department will develop a partnerships framework that will include a common approach and model to establishing and managing service delivery partnerships that improve services to Canadians. In 2017-2018, the Department will:

  • determine the feasibility of expanding an ESDC/Government of Northwest Territories (GNWT) service delivery partnership to include Social Insurance Number services;
  • assess the ESDC/GNWT partnership;
  • develop tools and define roles for the partnership framework; and
  • explore new partnership arrangements.

The CRA and ESDC are the two largest service delivery organizations within the federal government. Collectively, our organizations provide the vast majority of federal services to Canadians. As such, both organizations recognize the importance of collaborating with each other to provide Canadians with a convenient, seamless service experience that meets their changing needs.

In fall of 2016, the two departments created a link between their secure websites that allow individuals to access their My Service Canada Account and CRA My Account through one single log-in. ESDC and the CRA also combined their effort to reach out to Indigenous communities. In the coming year, the two departments will continue to work on ways to share client information and better serve Canadians.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Other government department programs are delivered seamlessly with effective oversight in accordance with partnership agreements

Percentage of customized information services meeting service level agreement standards

Source: Administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 Not applicable Not applicable 97.1%

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 178,192,378
  • 2017-2018* Planned Spending: 178,192,378
  • 2018-2019 Planned spending: 1,681,622
  • 2019-2020 Planned spending: 1,684,751
  • * Resources for passport services were approved for 2017-2018. As the resources are sunsetting, the Department will seek authorities from Treasury Board for the delivery of passport services for 2018-2019 and future years.

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018*: 2,238
  • 2018-2019: 12
  • 2019-2020: 12
  • * FTEs for passport services were approved for 2017-2018. The Department will seek authorities from Treasury Board for the delivery of passport services for 2018-2019 and future years.

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Description

The Skills and Employment program is intended to ensure that Canadian labour market participants are able to access the supports that they need to enter or reposition themselves in the labour market so that they can contribute to inclusive growth through full labour market participation. Initiatives in this program contribute to the common overall objectives of promoting skills development, enhancing labour market participation and ensuring labour market efficiency.

Planning highlights

In 2017-2018, the Department will continue to develop and implement program and policy changes. In particular, ESDC will focus on:

1. Inclusive growth

- Increasing labour market participation of under-represented groups to help all Canadians succeed, strengthen the middle class and improve Canada's performance. This includes:

Renewing and improving the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS)

2017-2018 will be used as a transition year to develop a renewed and improved ASETS, which aims to increase Indigenous participation in the Canadian labour market, ensuring that First Nations, Inuit and Métis people are engaged in sustainable, meaningful employment. ESDC will also continue to advance implementation of modern treaty obligations through ASETS.

Promoting economic development in Indigenous communities and creating jobs for Indigenous peoples

ESDC will continue to work with Indigenous and Northern Affairs and Innovation, Science and Economic Development on this priority. Projects funded through the Skills and Partnership Fund 2016 Call for Proposals are expected to be implemented in 2017. In addition, ASETS, through job training and employment supports that are based on employer demand, will continue to help support economic development and job creation.

Developing the Youth Service Initiative

ESDC will help young Canadians gain valuable work and life experiences while providing support for communities across Canada. An outcomes framework for the Youth Service Initiative is currently under development.

Increasing investments in the Youth Employment Strategy

New policy and programming will be informed by recommendations stemming from the Expert Panel on Youth Employment.

2. Skills for the changing nature of work

- Ensuring that graduates entering the workforce have in demand skills and knowledge to support innovation and growth. This includes:

Rolling out the Student Work Integrated Learning Program

ESDC will facilitate the creation of new work-integrated learning placements and create new multi-stakeholder partnerships with employers and post-secondary education institutions to develop innovative and sustainable work-integrated learning strategies.

Supporting union-based apprenticeship training

The Department will develop and launch a framework to support union-based apprenticeship training, innovation and enhanced partnerships.

Determine an approach for improving apprentices' outcomes through infrastructure investments

ESDC will continue to work with Infrastructure Canada and other key federal departments, employers and workers on advancing this commitment.

3. Worker flexibility and adaptability

- Ensuring a flexible labour force that can withstand shocks and adapt to a changing workplace. This includes:

Rationalizing and expanding intergovernmental agreements that support skills training

ESDC will transition to the next generation of labour market transfer agreements (including Canada Job Fund Agreements, Labour Market Development Agreements and Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities) with provinces and territories and engage with stakeholders on rationalizing and expanding the labour market transfer agreements to ensure training and employment supports are available for the unemployed and workers who need to upskill. This includes continued integration of adult literacy and essential skills into programs and services supported by the transfer agreements.

Improving the EI program to meet the needs of Canada's labour market, including:
  • providing more flexible and inclusive leave for caregivers; and
  • providing more flexible parental benefits.
4. Efficient labour market

- Ensuring a strong and responsive labour force to drive growth and innovation. This includes:

Reviewing the Temporary Foreign Worker Program

When qualified Canadians and permanent residents are not available, the Temporary Foreign Worker Program can be used to fill jobs.

On January 30, 2017, the Government tabled its response to HUMA's report, in which it indicated that further action was forthcoming to make changes to the TFW Program so that it works for all workers, for businesses and for the Canadian economy.

Improving labour market information for Canadians, including work with the Labour Market Information Council

ESDC will continue to address the need for local labour market information (LMI) and working with stakeholders on a collaborative platform to share LMI for Canadians by continuing to collaborate with provinces and territories, through the Forum of Labour Market Ministers, to implement the Labour Market Information Council. The Department will also:

  • launch a new interactive tool that introduces new local-level labour market geographic areas developed by Statistics Canada;
  • publish more detailed local labour market indicators through the new tool and Open Data; and
  • publish updated employment outlooks and prevailing wage data.
5. Improving service delivery to Canadians

- Providing modern and responsive services to support labour market attachment. This includes:

Automating Employment Insurance

Working within the larger Employment Insurance agenda and legislative context, the Employment Insurance automation project will implement a series of tactical changes designed to enhance the client experience and service quality. This includes:

  • implementing the "Alert me" functionality within My Service Canada Account for EI claimants;
  • adding additional claim status messages; and
  • enhancing electronic intake of information from claimants (eQuestionnaires).

These changes continue building on the foundational work already initiated to create a secure two-way communication space and allow for electronic capturing of structured information from clients.

Enhance auto-enrolment of EI claimants in Job Bank services to provide tools for job seekers

Building on the previous success of Job Alerts, the Job Bank 2.0 project will create easier enrolment for EI claimants and access to a modernized suite of job search tools and supports; and Job Bank will continue to work collaboratively with the EI program on auto-enrolment features to increase the number of EI claimants using Job Bank services.

