2019–20 Departmental Plan
Annex 1.2: Transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

From: Employment and Social Development Canada

Official title: Employment and Social development Canada, 2019–20 Departmental Plan

On this page

  1. Youth Employment Strategy
  2. Canada Service Corps
  3. Skilled Trades Awareness and Readiness Program
  4. Workforce Development Agreements
  5. Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities
  6. Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime
  7. Union Training and Innovation Program
  8. Apprenticeship Grants
  9. Literacy and Essential Skills
  10. Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program
  11. Foreign Credential Recognition Program
  12. Sectoral Initiatives Program
  13. Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities
  14. Skills and Partnership Fund
  15. Student Work Placement Program
  16. Future Skills
  17. Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement
  18. Canada Student Loans Program - Canada Student Grants
  19. Canada Education Savings Program (Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond)
  20. Pathways to Education Canada
  21. Wage Earner Protection Program
  22. Old Age Security Pension
  23. Guaranteed Income Supplement
  24. Allowances
  25. Canada Disability Savings Program - Grants and Bonds
  26. Reaching Home
  27. Enabling Accessibility Fund
  28. Social Development Partnerships Program
  29. New Horizons for Seniors Program
  30. Early Learning and Child Care
  31. Indigenous Early Learning and Childcare Transformation Initiative

1. Youth Employment Strategy

Name of transfer payment program

Youth Employment Strategy

Start date

April 1, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Link to department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Youth Employment Strategy

Description

The modernized Youth Employment Strategy will create more opportunities for all youth to help them develop the skills they need to succeed in a changing labour market. The modernized Youth Employment Strategy will help youth aged 15 to 30 gain the skills, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment, while also supporting and encouraging employers to hire and retain youth and help them recognize the value of youth.

The modernized Youth Employment Strategy is an Employment and Social Development Canada-led horizontal initiative involving ten other federal departments and agencies. It includes the Canada Summer Jobs program and is delivered by Employment and Social Development Canada.

This program is delivered nationally, regionally and locally via contribution agreements. The Youth Employment Strategy contribution is non-repayable.

Expected results

Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school.

Performance measures:

  • Number of clients served who have started one or more interventions within the current fiscal year.
    • 2018-19 Target: Career Focus = 1,451 // Skills Link = 8,993 // Canada Summer Jobs = up to 69,000
  • Number of clients employed or self-employed
    • 2018-19 Target: Career Focus = 1,016 // Skills Link = 4,496 // Canada Summer Job = Not applicable
  • Number of clients returned to school
    • 2018-19 Target: Career Focus = 145 // Skills Link = 899 // Canada Summer Job = Not applicable

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014-15

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of Youth Employment Strategy is in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2019-2020.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include individuals, other levels of government, provincial and territorial institutions, agencies, Crown corporations; and not-for-profit, for-profit and Indigenous organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engaged recipients via contribution agreements. Employment and Social Development Canada uses Calls for Proposals as the main mechanism to engage with partners.

Planning information (dollars)
Youth Employment Strategy Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 388,146,500 474,786,500 218,554,000 218,554,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 388,146,500 474,786,500 218,554,000 218,554,000

2. Canada Service Corps

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Service Corps

Start date

June 22, 2017

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment;

Contribution

Type of appropriation;

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions;

2017-18

Link to department's program inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Canada Service Corps

Description

The Canada Service Corps is a nationally delivered grants and contributions program with the objective of promoting civic engagement among Canadian youth aged 15-30 by creating and facilitating access to committed service opportunities that are meaningful to youth, while assisting them to gain valuable skills that will benefit them in life and work. These service opportunities will provide youth with the chance to make a difference in their communities. Canada Service Corps supports activities under five different components:

  • Youth Service Portal: Funding to promote the Canada Service Corps program and the benefits of civic participation and facilitate access to service opportunities.
  • Micro-Contributions: Funding to support the implementation of small-scale youth led projects and innovative community service ideas.
  • Youth Service Opportunities: Funding to national, regional  and local organizations to undertake service projects that allow youth to serve and benefit communities across Canada.
  • Innovative Engagement and Outreach: Funding to support innovative engagement and outreach activities, including the facilitation of a young volunteers matching service to support access to service opportunities and promote civic engagement.
  • Research and Evaluation: Funding to support knowledge development, research and prototyping projects to ensure that youth, particularly those who are not already engaged are aware of service benefits and are more likely to serve.

Expected results

The three-year period will be a pilot phase to explore, test and engage youth with innovative program interventions; expand the visibility and accessibility of youth service opportunities; and lay the foundations to develop a national signature program to encourage youth service.

By March 31, 2020, up to 12,000 youth are expected to have engaged in service opportunities.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable; program implemented in 2017-18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable; program implemented in 2017-18

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include not-for-profit organizations; for profit organizations; research organizations and institutes; Indigenous organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities); municipal, provincial and territorial governments and their entities, including institutions, agencies and Crown Corporations, public health and educational institutions (that is, universities, colleges, CÉGEPs, school boards/school districts).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Employment and Social Development Canada engages with stakeholders and youth through contribution agreements. The Department uses Calls for Proposals as the main mechanism to deliver programming.

Planning information (dollars)
Canada Service Corps Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 29,955,780 29,955,779 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 29,955,780 29,955,779 0 0

3. Skilled Trades Awareness and Readiness Program

Name of transfer payment program

Skilled Trades Awareness and Readiness Program

Start date

2018-19

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Skilled Trades Awareness and Readiness Program

Description

The Skilled Trades Awareness and Readiness program encourages Canadians, including groups that face barriers (e.g. women, Indigenous Peoples, newcomers, persons with disabilities and youth), to explore the trades, gain work experience, make informed career choices and prepare for careers in the skilled trades.

Expected results

Preliminary results are expected in Winter 2021 for the number of participants in projects that offer access to information, skills training and/or work experience opportunities, and are expected in Winter 2022 for the percentage of participants in projects that offer awareness activities.

Performance Measures:

Result 1: Participants have access to information, skills training and/or work experience opportunities

Indicator 1: Total number of participants in projects that offer awareness and exploration activities, skills training and/or work experience.

  • 2019-20 target: 450 participants

Result 2: Participants have increased awareness, an increase in skills and/or gained work experience

  • Indicator 2: Percentage of participants in projects that have reported an increase in awareness, skills and/or gained work experience.

2020-21 target: 80%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Evaluation Assessment (2020-21)

Final Evaluation report (2022-23)

General targeted recipient groups

Women, Indigenous Peoples, newcomers, persons with disabilities and youth

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Call for proposals or by direct solicitation

Planning information (dollars)
Trades Exploration and Experience Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,117,094 9,285,616 8,785,147 9,252,773
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,117,094 9,285,616 8,785,147 9,252,773

4. Workforce Development Agreements

Name of transfer payment program

Workforce Development Agreements

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

In perpetuity unless terminated in accordance with the Agreement.

Type of transfer payment

Other transfer payments

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017–18

Link to department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Workforce Development Agreement

Description

The Workforce Development Agreements consolidate and replace the Canada Job Fund AgreementsFootnote 1, the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities and the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers, making transfers to provinces and territories simpler and more flexible. This supports provinces and territories in designing and delivering labour market programs and services that assist Canadians in gaining employability skills and work experience and improving job skills, increasing labour market participation and finding and keeping employment. The Workforce Development Agreements provide dedicated funding for programs for persons with disabilities. Provinces and territories may also target members of underrepresented groups such as Indigenous peoples, youth, older workers and newcomers to Canada to increase their labour market participation. The Workforce Development Agreements can also assist employers by supporting employer-sponsored training.

Expected results

This initiative supports the efforts of provinces, territories and employers to equip workers with training and skills, reducing barriers to access employment, avoiding duplication, and promoting better outcomes for workers who need help. It is expected that these labour market transfers will result in increased access for Canadians to training and employment programs by providing provinces and territories with expanded program eligibility and increased funding. Specifically, it would increase the number of clients served and the flexibility to serve a broader range of client needs. Additionally, a robust new performance measurement strategy will allow for the measurement of outcomes, including:

  • Participation of individuals and employers in programs and services;
  • Progression of individuals along the continuum to labour market participation;
  • Improved workforce capacity of employers/industries;
  • Employers/industries are better able to manage labour market challenges;
  • Employment, increased earnings and positive net impacts for individuals; and
  • Sustainable employment of individuals.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable. No evaluation has been completed as the Workforce Development Agreements came into effect in 2017–18.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable. No evaluation has been completed as the Workforce Development Agreements came into effect in 2017–18.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021–22

General targeted recipient groups

Individuals who are unemployed and not covered by Employment Insurance underemployed and/or seeking to upskill; and members of underrepresented groups, including persons with disabilities.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engages provinces and territories through the bilateral committee set out in each Agreement. Provinces and territories are responsible for the design and delivery of skills training and programming and setting priorities within the parameters of the Agreements. As part of that process they are responsible for engaging with employers and other stakeholders to determine priorities.

