Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

Official title: Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more - 2017-2018 Departmental Plan

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1. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy

Name of transfer payment program

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2010

End date

March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2009-2010 (with the latest amendment in February 2016)

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.9: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy

Description

Indigenous communities have historically experienced significantly higher rates of unemployment, lower rates of labour force participation and higher rates of social assistance than other Canadian communities. The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) aims to increase Indigenous participation in the Canadian labour market, ensuring that First Nations, Inuit and Métis people are engaged in sustainable, meaningful employment. Funding from the Strategy supports Indigenous service delivery organizations, which deliver employment and training services and supports through over 600 points of service across Canada. ASETS is linked to the Employment Insurance Act, which enables Indigenous groups to deliver programs similar to those established by Part II of the Act. Currently, ASETS supports labour market obligations specified in Treaty and Self-Government Agreements that are in place with some Indigenous groups. The ASETS is also linked to the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative, as the funding flows through the ASETS network to agreement holders, to help increase the supply of quality child care services in First Nations and Inuit communities to a level comparable to what is available for the general population. This is done to support First Nations and Inuit early childhood development, as well as to provide child care for First Nations and Inuit caregivers so that they may work and/or participate in job training and skills development programs.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy.

ASETS is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

An increasing number of Indigenous people are employed and integrated into the Canadian labour market.

Performance measure: Number of clients who obtained employment following service intervention(s); 2017-2018 Target: 14,000 - 16,500

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019-2020

General targeted recipient groups

Indigenous organizations (may include incorporated for-profit and not-for-profit Indigenous-controlled organizations, Indigenous-controlled unincorporated organizations, Indian Act bands, tribal councils and Indigenous governments under modern treaties) and provinces.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

ESDC works with Indigenous Agreement Holders throughout the life of their contribution agreement. In particular, the Department interacts with agreement holders in, the development and negotiation of the multi-year ASETS strategic business plans, which form the basis of their contribution agreements. There is also ongoing communication with agreement holders at the national and regional level, including regular monitoring activities.

As part of the renewal of ASETS, to respect the commitment towards a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous people, ESDC has undertaken policy and operational engagement with Indigenous communities on the design and delivery of ASETS, taking into account community needs.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 272,375,000 261,443,000 251,743,000 251,568,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 272,375,000 261,443,000 251,743,000 251,568,000

2. Youth Employment Strategy

Name of transfer payment program

Youth Employment Strategy (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.6: Youth Employment Strategy

Description

The Youth Employment Strategy helps youth aged 15 to 30 gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment. YES is an Employment and Social Development Canada-led horizontal initiative involving 10 other federal departments and agencies that assist youth in making a successful transition to today's changing labour market. YES has three program streams - Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes Canada Summer Jobs. This program is delivered nationally, regionally and locally via contribution agreements.

YES is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school.

Performance measure:

  1. Number of clients served who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year. 2017-2018 Target: 78,383
  2. Number of clients employed or self-employed; 2017-2018 Target: 4,608

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy is in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2019 - 2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include individuals, other levels of government, provincial and territorial institutions, agencies, Crown corporations; and not-for-profit, for-profit and Indigenous organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engages recipients via contribution agreements. These services providers design and deliver support for youth to gain the skills, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment. Employment and Social Development Canada uses Calls for Proposals as the main mechanism to engage with partners.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 383,789,000 325,954,000 327,354,000 218,554,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 383,789,000 325,954,000 327,354,000 218,554,000

3. Targeted Initiative for Older Workers

Name of transfer payment program

Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (Voted)

Start date

October 17, 2006

End date

March 31, 2017 (program sunset date: March 31, 2017)

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-2015

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.7: Targeted Initiative for Older Workers

Description

The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW) is a federal-provincial/territorial cost shared initiative that provides unemployed older workers (normally between the ages of 55 and 64) with employment assistance services, skills upgrading and work experience to re integrate them into the workforce and/or increase their employability. The Initiative assists unemployed older workers in small communities of 250,000 or less that are experiencing high unemployment, significant downsizing/closures, unfulfilled employer demand and/or skills mismatches. Under this program, provinces and territories are responsible for identifying specific communities for participation in the Initiative, designing and delivering projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects. All projects must include employment assistance activities such as résumé writing, interview techniques, counselling and job search techniques and at least two employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, work experience or preparation for self-employment. The Government of Canada's investment in the Initiative complements other funding provided through various labour market transfers to provinces and territories to support Canadians in receiving the training they need to secure employment, including the Canada Job Fund Agreements, Labour Market Development Agreements and Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities.

The TIOW is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

Program sunset date: March 31, 2017. Therefore information related to Expected Results and Indicators is not applicable after March 31, 2017.

Note: Provinces and territories have up to nine months post March 31, 2017 to submit client level TIOW data for 2016-2017.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

As the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is sun-setting in March 2017, the Evaluation Directorate has not planned an evaluation for the upcoming cycle.

General targeted recipient groups

TIOW assists unemployed older workers (normally between the ages of 55 and 64) in small communities of 250,000 or less that are experiencing high unemployment, significant downsizing/closures, unfulfilled employer demand and/or skills mismatches.

Unemployed older workers aged 50 to 54 and over the age of 64 who have similar needs and live in vulnerable communities may also participate, in the initiative provided that their participation is not at the exclusion of those in the core age group.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable. Program sunset date: March 31, 2017.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 25,253,716 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 25,253,716 - - -

4. Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities

Name of transfer payment program

Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2004

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Other Transfer Payments

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.4: Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities

Description

In recognition of the barriers faced by persons with disabilities in the labour market, the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPDs) are designed to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities by enhancing their employability, increasing employment opportunities and demonstrating the best possible results for Canadians. This program transfers funds to provinces and territories under bilateral agreements for programs and services. Provinces and territories agree to match the federal contribution. As the needs of persons with disabilities may differ between jurisdictions, provinces and territories have flexibility to determine the design and delivery of programming in the following five priority areas: education and training; employment participation; employment opportunities; connecting employers and persons with disabilities; and building knowledge. These programs and services for persons with disabilities complement other provincial and territorial employment and skills training programs funded by the Government of Canada (for example, Labour Market Development Agreements and the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities).

These transfer payments are not repayable contributions.

Expected results

Improve the employment outcomes for persons with disabilities by enhancing their employability, increasing employment opportunities and demonstrating the best possible results for Canadians.

Performance measure:

Number of client interventions to enhance employability; 2017-2018 Target: 300,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Review of the Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities is scheduled to be completed in 2018-2019.

General targeted recipient groups

The Government of Canada transfers funding annually to the provinces and territories that design and deliver programs and services for persons with disabilities in their jurisdictions within the parameters set out in each bilateral agreement.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engages provinces and territories through the bilateral governance structure set out in each agreement. Provinces and territories are responsible for engaging with employers, disability community organizations and persons with disabilities in their jurisdictions.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments 222,000,000 222,000,000 222,000,000 222,000,000
Total program 222,000,000 222,000,000 222,000,000 222,000,000

5. Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Name of transfer payment program

Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-2015

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.5: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Description

The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities assists persons with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. It supports persons with disabilities in overcoming barriers to participation in the Canadian labour market, and it supports employers to hire persons with disabilities. This program supports a wide range of programs and services, including job search supports, pre-employability services, wage subsidies and employer awareness initiatives to encourage employers to hire persons with disabilities. The Opportunities Fund is delivered across the country by Service Canada Centres, in partnership with organizations in the community.