Working with stakeholders in the business and labour communities on strategies to reduce payroll reporting burden for employers, improve reporting compliance and increase the accuracy and speed of Employment Insurance payments

In 2017-2018, the Department will use an iterative, prototype approach to developing parameters for an e-Payroll system to capture and store real-time employment and earnings data from employers to support Employment Insurance processing, reduce overpayments and increase program integrity.

The Service Quality Review Panel recommended that Service Canada engage key stakeholders in the co-creation of a real-time payroll information-sharing solution. Over the long term, e-Payroll combined with policy simplification is expected to reduce compliance burden on employers, increase the accuracy and speed of Employment Insurance benefit payments and improve the timeliness of labour market information. As a key enabler for Benefits Delivery Modernization, e-Payroll would also be central to long-term gains for Employment Insurance clients (e.g. streamlined applications, more responsive service and shorter wait times).

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Ministers' mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Workers have the flexibility and support to pursue employment opportunities or labour market transitions

Percentage of the unemployed population who had paid EI  premiums in the last 12 months and had a recent job separation that qualified under the Employment Insurance program

Source: Statistics Canada, EI Coverage Survey*

83.7% March 31, 2018 2013: 85.8% 2014: 83.1% 2015: 82.8%
Canadians, including under-represented groups and vulnerable workers, have the opportunity to acquire skills to find and maintain productive employment

The proportion of clients employed following a completed employment program intervention under the following federally delivered programs: Youth Employment Strategy, Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities, Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, and Skills and Partnerships Fund

Source: Administrative data

70% March 31, 2017 69.6% 76% 71%
  • * Note: Statistics Canada is expected to release the 2016 EICS results in fall 2017.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)*

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 2,600,702,386
  • 2017-2018 Planned spending: 24,578,109,363
  • 2018-2019 Planned spending: 24,232,054,261
  • 2019-2020 Planned spending: 24,420,264,641
  • * Employment Insurance benefits are excluded from the Department's Main Estimates but included in planned spending.

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018: 9,120
  • 2018-2019: 8,434
  • 2019-2020: 8,291

The main reason for the reduction in FTEs is the sunsetting of Employment Insurance workload funding. This is temporary funding received by the Department to offset volume increases. The figures cited in this report do not reflect any future decisions that the Government may or may not take to renew funding.

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Horizontal initiatives: Service and benefits improvements

Many of the initiatives undertaken by Employment and Social Development Canada are focused on improving the service experience and benefit delivery process for multiple programs. Among the current priorities of the Department are the development and implementation of digital self-service and automated processes, wherever possible, and the provision of services to Canadians that are easy to use, timely and secure. The following initiatives focus on advancing digital service and improving access and information for a range of ESDC programs.

Focus on innovation in 2017-2018

Governments around the world, including the Government of Canada, are exploring new, innovative approaches that offer efficient and effective services that meet client expectations and respect service standards. ESDC is undertaking a significant transformative agenda that is aimed at rethinking our service delivery design and the way we work to meet changing clients' expectations, and expanding innovative approaches and collaboration with external partners, as well as leveraging modern technology solutions.

Five key principles will guide any future action by ESDC to transform its services for Canadians:

  1. Client-centric: Responsive to current and emerging client needs
  2. Digital: Secure and easy to use
  3. Collaborative: Connected through integrated and seamless collaboration and partnerships
  4. Efficient and Effective: Providing value for money
  5. Service Excellence: Based on a strong innovation service culture and an engaged workforce

In addition, the Department is undertaking an agile innovative process involving co creation and human-centred design to develop a Multi-Year Service Transformation Plan that will achieve the goals set out in the ESDC Service Strategy. This collaborative process brings together a group of employees from across the Department, as well as private-sector expertise, and includes direct citizen engagement to co-design and prototype options to improve the future client and service experience.

Service standards

ESDC's service standards are a measured commitment to provide services that are fast, accurate and accessible, and ensure the organization is efficient, effective and accountable. Service standards help clarify service expectations for clients and employees, drive service improvement and are essential to the measurement of overall program effectiveness. All ESDC service standards can now be viewed as a consolidated package on Canada.ca.

In 2017-2018, ESDC will undertake further service standards reviews for key programs, including the CPP, EI and OAS, which may follow the successful model adopted for the 2015-2016 review of CPP-D, where clients were consulted to understand their expectations for service, while considering operational requirements. This work is in line with recommendations made by the 2016 Employment Insurance Service Quality Review Panel.

Benefits Delivery Modernization (BDM)

BDM is focused on increasing client self-service and automation, streamlining business processes and addressing the risks associated with aging information technology, including software. It will explore policy and legislative changes to simplify service delivery to provide client-centric services that are easy to use, effective and sensitive to the needs of clients.

BDM will follow a strategic, phased approach to implementation, beginning with Employment Insurance and ensuring scalability to other benefits programs such as the Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security. The Department is currently in the process of completing the detailed planning phase and developing a comprehensive business case for the BDM. This will provide an opportunity to clarify in further detail the multi-year modernization roadmap, the notional program costs, as well as the benefits to clients that will accrue during the first wave of implementation. While detailed roadmap planning continues, implementation of the first phase of projects is expected to begin in the spring of 2018.

Call Centre Improvement Strategy (CCIS)

The Department is developing the Call Centre Improvement Strategy (CCIS) to frame the transformation plan for Specialized Call Centres. The Strategy will result in an enhanced client experience by implementing ongoing improvements to increase accessibility and reduce call demand. Furthermore, the introduction of advanced tools and technologies will result in a more client-centric service delivery model.

In 2017-2018, the Department will continue consulting with other government departments and the private sector on best-in-class operational practices, and undertake preparations for the eventual migration of Specialized Call Centres to a new call centre platform. This new platform will provide ESDC with access to new functionalities, such as client call-back and address change, with the potential to enhance the client experience, reduce wait times and increase self-serve opportunities. As part of this work, the Department will conduct citizen and employee engagement on the redesign of the Interactive Voice Response systems and the automated self-serve and navigation menu for Specialized Call Centres.

Modernization of grants and contributions (Gs and Cs) programs

The Department has made significant progress in the evolution of program delivery, including the streamlining of processes and tools, the organizational consolidation of national program delivery and the creation of an online system—Grants and Contributions Online Services (GCOS)—for program management. The Gs and Cs modernization agenda ensures program delivery is simplified, integrated and automated.

Key benefits for 2017-2018 include:

  • Modernization of Gs and Cs programming: Expand GCOS functionality to migrate existing paper-based documentation online for remaining Gs and Cs programs. Presently, only the Canada Summer Jobs program has this functionality.
  • Gs and Cs 2020 Expansion of the Electronic Signature: Expand the use of E signature internally throughout key phases of the project life cycle (i.e. for processing of claims, reports and monitoring) and the expansion of all grant programs to GCOS.
  • Back-End Processing Integration: Develop and implement a secure electronic solution to allow Gs and Cs recipients and program staff to manage direct deposit information through GCOS as well as allowing the electronic signature for minor amendments to agreements.