Planning information (dollars)
Workforce Development Agreements Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 815,706,801 872,000,000 422,000,000 422,000,000
Total program 815,706,801 872,000,000 422,000,000 422,000,000

5. Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Name of transfer payment program

Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Start date

April 1, 1997

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014–15

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Description

The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities assists persons with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. It supports persons with disabilities in overcoming barriers to participation in the Canadian labour market, and it supports employers to hire persons with disabilities. This program supports a wide range of programs and services, including job search supports, skills development, wage subsidies and employer awareness initiatives to encourage employers to hire persons with disabilities. The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities is delivered via third-party organizations in the community.

These transfer payments are not repayable contributions.

Expected results

Persons with disabilities have enhanced their employability, obtained employment, become self-employed or returned to school.

Performance measure:

  • Number of clients with enhanced employability
    • 2019–20 Target: 3,168
  • Number of clients employed or self-employed
    • 2019–20 Target: 2,401

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018–19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Phase 2 of the Evaluation of the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities is currently in progress and is scheduled to be completed in 2019–20.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include individuals acting as project sponsors or employers in relation to an eligible activity; other levels of government; provincial and territorial institutions, agencies and Crown corporations; and not-for-profit, for-profit and Indigenous organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engages recipients via both national and regional contribution agreements, and consults with employers and service providers to design and deliver programming for persons with disabilities to support enhanced employment outcomes.

Planning information (dollars)
Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 37,889,406 38,813,963 38,588,846 39,790,814
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 37,889,406 38,813,963 38,588,846 39,790,814

6. Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime

Name of transfer payment program

Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime

Note: Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children is renewed under the name Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime

Start date

January 1, 2013; modified September 30, 2018

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012–13, modified in 2018–19

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime (formerly the Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children grant)

Description

The Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime (formerly the Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children grant) provides income support to eligible parents who suffer a loss of income as a result of taking time away from work to cope with the death or disappearance of their child (or children) under the age of 25 as a result of a probable Criminal Code offence. Those who are eligible receive a payment of $450 per week paid bi-weekly for a maximum of 35 weeks during the income support period of two years following the date of the incident. This program is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

The financial burden on parents of children who are deceased or missing due to a probable Criminal Code offence and who take time away from work to cope with the tragic situation is eased. Due to the nature of the program, the Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime does not have targets to fulfill.

Performance measures:

  • Proportion of applications received and processed within the prescribed timeframe
    • 2019–20 Target: 90%
  • Proportion of successful applicants
    • 2019–20 Target: Not applicable
  • Average number of weeks paid per recipient incident
    • 2019–20 Target: Not applicable
  • Number of Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime inquiry calls to Service Canada
    • 2019–20 Target: Not applicable

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017–18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

The grant was updated in 2018 in order to make it more flexible and accessible to Canadians.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022–23

General targeted recipient groups

Individuals (Parents or Legal Guardians)

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Outreach activities to law enforcement agencies and victim stakeholder groups are ongoing to raise awareness of this income support among eligible families.

Planning information (dollars)
Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000

7. Union Training and Innovation Program

Name of transfer payment program

Union Training and Innovation Program

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grants and Contributions

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Ongoing

Link to department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Union Training and Innovation Program

Description

The Union Training and Innovation Program aims to strengthen training in the trades to better support a skilled, inclusive, and productive trades workforce.

The Union Training and Innovation Program funding is available through two streams. Stream 1 provides unions representing workers in Red Seal trades with up to 50% of the cost of purchasing up-to-date training equipment and materials. Stream 2 provides support for innovative approaches to address challenges that limit apprenticeship outcomes. Challenges include barriers to participation and success in the trades for key groups (for example, women and Indigenous people), and lack of employer engagement. This stream is open to a range of stakeholders, but unions representing workers in Red Seal trades must be involved, either as the lead or partner on projects.

Both streams must aim to increase participation and success of key groups in the trades, particularly women and Indigenous people.

The Women in Construction Fund aims to increase participation of women in construction trades where they have been traditionally underrepresented. It builds on existing models that have proven to be effective in attracting women to the trades. These models provide supports such as mentoring, coaching and tailored supports that help women to progress through their training and find and retain jobs in the trades.

Expected results

Participants have improved skills to succeed in the trades.

Performance measure:

  • Number of participants in funded projects in stream 1 (equipment)
    • 2019-20 Target: 4,500
  • Number of participants in funded projects in stream 2 (innovation)
    • 2020-21 Target: 250
  • Percentage of participants in funded projects reporting an increase in skills after program intervention
    • 2019-20 Target: 85%
  • Number of participants in funded projects in WCF.
    • Baseline data will be available in December 2020.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2020-21

General targeted recipient groups

Women, Indigenous people, newcomers, and persons with disabilities

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Call for Proposals or by direct solicitation

Planning information (dollars)
Union Training and Innovation Program Forecast spending 2018-19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 2,300,000 2,300,000 2,300,000 2,300,000
Total contributions 23,370,905 23,884,128 23,886,798 20,700,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 25,670,905 26,184,128 26,186,798 23,000,000

8. Apprenticeship Grants

Name of transfer payment program

Apprenticeship Grants

Start date

January 1, 2007 (Apprenticeship Incentive Grant) / January 1, 2009 (Apprenticeship Completion Grant)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012–13

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Apprenticeship Grants

Description

Apprenticeship grants are intended to help apprentices enter, progress and complete their training in Red Seal trades. This program targets eligible Canadian citizens, permanent residents and protected persons who are out of high school and are registered apprentices in one of the 56 designated Red Seal trades. It is comprised of three grants: the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, a taxable cash grant of $1,000 per year for registered apprentices (up to a maximum of $2,000 per apprentice) who have successfully completed the technical and on-the-job training requirements for the first or second year/level of an apprenticeship program; the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant for Women where eligible women receive $3,000 in grants for the first two year of their apprenticeship program in Red Seal trades where they are underrepresented; and the Apprenticeship Completion Grant, an additional $2,000 taxable cash grant to registered apprentices upon completion of apprenticeship training and receipt of journeyperson certification. Eligibility for this program is tied to the Red Seal trades which support the mobility of skilled tradespeople based on national standards.

Apprenticeship grants are not repayable contributions.

Expected results

Participant progression in and completion of an apprenticeship program in a designated Red Seal trade is increased.

Performance measures:

  • Number of Apprenticeship Incentive Grants issued
    • 2019–20 Target: 48,000
  • Number of Apprenticeship Completion Grants issued
    • 2019–20 Target: 23,000
  • Number of Apprenticeship Incentive Grants for Women issued
    • 2022–23 Target: 2,300

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014–15

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the Apprenticeship Grants Program is scheduled to be completed in 2018–19.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients are registered apprentices who meet the eligibility criteria of Apprenticeship Grants.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

In 2019–20, the Department will continue to work with provincial/territorial apprenticeship authorities to identify opportunities and implement measures to increase program efficiency while offering individuals applying for an Apprenticeship Grant, a more streamlined application process.

Planning information (dollars)
Apprenticeship Grants Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 112,478,322 112,804,322 113,904,322 113,904,322
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 112,478,322 112,804,322 113,904,322 113,904,322

9. Literacy and Essential Skills

Name of transfer payment program

Literacy and Essential Skills

Start date

April 1, 2006

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grants and Contributions

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012–13

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Literacy and Essential Skills

Description

The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills aims to help adult Canadians improve their literacy and essential skills to better prepare for, get and keep a job, and adapt and succeed at work. The Office is working closely with provincial and territorial governments to support the integration of essential skills into employment and training programs, which they in large part deliver, and for which they are further supported by federal labour market transfers such as the Workforce Development Agreements and Labour Market Development Agreements.

Particular emphasis is placed on supporting individuals with low skills and facing multiple barriers to employment such as Indigenous people, youth, and official language minority communities. The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills is working horizontally with other Employment and Social Development Canada programs such as the Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program, the Youth Employment Strategy and the Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities. The Office is also partnering with other government departments, such as Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada, to enhance the availability of essential skills supports for those most in need (for example, newcomers).

The literacy and essential skills grants and contributions appropriation is from both the Consolidated Revenue Fund – Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills and Employment Insurance Part II – National Essential Skills Initiative. Funding is used to make strategic investments in transformative projects to replicate and scale up proven approaches to skills upgrading across Canada and to develop innovative approaches to improve the quality of employment and training supports that are more responsive to employer and worker needs.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program. The program also links with the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–23.

