Archived - About the National Child Benefit Initiative

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The Government of Canada's Contribution to the National Child Benefit Initiative

The Government of Canada contributes to the NCB initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) system. This additional payment is called the NCB Supplement. It provides extra support to low-income families with children by topping up the monthly payments they receive under the CCTB system.

Since the NCB was introduced in 1998, the Government of Canada has steadily increased its investment in children and their families through the base benefit of the CCTB and NCB Supplement.

  • The base benefit of the CCTB provides child benefits to all low- and middle- income families. In 2006-2007, the Government of Canada provided $5.9 billion through the base benefit of the CCTB to 3.4 million families with 6.0 million children.
  • The NCB Supplement provides low-income families with additional child benefits on top of the base benefit. In 2006-2007, the Government of Canada provided $3.5 billion through the NCB Supplement, providing benefits to 1.5 million families with 2.8 million children.

The CCTB is administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

Each July, the CRA send CCTB recipients a “Child Benefit Notice” which provides an explanation of the benefits they will receive for the next 12 months, unless there is a mid-year change in their marital status.

Canada Child Tax Benefit

Annual maximum CCTB (including the NCBS) for the July 2011 to June 2012 benefit year for families with net incomes below $24,183 in 2011

Number of Children Basic CCTB NCBS Total Monthly Benefit
1st child $1367 $2118 $3485 $290.41
2nd child $1367 $1873 $3240 $270.00
3rd & each additional child $1462 $1782 $3244 $270.33
  • Families with net incomes below $24,183 will get the maximum CCTB - including the full NCBS and the supplement for the third and each additional child - of:
    • $290.41 per month ($3,485 per year) for the first child,
    • $270.00 per month ($3,240 per year) for the second child, and
    • $270.00 per month ($3,244 per year) for all other children in the family, along with any supplement for children under 7 that is applicable.
  • Families with net incomes between $24,183 and $41,544 will get the maximum basic CTB, the supplement for the third and each additional child, and a partial NCBS, along with any supplement for children under 7 that is applicable. Families with four or more children will also be entitled to a partial NCBS if their income is just above $41,544.
  • One and two-child families with net incomes between $41,544 and approximately $109,894 will receive partial benefits. Larger families may also be entitled to a partial CCTB if their income is above $109,894.
  • The annual Children’s Special Allowances amount will increase from $3,485. The monthly amount per child will increase from $290.41 in July 2011.

To determine the amount of benefits you may be entitled to receive, visit the CRA’s Child and Family Benefits On-Line Calculator.

Canada Child Tax Benefit for July 2011

Beginning in July 2011, the amount of CCTB will be increased to provide extra support to low- and middle- income families with children.

Annual maximum CCTB (including the NCBS) for the July 2011 to June 2012 benefit year for families with net incomes below $24,183 in 2011.

Number of Children Basic CCTB* NCBS Total Monthly Benefit
1st child $1367 $2118 $3485 $290.41
2d child $1367 $1873 $3240 $270.00
3rd & each additional child $1462 $1782 $3244 $270.33
  • Families that had net income below $24,183 in 2011 qualify for the maximum base benefit of the CCTB and maximum NCB Supplement.
  • Families that had net incomes between $24,183 and $41,544 in 2011 qualify for the maximum base benefit of the CCTB and part of the NCB Supplement.
  • Families that had net incomes above $41,544 in 2011 qualify for a part of the base benefit of the CCTB.

*The Alberta government has chosen to vary the amount of the basic benefit its residents receive. Details are not yet available.

To determine the amount of benefits you may be entitled to receive, visit the CRA’s Child and Family On-Line Calculator.

Links to CCTB Information

Click on the items below to get information about the CCTB.

If you need more information about your own Canada Child Tax Benefit, call 1-800-387-1193

Other Links

Social Union

The “social union” initiative is the umbrella under which governments will concentrate their efforts to renew and modernize Canadian social policy. It focuses on the pan-Canadian dimension of health and social policy systems, the linkages between the social and economic unions, and the recognition that reform is best achieved in partnership among provinces, territories and the Government of Canada. The primary objective of the social union initiative is to reform and renew Canada’s system of social services and to reassure Canadians that their pan-Canadian social programs are strong and secure. In working to build a strong social union, the Government of Canada and the provinces and territories have reached a broad consensus that the first priorities should be children in poverty and persons with disabilities. Site content focuses on the National Children’s Agenda and Benefits and Services for Persons with Disabilities.

Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA)

CCRA information related to the National Child Benefit.

How the NCB works

Figure 1 – How the NCB Works
Figure 1 – How the NCB Works (2006-2007 [Estimates]). Text description follows.
Text version of Figure 1 - How the NCB Works (2006-2007 [Estimates])

A Venn diagram illustrates the relationship between the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and the National Child Benefit (NCB).

The diagram is composed of three circles aligned horizontally. The left circle illustrates the base benefit of the CCTB, provided to both low- and middle-income families with children. In 2006-2007, the Government of Canada provided $5.9 billion through the base benefit of the CCTB.

The middle circle illustrates the NCB Supplement, provided to low-income families with children. It shows that in 2006-2007, the Government of Canada provided $3.5 billion through the NCB Supplement. The NCB Supplement, combined with the base benefit of the CCTB, comprise the CCTB system. The NCB Supplement is also part of the NCB initiative.

The right circle illustrates the NCB reinvestments and additional investments by provinces, territories and First Nations. This circle overlaps with the NCB Supplement. The area of overlap is the provincial, territorial and First Nations reinvestments, which were $652.4 million in 2006-2007. The remainder of the circle represents additional investments by provinces, territories and First Nations, which were $181.2 million in 2006-2007.

Description: A Venn diagram illustrates the application of the National Child Benefit (NCB).

On the left, the Government of Canada’s Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) system is illustrated with two circles: The CCTB Base Benefit and the NCB Supplement. On the right, the NCB initiative is illustrated with two circles: the NCB Supplement and the Provincial, Territorial and First Nations Component of the initiative. The NCB Supplement is a component of both the CCTB system and the NCB initiative.

The CCTB is targeted to low-and middle-income families with children. The first circle, on the left, shows the CCTB Base Benefit. In 2006-2007, the Government of Canada provided $5.9 billion through the base benefit of the CCTB to 3.4 million families with 6.0 million children.

The second circle, in the middle of the diagram, shows the NCB Supplement. The NCB Supplement provides low-income families with additional child benefits on top of the CCTB base benefit. In 2006-2007, the Government of Canada provided $3.5 billion through the NCB Supplement, providing benefits to 1.5 million families with 2.8 million children.

The third circle, on the right, shows the Provincial, Territorial and First Nations Component of the NCB initiative. The circle overlaps with the NCB Supplement. The area of overlap is the provincial, territorial and First Nations reinvestments, which were $652.4 million in 2006-2007. The remainder of the circle represents additional investments by provinces, territories and Indian and Northern Affairs for First Nations, which were $181.2 million in 2006-2007. As such, provinces, territories and First Nations reinvested and invested a total of $833.6 million in 2006-2007.

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