Review of the Social Security Tribunal of Canada

The Government is committed to providing a quick, effective and efficient system of appeals that will ensure that Canadians get the support they need when they need it most.

To that end, ESDC will undertake a review of the Social Security Tribunal of Canada (SST). This work is in response to the recommendation of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA) report and the Service Quality Review (SQR) Panel. The final report will provide options to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development on how to improve, if necessary, the appeals processes administered by the SST for the Employment Insurance, the Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security social benefits programs. This review will be completed by fall 2017.

Program 2.2: Learning

Description

Learning is composed of two programs:

  • the Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program; and
  • the Canada Education Savings Program.

The Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program aims to improve access to, and affordability of, post-secondary education, including apprenticeship programs, by providing supports to eligible apprentices through loans and to students with demonstrated financial need through grants, loans and repayment assistance measures. This program also provides non-repayable grants that are targeted to students from low- and middle-income families, students with permanent disabilities, students with dependants and part-time students from low-income families.

In addition, the Government recognizes the importance of helping Canadians to save for their children's future education. Through the Canada Education Savings Program, the Government encourages Canadians to use Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs) to save for a child's post-secondary education. The Government offers two education savings incentives linked to RESPs: the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) which is available to all eligible Canadians with higher CESG rates (termed "Additional CESG") for children from middle- and low-income families; and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB) which is available for children from low-income families, born in 2004 or later and up to the age of 15, with no requirement that personal contributions be made.

Together, these programs help make post-secondary education more accessible to all Canadians, recognizing that education and training are key factors in building a strong economy and promoting a highly skilled, inclusive, productive and competitive workforce. These programs help families save for their children's education, provide financial assistance in the form of repayable loans and non-repayable grants to students, and ensure that debt loads are manageable. ESDC promotes the communication of information to support informed education and labour market choices that help secure good-quality jobs. ESDC works in collaboration with the provinces and territories, the voluntary sector, financial institutions, service providers and other key stakeholders to help Canadians pursue post-secondary education.

Planning highlights

The Department will continue to develop and implement the following measures introduced in Budget 2016 and as part of ministerial mandate commitments. Specifically, in 2017-2018 work will continue to:

Introduce a fixed student contribution model to determine eligibility for Canada Student Loans and Grants

This will replace the current system of assessing student income and financial assets, allowing students to work and gain valuable labour market experience without having to worry about a reduction in their level of financial assistance. Adult learners will also benefit from this measure as, under the current system, their income and assets often made them ineligible for loans or grants. While the new fixed student contribution was announced in fall 2016, ESDC will work with provinces and territories to implement the measure for the 2017-2018 school year.

Introduce increased thresholds to determine eligibility for Canada Student Grants

Under the new model, the existing low- and middle-income thresholds will be replaced with a single progressive threshold under which grant amounts will gradually decline based on income and family size. As a result of this measure, more students from low- and middle-income families will qualify for more non-repayable assistance. Provincial and territorial colleagues were consulted during the development of this new model; however, legislation must be amended and approved before the new model can take effect. It is anticipated the new model will be in place for the 2017-2018 school year.

Improve the promotion of Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB)

ESDC will continue to focus efforts on activities aimed at increasing awareness and promoting the benefits of early savings through RESPs and the CLB so that families take full advantage of government education savings incentives, in particular improve their takeup of the CLB, and start saving early for post-secondary education.

Ease access to the Canada Learning Bond (CLB)

Recognizing that Canadians seeking to apply for the CLB on behalf of eligible children may encounter a variety of challenges, ESDC will explore approaches to simplify registration and make it easier to access the CLB. Efforts and activities will also aim to increase awareness of the CLB, particularly among low-income families to ensure that all families in Canada can benefit from Government of Canada education savings incentives.

Focus on completing the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) Service Provider Re-procurement

The Department has undertaken significant efforts to establish a new contract with the third-party service provider that includes an e-enabled service delivery model, consistent with the Departmental Service Strategy's goal of improving digital service offerings. In April 2016, the new service provider contract was awarded after a full procurement process. In 2017-2018, the Department will transition to the new service provider, transforming the delivery of the program by allowing clients to access and manage their student loans through a self-serve online process. Key improvements will include the use of electronic identity verification and signatures, real-time updates and an interactive "channel of choice" model communication approach. In 2017-2018, efforts will focus on the migration of data from the legacy systems to the new system and the completion of user acceptance testing and training so that the new e-enabled service delivery model will be operational in April 2018.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Ministers' mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Canadians have the skills and credentials to succeed in the labour market

Canada's OECD ranking for the percentage of its population (aged 25-64) with PSE credentials

Source: OECD, Education At a Glance 2014

1st 2018 (using 2017 data) 2013: 1st   2014: 1st 2015: 1st

Percentage of the Canadian labour force (aged 25-64) who have attained a post-secondary education certificate, diploma or degree

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey

70.9% December 31, 2017 2013: 68%   2014: 68.4% 2015: 69.8%
Canadians, including those from under-represented groups, can participate equitably in post-secondary education

Percentage of Canadians (aged 17-21) who were attending university or college

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey

44.7% December 31, 2017 2013: 42.8% 2014: 43.0% 2015: 43.4%
Canadians, including those from under-represented groups, have access to financing for their post-secondary education

Percentage and number of full‑time post-secondary students (aged 15 to 29) in participating provinces/territories who used a Canada Student Loan and/or a Canada Student Grant and/or an in-study interest subsidy to help finance their participation in post-secondary education

Source: CSLGCALP administrative data and the Actuarial Report on CSLP

47%
(534,000)
March 31, 2018 2013-2014: 49% (552,620) 2014-2015: 48% (547,500) 2015-2016: 50% (562,500)
Student loan borrowers can and do repay their loans

The proportion of loan dollars that enter repayment in a given loan year (cohort) and default within three years

Source: CSLGCALP administrative data

+/- 3 percentage points from the last report year's actual results July 31, 2018 2013-2014: 13% 2014-2015: 12% 2015-2016: 11%
Canadians are able to finance their participation in post-secondary education using Registered Education Savings Plan savings

Percentage and number of full- and
part-time post-secondary students
(aged 15 to 29) who used Registered Education Savings Plan funds to help finance their participation in post-secondary education

Source: Administrative data and Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey

24.1% December 31, 2017 2013: 21.0% (360,903) 2014: 22.2% (382,050) 2015: 23.1% (395,027)

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 2,969,076,593
  • 2017-2018* Planned Spending: 2,969,076,593
  • 2018-2019* Planned Spending: 3,074,026,937
  • 2019-2020* Planned Spending: 3,185,136,037
  • * The increase in Planned Spending is due to the Budget 2016 measures to the Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program to make post-secondary education more affordable for low- and middle-income families.