Expected results

Adult Canadians have the literacy and essential skills they need to do their job, adapt and succeed in the labour market and contribute to their communities and families.

Performance measures:

  • Number of organizations supporting essential skills training and development
    • 2019–20 Target: 500
  • Number of Canadians having accessed essential skills training or supports
    • 2019–20 Target: 16,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017–18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022–23.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients for program funding include: not-for-profit organizations; for-profit organizations; municipal governments; Indigenous organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities); and provincial and territorial governments, institutions, agencies and Crown Corporations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Over 235,000 literacy and essential skills tools and resources were ordered in print and accessed online, including through partners such as Service Canada, Red Seal and the Canada Business Network. The program hosts regular webinars and other fora to support recipients with measuring outcomes, report on project progress, and to share broadly "what works" to support people in developing the skills needed for the job market. A playbook of good practices and lessons learned from literacy and essential skills pilot projects is under development, and is expected to be released in 2019–20. The “evergreen” playbook will be shared widely among Essential Skills development practitioners.

The program also hosts an annual Essential Skills Forum with partners, stakeholders and project recipients to discuss current program objectives, common challenges, and to share good practices.

Planning information (dollars)
Literacy and Essential Skills Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 17,305,164 14,800,000 14,800,000 14,800,000
Total contributions 6,503,836 3,209,000 3,209,000 3,209,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 23,809,000 18,009,000 18,009,000 18,009,000

10. Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program

Name of transfer payment program

Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program

Start date

April 1, 2019

End date

March 31, 2029

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019–20

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program

Description

The Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program is the successor program to the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy. The Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program’s objective is to help to reduce skills and employment gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, focusing on employment skills development and training to help Indigenous Peoples to develop and upgrade their skills and attain employment. The Program is grounded in a distinctions-based approach to better meet the needs of First Nations, Inuit, Métis, and Urban/Non-affiliated Indigenous people. The Program will provide a full suite of skills development and job training – from the acquisition of essential skills such as literacy and numeracy to more advanced training for in-demand jobs. The Program will support a network of Indigenous service delivery organizations to design and deliver employment programs and services for Indigenous Peoples with points of service all across Canada.

The Program is linked to the Employment Insurance Act, which funds Indigenous groups to deliver programs similar to those established by Part II of the Act.

The Indigenous Skills and Employment Training program is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

An increasing number of Indigenous people are employed and integrated into the Canadian labour market.

Performance measure:

  • Number of clients who obtained employment following service intervention(s)

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014–15

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019–20 (Aboriginal Labour Market Programming)

General targeted recipient groups

Indigenous organizations (may include incorporated for-profit and not-for-profit Indigenous-controlled organizations, Indigenous-controlled unincorporated organizations, Indian Act bands, tribal councils and Indigenous governments under modern treaties)

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

To advance reconciliation and respect the commitment towards a renewed nation-to-nation, government-to-government and Inuit-Crown relationships with Indigenous Peoples, Employment and Social Development Canada has worked closely with Indigenous partners to co-develop the implementation of the Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program. The Department also works with Indigenous contribution recipients throughout the life of their contribution agreement, at the national and regional levels.

Planning information (dollars)
Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20  2020–21  2021–22 
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 294,306,844 300,628,425 302,669,519 304,808,286
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 294,306,844 300,628,425 302,669,519 304,808,286

11. Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Name of transfer payment program

Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Start date

May 26, 2010

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010–11

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Description

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program works to support internationally-trained individuals to fully participate in the Canadian labour market. It also contributes to the Government of Canada’s commitment to the attraction, selection and integration of skilled immigrants into the Canadian economy and society. The Foreign Credential Recognition Program focuses on three areas of activities to facilitate the labour market integration of skilled immigrants: (1) simplifying and harmonizing national credential recognition processes; (2) providing micro loans to cover foreign recognition related expenses; and (3) testing the most effective and efficient ways to help highly skilled newcomers gain their first Canadian work experience in their profession/field of study. The Foreign Credential Recognition Program is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

Performance measures:

Foreign-trained individuals are better able to use their skills and experience gained abroad in the Canadian labour market.

  • Portion of skilled immigrants in regulated occupations targeted by systemic foreign credential recognition interventions
  • Loans program: Newcomer clients have their credentials recognized and have better employment outcomes.
  • Percentage of newcomer clients who complete their credential assessment after intervention (following loan repayment)
    • 2023 Target: 17%
  • Percentage of newcomer clients who find employment in their intended or related occupation affter intervention
    • 2023 Target: 35%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Joint Summative Evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program and Inter-provincial Labour Mobility Initiative was completed in 2015–16. The evaluation findings can be found on theEmployment and Social Development Canada website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of Foreign Credential Recognition Program is scheduled to be completed in 2019–20.

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include, but are not limited to, not-for-profit organizations, regulatory bodies, national organizations, provincial governments, sectoral and cross-sectoral councils, professional associations, industry associations, unions, school boards, municipal governments, public health institutions, universities, colleges, Collèges d'enseignement général et professionnel and consortia composed of all or some of the aforementioned types of recipient organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Employment and Social Development Canada continued to engage with key stakeholders through meetings and conferences, and participated in regular federal/provincial/territorial activities through the Forum of Labour Market Ministers intergovernmental working groups (for example, the Foreign Qualifications Recognition Working Group and the Labour Mobility Coordinating Group).

Planning information (dollars)
Foreign Credential Recognition Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000 21,420,000

12. Sectoral Initiatives Program

Name of transfer payment program

Sectoral Initiatives Program

Start date

April 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013–14

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Sectoral Initiatives Program

Description

The Sectoral Initiatives Program is a contributions program with the objective of addressing current and future skills shortages by supporting the development and distribution of sector-specific labour market intelligence, national occupational standards, and skills certification and accreditation systems. The mandate is to help industry identify, forecast, and address human resources and skills issues through partnership-based projects for key sectors of the Canadian economy, to help ease labour mobility and labour market adjustment.

The Sectoral Initiatives Program does not use repayable contributions.

Expected results

Number of labour market information reports or forecasting systems, National Occupation Standards , Certification and Accreditation regimes, and curricula developed or updated, and number of pilot project reports produced and shared via the Sectoral Initiatives Program projects.

Performance measures:

  • Number of Labour Market Information Reports and Forecasting Systems
    • 2019–20 Target: 91 Reports / 10 Forecasting Systems
  • Number of National Occupation Standards
    • 2019–20 Target: 32
  • Number of certification regimes
    • 2019–20 Target: 5
  • Number of accreditation systems
    • 2019–20 Target: 3
  • Number of curricula developed or updated
    • 2019–20 Target: 0
  • Number of pilot project reports
    • 2019–20 Target: 1

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The last evaluation of the Sectoral Initiatives Program was completed in April 2018.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The next evaluation will be completed in 2023–24.

General targeted recipient groups

The targeted recipients are organizations that represent a partnership of key players within a sector such as employers, associations and educational institutions, and include:

  • Employee or employer associations;
  • Not-for-profit organizations; and
  • Indigenous organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

In 2017–18, the Sectoral Initiatives Program launched a Call for Proposals process. In addition, the Program invited stakeholders in key economic sectors to submit target proposals for the development or updating of foundational labour market forecasting systems. Recipients were also consulted to gather information about outputs, users and results of current Sectoral Initiatives Program projects.

Planning information (dollars)
Sectoral Initiatives Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123 5,724,123

13. Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities

Name of transfer payment program

Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities

Start date

April 1, 2005 / March 28, 2018 (Launch of last Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-23: Investing in Our Future)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013–14

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities

Description

The Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities is Employment and Social Development Canada main contribution under the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future.

The Enabling Fund program and its predecessor program, the Support Fund (1999–2005), is the Department’s main program to meet its legal and mandated obligations under Section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

The program has three main objectives: strengthening community capacity building; promoting partnerships in the area of human resources development; and, enhancing community economic development. It is delivered through contribution agreements with a pan-Canadian network of 14 designated community economic development organizations (one in each jurisdiction and a national organization) with more than 130 employees working in 50 locations across the country.

Expected results

Official Languages Minority Communities are better able to implement and sustain community economic and human resource development

Performance measures:

  • Amount invested by non-Enabling Fund funded partners for every dollar invested by the Enabling Fund in community economic development and human resource development
  • 2019–20 Target: 2:1*

* Leverage $2 for every dollar invested by the Enabling Fund

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017–18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021–22

General targeted recipient groups

Official Languages Minority Communities

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Continued engagement through formal dialogue and a tripartite governance mechanism, the Economic Action Network. This network brings together federal and community representatives with economic and human resource development mandates to discuss cooperation mechanisms and initiatives aimed at improving the vitality and economic development of Official Languages Minority Communities.