These transfer payments are not repayable contributions.

Expected results

Persons with disabilities have enhanced their employability, obtained employment, become self-employed or returned to school.

Performance measure:

Number of clients with enhanced employability; 2017-2018 Target: 4,579

Number of clients employed or self-employed; 2017-2018 Target: 2,035

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities is currently in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018 (Phase 1) and 2019-2020 (Phase 2).

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include individuals acting as project sponsors or employers in relation to an eligible activity; other levels of government; provincial and territorial institutions, agencies and Crown corporations; and not-for-profit, for-profit and Indigenous organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engages recipients via both national and regional contribution agreements. The Government of Canada regularly consults with employers and service providers to design and deliver programming for persons with disabilities to support enhanced employment outcomes.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 45,026,000 39,826,000 36,751,000 36,751,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 45,026,000 39,826,000 36,751,000 36,751,000

6. Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children

Name of transfer payment program

Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children (Voted)

Start date

January 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-2013

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.2: Social Development

Sub-Program 4.2.6: Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children

Description

The Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children is an income support grant available to eligible parents who have suffered a loss of income as a result of taking time away from work to cope with the death or disappearance of their child (or children) under the age of 18 as a result of a probable Criminal Code offence.

This program is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

The financial burden on parents of children who are deceased or missing due to a probable Criminal Code offence and who take time away from work to cope with the tragic situation is eased.

Performance measures:

  1. Proportion of successful applicants; 2017-2018 Target: Not applicable.
  2. Average number of weeks paid per incident; 2017-2018 Target: Not applicable

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Federal Income Support for Parents of Missing and Murdered Children is currently in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

Individuals (Parents or Legal Guardian)

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Outreach activities to law enforcement agencies and victim stakeholder groups are ongoing to raise awareness of this income support among eligible families.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000

7. Canada Job Fund Agreements

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Job Fund Agreements (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Other Transfer Payments

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-2015

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Canada Job Fund Agreements

Description

Under the Canada Job Fund (CJF) Agreements, the Government of Canada transfers funds to support provinces and territories to deliver programs and services to increase labour force participation and help Canadians develop the skills necessary to find and keep a job. The CJF consists of three streams: the Canada Job Grant to encourage greater employer involvement and investment in training by providing financial assistance to employers on a cost-shared basis in order to help Canadians develop the skills needed for available jobs; Employer-Sponsored Training to support employer involvement in and contribution to demand-driven training programs and incentives; and Employment Services and Supports to enhance labour market participation of Canadians, with priority given to the unemployed ineligible for Employment Insurance benefits and to low-skilled employed workers. A separate six-year agreement was signed with Quebec that does not include the delivery of the Canada Job Grant, recognizing that the core principles behind the Canada Job Grant are already embedded in Quebec's training system. Quebec's new agreement, however, includes a commitment to strengthened reporting and accountability. These Agreements complement other provincial and territorial employment and skills training programs funded by the Government of Canada, for example, under the Labour Market Development Agreements and the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities, and the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers.

CJF Agreements are not repayable contributions

Expected results

Increase labour market participation of Canadians through funding for provincial/ territorial programs that aim to help them develop the skills necessary to find and keep a job, and increase employer involvement / investment in skills training.

Performance measure:

  1. Number of participants benefiting from programs covered under the Canada Job Fund; 2017-2018 Target: Provinces and territories set targets
  2. Average employer contribution to the Canada Job Grant in a given year; 2017-2018 Target: Provinces and territories set targets.
  3. Change in employment status of participants benefiting from programs covered under the Canada Job Fund; 2017-2018 Target: Provinces and territories set targets.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Provinces and Territories will carry out their own CJF evaluations by June 2018. For the province of Quebec, this report is due by June 2019. The Evaluation Directorate will produce a summary roll-up report by March 2019 based on provincial and territorial evaluations.

General targeted recipient groups

All Canadians entitled to work in Canada and permanent residents.

Canada Job Grant / Employer-Sponsored Training:

Eligible employers: Individual employers and organizations acting on behalf of employers (e.g. employer consortia, union halls, industry associations and training coordinators), in the private and not-for-profit sectors. Currently, in some provinces and territories, some Crown corporations and Indigenous governments are considered eligible employers.

Eligible beneficiaries: All Canadians seeking training for a new or better job including individuals who are: Unemployed and seeking training to obtain a job; Employed, but underemployed and seeking training for a better job; or, Employed but seeking training for a better job.

Employment services and supports: All Canadians, with priority given to: unemployed individuals who are not EI clients; and employed individuals who are low-skilled such as those who do not have a high school diploma or who have low levels of literacy and essential skills.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Funding was transferred to the provinces and territories (P/Ts). P/Ts are responsible for the design and implementation of skills training and programming and setting priorities within the parameters of the Agreements. As part of that process they are responsible for engaging with employers and other stakeholders to determine priorities.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments 550,000,000 500,000,000 500,000,000 500,000,000
Total program 550,000,000 500,000,000 500,000,000 500,000,000

8. Apprenticeship Grants

Name of transfer payment program

Apprenticeship Grants (Voted)

Start date

January 1, 2007 (Apprenticeship Incentive Grant) / January 1, 2009 (Apprenticeship Completion Grant)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-2013

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.16: Apprenticeship Grants

Description

Apprenticeship grants are incentives to attract Canadians to the trades and to assist apprentices in the Red Seal trades to progress and complete their training. This program targets eligible Canadian citizens, permanent residents and protected persons who are out of high school and are registered apprentices in one of the 56 designated Red Seal trades. It is comprised of two grants: the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, a taxable cash grant of $1,000 per year for registered apprentices (up to a maximum of $2,000 per apprentice) who have successfully completed the technical and on-the-job training requirements for the first or second year/level of an apprenticeship program; and the Apprenticeship Completion Grant, an additional $2,000 taxable cash grant to registered apprentices upon completion of apprenticeship training and receipt of journeyperson certification. Eligibility for this program is tied to the Red Seal trades, as the Red Seal represents a standard of excellence which promotes the mobility of skilled tradespeople based on national standards. Delivery of apprenticeship grants to eligible registered apprentices involves responding to calls for information, collecting and processing applications, issuing payments and monitoring accuracy of payments.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Apprenticeship Grants.

Expected results

Participant progression in and completion of an apprenticeship program in a designated Red Seal trade is increased.

Performance measures:

  1. Number of Apprenticeship Incentive Grants issued; 2017-2018 Target: 50,300.
  2. Number of Apprenticeship Completion Grants issued; 2017-2018 Target: 24,300.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Apprenticeship Grants (AG) is scheduled to be completed in 2018-2019.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients are registered apprentices who meet the eligibility criteria of the Apprenticeship Grants program.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Department continues to work with provincial/territorial apprenticeship authorities to identify opportunities and implement measures to increase program efficiency while offering individuals applying for an Apprenticeship Grant, a more streamlined application process.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 114,552,200 114,552,200 114,552,200 114,552,200
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 114,552,200 114,552,200 114,552,200 114,552,200

9. Literacy and Essential Skills

Name of transfer payment program

Literacy and Essential Skills (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2006

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-2013

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.14: Literacy and Essential Skills

Description

The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills (OLES) aims to help adult Canadians improve their literacy and essential skills to better prepare for, get and keep a job, and adapt and succeed at work.