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018: 348
  • 2018-2019: 348
  • 2019-2020: 348

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Horizontal initiatives: Secure service and seamless access for clients

Canadians increasingly expect convenience in accessing government programs and services, and this translates into asking for and providing personal information only once or at least only when necessary; they also expect a reliable, consistent user experience across all programs and services regardless of jurisdiction. Employment and Social Development Canada has made it a priority to explore and develop opportunities to provide clients with access to bundled or related services across departments and jurisdictions and leverage the information already provided for other related services. The following initiatives address the need for secure and seamless access to all services and thus have an impact on a range of ESDC programs.

Business Number adoption

As part of improving its identity management, ESDC began a pilot project allowing the use of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Business Number as a single common identifier for businesses to interact with the various levels of government. Starting in 2017-2018, ESDC business-facing programs will begin to adopt the CRA Business Number and will only have to use one number when interacting with the Department. The number will also be used to validate the identity of the business to ensure secure delivery of services.

Service network collaboration with provinces and territories

ESDC collaborates with provinces and territories to foster seamless and integrated service delivery. In 2017-2018, a geo-mapping "proof of concept" will be advanced to establish a baseline of federal-provincial/territorial points of service and identify opportunities for in-person collaboration. An evergreen Innovative Service Partnerships inventory of pilots/innovation will be populated. The development of a Partnerships Guide, outlining principles and a framework, will be initiated to provide turnkey solutions for future co-located sites. Work on potential pilots with New Brunswick, Ontario and other jurisdictions will be initiated to explore service integration beyond co-location.

Direct Deposit and Address Information Sharing Initiative

The Direct Deposit and Address Information Sharing Initiative (DAISI) is one of ESDC's and the CRA's collaboration initiatives. DAISI will allow clients to update both their direct deposit and address information via any channel with one program and/or organization to the alternate organization, if they are enrolled in a program. Once fully implemented, this initiative will allow Canadians to register and/or update both their direct deposit and address information with one department and know that the other department has also received the same information, thereby saving Canadians the time and effort required to update each department separately. Starting in November 2017, individuals will be able to give consent to share their direct deposit information between the CRA and ESDC's Canada Pension Plan program.

Identity and access management

Business requirements have been identified that will inform the development of a modernized identity verification system. ESDC will continue to plan the modernization of identity verification systems to improve access to online services while protecting the privacy of Canadians and facilitating secure program delivery.

Canada's Digital Interchange (CDI)

In 2017-2018, ESDC will test key program and design elements of the CDI initiative through the creation of "proof-of-concept" pilot projects with two participating provinces. ESDC will lead a request for information to consult industry to identify best practices and to refine costing to inform the implementation of CDI.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada/ESDC Identity Linkages Project

ESDC will enhance service delivery to Canadians by providing electronic identity validation for passport applications to increase the secure delivery of passports, while protecting the privacy of Canadians.

Vital Events Linkages Project

ESDC will continue to engage with the territories with the goal of obtaining a commitment to securely share life event information to improve service delivery for Canadians.

Death notification

ESDC will continue to work on improving death registration and notification by collaborating with jurisdictions in order to make it easier for Canadians to report the death of a loved one to the federal government.

Social Insurance Register modernization

ESDC will work to modernize the Social Insurance Register so the Registry can increasingly be used to support efforts to improve client access and a modernized identity verification system.

Advance key measures to improve the integrity of programs and services

ESDC continues to improve the integrity of programs and services by taking steps to prevent error, abuse and fraud from happening throughout the benefit and service life cycle. Protecting and improving the integrity of ESDC programs and services, including the protection of client information, ensures that Canadians receive the benefits and services to which they are entitled, while also protecting the stewardship of public funds.

Program 3.1: Labour

Description

The Labour Program contributes to social and economic well-being by fostering safe, healthy, fair and inclusive work environments and cooperative workplace relations in the federal jurisdiction. It does so by providing labour relations mediation services, safeguarding workers against hazards, enforcing minimum working conditions, promoting decent work and fostering respect for international labour standards.

Planning highlights

In 2017-2018, the Labour Program will continue to develop and implement initiatives to ensure that Canadians work in safe, healthy, fair and inclusive environments. The Program will foster the concept of decent work in the federal jurisdiction, with a particular focus on vulnerable workers.

It will propose specific initiatives to:

  • promote good-quality jobs, building on the 2006 federal report, Fairness at Work: Federal Labour Standards for the 21st Century;
  • update the Canada Labour Code to address emerging issues such as unpaid internships; and
  • ensure that federal workplaces are free from harassment and sexual violence.
Implement a modern Fair Wages Policy

The Program will work with Public Services and Procurement and Treasury Board to implement a modern Fair Wages Policy.

Support fairness at work by developing options for proactive pay equity

The Labour Program will also work with the Treasury Board Secretariat, Justice Canada and Status of Women on the development of a pro-active pay equity regime for federally regulated employees to support the Government's commitment to the principles of equal pay for work of equal value and fair treatment of all workers, regardless of gender.

Propose amendments to the Canada Labour Code to allow workers to formally request flexible work arrangements

The Program will continue its work to support implementation of a right to request flexible work arrangements and other measures under the Canada Labour Code to allow more flexibility for those who work in the federally regulated private sector.

Work to support timely passage of Bill C-4 to help restore a fair and balanced approach to labour relations

The Program will continue to support the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour in ensuring timely passage of Bill C-4 by the Senate, a critical step in restoring a fair and balanced approach to labour relations.

Enhance service delivery to meet the evolving needs of Canadian workers and employers

The Labour Program will further improve its service delivery by leveraging technology and by using tools that focus on the evolving needs of Canadian workers and employers. The Program will make workplace conditions better for Canadians by enhancing regulatory standards and by improving compliance and enforcement with a particular attention to repeat offenders. It will also improve response time to process complaints related to violations of labour laws.

In addition, the Program will renegotiate some of the Government Employees Compensation Act agreements with provincial workers' compensation boards as some of those agreements are outdated. The objective will be to modernize service agreements that focus on early intervention, safe and timely return-to-work, and a modern approach to disability management through an efficient and effective workers' compensation system.

As part of its continued effort to support positive workplace relations, the Program will increase proactive activities with unions and employers to facilitate collective bargaining. For example, it will offer joint training workshops and help manage productive discussions between the bargaining parties.

Improve workplace conditions in Canada by continually enhancing new standards of safety

The Program will implement changes to standards regarding asbestos and vaping.