The Economic Action Network connects local, regional and national economic stakeholders and policy makers and serves as a platform for establishing links between labour market strategies and programs with different scopes. The Network is also an important mechanism for the federal government to remain apprised of the needs and circumstances of Official Languages Minority Communities from across the country.

Planning information (dollars)
Enabling Fund for Official Languages Minority Communities Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 13,450,000 14,050,000 14,150,000 14,450,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 13,450,000 14,050,000 14,150,000 14,450,000

14. Skills and Partnership Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Skills and Partnership Fund

Start date

April 1, 2010

End date

March 31, 2028

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2009–10 (with the last amendment in March 2016)

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Skills and Partnership Fund

Description

The Skills and Partnership Fund is a demand-driven, project-based program that contributes to the skills development and training-to-employment of Indigenous Peoples through strategic partnerships. The Skills and Partnership Fund provides training-to-employment for jobs identified by partner employers and focuses on emerging or untapped economic development opportunities that meet the needs of high-demand sectors and areas with skills shortages. The Fund also encourages innovative approaches to providing labour market training and improving employment outcomes for Indigenous Peoples. To do this, the program requires the development of partnerships, leverages private sector and federal-provincial-territorial funding to maximize Skills and Partnership Fund investments, and encourages testing of new service delivery models to embed long-term program improvements.

The Skills and Partnership Fund is not a repayable contribution.

Expected results

An increasing number of Indigenous people are employed and integrated into the Canadian labour market.

Performance measures:

  • Number of clients who obtained employment following service intervention(s)

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2014–15

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019–20

General targeted recipient groups

Indigenous organizations (may include incorporated for-profit and not-for-profit Indigenous-controlled organizations, Indigenous-controlled unincorporated organizations, Indian Act bands, tribal councils and Indigenous governments under modern treaties).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Employment and Social Development Canada works with Indigenous contribution recipients throughout the life of their contribution agreement. There is ongoing communication with agreement holders at the national and regional level, including regular monitoring activities.

Planning information (dollars)
Skills and Partnership Fund Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000

15. Student Work Placement Program

Name of transfer payment program

Student Work Placement Program (formerly Student Work-Integrated Learning Program)

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017–18

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Student Work Placement Program

Description

The Student Work Placement Program supports multi-stakeholder partnerships bringing employers and post-secondary institutions together to collaborate on the creation of work-integrated learning placements for Canadian students enrolled in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and business programs in post-secondary institutions. The majority of funds will be directed towards providing wage subsidies to employers who offer new work-integrated learning placements focusing on “work-ready” and entrepreneurial skills development opportunities for student participants. In order to promote full and equitable participation in the Program, increased wage subsidies will be offered to employers who create placements for students from underrepresented groups who have traditionally lacked access to these valuable skills development opportunities. These students include: women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, Indigenous students, Persons with Disabilities, newcomers and first-year students. Funding will also be directed towards innovative projects that develop strategies to better align educational and skills development opportunities with the skills needs of employers in key and emerging sectors of the economy. Employment and Social Development Canada has engaged multiple employer consortia to lead the program’s delivery as they are well placed to deliver with sustained impact on skills development in their sectors. Resources are allocated and/or announced over three years to support the creation of an additional 3,000 placements in cybersecurity and artificial intelligence sectors.

Expected results

Performance measure:

Increased number of Post-Secondary Education students participating in work placement opportunities and developing work ready skills

  • Number of new work placement opportunities, including commitment to create opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics and Business sectors
  • Increased engagement of employers, including small/medium sized employers, in adopting and implementing work placement opportunities
  • Number of new formalized Post-Secondary Education and industry partnerships

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2020–21

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients include employer consortia delivering program activities. Employer consortia will target employers of all sizes, and post-secondary students as ultimate recipients of program funds.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Government of Canada engaged recipients via contribution agreements. The Government of Canada regularly consults with employer consortia delivering activities and has put in place performance measurement and reporting requirements which each recipient is required to adhere to in order to secure additional funding. The program also funds an online exchange platform which uses new technology to simplify and improve job matching between employers and students, based on competency-matching placement process. Information about the program will be shared as part of the Youth Employment Strategy modernization.

Planning information (dollars)
Student Work Placement Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 20,015,269 2,709,936 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,015,269 2,709,936 0 0

16. Future Skills

Name of transfer payment program

Future Skills

Start date

May 24, 2018

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018–19

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Future Skills

Description

Future Skills is part of the Government’s plan to build a resilient and confident workforce that reflects our rapidly evolving world. Working in partnership with provinces and territories, the private sector, labour, educational and training institutions, and not-for-profit organizations, it will identify in-demand skills, develop and test innovative training approaches, and inform future skills investments and programming.

It is aligned with the results in the Employment and Social Development Canada Departmental Results Framework, which are “Canadians access education, training and life-long learning supports to gain the skills and work experience they need” and “Canadians participate in an inclusive and efficient labour market”.

Future Skills includes:

  • A Council – appointed by the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour to provide advice on national and regional strategic priorities; and
  • A Centre – an arm’s length to government research centre to develop, test and rigorously measure new approaches to skills assessment and development

The Future Skills Office within Employment and Social Development Canada will encourage the adoption of recommendations by the Council and best practices identified by the Centre into policies and programming.

Future Skills will include a focus on addressing the needs of disadvantaged and underrepresented groups, such as Indigenous Peoples, persons with disabilities, low-income workers, newcomers to Canada and youth, to ensure that all Canadians can benefit from emerging opportunities.

Expected results

The Future Skills Council and Centre will be established and will initiate efforts to fulfill their respective mandates in 2019–20.

The Council will publish its first strategic plan, will update it annually and will mobilize actors across sectors to address priorities of pan-Canadian significance identified.

The Centre will fund projects to identify emerging in-demand skills; develop, test and identify effective approaches to skills assessment and development; and share results to inform future investments.

The Future Skills Office will support the adoption of evidence generated by the Council and Centre into policy and program design.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable; program implemented in 2018–19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable; program implemented in 2018–19

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022–23

General targeted recipient groups

The Future Skills Centre, a not-for-profit organization, will be funded through a contribution agreement. The Centre will undertake projects with or redistribute funding to projects led by not-for-profit organizations, provinces and territories, Indigenous governments and organizations, other orders of government, the private sector, labour, educational and training institutions.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Since the summer of 2017, Employment and Social Development Canada has engaged over 400 organizations including private sector, educational institutions, labour, not-for-profit, and provinces and territories to inform the design of Future Skills and raise awareness on the two open calls to support the appointment of Council members and the selection of the organizations partnering to operate the Centre.

Planning information (dollars)
Future Skills Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 22,712,823 47,725,578 72,860,007 72,726,754
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 22,712,823 47,725,578 72,860,007 72,726,754

17. Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Student Loans Program – Direct Financing Arrangement

Start date

August 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Student Financial Assistance Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Student Financial Assistance Act S.C. 24, c. 28

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Apprentice Loans

Description

The Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Apprentice Loans provide loans to Canadians who have a demonstrated financial need to help them participate in post-secondary education. The Program also offers debt management measures to those borrowers who are experiencing financial difficulty so that they can repay their student loans in periods of unemployment or low income. It is managed in partnership with the participating provinces and territories, educational institutions and agencies, financial aid administrators, financial institutions and a service provider. The clients and beneficiaries include full- and part-time students and borrowers in repayment.

This transfer payment also includes a non-repayable contribution to provinces and territories that have elected to deliver programs comparable to the Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Apprentice Loans in their jurisdictions.

Expected results

Post-secondary education students in the province of Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Apprentice Loans.

Students in non-participating jurisdictions with financial difficulty are able to receive repayment benefits.

Performance measure: Percentage and number of full-time post-secondary students (aged 15 to 29) in participating provinces/territories who used a Canada Student Loan, and/or a Canada Student Grant and/or an in-study interest subsidy, to help finance their participation in post-secondary education.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

  • The Summative Evaluation of the Budget 2008 Canada Student Loans Program Enhancements was completed in 2016–17
  • The Summative Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan was completed in 2017–18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Canada Student Loans Program: Effectiveness at Achieving Outcomes – Phase 1, expected in 2019–20

Canada Student Loans Program: Effectiveness at Achieving Outcomes – Phase 2, expected in 2022–23

Evaluation of Canada Apprentice Loans – Phase 2, expected in March 2020

General targeted recipient groups

Provinces and Territories: Non-participating provinces and territories for the benefit of resident low- and middle-income students.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable

Planning information (dollars)
Canada Student Loans Program – Direct Financing Arrangement Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 834,446,404 854,303,121 879,930,344 897,884,063
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 834,446,404 854,303,121 879,930,344 897,884,063

18. Canada Student Loans Program - Canada Student Grants

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Student Loans Program – Canada Student Grants

Start date

August 1, 2009

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Student Financial Assistance Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Student Financial Assistance Act (S.C. 1994, c. 28)

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment Program: Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Apprentice Loans

Description

The Canada Student Grants Program provides predictable, up-front grants to assist and encourage students from low- and middle-income families, student who are parents and students with disabilities to participate in post-secondary education. It is managed in partnership with participating provinces and territories. While Canada Student Loans are repayable, Canada Student Grants provide non-repayable assistance.