As such, OLES is working closely with provincial and territorial governments to support the integration of essential skills into employment and training programs, which they in large part deliver, and for which they are further supported by federal labour market transfers such as the Canada Job Fund and Labour Market Development Agreements.

Particular emphasis is placed on supporting individuals with low skills and facing multiple barriers to employment such as Indigenous people, youth, and Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs). Accordingly, OLES is working horizontally with other ESDC programs such as the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, the Youth Employment Strategy and the Enabling Fund for OLMCs. OLES is also partnering with other government departments, such as Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada, to enhance the availability of essential skills supports for those most in need, e.g. newcomers.

The literacy and essential skills grants and contributions is from both the Consolidated Revenue Fund - Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills (ALLESP) and Employment Insurance Part II - National Essential Skills Initiative (NESI). Funding is used to make strategic investments in transformative projects to replicate and scale up proven approaches to skills upgrading across Canada and to develop innovative approaches to improve the quality of employment and training supports that are more responsive to employer and worker needs.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program. The program also links with the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018.

Expected results

Adult Canadians have the literacy and essential skills they need to do their job, adapt and succeed in the labour market and contribute to their communities and families.

Performance measures:

  1. Number of Canadians accessing essential skills training or supports; 2017-2018 Target: 13,000 - 17,500
  2. Number of organizations supporting essential skills training and development; 2017-2018 Target: 450 - 500

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012-2013

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of Literacy and Essential Skills is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients for program funding include: Not-for-profit organizations; For-profit organizations*; Municipal governments; Aboriginal organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities); and Provincial and territorial governments, institutions, agencies and Crown Corporations.

* Note: For-profit organizations may be eligible for funding provided that the nature and intent of the activity is non-commercial, not intended to generate profit, and supports program priorities and objectives.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Throughout the year, OLES hosts webinars to report on project progress and results and to disseminate intelligence on "what works" to support people to develop the skills needed for the job market.

OLES will also be updating its on-line database to include up to date information on its program investments.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 14,800,000 14,800,000 18,300,000 18,300,000
Total contributions 3,209,000 3,209,000 3,209,000 3,209,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 18,009,000 18,009,000 21,509,000 21,509,000

10. Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Name of transfer payment program

Foreign Credential Recognition Program (Voted)

Start date

May 26, 2010

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-2011

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.17: Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Description

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) targets internationally trained professionals and tradespersons, working with provincial and territorial governments and various organizations (such as regulatory bodies, national associations and credential assessment agencies) to facilitate credential recognition processes and ensure they are fair, consistent, transparent and timely. This program provides strategic financial support to its stakeholders through contribution agreements for key high-demand professions and skilled trades as well as other occupations to ensure that professionals and tradespersons who have obtained their credentials in another country can fully use their skills in Canada's labour market. In order to streamline foreign credential recognition processes, this program facilitates national coordination among provinces and territories and other partners. The FCRP also works to implement domestic labour mobility initiatives, and complements the Agreement on Internal Trade, by facilitating national coordination among partners and reducing barriers faced by workers in regulated occupations as they pursue employment opportunities across the country.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

The FCRP is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

The labour market needs of immigrant workers, employers, and other stakeholders are met

Performance measure: Portion of skilled immigrants in regulated occupations targeted by systemic foreign credential recognition interventions; 2017-2018 Target: 78%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Joint Summative Evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program and Inter-provincial Labour Mobility Initiative was completed in 2015-2016. The evaluation findings can be found on the ESDC website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include, but are not limited to, not-for-profit organizations, regulatory bodies, national organizations, provincial governments, sector and cross-sectoral councils, professional associations, industry associations, unions, school boards, municipal governments, public health institutions, universities, colleges, Collèges d'enseignement général et professionnel and consortia composed of all or some of the aforementioned types of recipient organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Employment and Social Development Canada will continue to engage with key stakeholders through periodic meetings and conferences, and participated in regular federal/provincial/territorial activities through the Forum of Labour Market Ministers intergovernmental working groups (e.g. the Foreign Qualifications Recognition Working Group and the Labour Mobility Coordinating Group).

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000

11. Sectoral Initiatives Program

Name of transfer payment program

Sectoral Initiatives Program (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.13: Sectoral Initiatives Program

Description

The Sectoral Initiatives Program (SIP) is a grants and contributions program with the objective of addressing current and future skills shortages by supporting the development and distribution of sector-specific labour market intelligence, national occupational standards, and skills certification and accreditation systems. The mandate is to help industry identify, forecast, and address human resources and skills issues through partnership-based projects for key sectors of the Canadian economy, to help ease labour mobility and labour market adjustment.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Sectoral Initiatives Program.

The Sectoral Initiatives Program does not use repayable contributions.

Expected results

Sectoral stakeholders benefit from industry-validated labour market intelligence products, national occupational standards and certification and accreditation programs.

Performance measures:

Number of sectoral intelligence reports or forecasting systems, National Occupation Standards (NOS), Certification and Accreditation regimes developed or updated via SIP projects;

2017-2018 Targets:
Reports: 80
Forecasting systems: 10
National occupations standards (NOS): 45
Certification: 20
Accreditation programs: 10

Note: Targets are based on historical data and take into account the long-term nature of the projects and cyclical nature of the program. A decrease in the number of products in a particular fiscal year may simply indicate that new projects are starting while a significant increase may indicate several projects have been completed in that year.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Sectoral Initiatives Program is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

The targeted recipients are organizations that represent a partnership of key players within a sector such as employers, associations and educational institutions, such as:

  • Employee or employer associations;
  • Not-for-profit organizations; and
  • Indigenous organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

SIP will continue to actively engage with potential and actual funding recipients, and will continue to develop and maintain partnerships and projects. Recipients will also be consulted to gather information about outputs, users and results of SIP projects.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123

12. First Nations Job Fund

Name of transfer payment program

First Nations Job Fund (Voted)

Start date

May 30, 2013

End date

March 31, 2017 (program sunset date: March 31, 2017)

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-2013

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.11: First Nation Job Fund

Description

The Indigenous youth population is growing in First Nations communities, where there is high unemployment rates and high dependency on Income Assistance, especially on reserves. The First Nations Job Fund (FNJF) aims to provide on reserve First Nations Income Assistance recipients between 18 and 24 years of age, who are able to work and who are trainable within one year, with the personalized training necessary to access jobs. Clients are referred to the Fund through Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Enhanced Service Delivery system. This program is delivered through the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) delivery network. Selected organizations work with local training facilities and employers to ensure that Income Assistance recipients referred from the Enhanced Service Delivery system are provided with the training-to-employment and employment supports they need to secure jobs. The Fund is one of two components of the First Nations Income Assistance Reform Initiative-a joint initiative between INAC, that administers the enhanced Service Delivery, and ESDC, that administers the FNJF.