Improve workplace conditions by fostering respect for international labour standards

The Program will work in partnership with stakeholders to provide technical assistance to trading partners in support of adherence with International Labour Organization conventions. It will also foster respect for international labour standards through increased dialogue, monitoring and compliance actions.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Ministers' mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Workplaces are safe and healthy

Percentage annual (year-over-year) decrease in the disabling injuries incidence rate (DIIR) across all sectors in federal jurisdiction (combined)

Source: Federal Jurisdiction Injuries Database (FJID)

2% decrease See the note below the table Not applicable* Not applicable* Increase of 6.6%*

Percentage of all Occupational Health and Safety activities devoted to prevention

Source: LA2000

60% March 31, 2018 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**
Workplaces are diverse and inclusive

Percentage of federally regulated private-sector employers whose representation equals or surpasses Canadian Labour Market Availability for 2+ designated groups or who demonstrated progress towards representation since the previous reporting period

Source: Workplace Equity Information Management System

65% September 1, 2017 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**

Percentage of employment equity reports that are in compliance with the reporting requirements of the Act

Source: Workplace Equity Information Management System

95% September 1, 2017 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**
Employment standards are met    

Percentage of all Labour Standards activities devoted to prevention

Source: LA2000

10% March 31, 2018 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**

Percentage of initial Wage Earner Protection Program payments and non-payment notifications issued within 35*** calendar days

Source: Common System for Grants and Contributions and administrative data

80% March 31, 2018 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**

Percentage annual (year-over-year) decrease of monetary complaints backlog****

Source: LA2000

10% March 31, 2018 Not applicable** Not applicable** Not applicable**
Labour relations are cooperative

Percentage of labour disputes settled under Part I (Industrial Relations) of the Canada Labour Code without work stoppages, where parties were assisted by Labour Program officers

Source: Administrative data

95% March 31, 2018 97% 95% 94%
  • * 2015-2016 was the baseline year. Most recent data (2013 over 2014). Data for 2015 will be available in 2017.
    This is a new indicator which tracks the decrease in the Disabling Injuries Incidence Rate (DIIR) across all industry sectors on an annual basis. The latest national DIIR shows an increase from 1.68 to 1.79 (6.6% increase). This is largely due to the changes in reporting practices by one industrial sector, representing approximately 5 percent of federally regulated employees. Over the last decade, the national DIIR decreased from 2.13 in 2005 to 1.79 in 2014 (16% decline). Despite the increase, the latest DIIR rate is the fifth lowest for the federal jurisdiction since1982.
  • ** 2016-2017 is the baseline year.
  • *** The indicator was modified in 2016-2017 by changing the service standard from 42 days to 35 days. As a result, historical results are not available.
  • **** Backlog refers to complaints that are over 180 days.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 285,484,779
  • 2017-2018 Planned spending: 285,484,779
  • 2018-2019 Planned spending: 285,484,779
  • 2019-2020 Planned spending: 285,484,779

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018: 638
  • 2018-2019: 638
  • 2019-2020: 638

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Highlighting innovation and experimentation to better support Canadians

The Department's innovation efforts are driven by our commitment to serve the evolving needs of Canadians. ESDC's approach to innovation includes using new technologies, using a new basis for partnerships, using data more intelligently and implementing or testing new ways of supporting Canadian communities to improve the policy development process, program design and service delivery. The Department has also created a network of officials that act as a consultative body to provide a collaborative and collegial forum for discussion to share, advance and develop innovative projects within ESDC and across departments. The following provide examples of the Department's approach.

Improved service delivery to Canadians

  • Employment and Social Development Canada launched an Innovation Lab in May 2015. Inspired by the emergence of public-sector labs worldwide, the Innovation Lab is a mechanism to drive client-centric innovation within the Department. It is dedicated to generating sustainable service solutions for Canadians and building new capacities within ESDC across the service delivery continuum, from policy to programs and services, in order to collaboratively address departmental challenges. Among a number of initiatives, the Lab has completed two major projects that have actively engaged citizens in developing solutions. The first project, E-Services for Canada Pension Plan, developed insights into client needs through interviews with Canadians. The second involved working with the Youth Council to enhance service opportunities for youth. Collaboration between three departments, several design workshops with organizations and youth, and approximately 150 end-user interviews, including "intercept" street interviews, led to the development of several potential interventions and will inform work going forward.
  • Service Canada regional officers will be piloting a number of innovation projects aimed at improving service delivery. These include:
    • improving access to federal programs and services for rural and northern communities through the provision of interactive, on-screen access to agents in offices across the country;
    • redesign of Service Canada Centres using state-of-the-art technology, new accommodations solutions and other innovative uses of space; and
    • leveraging existing data to better understand labour market trends and improve program delivery and coverage.
  • The Department is undertaking an agile, innovative process involving co-creation and human-centred design to develop a Multi-Year Service Transformation Plan that will achieve the goals set out in the ESDC Service Strategy. This collaborative process brings together the knowledge of over 60 policy, program and service delivery experts from across the Department, the expertise of the private sector and the views of clients to co-design and prototype options to improve the future client and service experience. As a result of this collaboration, ESDC employees are not only learning a great deal about the work that their colleagues do but, more importantly, how to better support each other's work, and how to work better as an organization.

Improved analytics to support program and policy development

  • In the past, ESDC relied on expensive surveys of clients to evaluate the results of the training programs for unemployed workers provided by the provinces using federal funding. For the past five years, however, the Department has been developing internal capacity in making greater use of rich program data from the provinces and territories to study the social impacts that can be attributed to training interventions, including impacts on earnings and employment. This required the development of a methodology to measure social impacts in consultations with national and international academics. This led to the creation of a longitudinal database that will support the ability to track results over the long term and produce high-quality evaluations, including cost benefit analysis. This work shows what approaches work best, and will allow provinces and territories to continuously improve their programs and services to unemployed Canadians.
  • Partnership with leading-edge organizations is a key component in nurturing innovative approaches, piloting innovative ways of serving Canadians and tackling specific labour market and social development challenges. For example, the Innovative Solutions to Homelessness Funding stream is financing projects that are developing and/or testing innovative practices to reduce homelessness in Canada.