Expected results

Eligible students receive a Canada Student Grant to help them finance their post-secondary education. Performance measure: Percentage and number of full-time post-secondary students (aged 15 to 29) in participating provinces/territories who used a Canada Student Loan, and/or a Canada Student Grant and/or an in-study interest subsidy, to help finance their participation in post-secondary education.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

  • The Summative Evaluation of the Budget 2008 Canada Student Loans Program Enhancements was completed in 2016–17
  • The Summative Evaluation of the Canada Apprentice Loan was completed in 2017–18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Canada Student Loans Program: Effectiveness at Achieving Outcomes – Phase 1, expected in 2019–20 Canada Student Loans Program: Effectiveness at Achieving Outcomes – Phase 2, expected in 2021–22

General targeted recipient groups

Low- and middle-income students pursuing post-secondary education

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Ongoing outreach to current and prospective post-secondary education students through multiple channels
Planning information (dollars)
Canada Student Loans Program – Canada Student Grants and Loans Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 1,600,000,000 1,454,300,000 1,446,400,000 1,346,200,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 1,600,000,000 1,454,300,000 1,446,400,000 1,346,200,000

19. Canada Education Savings Program (Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond)

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Education Savings Program (Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond) (Statutory)

Start date

January 1, 1998 (Canada Education Savings Grants); January 1, 2005 (Canada Learning Bond)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Education Savings Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Canada Education Savings Act (S.C. 2004, c.26) Canadian Education Savings Regulations (SOR/2005-151)

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Canada Education Savings Program

Description

The Government of Canada encourages families to save for a child’s post-secondary education. Employment and Social Development Canada administers two education savings incentives linked to Registered Education Savings Plans:

The Canada Education Savings Grant is available to all eligible children and provides 20% (Basic Grant) on the first $2,500 in personal contributions made to a Registered Education Savings Planeach year, and an additional amount (Additional Grant) for eligible children from middle- and low- income families of 10% or 20% on the first $500 of personal contributions made each year. The Canada Education Savings Grant is available until the calendar year in which the child turns 17, and the maximum lifetime amount, including the Additional Grant, is $7,200.

The Canada Learning Bond is available for children from low-income families born in 2004 or later and provides an initial payment of $500 into a Registered Education Savings Planplus $100 for each year of eligibility, up to age 15, for a maximum of $2,000. No personal contributions are required to receive the Canada Learning Bond.

These education savings incentives are delivered through a unique service delivery arrangement with financial institutions, banks, mutual fund companies and scholarship foundations.

Note: Where “Basic Grant” or “Additional Grant” is not specified, Canada Education Savings Grant refers to both.

Expected results

Canadians have accumulated savings in Registered Education Savings Plans to help finance a portion of their post-secondary education.

Performance measures: Total Registered Education Savings Plan assets by end of the calendar year, and Total Registered Education Savings plan withdrawals.

More children, including those from low- and middle-income families, receive the education savings incentives.

Performance measures: Percentage of children under 18 (in the current calendar year) who have ever received a Canada Education Savings Grant, and Percentage of eligible children in the current calendar year who have ever received a Canada Learning Bond.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

A Summative Evaluation of the Canada Education Savings Program - Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond was completed in 2015–16. The evaluation findings can be found on the Employment and Social Development Canada website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

An Evaluation of the Canada Education Savings Program is scheduled to be completed in 2020–21.

General targeted recipient groups

Canada Education Savings Grant beneficiaries are children aged 0–17. The Canada Learning Bond is available to children born on or after January 1, 2004, from low-income families or in care of a child services agency.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Information on the Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond is available online at canada.gc.ca, through the Program’s telephone, mail and email inquiry services and at 1 800 O-Canada.

The Government of Canada seeks to increase awareness and take-up of the education savings incentives through a variety of means, including: information products and resources; e.g. mailing inserts and brochures, direct mailings to Primary Caregivers of children eligible for the Canada Learning Bond, and outreach activities undertaken in collaboration with internal and external partners and stakeholders (for example, information sessions and presentations, support for community-led Canada Learning Bond sign-up events, and Education Savings Week , an annual communications and outreach event designed to promote the benefits of early savings in Registered Education Savings Plans and to raise awareness of the federal and provincial education savings incentives among low- and middle-income families, Indigenous people, newcomers to Canada, and those living in rural and isolated communities, etc.).

Planning information (dollars)
Canada Education Savings Program (Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond) Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants - CESG 925,000,000 955,000,000 985,000,000 1,015,000,000
Total grants - CLB 176,000,000 185,000,000 194,000,000 200,000,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 1,101,000,000 1,140,000,000 1,179,000,000 1,215,000,000

20. Pathways to Education Canada

Name of transfer payment program

Pathways to Education Canada (Multi-year funding agreement)

Start date

April 1, 2018 (based on draft grant agreement – not yet signed)

End date

March 31, 2022 (based on draft grand agreement – not yet signed)

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018–19

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Learning, Skills Development and Employment

Program: Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Apprentice Loans

Description

Pathways to Education Canada, a charitable organization founded in Toronto in 2001, is a community-based youth learning intervention program. The program was created to reduce poverty and its effects by lowering the high school dropout rate and increasing access to post-secondary education among disadvantaged youth. The Pathways to Education program provides non-financial supports such as tutoring, mentoring and counselling; and financial supports such as bursaries for post-secondary education and funding for certain immediate costs related to attending high school (such as bus tickets).

Expected results

Over the course of the grant period, Pathways to Education Canada is expected to:

  1. Expand its supports to reach more students in more areas of the country
    • Continue to provide ongoing support to the approximate 5,400 existing participants across the Program’s active sites
  • Increase enrolments to 6,500 students annually (approximate 20% increase)
  • Open an additional site in Thunder Bay
  • Explore the feasibility of and implement alternative delivery approaches aimed at broadening the reach of Pathways’ supports
  1. Improve rates of high school graduation and acceptance to post-secondary education among program participants
    • Increase the number of program participants accepted to post-secondary education
  • Increase high school graduation rates among participants to within 10% of local school boards graduation rates
  • Ensure 85% of participants are accepted into post-secondary studies
  1. Expand employability programming for participants
  • Increase access to career development activities
  • Continue to engage employers and alumni as part of program activities
  • Increase access to front-line resources to support development of employability skills for Pathways students
  • Expand capacity to track labour market outcomes of program graduates
  • Implement pilot projects to assess the skills of students exiting the program
  1. IV. Develop a Sustainability Plan that will support knowledge transfer and Sustainable Reach
    • Continue to implement the strategic partnership model to ensure sustainability of programming
  1. Continue to develop Indigenous youth programming and finalize an Indigenous Youth Strategy
    • ◦Gather data and information from students, advisory circles and other Indigenous stakeholders on how to improve educational outcomes
  • Establish educational indicators for Indigenous youth
  • Develop Indigenous evaluation strategies to assess programming needs
  • Finalize the production of an Indigenous Youth Strategy

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018–19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

To be determined.

General targeted recipient groups

The only eligible recipient of funding is Pathways to Education Canada, a non-profit organization.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

As stipulated in the draft funding agreement between Pathways to Education Canada and the Government of Canada, Pathways will ensure that funded activities are effectively captured. The organization will use indicators to evaluate the outputs of its activities, to determine the extent to which results support expected objectives and outcomes, and to capture lessons learned. This information will be reflected in financial statements, annual reports and in the final report.

Planning information (dollars)
Pathways to Education Canada Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 9,500,000 9,500,000 9,500,000 9,500,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 9,500,000 9,500,000 9,500,000 9,500,000

21. Wage Earner Protection Program

Name of transfer payment program

Wage Earner Protection Program

Start date

July 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Wage Earner Protection Program Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2008–09

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Working Conditions and Workplace Relations

Program: Wage Earner Protection Program

Description

This Program is designed to reduce the economic insecurity of Canadian workers who are owed unpaid wages and vacation pay, disbursements, termination pay and severance pay when their employer files for bankruptcy or becomes subject to receivership. Workers can receive an amount up to four weeks of maximum insurable earnings under the Employment Insurance Act. When eligible workers receive payments under the Wage Earner Protection Program Act, they sign over their rights as creditors of the employer to the federal government, but only up to the amount of the payment received from the Program. The federal government seeks recovery of the amounts as the creditor of the employer in the bankruptcy or receivership process. This Program covers workers in all Labour jurisdictions.