Expected results

Program sunset date: March 31, 2017. Therefore information related to Expected Results and Indicators is not applicable after March 31, 2017.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Joint Evaluation of the On-Reserve Income Assistance Reform was completed in 2015-2016.The lead department on this evaluation is Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). The publication of the evaluation is currently in progress and will be found on the INAC website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Sun-setting March 2017

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

As the First Nation Job Fund is sun-setting in March 2017, the Evaluation Directorate has not planned an evaluation for the upcoming cycle.

General targeted recipient groups

First Nations youth between the ages of 18 and 24 who reside on reserve, who are able to work, who require up to one year of job training and who are referred to FNJF services from the INAC Enhanced Service Delivery program in participating First Nations communities.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable. Program sunset date: March 31, 2017.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 31,409,566 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 31,409,566 - - -

13. Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities

Name of transfer payment program

Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.8: Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities

Description

The Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities is an integral component of the Government of Canada's strategy for official languages as expressed in the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities. This program aims to enhance the development and vitality of these communities by strengthening their capacity in the areas of human resources and community economic development, and by promoting partnerships at all levels, including with federal partners. This program provides funds to official language minority communities in every province and territory to support professional local capacity to deliver services and supports to jobseekers, businesses and communities; generate strategic partnerships; spur investment; and consolidate efforts and resources to take action on community priorities. The Enabling Fund is designed so that official language minority communities can plan and implement community-specific development initiatives and better access a range of labour market services and programs. In addition to contributing to community development, the Enabling Fund allows the Department to deliver on its commitments and obligations related to the Official Languages Act.

Expected results

Official Language Minority Communities are better able to implement and sustain community economic and human resource development

Performance measures: Amount invested by non-Enabling Fund funded partners* for every dollar invested by the Enabling Fund in community economic development and human resource development; 2017-2018 Target: $2**

* Not-for-profit groups, private-sector organizations and other governmental partners.
** Two dollars invested for each dollar allocated to Official Language Minority Communities through the Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities Program.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2013-2014

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities is currently in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

Official language minority communities

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Continue engagement through informal dialogue and through a formal tripartite governance mechanism.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 12,000,000 12,000,000 12,000,000 12,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 12,000,000 12,000,000 12,000,000 12,000,000

14. Skills and Partnership Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Skills and Partnership Fund (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2010

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2009-2010 (with the latest amendment in March 2016)

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

Sub-Program 2.1.19: Student Work-Integrated Learning Program

Description

As a complement to the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, the Skills and Partnership Fund (SPF) is a demand-driven, partnership-based program that supports government priorities through strategic partnerships that fund projects that contribute to the skills development and training to employment of Indigenous workers towards long-term, meaningful employment. SPF encourages innovations in Indigenous training-to-employment and service delivery, including new approaches to labour market training, and improving employment outcomes for Indigenous people. This is done by supporting innovative projects to prepare and train Indigenous people for the demands of the Canadian labour market, requiring the development of partnerships and leveraging of private sector and federal-provincial-territorial funding to maximize SPF investments and testing new service delivery models to embed long-term program improvements.

Funding recipients deliver supports and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis people to help them develop the necessary skills and job training to secure jobs. This program focuses on emerging or untapped economic development opportunities to meet the needs of high-demand sectors, as well as areas with skills shortages. Attention is given to ensuring that partnerships are in place prior to project initiation and that the focus of projects are responsive to demonstrated need with supports in the areas of training-to-employment, skills development and service innovation.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Skills and Partnership Fund.

The SPF is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

An increasing number of Indigenous people are employed and integrated into the Canadian labour market.

Performance measure: Number of clients who obtained employment following service intervention(s); 2017-2018 Target: 1,600 per year

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019-2020

General targeted recipient groups

Indigenous organizations (may include incorporated for-profit and not-for-profit Indigenous-controlled organizations, Indigenous-controlled unincorporated organizations, Indian Act bands, tribal councils and Indigenous governments under modern treaties) and provinces.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

National calls for proposals are conducted to solicit projects as well as targeted solicited projects.

ESDC works with Indigenous agreement holders throughout the life of their contribution agreement. The Department interacts with agreement holders in the development and negotiation of their contribution agreements. There is also ongoing communication with agreement holders at the national and regional level, including regular monitoring activities.

In addition, ESDC also engages with industry/employer stakeholders to continue to foster partnerships and build solid relationships with these partners.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000

15. Student Work-Integrated Learning Program

Name of transfer payment program

Student Work-Integrated Learning Program (Voted)

Start date

TBD

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Skills and Employment

2.1.19: Student Work-Integrated Learning Program

Description

The Student Work-Integrated Learning Program (SWILP) is a contributions program with the objective of supporting the establishment of sustainable multi-stakeholder partnerships, involving employers and post-secondary education (PSE) institutions that work collaboratively to create quality work-integrated learning (WIL) opportunities for PSE students in high demand fields of the economy to foster a culture of WIL in Canada.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Student Work-Integrated Learning Program.

SWILP is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

The SWILP will ultimately result in PSE students having the requisite skills that are sought by employers to transition effectively into the labour force. This will be demonstrated by the establishment of sustainable multi-stakeholder partnerships between employers and PSE institutions that will continue to develop WIL opportunities and develop strategies to foster a culture of WIL across Canada.

Performance measure: Number of work-integrated learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and business fields; 2017-2018 Target: Baseline Year.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019-2020

General targeted recipient groups

The SWILP will engage employer consortia to lead the delivery of the Program as these organizations work extensively with a broad cross section of employers in their respective sectors, PSE institutions and other levels of government across Canada; and are well placed to develop project proposals that will have a broad and more sustained impact on skills development across key sectors of the economy.

Through SWILP, employer consortia will provide support to small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) interested in offering WIL placements, as well as actively engage large-sized employers to act as "champions" for the program, leading the development of WIL opportunities and demonstrating the business value of adopting a culture of WIL to SMEs.

Employer consortia are third party organizations representing the skills development and human resource interests of an economic sector and may include: industry associations representing employers, Chambers of Commerce, business councils and the like.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Given that the SWILP was announced as a one-time, four-year investment of funds, ESDC will draw on existing relationships with employer consortia and other stakeholders groups that were consulted in developing the Program, through a targeted Call for Proposals to officially launch project activities in support of the SWILP.

A targeted Call for Proposals will allow the Department to draw on the expertise and existing relationships our partners have established with PSE institutions and employers in their respective sectors to begin implementing projects and activities that will deliver results over both the short and longer-terms.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 4,763,341 16,095,890 6,032,043 5,021,362
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 4,763,341 16,095,890 6,032,043 5,021,362

16. Canada Student Loans Program - Interest Payments and Liabilities

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Student Loans Program - Interest Payments and Liabilities (Statutory)

Start date

August 1, 1995

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Student Loans Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Student Financial Assistance Act (S.C. 1994, c. 28)

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Learning

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program

Description

From August 1, 1995, to July 31, 2000, the Canada Student Loans Program operated a risk-shared loans regime with Canadian financial institutions. This transfer payment represents consolidated costs related to that regime, including interest subsidy, repayment assistance benefits, the amount of loans forgiven, risk premium put-backs and administrative costs net of recoveries on affected loans.

Expected results

  1. Students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime continue to receive in-study student financial assistance and debt management assistance in repayment.
  2. Canada meets its obligations as set out under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act in agreements with financial institutions.