Innovative ways to engage specific groups

  • Via funding through the Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP) - Children and Families component, the Meticulon social enterprise project received funding to leverage the unique gifts and capabilities of people with autism to create a self-sustaining, profitable enterprise in the IT sector. The SDPP is also funding a project with Prosper Canada that seeks to employ social innovation concepts to raise awareness and address the financial vulnerability of Canadians.
  • In response to a Budget 2016 commitment, a new program will be launched to support union-based apprenticeship training which will include funding to support innovative approaches to improve apprenticeship outcomes. This innovation will build on the Flexibility and Innovation in Apprenticeship Technical Training (FIATT) pilot. FIATT funds third-party organizations, such as community colleges, industry trainers and union training centres, to promote the use of innovative approaches to improve access to apprenticeship training, raise the level of employer engagement in this training, improve apprenticeship completion rates and increase the overall efficiency of apprenticeship training systems.
  • As part of the Department's commitment to pioneer dynamic new approaches to policy development, ESDC launched the first-ever Government of Canada hackathon to reduce homelessness in partnership with DataFest Ottawa and the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) Lab. The hackathon brought together developers, designers, communications specialists, homelessness experts and general enthusiasts for a weekend (November 18-20) to collaboratively "hack" challenges faced by those who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Participants were provided with problem statements and tasked with coming up with solutions to these problem statements. These solutions were presented to a panel of experts from the homelessness, social innovation, communication and technology sectors for comments and suggestions. To assist with community capacity building, ESDC has supported a post-hackathon strategy by presenting the solutions to community homelessness collaborators to continue to build support and partnerships for the different approaches, as well as sharing the hackathon experience and lessons learned with other federal departments and governments. ESDC will continue to work closely with HPS communities, and collective impact funders, to explore these innovative solutions to prevent and reduce homelessness in Canada.
  • In the fall of 2016, the Department held a call for nominations to seek membership on a Co-Creation Steering Group that will embark on a collaborative initiative to develop a Social Innovation and Social Finance Strategy for Canada. Social innovation focuses on improving people's quality of life through testing creative ideas and measuring their impact. Social finance is a tool that seeks to mobilize private capital for public good. Recognizing that new approaches are required to tackle social issues, the Co-Creation Steering Group will be mandated to consult and engage with the broader community sector to propose measures that will jumpstart social innovation on a national scale.

The Innovation Network is also tracking the Department's efforts through the creation of an inventory of all innovative initiatives undertaken. The inventory, which is anticipated to be completed in 2017, will be used to create a report on key innovations within the Department and help inform the level of investments made and track progress. In line with the Government's expectations, the Department is working to establish evaluation and impact measurement strategies to strengthen the experimentation evidence base.

Program 4.1: Income Security

Description

This program ensures that Canadians are provided with retirement pensions, survivor pensions, disability benefits and benefits for children through the Old Age Security program, the Canada Pension Plan and the Canada Disability Savings Program.

Planning highlights

Create a new mechanism to ensure OAS benefits keep pace with the cost of living seniors face

As part of its commitment to improve income security among seniors (age 65 and over), the Government of Canada announced in Budget 2016 that it would ensure that Old Age Security program benefits keep pace with the actual cost of living faced by seniors. To date, ESDC and Statistics Canada have undertaken an analysis to develop such an index, taking into consideration factors such as the quality of the index, timeliness, the cost to develop and the comparability with the Consumer Price Index. Work is currently underway by Statistics Canada to refine a potential methodology for the development of an SPI.

Renewal of Canada Pension Plan Disability Program (CPP-D)

The Department is modernizing delivery of the Canada Pension Plan Disability program to ensure it is responsive to the needs of Canadians with severe and prolonged disabilities. This is being achieved by streamlining and simplifying the application process and improving client services through initiatives such as early communication with applicants to ensure understanding of the application process. In 2017-2018, the Department will continue a comprehensive review and renewal of the CPP Disability program through:

  • streamlining and simplifying the application process, enhancing efficiencies and improving client services, and embedding quality by design in new services, processes and technological solutions;
  • improving the decision-making process and supports, including implementing a new system for monitoring the consistency and quality of medical adjudication decisions;
  • liaising and consulting with internal and external partners and stakeholders to advance CPP Disability program priorities and objectives;
  • implementing revised CPP Disability program service standards including monitoring and reporting results; and
  • undertaking a phased implementation of a quality assurance framework for CPP disability benefits, including a phased implementation of a Quality Management System, an Individual Quality Feedback program and improved payment and processing accuracy reviews.
Enhancement to the Canada Pension Plan

To further strengthen income support for seniors, the Department will implement an enhancement to the Canada Pension Plan in 2019, which will increase the amount working Canadians will receive from the CPP in their retirement years. The Department will ensure service delivery of the CPP enhancement by undertaking activities related to communicating with Canadians, preparing the workforce and systems changes.

Strengthen pension workload management

The Department will continue to strengthen pension workload management to address workload pressures associated with an aging population. This is being achieved by implementing measures to ensure Canadians continue to receive decisions in a timely manner by improving pension workload tracking reporting capacity and workload management practices, including:

  • development of enhanced service standards for the OAS and CPP programs;
  • implementation, in 2017-2018, of a national workload management system to support the processing of Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and Old Age Security (OAS); and
  • development and implementation of a national workload plan.
Old Age Security Service Improvement Strategy

The Department is modernizing the delivery of the Old Age Security (OAS) program by improving services to eligible Canadian seniors, including low-income individuals, while also generating efficiencies in the processing of OAS benefits. This includes:

  • piloting the integrated OAS and Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) application in April 2017;
  • releasing an OAS toolkit to support non-governmental organizations, stakeholders and third parties who help citizens apply for benefits in understanding the OAS program and how to receive benefits; and
  • implementing the first phase of automatic enrolment for the GIS in December 2017.
Canada Pension Plan Service Improvement Strategy

The Department is implementing a series of improvements to the delivery of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), including the Canada Pension Plan Disability (CPP-D) benefit, by streamlining and automating processes, improving workload management, enhancing electronic services and improving quality assurance. This includes:

  • testing a new CPP-D application in 2017;
  • continuing to pilot a collaborative approach with long-term disability insurers to reduce client burden in obtaining additional medical information to support a CPP-D application; and
  • implementing an expiry date on Personal Access Codes to improve security measures for clients.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Ministers' mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Canada's seniors have a basic level of income in retirement

Percentage of seniors with an annual income above the Low Income Cut Off

Source: Statistics Canada Canadian Income Survey

 Contextual indicator Not applicable
(contextual indicator)
2012:
95.4%
2013: 96.3% 2014: 96.1%
Eligible individuals with severe disabilities (and their families /guardians) open Registered Disability Saving Plans to save for the future

Total number of registered plans since the inception of the program

Source: Canada Disability Savings Program Administrative Database

162,000 December 31, 2017* 83,594 100,732 128,294
  • * The Canada Disability Savings Program is now reporting by calendar year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)*

  • 2017-2018* Main Estimates: 52,144,690,865
  • 2017-2018 Planned spending: 97,929,274,126
  • 2018-2019 Planned spending: 103,322,693,183
  • 2019-2020 Planned spending: 108,996,862,167
  • * Canada Pension Plan benefits are excluded from the Department's Main Estimates but included in planned spending.