There is no repayment of statutory transfer payments, unless a Wage Earner Protection Program recipient receives an overpayment. When available, dividends from insolvent employer estates are returned to the fund.

Expected results

Wage Earner Protection Program applicants receive a payment, or a non-payment notification, in a timely manner

Performance measure: Percentage of initial Wage Earner Protection Program payments and non-payment notifications issued within 35 calendar days;
2018–19 Target: 80%

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2013–14

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021–22

General targeted recipient groups

All employed workers in Canada, irrespective of jurisdiction.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

In 2014–15, the Labour Program completed the five-year statutory review of the Wage Earner Protection Program Act, its operations and administration, which culminated with the tabling of a Report in both Houses of Parliament on June 18, 2015. Subsequent to the review, the Labour program continues to engage with internal and external stakeholders to identify ways to improve the administration and service delivery.

Planning information (dollars)
Wage Earner Protection Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000 49,250,000

22. Old Age Security Pension

Name of transfer payment program

Old Age Security Pension

Start date

1952

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Old Age Security Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Pensions and Benefits

Program: Old Age Security

Description

The Old Age Security program is the first pillar of Canada’s retirement income system. Its objective is to ensure a minimum income for seniors, and to mitigate income disruptions at retirement. The Old Age Security program is funded by general tax revenues. The program includes three benefits: The Old Age Security Pension, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowances. The Old Age Security Pension is a monthly payment to all Canadians aged 65 or older who meet the residence and legal status requirements. To be eligible for the pension, an individual must have resided in Canada for at least 10 years after the age of 18. The Guaranteed Income Supplement provides additional assistance to Old Age Security pensioners with little or no income. Entitlement to the Guaranteed Income Supplement is based on the marital status and the annual net income of the individual, and their spouse or common-law partner when applicable. The Guaranteed Income Supplement is income-tested to ensure that the highest benefits are paid to the lowest-income seniors. The Allowances provide benefits to low-income 60 to 64 year-old individuals who are either the spouse or common-law partner of a Guaranteed Income Supplement recipient (the Allowance), or who are a widow/widower (the Allowance for the survivor). The Allowances are income-tested to ensure that the highest benefits are paid to the lowest-income seniors.

Expected results

Seniors have income support for retirement.

Performance measure: Percentage of seniors receiving the Old Age Security pension in relation to the estimated total number of eligible seniors.
2019–20 Target: 97%.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018–19 (Evaluation of the Old Age Security Program: Phase 1)

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

  • The Evaluation of Old Age Security: Phase 2 is scheduled to be completed in 2019–20.
  • The Evaluation of Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement Service Improvement is scheduled to be completed in 2021–22

General targeted recipient groups

Seniors aged 65 and over

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

As part of its modernization and transformation agendas, the Department continues to implement automatic enrolment for Old Age Security benefits. The first two phases of automatic enrolment, which were implemented in 2013 and 2016 respectively, allowed many new seniors to receive the Old Age Security pension automatically, without the need to apply. As the second phase of the initiative continues to be implemented throughout 2018–19, it is expected that over 50% of new pensioners will receive the Old Age Security pension without having to apply.

Planning information (dollars)
Old Age Security Pension Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 40,854,760,327 42,754,293,790 45,246,000,000 47,824,000,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 40,854,760,327 42,754,293,790 45,246,000,000 47,824,000,000

23. Guaranteed Income Supplement

Name of transfer payment program

Guaranteed Income Supplement

Start date

1967

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Old Age Security Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Pensions and Benefits

Program: Old Age Security

Description

The Old Age Security program is the first pillar of Canada’s retirement income system. Its objective is to ensure a minimum income for seniors, and to mitigate income disruptions at retirement. The Old Age Security program is funded by general tax revenues. The program includes three benefits: The Old Age Security pension, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowances. The Old Age Security pension is a monthly payment to all Canadians aged 65 or older who meet the residence and legal status requirements. To be eligible for the pension, an individual must have resided in Canada for at least 10 years after the age of 18. The Guaranteed Income Supplement provides additional assistance to Old Age Security pensioners with little or no income. Entitlement to the Guaranteed Income Supplement is based on the marital status and the annual net income of the individual, and their spouse or common-law partner when applicable. The Guaranteed Income Supplement is income-tested to ensure that the highest benefits are paid to the lowest-income seniors. The Allowances provide benefits to low-income 60 to 64 year-old individuals who are either the spouse or common-law partner of a Guaranteed Income Supplement recipient (the Allowance), or who are a widow/widower (the Allowance for the survivor). The Allowances are income-tested to ensure that the highest benefits are paid to the lowest-income seniors.

Expected results

Seniors have income support for retirement.

Performance measure: Percentage of seniors receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement in relation to the estimated total number of eligible seniors.
2019–20 Target: 90%.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012–13

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-up is scheduled to be completed in 2019–20.

The Evaluation of Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement Service Improvement is scheduled to be completed in 2021–22.

General targeted recipient groups

Low-income seniors aged 65 and over

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

As part of its modernization and transformation agendas, the Department continues to implement automatic enrolment for Old Age Security benefits. The first two phases of automatic enrolment, which were implemented in 2013 and 2016 respectively, allowed many new seniors to receive the Old Age Security pension automatically, without the need to apply. Legislative and regulatory amendments came into force in November 2017 to allow for the implementation of the third phase of automatic enrolment, that is, automatic enrolment for the Guaranteed Income Supplement. New pensioners who are automatically enrolled for the Old Age Security pension are automatically assessed for the Guaranteed Income Supplement year after year, without having to fill in a separate application.

Planning information (dollars)
Guaranteed Income Supplement Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 12,262,059,046 12,894,967,152 13,891,000,000 14,891,000,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 12,262,059,046 12,894,967,152 13,891,000,000 14,891,000,000

24. Allowances

Name of transfer payment program

Allowances

Start date

1975 – Allowance; 1985 – Allowance for the Survivor

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Old Age Security Act

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Pensions and Benefits

Program: Old Age Security

Description

The Old Age Security program is the first pillar of Canada’s retirement income system. Its objective is to ensure a minimum income for seniors, and to mitigate income disruptions at retirement. The Old Age Security program is funded by general tax revenues. The program includes three benefits: The Old Age Security pension, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowances. The Old Age Security pension is a monthly payment to all Canadians aged 65 or older who meet the residence and legal status requirements. To be eligible for the pension, an individual must have resided in Canada for at least 10 years after the age of 18. The Guaranteed Income Supplement provides additional assistance to Old Age Security pensioners with little or no income. Entitlement to the Guaranteed Income Supplement is based on the marital status and the annual net income of the individual, and their spouse or common-law partner when applicable. The Guaranteed Income Supplement is income-tested to ensure that the highest benefits are paid to the lowest-income seniors. The Allowances provide benefits to low-income 60 to 64 year-old individuals who are either the spouse or common-law partner of a Guaranteed Income Supplement recipient (the Allowance), or who are a widow/widower (the Allowance for the survivor). The Allowances are income-tested to ensure that the highest benefits are paid to the lowest-income seniors.

Expected results

This measure is no longer reported as the data do not allow for a clear distinction between near-seniors who are entitled to the Allowances and those who are not.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018–19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019–20 (Old Age Security Phase 2)

General targeted recipient groups

Low-income seniors aged 60 to 64

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Department undertakes a variety of initiatives to ensure individuals are aware of, and apply for, benefits to which they are entitled. This includes proactive mailings to potential beneficiaries, inclusion of information with annual tax slips, enhancement of Service Canada channels (Web, phone, in person), outreach services for those potentially eligible and discussions with other government departments, municipal governments and community service providers to identify opportunities for partnership to increase take-up.

Planning information (dollars)
Allowances Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 550,221,046 555,082,525 558,000,000 576,000,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 550,221,046 555,082,525 558,000,000 576,000,000

25. Canada Disability Savings Program - Grants and Bonds

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Disability Savings Program – Grants and Bonds

Start date

December 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Statutory: Canada Disability Savings Act and Disability Savings Regulations

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Pensions and Benefits

Program: Canada Disability Savings Program

Description

The Canada Disability Savings Grant is a limited matching grant that the government deposits into a Registered Disability Savings Plan to match contributions to the plan. Grants may be paid into a plan until the end of the calendar year in which the beneficiary turns 49 years old. There is no annual contribution limit, but there is a maximum lifetime contribution limit of $200,000. The government also deposits Canada Disability Savings Bonds into the plans of low and modest income Canadians. The bond amount can be up to $1,000 a year depending upon the beneficiary’s family income. No contributions are necessary to receive a bond. Bonds may be paid into a plan until the end of the calendar year in which the beneficiary turns 49 years old. The program is administered by two directorates. The Office for Disability Issues within the Income Security and Social Development Branch, is responsible for overall policy development, legislative and regulatory changes, communications and the development of outreach products, outreach efforts and strategies, performance measurement, monitoring, and evaluation. The Canada Education Savings Program within the Learning Branch is responsible for issuer and client support services, training, compliance and undertaking the necessary development and maintenance of the program’s computerized administrative system.