Performance measure: Percentage of in-study and in-repayment borrowers who are satisfied with the overall loan experience provided by the Canada Loans and Grants for Students and Apprentices Program.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

  • The Summative Evaluation of the Budget 2008 CSLP Enhancements is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.
  • The Summative Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Financial institutions that provided Canada Student Loans to low- and middle-income students pursuing post-secondary education

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants  -  -  -  -
Total contributions  6,892,073  7,359,110  6,574,936  5,884,865
Total other types of transfer payments  -  -  -  -
Total program  6,892,073  7,359,110  6,574,936  5,884,865

17. Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement (Statutory)

Start date

August 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Student Loans Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Student Financial Assistance Act S.C. 24, c. 28

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Learning

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program

Description

The Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) provides loans to Canadians who have a demonstrated financial need to help them participate in post-secondary education. The Program also offers debt management measures to those borrowers who are experiencing financial difficulty so that they can repay their student loans in periods of unemployment or low income. It is managed in partnership with participating provinces and territories, educational institutions and agencies, financial aid administrators, financial institutions, Canada Post Corporation and a service provider. The clients and beneficiaries include full- and part-time students and borrowers in repayment.

This transfer payment also includes a non-repayable contribution to provinces and territories that have elected to deliver programs comparable to the CSLP in their jurisdictions.

Expected results

Post-secondary education students in the province of Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the CSLP; and

Students in non-participating jurisdictions with financial difficulty are able to receive repayment benefits

Performance measure: Percentage and number of full-time post- secondary students (aged 15 to 29) in participating provinces/territories who used a Canada Student Loan and/or an in-study interest subsidy, to help finance their participation in post-secondary education.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

  • The Summative Evaluation of the Budget 2008 CSLP Enhancements is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.
  • The Summative Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Non-participating provinces and territories for the benefit of resident low- and middle-income students

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 556,980,601 679,125,978 763,833,159 832,117,649
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 556,980,601 679,125,978 763,833,159 832,117,649

18. Canada Student Grants Program

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Student Grants Program (Statutory)

Start date

August 1, 2009

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Student Financial Assistance Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, (S.C. 1994, c. 28)

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Learning

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program

Description

The Canada Student Grants Program (CSGP) provides predictable, up-front grants to assist and encourage students from low- and middle-income families, student parents and students with disabilities to participate in post-secondary education. It is managed in partnership with participating provinces and territories. Budget 2016 announced a 50% increase to the amounts of Canada Student Grants beginning August 1, 2016. These measures will provide assistance of $1.53 billion over five years.

While Canada Student Loans are repayable, Canada Student Grants, provide non-repayable financial assistance.

Expected results

Eligible students receive a Canada Student Grant to help them finance their post-secondary education.

Performance measure: Percentage and number of full-time post-secondary students (aged 15 to 29) in participating provinces/territories who used a Canada Student Grant, to help finance their participation in post-secondary education.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

  • The Summative Evaluation of the Budget 2008 CSLP Enhancements is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.
  • The Summative Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Low- and middle-income students pursuing post-secondary education

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Ongoing outreach to current and prospective PSE students through multiple channels.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 959,957,940 1,135,015,909 1,153,711,344 1,173,652,452
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 959,957,940 1,135,015,909 1,153,711,344 1,173,652,452

19. Canada Education Savings Program

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Education Savings Program (Statutory)

Start date

January 1, 1998 (Canada Education Savings Grant);

January 1, 2005 (Canada Learning Bond and Additional Canada Education Savings Grant)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Education Savings Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Education Savings Act (S.C. 2004, c. 26) Canada Education Savings Regulations (SOR/2005-151)

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Learning

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Canada Education Savings Program

Description

The Government of Canada encourages Canadians to use Registered Education Savings Plans (RESP) to save for a child's post-secondary education.

The department administers two education savings incentives linked to RESPs:

  1. The Canada Education Savings Grant consisting of a basic grant of 20% on the first $2,500 in annual personal contributions to an RESP (this grant is available to all Canadians regardless of their family income), as well as the Additional Canada Education Savings Grant, consisting of:
    • 10% on the first $500 of annual personal contributions for children from families with a net income between $45,282* and $90,563*; or,
    • 20% on the first $500 of annual personal contributions for children from families with net incomes of $45,282* or less.
      * Net family income levels are subject to annual indexing for inflation.
    • The Canada Education Savings Grant is available until the calendar year in which the beneficiary turns 17, and the maximum lifetime amount, including Additional Canada Education Savings Grant, is $7,200.
  2. The Canada Learning Bond is available for children from low-income families born in 2004 or later and provides an initial payment of $500 plus $100 for each year of eligibility, up to age 15, for a maximum of $2,000. Personal contributions are not required to receive the Canada Learning Bond.

These incentives are delivered through an alternative service delivery arrangement with financial institutions, banks, mutual fund companies and scholarship foundations. These incentives complement the Canada Student Loans Program and other labour market and skills development programs offered by the department. Funding and activities in support of these incentives are governed by the Canada Education Savings Act and related Regulations.

Expected results

Canadians are able to finance their participation in post-secondary education using RESP savings.

Performance measure: Percentage and number of full- and part-time post-secondary students (aged 15 to 29) who used RESP funds to help finance their participation in post-secondary education; 2017-2018 Target: 24.1% by December 31, 2017.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Canada Education Savings Program (CESP) - Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond was completed in 2015-2016. The evaluation findings can be found on the ESDC website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Canada Education Savings Program - Phase 1 is scheduled to be completed in 2020-2021.

General targeted recipient groups

CESG beneficiaries are children aged 0-17. The Canada Learning Bond is for low-income children born on or after January 1, 2004.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Information on the CESG and the CLB is available online at canada.gc.ca, the Program's telephone, mail and email inquiry services and 1 800 O-Canada.

Newly and previously CLB-eligible families received letters concerning their entitlement to receive this benefit.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Grants - CESG 832,000,000 843,000,000 860,000,000 875,000,000
Grants - CLB 133,000,000 143,000,000 155,000,000 165,000,000
Contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 965,000,000 986,000,000 1,015,000,000 1,040,000,000

20. Pathways to Education Canada

Name of transfer payment program

Pathways to Education Canada (Multi-year funding agreement)

Start date

December 31, 2014

End date

March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-2016

Strategic outcome

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.2: Learning

Description

Pathways to Education Canada is a community-based charitable organization founded in 2001, dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty by helping youth from disadvantaged communities graduate from high-school, successfully transition into post-secondary education (PSE), and to become engaged in their career development. Pathways works closely with community-based partners and volunteers to deliver an after-school program that offers a comprehensive suite of academic, social and financial supports targeted at middle and secondary school age students.

Expected results

Federal funding is expected to allow Pathways to continue to support the approximately 5,300 existing participants across the program's 18 active sites; improve high school graduation rates; increase the number of program participants entering PSE; strengthen Pathways existing programs; and expand activities into new two sites in 2018-2019.

Pathways programming is expected to benefit youth from populations typically under-represented in post-secondary education including youth from low-income families, Indigenous youth, and youth from families without post-secondary experience.