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018: 4,506
  • 2018-2019: 4,569
  • 2019-2020: 3,638

The main reason for the reduction in FTEs is the sunsetting of Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan workload funding. This is temporary funding received by the Department to offset volume increases. The figures cited in this report do not reflect any future decisions that the Government may or may not take to renew funding.

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Horizontal initiatives: Strategies for families, children and vulnerable groups

Many new policy initiatives have been introduced by the Government that intend to address the needs of families and children and vulnerable groups through the development of strategic perspectives, which could lead to the development or enhancement of programs or initiatives by ESDC or in conjunction with other government departments and/or other levels of government.

Poverty Reduction Strategy

The Government of Canada has committed to growing the middle class and lifting more Canadians—including children and seniors—out of poverty. The Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS) is a comprehensive initiative that is expected to provide a new perspective on many of the Department's programs and lead to changes that will strengthen the federal government's collaboration with provinces, territories and municipal governments and its contribution to reducing poverty.

With Budget 2016, the Government of Canada already took action to address poverty through measures such as the introduction of the new Canada Child Benefit, the increase to the Guaranteed Income Supplement for single seniors and investments in social infrastructure. The Government will build on these measures to develop a Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy that will outline actions to be undertaken, set targets to reduce poverty and measure and publicly report on progress. The Canadian strategy will align with and support existing provincial, territorial and municipal poverty reduction strategies and is expected to be released in 2017-2018.

In October, the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development tabled a discussion paper, "Towards a Poverty Reduction Strategy," and technical backgrounder at the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA) which launched a study on poverty reduction strategies. The Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy will be informed by the findings from the HUMA study as well as input received through a formal public engagement process with provincial and territorial governments, a variety of stakeholders, Indigenous peoples and the general public. Engagement will begin in February 2017 and will continue into 2017-2018.

The Government of Canada announced the Tackling Poverty Together Project, which involves gathering qualitative and quantitative information on the impact of government programs on those living in poverty, barriers to accessing the programs and ideas to improve existing programs. Recognizing the importance of hearing the voice of people with the lived experience of poverty, the project includes a series of case studies in six communities (Saint John, Trois-Rivières, Toronto [Regent Park], Winnipeg, Yellowknife and Tisdale, Saskatchewan). The final report for this project will be released in 2017-2018.

Promoting good-quality jobs and protecting vulnerable workers

After consulting stakeholders and Canadians, the Labour Program will propose ways to promote good-quality jobs in Canada including adjusting labour standards under Part III of the Canada Labour Code to protect vulnerable workers who are more likely to be paid low salaries, work in difficult conditions and have jobs of relatively short duration.

Planned federal accessibility legislation

In 2016-2017, ESDC supported the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities and the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development in their mandate to lead a consultation process with provinces, territories, municipalities and stakeholders to inform the development of planned federal accessibility legislation. The formal consultation process was launched in June 2016 and closed in February 2017.

Budget 2016 allocated $2 million over two years, starting in 2016-2017, to help stakeholder organizations engage their members on the planned accessibility legislation. These stakeholder engagement activities will continue into 2017-2018.

In 2017-2018, ESDC will support the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities and the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development in developing a legislative proposal.

Early learning and child care

The Government of Canada recognizes that Canadian families need support and that all Canadian children deserve a fair chance to succeed. Intervening early to promote child development from the prenatal period to age six can have long-term benefits that can extend throughout children's lives. Further, the Government recognizes that access to affordable, quality child care that is culturally appropriate is critical for Indigenous parents and children.

To advance this priority, the Department will continue to work with provinces and territories to develop a new Early Learning and Child Care Framework as a first step towards delivering affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully inclusive child care. The Framework is expected to represent a significant milestone for national collaboration, with governments agreeing to work together to address some of the key early learning and child care issues across the country.

Given the diverse nature of Indigenous communities, ESDC will develop a complementary Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care (IELCC) Framework on a separate track to the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) Framework. This initiative also offers the opportunity to examine current federal IELCC programs to ensure that programs are optimally coordinated. It is anticipated that engagement will be launched in early 2017 to work towards the development of an IELCC Framework.

Program 4.2: Social Development

Description

This program supports programs for the homeless or those individuals at risk of homelessness, as well as programs for children, families, seniors, communities and people with disabilities. It provides these groups with the knowledge, information and opportunities to move forward with their own solutions to social and economic challenges.

Planning highlights

Tackling homelessness

The Government of Canada's Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) provides direct financial support to 61 designated communities, as well as Aboriginal, rural and remote communities across Canada to help them address their local homelessness needs.

Budget 2016 augmented the existing HPS funding with $111.8 million over two fiscal years to provide more support to communities to prevent and reduce homelessness, to build capacity in new and existing communities as well as to test innovative approaches—particularly among specific homeless populations, such as Indigenous Canadians, youth, women fleeing violence and veterans. Nearly $12.5 million was provided to the Innovative Solutions to Homelessness stream, which supports the development of innovative approaches to reducing homelessness.

In 2017-2018, ESDC will continue to work with communities to deliver the additional investment and address local homelessness priorities and provide oversight to the projects approved under the Innovative Solutions to Homelessness stream. In spring 2017, the Department will establish an Advisory Committee of experts and stakeholders in the field of homelessness to support the renewal of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy.

ESDC will also explore in greater depth the ideas and recommendations made during the National Housing Strategy consultations to prepare for the renewal of the Homelessness Partnership Strategy in 2019. The HPS will also be supported by the development of a social infrastructure investment strategy.

National Seniors Council

The National Seniors Council (NSC) engages with seniors, stakeholders and experts to provide advice to the Government of Canada on current and emerging issues and opportunities related to seniors. The Council provides advice to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and the Minister of Health. In 2017-2018, the NSC will be developing a workplan to examine and advise on one or more issues related to the health, well-being and quality of life of seniors.

Social Innovation and Social Finance Strategy

In 2017-2018, ESDC will support the Co-Creation Steering Group, a panel of stakeholders and ESDC officials mandated by the Government to develop a draft SI/SF Strategy for Ministerial consideration. The Strategy will provide better support and partnership opportunities for community organizations working in new ways to address persistent social and economic problems.

The SI/SF Strategy will harness the potential of innovation that exists within our communities and enable the use of tools and approaches that mobilize and foster collaboration among actors across the charitable, non-profit, business and public sectors to tackle our most pressing challenges together. The SI/SF Strategy is expected to lead to an increase in social finance funding in Canada, growth in the sustainability of social enterprises and other service-providing organizations, and an improvement in the effectiveness of social interventions delivered by community organizations.

Enabling Accessibility Fund

The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) provides funding to eligible capital projects that increase access for people with disabilities to Canadian communities and workplaces, which in turn creates opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in community activities or access employment opportunities. Budget 2016 announced an additional $4 million over two years (2016-2018) for small projects under the EAF's Community Accessibility funding stream.