Expected results

Eligible individuals with severe disabilities (and their families/ guardians) open Registered Disability Savings Plans to save for the future.

Performance measure: Total number of registered plans since the inception of the program.
2019–20 Target: 209,195.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018–19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2023–24

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian residents under the age of 60 (if they are 59, they must open a Registered Disability Savings Plan by the end of the calendar year in which they turn 59) who have a valid Social Insurance Number and are eligible to claim the Disability Tax Credit.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Ongoing and planned activities to increase program awareness, understanding and take-up include the following:

    • Mail-outs targeting Disability Tax Credit-eligible Canadians who do not have a Registered Disability Savings Plan.
    • Teleconferences following the mail-outs to answer inquiries
    • Fact sheets and brochures are distributed at conferences or provided to stakeholder groups.
    • Exhibiting at conferences and events across Canada. Conferences and events are attended by service providers, practitioners, people with disabilities and their families, and the general public.
    • Stakeholder engagement meetings/discussions in the cities and towns where conferences and events are held.
    • Presentations to the disability community and provincial/territorial social services front-line workers to increase awareness, understanding and uptake of a Registered Disability Savings Plan, the grant and the bond.
Planning information (dollars)
Canada Disability Savings Program – Grants and Bonds Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Grants – Canada Disability Savings Grant 391,300,000 430,700,000 470,800,000 511,800,000
Grants – Canada Disability Savings Bond 282,400,000 336,600,000 396,300,000 461,400,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 673,700,000 767,300,000 867,100,000 973,200,000

26. Reaching Home

Name of transfer payment program

Reaching Home

Start date

April 1, 2019

End date

March 31, 2028

Type of transfer payment

Grants and contributions

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019–20

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Reaching Home

Description

Reaching Home supports community-based solutions to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada. It provides grants and contributions funding to communities and service providers providing access to permanent housing and supports to help clients remain housed as well as preventing individuals at imminent risk of homelessness from becoming homeless. Services are targeted to individuals, families and Indigenous people who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless in major urban centers, rural communities and the North. Federal funding is prioritized based on input from Community Advisory Boards, in recognition that communities are best placed to identify their homelessness-related needs. Reaching Home works with communities to develop and deliver data-driven system plans with clear outcomes. Communities are asked to report publicly on community-wide outcomes. The program also collects and analyzes national homelessness data through the Homeless Individuals and Families Information System, which collects statistics on shelter use and shares knowledge among communities, partners and stakeholders. The program is a Transfer Payment Program with non-repayable grants and contributions; however, some repayment clauses are outlined in the Terms and Conditions. The Government of Canada is one of many funding partners addressing homelessness issues and performance indicators and expected results are impacted by these and other factors.

Expected results

Homelessness is prevented and reduced

Performance measure:

  • Reduction in the estimated number of shelter users who are chronically homeless.
    • Target: 31% reduction by 2023–2024 from the baseline of 26,900 (2016).

Housing stability for homeless individuals and those at risk of becoming homeless.

Performance measures:

  • Number of people placed in more stable housing.
    • Target: 16,400 by March 31, 2020.
  • Percentage of clients who were placed in more stable housing and, 12 months later, have remained housed, or have successfully exited the program.
    • Target: 75% annually

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Evaluation of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy was completed in 2018–19.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy is scheduled for completion in 2021–22

The Reaching Home Evaluation is scheduled for completion 2022–23

General targeted recipient groups

The following recipients are eligible for Reaching Home funding: not-for-profit organizations; individuals; municipalities; for-profit organizations; public health and educational institutions; Indigenous organizations; and provincial and territorial governments and their entities, including institutions and agencies. These groups are eligible to receive funding and act as coordinators for activities. In Quebec, health and social services agencies are eligible for funding consistent with a formal Canada-Quebec agreement.

For-profit organizations may be eligible for funding, provided that the nature and intent of the activity is: non-commercial; not intended to generate profit; based on fair market value; supports program priorities and objectives; and fits within the community plan (or identified local need where community plans are not required).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

As a community-based and partnership-enhancing program, Reaching Home engages and seeks to build relationships with a wide range of partners and stakeholders. To engage applicants and recipients, various methods, such as calls for proposals, targeted solicitation of applications, unsolicited proposals and expressions of interest or letters of intent will be used.

Planning information (dollars)
Reaching Home Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 500,000 1,400,000 2,600,000 5,000,000
Total contributions 168,407,868 179,831,722 188,615,113 210,251,345
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 168,907,868 181,231,722 191,215,113 215,251,345

27. Enabling Accessibility Fund

Name of transfer payment program

Enabling Accessibility Fund

Start date

The Enabling Accessibility Fund was introduced in Budget 2007, renewed in Budget 2010 for an additional three years and extended on an ongoing basis through Budget 2013.

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

New terms and conditions were approved in September 2013.

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Enabling Accessibility Fund

Description

People with disabilities often experience barriers to their full participation and inclusion in activities of everyday living. To support full participation of people with disabilities in Canadian society, the Government of Canada, through the Enabling Accessibility Fund is taking concrete action to ensure greater accessibility and opportunities for Canadians with disabilities. The Enabling Accessibility Fund provides funding to increase accessibility and eliminate barriers in communities and workplaces across Canada. Grants or contributions are provided to eligible recipients for capital cost projects that increase access for people with disabilities to programs and services, which in turn can create an equal opportunity for people with disabilities to participate in community activities or access employment opportunities. The program has two funding streams: the Workplace Accessibility Stream and the Community Accessibility Stream. Competitive processes are usually held once a year to provide grant funding for small projects (up to $100K). The Program also allows mid-sized projects to be funded through multi-year contributions (up to $3M). Mid-sized projects have a greater scope and impact than small projects. Eligible recipients under the Enabling Accessibility Fund are: not-for-profit organizations; municipalities; Indigenous organizations; territorial governments; and for-profit organizations.

Expected results

Community spaces and workplaces are more accessible.

Performance measure: Number of community spaces and workplaces that are more accessible due to Enabling Accessibility Fund funding;
2019–20 target: 400.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017–18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022–23

General targeted recipient groups

Persons with disabilities across Canada through eligible funding recipients, that is, not-for-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, municipalities, Indigenous organizations (including band councils, tribal councils and self-government entities) and territorial governments.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

In 2018–19, the Enabling Accessibility Fund held three funding processes, one under each program component: A Call for Concepts for mid-sized projects, a Call for Proposals for small projects and a Call for Expression of Interest for youth-driven projects. A complete communications package, including media lines and questions and answers, were developed for each funding process. Departmental officials also responded to public inquiries submitted through the generic program inbox during each pre-defined application intake periods. In addition, the Department provided two information sessions as part of the small projects call, which aimed to support interested applicants in developing and submitting their project proposals.

Planning information (dollars)
Enabling Accessibility Fund Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 20,650,000 20,650,000 20,650,000 20,650,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,650,000 20,650,000 20,650,000 20,650,000

28. Social Development Partnerships Program

Name of transfer payment program

Social Development Partnerships Program

Start date

April 1998

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grants and contributions

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Grants and Contributions were last amended in 2017–18

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Social Development Partnerships Program

Description

The Social Development Partnerships Program is a Grants and Contributions program that supports Government of Canada priorities through investment in not-for-profit organizations aiming to improve the life outcomes for people with disabilities, children and families, and other vulnerable populations. The program supports two components: Disability and Children and Families. In 2018–19, additional funds were allocated to the disability component to support the production and distribution of alternate format materials. The November 2018 Fall Economic Statement made available additional funding supports, including a Social Finance Fund and an Investment and Readiness Stream. This is an important first step that will help charitable, non-profit and other social purpose organizations access new financing and improve their ability to successfully participate in the social finance market. The program funding is provided through Grants and Contributions to eligible organizations, including Not-for-Profits. The use of Grants & Contributions investments represents a flexible and cost-effective way to support the role that communities, Not-For-Profit and voluntary sector organizations play in helping people with disabilities, families and children, and other vulnerable populations to be resilient and to provide them with the tools and skills to respond to current and emerging social issues. Children and families, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable populations have unique social development needs that are compounded by physical, economic and social pressures. As a result, they may experience a diminished quality of life, with limited ability to participate in the workplace or to contribute to their communities.