Performance measures:

  1. The total number of students enrolled in the Pathways program across all sites as of October 30, 2015.
  2. Percentage of students who graduated and went on to PSE.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of Pathways to Education Canada is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

Pathways to Education Canada is the only eligible recipient of funding under this agreement.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

As stipulated in the funding agreement between Pathways to Education Canada and the Government of Canada, Pathways will ensure that funded activities are effectively captured using indicators to evaluate the outputs of its activities, to determine to the extent to which results support expected objectives and outcomes, and to capture lessons learned. This information will be reflected in financial statements, annual reports and in the final report.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 9,500,000 9,500,000 - -
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 9,500,000 9,500,000 - -

21. Wage Earner Protection Program

Name of transfer payment program

Wage Earner Protection Program (Statutory)

Start date

July 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Wage Earner Protection Program Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2008-2009

Strategic outcome

Safe, healthy, fair and inclusive work environments and cooperative workplace relations

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 3.1: Labour

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Labour Standards and Equity

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3.3: Wage Earner Protection Program

Description

This Program is designed to reduce the economic insecurity of Canadian workers who are owed unpaid wages and vacation, termination and severance pay when their employer declares bankruptcy or becomes subject to receivership. Workers can receive an amount up to four weeks of maximum insurable earnings under the Employment Insurance Act. When eligible workers receive payments under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act, they sign over their rights as creditors of the employer to the federal government, but only up to the amount of the payment received from the Program. Applicants who disagree with Service Canada's eligibility decision can request a review within 30 days of the initial decision for appeal within 60 days of the review decision. The appeals are handled by an independent adjudicator appointed by the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The federal government seeks recovery of the amounts as the creditor of the employer in the bankruptcy or receivership process. This Program covers workers in all labour jurisdictions. Delivery of Wage Earner Protection Program (WEPP) benefits to eligible workers involves responding to calls for information, collecting and processing applications, issuing payments and monitoring for accuracy of payments.

There is no repayment of statutory transfer payments, unless a Wage Earner Protection Program recipient receives an overpayment.

Expected results

WEPP applicants receive a payment, or a non-payment notification, in a timely manner

Performance measure: Percentage of initial WEPP payments and non-payment notifications issued within 35 calendar days; 2017-2018 Target: 80%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2013-2014

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Wage Earner Protection Program is scheduled to be completed in 2018-2019.

General targeted recipient groups

All employed workers in Canada, irrespective of jurisdiction. The WEPP helps ensure that wages and vacation, termination and severance pay owed to workers are paid if their employer goes bankrupt or is subject to a receivership. Workers may receive a payment of up to four weeks of maximum insurable earnings under the Employment Insurance Act.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

In 2014-2015, the Labour Program completed the five-year statutory review of the Wage Earner Protection Program Act, its operations and administration, which culminated with the tabling of a Report in both Houses of Parliament on June 18, 2015. Subsequent to the review, the Labour program continues to engage with internal and external stakeholders to identify ways to improve the administration and service delivery.

The WEPP again surpassed its service delivery standard and ensured applicants receive payments in timely manner. This year, 99% of initial payment and non-payment notifications were processed within 42 days, which significantly exceeded the 80% target. Given this processing success, this performance measure is being adjusted in 2016-2017 to 80% of initial payment and non-payment notifications issued within 35 days. In 2015-2016, over 11,000 workers received WEPP payments (with 50% receiving the WEPP maximum, while the average WEPP payment was $2,581). In 2015 the WEPP maximum payment was $3,808 and in 2016, it is $3,904.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000

22. Old Age Security Pension

Name of transfer payment program

Old Age Security Pension (Statutory)

Start date

1952

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Old Age Security Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.1: Income Security

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Old Age Security

Description

The Old Age Security (OAS) Pension Program contributes to the income security of seniors by providing a monthly payment to all Canadians aged 65 or older who meet the age, residence and legal status requirements.

Expected results

Canada's eligible seniors receive the OAS benefits to which they are entitled.

Performance measure: Percentage of seniors receiving the Old Age Security pension in relation to the total number of eligible seniors (benefit take-up rate). 2017-2018 Target: 98%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012-2013

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

  • The Evaluation of Old Age Security is currently in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018 (Phase 1) and 2018-2019 (Phase 2).
  • The Evaluation of OAS/GIS Service Improvement is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Seniors aged 65 and over

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

In 2012, the Old Age Security Act was amended to introduce the proactive enrolment of OAS benefits, which allows many seniors to receive OAS benefits without having to apply. The first phase of the proactive enrolment initiative began in April 2013, with the automatic enrolment of new pensioners for the OAS pension. In 2015-2016, 46% of new pensioners were automatically enrolled. Phase 2 of automatic enrolment, which will increase the number of new pensioners who will be automatically enrolled, began in November 2016.The Department undertakes a variety of other initiatives to ensure that individuals who are not automatically enrolled for the OAS pension are aware of, and apply for, benefits to which they are entitled. This includes proactive mailings to potential beneficiaries, inclusion of information with annual tax slips, enhancement of Service Canada channels (Web, phone, in-person), outreach services for those potentially eligible and discussions with other government departments, municipal governments and community service providers to identify opportunities for partnership to increase take-up.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 36,765,000,000 38,810,000,000 41,036,000,000 43,422,000,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 36,765,000,000 38,810,000,000 41,036,000,000 43,422,000,000

23. Guaranteed Income Supplement

Name of transfer payment program

Guaranteed Income Supplement (Statutory)

Start date

1967

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Old Age Security Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.1: Income Security

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Old Age Security

Description

Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) contributes to the income security of seniors by providing an additional benefit, on top of the Old Age Security (OAS) pension, to low-income seniors living in Canada. To be eligible for the GIS, applicants must be receiving the OAS pension and have no or little income.

Expected results

Canada's eligible seniors receive the Old Age Security benefits to which they are entitled.

Performance measure: Percentage of seniors receiving the GIS in relation to the total number of eligible seniors (Guaranteed Income Supplement take-up rate). 2017-2018 Target: 90%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012-2013

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-up is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.The Evaluation of OAS/GIS Service Improvement is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Low-income seniors aged 65 and over

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Department undertakes a variety of initiatives to ensure individuals are aware of, and apply for, benefits to which they are entitled. This includes proactive mailings to potential beneficiaries, inclusion of information with annual tax slips, enhancement of Service Canada channels (Web, phone, in person), outreach services for those potentially eligible and discussions with other government departments, municipal governments and community service providers to identify opportunities for partnership to increase take-up. In addition to simplifying application forms for the GIS, a "lifetime list" was established which further enables automatic renewal of GIS benefits for tax filers. The Department is working to further extend the automatic enrolment process to the GIS.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 11,103,000,000 11,848,000,000 12,504,000,000 13,171,000,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 11,103,000,000 11,848,000,000 12,504,000,000 13,171,000,000

24. Allowance Payments

Name of transfer payment program

Allowances (Statutory)

Start date

1975 - Allowance; 1985 - Allowance for the Survivor

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Old Age Security Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.1: Income Security

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Old Age Security

Description

The Allowances contribute to the income security of near-seniors by providing an additional benefit to low-income individuals aged 60 to 64 who are the spouse or common-law partner of a Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) recipient, or who are a widow/widower.