In 2017-2018, ESDC will continue to improve physical accessibility and safety for people with disabilities in Canadian communities and workplaces using grants and contributions to fund accessibility projects via the EAF. Building on last year's success, funding will continue to flow towards small projects in 2017-2018 under the Fund's Community and Workplace Accessibility funding streams.

Breaking down barriers to social and economic inclusion for people with disabilities

The Social Development Partnership Program - Disability Component (SDPP-D) is a grant and contribution program that provides funding to not-for-profit organizations across Canada to tackle barriers faced by people with disabilities with a focus on social inclusion.

In 2017-2018, the Department, in consultation with stakeholders, will advance the development of a performance and accountability framework focussing on results, openness and transparency to ensure that resources are directed to those initiatives that are having the greatest impact on the lives of Canadians with disabilities.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Ministers' mandate letters on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Planned results

Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to achieve target Actual results
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Homelessness is prevented and reduced

Number of people placed in more stable housing through HPS interventions, including Housing First

Source: Homelessness Electronic Reporting Information Network

15,000 2017-2018 12,978 12,102 9,904*
Seniors participate in and contribute to communities Number of seniors who participated in community projects      Baseline year**  Date to achieve target will be determined when target is set Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Number of seniors who have reported a reduction in social isolation

Source: Administrative data


Final Project Reports attached in Common System for Grants and Contributions (CSGC)

Baseline year ** Date to achieve target will be determined when target is set Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Accessible communities and workplaces which allow people with disabilities to have access to programs, services and employment opportunities

Total number of Enabling Accessibility Fund projects that received funding

Source: Common System for Grants and Contributions (CSGC) and administrative data-project reports

525 March 31, 2018 334 438 459
  • * Not all data has been received for this fiscal year.
  • ** This indicator is new as of 2017-18; therefore, there are no targets set or historical data.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 311,001,403
  • 2017-2018* Planned Spending: 311,001,403
  • 2018-2019* Planned Spending: 243,649,279
  • 2019-2020* Planned Spending: 114,211,342
  • * The decrease in Planned Spending from 2017-2018 to 2019-2020 is mainly due to the sunsetting of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy, Enabling Accessibility Fund and Universal Child Care Benefit, which is the program replaced by the new Canada Child Benefit. The figures cited in this report do not reflect any decisions that the Government may make to renew or not renew the programs through Parliament. The Government of Canada reassesses priorities, as required, and programs that are set to sunset will be considered for renewal and may in fact be renewed.

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])*

  • 2017-2018: 364
  • 2018-2019: 347
  • 2019-2020: 240
  • * The decrease in FTEs from 2017-2018 to 2019-2020 is mainly due to the sunsetting of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy. The figures cited in this report do not reflect any decisions that the Government may make to renew or not renew the programs through Parliament. The Government of Canada reassesses priorities, as required, and programs that are set to sunset will be considered for renewal and may in fact be renewed.

Information on ESDC's lower-level programs can be found on ESDC's website.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the delivery of programs and services to Canadians. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided specifically to a program.

Planning highlights

Departmental management excellence and accountability

Implement an enterprise approach to planning and performance, while enhancing investment planning and project management processes, systems and capacity:

  • ESDC will continue the improvement of the Department's integrated planning process (including research planning) through further refinement and usage of the departmental strategic framework, along with streamlined planning and performance processes and the introduction of a planning and performance management tool. In addition, ESDC will strengthen current investment/project management tools and procedures, and leverage corporate directions and planning, with a continuous intake and top-down prioritization process to ensure the integrity of investment management and provide value-for-money of services the Department provides Canadians.
  • Work is underway to deliver on the broader ESDC Performance Package by building on the Service View component of the performance framework. ESDC will review indicators, including definitions, methodologies and baselines for indicators, and implement reporting based on the new framework in alignment with the new Policy on Results.
Development of people and fostering of a productive and effective workplace

ESDC will focus on: increasing senior leadership capacity through sharing external innovative practices within our Senior Management community; implementing critical actions from the Mental Health Framework; and strategically using development programs and innovative hiring approaches.

Develop and implement modern IT infrastructure and platforms that enable effective, efficient and timely availability of information

Ensure that our data is effectively integrated through the continued implementation of the Departmental Service Bus (DSB) and integration with the Government of Canada Service Bus:

  • implement the first phase of Tell Us Once (Direct Deposit and Address Information Sharing Initiative). This will give the clients the option to share their data between the Canada Revenue Agency and ESDC, thus ensuring that clients data is collected once and used for multiple government services;
  • modernize the National Occupational Classification (NOC) program by leveraging the DSB to improve distribution of information to stakeholders (business groups, researchers, etc.); and
  • migrate the DSB client solutions to an improved infrastructure that will enhance performance and security, and expand functionality.

Deploy ESDC Desktop 2020, a common operating system for all desktops, laptops and tablets.

Modernize the Accounts Receivable function to enhance the processing of Accounts Receivable at ESDC to promote consistent practices among programs and overall consistencies in business processes.

Manage information and data to ensure their usability and accessibility

Integrate Open Government considerations, including Open Data, into policy, program and service delivery design.

  • In 2017-2018, ESDC will work to:
    • integrate Open Government considerations into policy, program and service delivery design;
    • develop and begin implementing an enterprise-wide data vision and strategy for ESDC to build departmental data assets and optimize their use; and
    • pursue pilot projects that demonstrate the potential to maximize the value of data at the enterprise level through effective use of data governance and analytics.
  • The Government of Canada's approach in the new Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership for 2016-2018 is structured into four priority areas: open by default (includes both data and information); fiscal transparency; innovation, prosperity and sustainable development; and engaging Canadians and the world. ESDC will publish a departmental data inventory and meet TBS-set performance indicators for managing data and information.
  • Implement GCDOCS, an information management repository, within ESDC to ensure the effective management of information.
  • ESDC will support proactive privacy-by-design in policies, programs and service delivery; continue to facilitate a risk-based approach to privacy management; support modernization of privacy service delivery; and enhance privacy monitoring and reporting and develop a privacy analysis framework to support privacy compliance and risk.
  • ESDC will keep abreast of and influence developments on the Access to Information Act review through continued support and collaboration with Treasury Board Secretariat and the Government. In addition, the Department will continue to provide strategic advice and support on Privacy Act reform.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

  • 2017-2018 Main estimates: 754,615,282
  • 2017-2018 Planned spending: 754,615,282
  • 2018-2019 Planned spending: 722,700,214
  • 2019-2020 Planned spending: 720,711,808

Human resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

  • 2017-2018: 4,218
  • 2018-2019: 4,049
  • 2019-2020: 4,080
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