Expected results

Not-for-profit organizations, communities and other groups have an enhanced capacity to address a range of social issues such as the social inclusion of people with disabilities, the engagement of seniors and support for children and families.

Performance measures:

  • For every dollar invested through the Social Development Partnerships Program, amount leveraged/invested by non-federal partners; March 31, 2020. Target: $0.30.
  • Number of individuals of the target population who were reached by, or benefitted from, the projects (for Child and Family Component Only); March 2020. Target: Baseline year.
  • Not-for-profit sector and partners have improved capacity to respond to existing and emerging social issues for target populations.
  • Performance measure: Percentage of Social Development Partnerships Program projects that leverage funds from non-federal partners. Target: 90%.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018–19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019–20

General targeted recipient groups

Not-for-profit organizations, including registered charities and social enterprises actively pursuing activities in line with Social Development Partnerships Program objectives.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Children and Families Component: various methods are used to engage applicants and recipients, such as targeted solicitation of applications, unsolicited proposals and expressions of interest or letters of intent.

Disability Component: In 2016a stakeholder engagement process was conducted as part of the Disability Component renewal with a goal to designing a performance and accountability framework. The framework will enhance fairness, transparency and predictability in funding while being relevant to the disability community. A steering committee was established and included a broad and inclusive group of representatives from the disability community to inform the development of the framework. Work continued throughout 2017–18 to refine and finalize the framework with the launch of a call for proposals in late 2017–18.

Planning information (dollars)
Social Development Partnerships Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 14,902,500 16,709,206 16,649,206 16,269,207
Total contributions 12,012,405 13,130,489 9,109,206 9,089,207
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 26,914,905 29,839,695 25,758,412 25,358,414

29. New Horizons for Seniors Program

Name of transfer payment program

New Horizons for Seniors Program

Start date

Original program: October 1, 2014

Expanded program: September 27, 2007

Enhanced program: September 30, 2010

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grants and contributions

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and Conditions were last amended in 2018

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: New Horizons for Seniors Program

Description

The New Horizons for Seniors Program supports the Government of Canada’s overarching social goals to enhance the quality of life and promote the full participation of individuals in all aspects of Canadian society. In doing so, New Horizons for Seniors Program initiatives at the national, regional and community level address seniors’ issues through partnerships and the engagement and contributions of seniors themselves. The New Horizons for Seniors Program’s design includes two streams: Community-based grants and Pan-Canadian projects. Community-based grants, administered by Service Canada regional offices, address social challenges ‘on the ground’ and recognize communities as the focal point for program and service delivery. Funded projects are: volunteer-based; supported by communities; inspired or led by seniors; and, address one or more of the five program objectives. Selected through annual calls for proposals, one-year Community-based projects are eligible to receive up to $25,000 in grant funding and, as of 2018, up to $5,000 in new small grants funding for organizations that have not received funding within the last five years. Pan-Canadian projects, administered by the National Grants and Contributions Delivery Centre, receive up to $250,000 per year. The maximum duration of grant funding under an agreement will not exceed three years (36 months). The maximum allowable contribution funding will not exceed $10,000,000. The maximum duration of contribution funding under an agreement will not exceed five years (60 months).

Expected results

Communities have the capacity to address local issues by engaging seniors.

Performance measures:

  • Total number of New Horizons for Seniors Program projects that received funding;
    • 2019–20 Target: 1,850.
  • Number of seniors who participated in community projects;
    • 2019–20 Target: 369,000.
  • Recipient’s organizations recognize and address barriers to social inclusion faced by seniors.
  • Performance measure: Reduction in the number of targeted seniors who have been identified as being socially isolated; 2019–20 Target: Baseline being developed in 2019–20.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Summative Evaluation of the New Horizons for Seniors Program was completed in 2015–16. Evaluation findings can be found on the Employment and Social Development Canada website.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The Evaluation of the New Horizons for Seniors Program is scheduled to be completed in 2019–20.

General targeted recipient groups

The New Horizons for Seniors Program has a broad array of eligible recipients, including not-for-profit organizations, coalitions, for-profit enterprises, Indigenous organizations, municipal governments and research and educational institutions.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Information about New Horizons for Seniors Program calls for proposals is posted on Employment and Social Development Canada's website and shared with networks. For the annual Community-Based Projects call for proposals, potential applicants are engaged as part of the community outreach activities performed by Service Canada. In addition, a systematic approach to identify Community-Based project best practices is being developed and once completed, these best practices will be disseminated broadly, including with future applicants.

Planning information (dollars)
New Horizons for Seniors Program Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 41,340,000 41,340,000 41,340,000 41,340,000
Total contributions 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,800,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 43,140,000 43,140,000 43,140,000 43,140,000

30. Early Learning and Child Care

Name of transfer payment program

Early Learning and Child Care

Start date

April 2017

End date

March 2028

Type of transfer payment

Other transfer payment

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Early Learning and Child Care

Description

The early years of life are critical in the development and future well-being of the child and continuum of learning. The evidence is clear that there are positive relationships between quality early learning and child care, especially for less advantaged children, parental labour market participation, especially for women, and child developmental outcomes. Yet, only 1 in 4 children in Canada have access to regulated early learning and child care. Affordability also remains a concern for many families. To begin addressing these gaps, on June 12, 2017, the Government of Canada announced a historic agreement with provincial and territorial governments on a Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework. The Framework sets the foundation for governments to work towards a shared long term vision where all children can experience the enriching environment of quality early learning and child care. To work towards this vision, the Framework is based on a set of principles that guide investments towards increasing the quality, accessibility, affordability, flexibility and inclusivity of early learning and child care, with consideration for families more in need. The Government of Canada is entering into three-year bilateral agreements with provinces and territories to implement the Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework.

Expected results

Access to early learning and child care is increased

Performance measures:

  • Number of children in regulated child care spaces and/or early learning programs;
    • Targets will be using fiscal year 2017–18 as a baseline. Preliminary results will be available in 2019–20.
  • Number of children receiving subsidies or other financial supports;
    • Targets will be using fiscal year 2017–18 as baseline year, and data is not yet available. Preliminary results will be available in Spring 2019.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022–23

General targeted recipient groups

The recipients of this transfer payment program are provincial and territorial governments. Provinces and territories will invest in regulated early learning and child care programs and services for children under age six.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Employment and Social Development Canada works with provinces and territories throughout their bilateral agreements including the development of action plans and review of annual reporting.

Planning information (dollars)
Early Learning and Child Care Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 399,347,695 399,347,695 0 0
Total program 399,347,695 399,347,695 0 0

31. Indigenous Early Learning and Childcare Transformation Initiative

Name of transfer payment program

Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Transformation Initiative

Start date

September 2018

End date

March 2028

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Vote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018–19

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Indigenous Early Learning and Childcare Transformation Initiative

Description

Core Responsibility: Social Development

Program: Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care

The new Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Transformation Initiative is led by Employment and Social Development Canada, with Indigenous Services Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada as key federal partners.

The Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Initiative supports the implementation of the Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework, which was co-developed with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation. It supports the Government’s commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, specifically responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action #12 to develop culturally appropriate early childhood education programs for Indigenous families. The Initiative has three objectives, to be achieved in collaboration with distinction-based partners:

  1. Enable greater control and influence by Indigenous peoples
  2. Strengthen foundational supports for Indigenous early learning and child care
  3. Adapt and expand current federal Indigenous early learning and child care programs

Expected results

A performance measurement strategy will be co-developed with Indigenous partners. This will include Results Frameworks by Distinction Group and is to be ready for implementation in 2020–21.

Performance indicators to be determined in collaboration with Indigenous partners.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021–22

General targeted recipient groups

Indigenous children and families

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The approach to the development of the Indigenous early learning and child care Framework was guided by the federal principles governing the Government of Canada’s relationship with Indigenous Peoples, in respecting nation to nation, government to government and Inuit Crown relationships and is based on comprehensive engagement with Indigenous partners. A performance measurement strategy will be co-developed with Indigenous partners. This will include Results Frameworks by Distinction Group and is to be ready for implementation in 2020–21.

Through the establishment of National and Regional Partnership Tables, a “partnership model” ensures Indigenous-led decision-making on the allocation of federal funding to best support national, regional and community level Indigenous early learning and child care goals and priorities and consistency with the spirit of the Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework. In additional, input from Indigenous stakeholders will be acquired on proposals relating to the Quality Improvement Projects.

Planning information (dollars)
Indigenous Learning and Child Care Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 119,500,000 0 120,500,000 121,500,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 119,500,000 0 120,500,000 121,500,000
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