Expected results

Previous measure is no longer reported as data do not allow us to make a clear distinction between near-seniors who are entitled to the Allowances and those who are not.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012-2013

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2018-2019

General targeted recipient groups

Low-income near-seniors aged 60 to 64

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Department undertakes a variety of initiatives to ensure individuals are aware of, and apply for, benefits to which they are entitled. This includes proactive mailings to potential beneficiaries, inclusion of information with annual tax slips, enhancement of Service Canada channels (Web, phone, in person), outreach services for those potentially eligible and discussions with other government departments, municipal governments and community service providers to identify opportunities for partnership to increase take-up.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 483,000,000 497,000,000 512,000,000 525,000,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 483,000,000 497,000,000 512,000,000 525,000,000

25. Canada Disability Savings Program - Grants and Bonds

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Disability Savings Program - Canada Disability Savings Grants and Canada Disability Savings Bonds (Statutory)

Start date

December 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Disability Savings Act and Canada Disability Savings Regulations

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.1: Income Security

Sub-Program 4.1.4: Canada Disability Savings Program

Description

The Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) was introduced in 2008 to help people with disabilities improve their long-term financial security by providing a tool to encourage them and their families to save for the future.

Complementary to the RDSP, the Canada Disability Savings Grants and Canada Disability Savings Bonds provide additional support to encourage savings.

Canadian residents with a Social Insurance Number who are eligible for the federal Disability Tax Credit can open an RDSP until the end of the calendar year in which they reach 59 years of age. Once an RDSP is opened, the beneficiary may receive grants and bonds until the end of the calendar year in which the beneficiary reaches 49 years of age.

Assets held in and payments received from RDSPs will not affect the eligibility for federal benefits, such as the Canada Child Benefit, the Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax Credit, Old Age Security and Employment Insurance.

This Sub-Program is managed in accordance with the Income Tax Act, the Canada Disability Savings Act, and their respective Regulations.

Grants and bonds are statutory expenditures under the authority of the Canada Disability Savings Act and Regulations.

Expected results

People with severe and prolonged disabilities have a measure of long-term financial security.

Performance measures:

  1. Total number of registered plans since the inception of the program. 2017 Calendar Year Target: 162,000
  2. Percentage of individuals (aged 0 to 49) eligible for the Disability Tax Credit who have a Registered Disability Savings Plan. 2017 Calendar Year Target: 28%
  3. Percentage of Registered Disability Savings Plan beneficiaries (aged 0 to 49) in receipt of a Canada Disability Savings Grant and/or a Canada Disability Savings Bond; 2017 Calendar Year Target: 81%
  4. Percentage of Registered Disability Savings Plan beneficiaries (aged 0 to 49) of low to modest income who are in receipt of both a Canada Disability Savings Bond and a Canada Disability Savings Grant; 2017 Calendar Year Target: 57%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The second phase of the evaluation of the Canada Disability Savings Program is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian residents with a valid Social Insurance Number and who are eligible for the federal Disability Tax Credit who open a Registered Disability Savings Plan by December 31st of the calendar year in which they reach 59 years of age.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

  • Continued program promotion and awareness with public, private and not-for-profit organizations and at conferences attended by people with disabilities, their families and the general public;
  • Participation at industry-based events relating to financial literacy and/or the financial sector
  • E-mail communiqués to audiences such as community-based organizations, provincial/ territorial income and social support offices, health care facilities and social work departments, and MPs;
  • Continued inclusion of program information in letters sent by the Canada Revenue Agency to newly-eligible Disability Tax Credit recipients;
  • Web-based information tools; and
  • Direct mail-outs to Disability Tax Credit recipients who have yet to open an RDSP.
Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Grants - Canada Disability Savings Grant 325,500,000 371,500,000 418,300,000 466,000,000
Grants - Canada Disability Savings Bond 171,600,000 200,600,000 230,800,000 262,200,000
Contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 497,100,000 572,100,000 649,100,000 728,200,000

26. Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Name of transfer payment program

Homelessness Partnering Strategy (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

A minor amendment was made in 2016/17 to reflect changes in the Ts and Cs for the Rural and Remote Homelessness Funding Stream

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.2: Social Development

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Description

Homeless individuals and families can face a wide range of personal, financial and social challenges. Addressing these challenges in a sustainable manner requires the coordinated action of a number of partners including the federal government. The objective of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) is to support the implementation of effective, sustainable and community-based solutions to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada. As a community-based strategy, it provides grant and contribution funding to communities and service providers across the country with a focus on the Housing First approach, providing access to permanent housing and supports to help clients remain housed.

These services target individuals, families and Indigenous people who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless in major urban centres, rural communities and the North. Federal funding is prioritized based on input from Community Advisory Boards, in recognition that communities are best placed to identify their own unique homelessness-related needs.

Complementary activities under the Strategy include promoting data development and collection; disseminating knowledge among communities, partners and stakeholders, exploring innovative approaches to homelessness and making surplus federal properties available to communities for projects that prevent and reduce homelessness. The latter activity is a horizontal initiative that Employment and Social Development Canada manages in partnership and collaboration with Public Services and Procurement Canada and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Indigenous organizations support activities to help alleviate and prevent homelessness across Canada.

The HPS is a transfer payment program with non-repayable contributions; however, some repayment clauses are outlined in the Terms and Conditions.

Expected results

Housing stability for homeless individuals and those at risk of becoming homeless.

  1. Reduction in the usage of emergency shelters, as measured by number of "bednights" utilized; 2017-2018 Target: 15%
  2. Reduction in the estimated number of shelter users who are episodically or chronically homeless; 2017-2018 Target: 20% reduction from 2013 baseline

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2017-2018

General targeted recipient groups

The following class of recipients is eligible for HPS funding: not-for-profit organizations; individuals; municipalities; for-profit organizations; public health and educational institutions; Aboriginal organizations; and provincial and territorial governments and their entities, including institutions and agencies. These groups are eligible to receive funding and act as coordinators for activities. In Quebec, health and social services agencies are eligible for funding consistent with a formal Canada-Quebec agreement.

For-profit organizations may be eligible for funding provided that the nature and intent of the activity is: non-commercial; not intended to generate profit; based on fair market value; supports program priorities and objectives; and fits within the community plan (or identified local need where community plans are not required).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

As a community-based and partnership-enhancing program, the HPS engages and seeks to build relationships with a wide range of partners and stakeholders. To engage applicants and recipients, the HPS uses various methods, such as calls for proposals, targeted solicitation of applications, unsolicited proposals and expressions of interest or letters of intent.

In 2016, the Department supported the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation in undertaking broad-based consultations to inform the National Housing Strategy, including on homelessness. In 2017-2018, ESDC will look to explore in greater depth the ideas and recommendations on homelessness heard through the National Housing Strategy engagement activities.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 250,000 500,000 500,000 -
Total contributions 166,288,810 158,762,578 106,753,536 -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 166,538,810 159,262,578 107,253,536 -

27. Enabling Accessibility Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Enabling Accessibility Fund (Voted)

Start date

The Enabling Accessibility Fund was introduced in Budget 2007, renewed in Budget 2010 for an additional three years and extended on an ongoing basis through Budget 2013.

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Current terms and conditions were approved in September 2013

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.2: Social Development

Sub-Program 4.2.5: Enabling Accessibility Fund

Description

People with disabilities often experience barriers to full participation and inclusion in the activities of everyday living. The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) a grant and contributions program that supports capital costs of construction and renovations related to removing barriers, and improving physical accessibility and safety for people with disabilities in Canadian communities and workplaces.

The EAF is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

Recipient organizations have accessible facilities, technologies and transportation

Performance measures:

  1. Number of communities with funded projects; 2017-2018 Target: 215
  2. Dollar amount of funds leveraged (cash and/or in kind) by other sources of funding for every dollar invested through Enabling Accessibility Fund funding 2017-2018 Target: $0.35

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012-2013

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Enabling Accessibility Fund is scheduled to be completed in 2017-2018.

General targeted recipient groups

Persons with disabilities across Canada through eligible funding recipients, i.e. not-for-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, municipalities, Aboriginal organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities) and territorial governments.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Communications approaches are developed for each call for proposals to generate awareness of the funding process and its related funding priorities/streams, to encourage the target audiences to submit an application to receive funding and to demonstrate the Government of Canada's support for the integration of Canadians with disabilities in their communities and in the labour market.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 15,650,000 15,650,000 13,650,000 13,650,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 15,650,000 15,650,000 13,650,000 13,650,000

28. Social Development Partnerships Program

Name of transfer payment program

Social Development Partnerships Program (Voted)

Start date

April 1998

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Ts and Cs were last amended in 2016-2017

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.2: Social Development

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Social Development Partnerships Program

Description

The Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP) makes strategic investments to support government priorities related to children and families, people with disabilities, the voluntary sector, official languages minority communities and other vulnerable populations by playing a unique role in furthering broad social goals. It provides an opportunity to work in partnership with social not-for-profit organizations to help improve life outcomes of these target groups. Activities funded by the program are expected to lead to the development and sharing of knowledge of existing and emerging social issues; the creation of collaboration, partnerships, alliances and networks; and the development of approaches to respond to existing and emerging social issues. Over the long term, program support for these activities will help the not-for-profit sector and partners be more effective in addressing existing and emerging social issues, and will help target populations have access to information, programs and services tailored to their unique needs.

This is a grant and contribution program with non-repayable contributions in general. Under certain circumstances, provisions may specify repayment terms.

Expected results

Not-for-profit sector and partners have improved capacity to respond to existing and emerging social issues for target populations.

Performance measure: Percentage of Social Development Partnership Program projects that leverage funds from non-federal partners; 2017-2018 Target: 90%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-2015

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Social Development Partnerships Program is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Not-for-profit organizations, including registered charities and social enterprises actively pursuing activities in line with SDPP objectives.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Information on Call for Proposals for SDPP is posted publicly on Employment and Social Development Canada's website.

SDPP-Children and Families: To further the shift of the SDPP-Children and Families component toward leveraging federal investments, encouraging multi-sector partnerships and a focus on outcomes and impact, the Department will continue to engage stakeholders in focused discussions toward achieving those goals.

SDPP Children and Families uses various methods to engage applicants and recipients, such as targeted solicitation of applications, unsolicited proposals and expressions of interest or letters of intent.

SDPP-Disability: Departmental officials will continue to engage the stakeholders in the development of a performance and accountability framework to guide the distribution of program funding.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 14,775,000 14,275,000 14,275,000 14,275,000
Total contributions 5,840,000 5,840,000 5,840,000 5,840,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 20,615,000 20,115,000 20,115,000 20,115,000

29. New Horizons for Seniors Program

Name of transfer payment program

New Horizons for Seniors Program (Voted)

Start date

Original program: October 1, 2004; Expanded Program: September 27, 2007; Enhanced Program: September 30, 2010

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Ts and Cs were last amended in July 2013

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 4.2: Social Development

Sub-Program 4.2.3: New Horizons for Seniors Program

Description

The growth in the population of seniors in Canada is accelerating, with the total number of seniors projected to reach approximately 10 million by 2036. This presents both opportunities and risks for seniors and their communities. Empowering seniors, encouraging them to share their knowledge, skills and experience with others in the community and enhancing seniors' social well-being and community vitality are goals of the New Horizons for Seniors Program (NHSP). This program provides grants and contributions funding for projects led or inspired by seniors who want to make a difference in the lives of others and in their communities. The program has five objectives: promoting volunteerism among seniors and other generations; engaging seniors in the community through mentoring of others; expanding awareness of elder abuse, including financial abuse; supporting social participation and inclusion of seniors; and providing capital assistance for new and existing community projects and/or programs for seniors.

Community-based one-year grants are funded up to $25,000. In 2014-2015, 2-year pilot projects tested the ability of applicants to leverage funds from others sources.

Pan-Canadian projects are eligible to receive up to $750,000 for up to three years in duration. A Call for Proposals was launched 2015-2016 requiring community partners to work together to measurably reduce the social isolation amongst seniors in their communities.

This program is complemented by a range of policies, programs and services targeted at seniors such as the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security and the National Seniors Council.

The NHSP does not use repayable contributions.

Expected results

Communities have the capacity to address local issues by engaging seniors.

Performance measure:

Total number of New Horizons for Seniors Program projects that received funding; 2017-2018 Target: 1,850

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the New Horizons for Seniors Program was completed in 2015-2016. Evaluation findings can be found on the ESDC website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the New Horizons for Seniors Program is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

The NHSP has a broad array of eligible recipients, including not-for-profit organizations, for-profit enterprises, coalitions, Aboriginal organizations, municipal governments and research and educational institutions.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Community-based stream is promoted annually with potential applicants engaged through community outreach by Service Canada. In support of this, a systemic identification of best practices will be disseminated broadly when completed.

During the 2015-2016 Pan-Canadian Projects Call for Proposals, the Department partnered with the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation to provide on-the-ground engagement of, and support to, potential applicants to measurably reduce the social isolation of seniors in a collaborative approach.

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 41,340,000 41,340,000 41,340,000 41,340,000
Total contributions 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 43,140,000 43,140,000 43,140,000 43,140,000

30. Universal Child Care Benefit

Name of transfer payment program

Universal Child Care Benefit (Statutory)

Start date

July 1, 2006

End date

Replaced by the Canada Child Benefit in July 2016

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Universal Child Care Benefit Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2006-2007

Strategic outcome

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 2.1: Social Development

Sub-Program 4.2.4: Universal Child Care Benefit

Description

The Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) provided financial support to help all Canadian families with young children.

The UCCB was replaced by the new Canada Child Benefit (CCB) effective July 1, 2016. The CCB is reported in Canada Revenue Agency's Departmental Plan. Planned Spending for UCCB is to cover retroactive payment of benefits.

Expected results

Not applicable

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2011-2012

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

This program will not be included in the department's planned evaluation coverage for the upcoming five-year cycle because the program has ended. The Departmental Evaluation Committee decided that it would be beneficial for the Evaluation Directorate to provide program officials with guidance and support in the development of performance measures for the newly designed Canada Child Benefit.

General targeted recipient groups

Families with children under the age of eighteen

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable

Details 2016-2017 forecast spending ($) Planned spending ($)
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Total grants 2,024,954,945 24,000,000 12,000,000 300,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total program 2,024,954,945 24,000,000 12,000,000 300,000
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