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Appendix 2
Provincial, Territorial and First Nations National Child Benefit Reinvestments and Investments

Newfoundland and Labrador
Prince Edward Island
Nova Scotia
New Brunswick
Ontario
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
British Columbia
Yukon
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
First Nations
Citizenship & Immigration Canada

This appendix provides information on the NCB reinvestments and investments that jurisdictions27 have undertaken. Some of these reinvestments and investments are new programs or services, while others are enhancements to existing programs. This appendix includes descriptions, actual expenditure data for 2001-2002 and 2002-2003, and estimated expenditure data for 2003-2004 and 2004-2005.

There are two sources of funds for NCB initiatives: reinvestment funds and investment funds. The data presented in this appendix represents the total of reinvestment and, where applicable, investment funds.

Reinvestment funds result from savings related to the federal NCB Supplement that free up provincial and territorial funds previously used for social assistance. Some jurisdictions make adjustments to their social assistance payments based on the NCB Supplement. The amount of the adjustment then becomes available for reinvestment. Other jurisdictions have restructured social assistance to implement income-tested child benefits delivered outside of welfare. Among these jurisdictions, some adjust their child benefits to match, in whole or in part, the NCB Supplement, while some do not make any adjustment. For those that make an adjustment related to the NCB Supplement, funds available for reinvestments increase along with the NCB Supplement. For those that do not make such adjustments, funds available for reinvestments are deemed to be “fixed” to the amount of savings at the time their system was restructured. That amount is available for reinvestment each year.

Investment funds are additional funds that some jurisdictions have chosen to devote to the NCB initiative, over and above the reinvestment amounts.

Sources of Reinvestment Funds

There are two sources of reinvestment funds:28

1. Social Assistance/Child Benefit Adjustments

Chapter 3 provides a summary of the various approaches that have evolved with respect to the adjustment of social assistance benefits and child benefits through the NCB.

2. Children’s Special Allowance Adjustments

The Children’s Special Allowance is paid on behalf of children who are in the care of provincial/territorial child welfare authorities. It mirrors the maximum Canada Child Tax Benefit payments, including the NCB Supplement. Jurisdictions have the option to either recover, or pass on the increased NCB Supplement amount to child welfare authorities for child maintenance costs. Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta have chosen to recover the increased amount, and it is considered to be part of NCB reinvestment funds.

Newfoundland and Labrador

In Newfoundland and Labrador, the NCB initiatives have improved the well-being of low-income families in the province. These initiatives promote labour market attachment for low-income families and support early childhood and youth initiatives to improve the well-being of young people living in low-income families.

There was no adjustment to income support benefits in 1998-1999. The NCB Supplement was not deducted from benefits provided to families in receipt of income support. As a result, all programs funded under the NCB initiatives in 1998-1999 were investments by the province.

As a result of the second increase in the NCB Supplement in1999, the income support program was redesigned, resulting in the introduction of the Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (NLCB). Income support benefits were reduced for families with dependent children as basic benefits for children were removed. However, the reduction was offset by the 1999 increase in the NCB Supplement and the new NLCB, which all low-income families receive, including families in receipt of income support. All families in receipt of income support realized an increase in their monthly income.

Newfoundland and Labrador’s reinvestments and investments include:

Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (NLCB) (Reinvestment) — This is a provincial child benefit paid to all low-income families in Newfoundland and Labrador. The NLCB is administered by the Canada Revenue Agency on behalf of the province, and payments are included in the Canada Child Tax Benefit cheque. In 2001-2002 and 2002-2003, as a result of slippage in program expenditures because of an improved economy, making fewer families eligible for this benefit, the income threshold of the NLCB was increased to follow increases in the NCB Supplement. In 2003-2004, the slippage in the program expenditures was used to increase the first child rate by $12 per year and to index the NLCB. In 2004-2005, the slippage in the program expenditure was used to increase the first child rate by $12 per year and to offset the cost of indexing.

In December 2001, the Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement (MBNS) was added as an additional benefit to the NLCB in the form of a nutritional supplement of $45 per child per month, for children under one year of age living in families eligible for at least $1 of NLCB. This benefit is funded through redirecting funds from the income support program into the NLCB.

Note: The pre-natal portion of the MBNS of $45 per month per family was also part of the income support program. This was also removed from the income support program and is now delivered as an income-tested benefit outside the income support program. Funding for this initiative is provided through funds redirected from the income support program and through funding from the Early Childhood Development Initiative.

Unlicensed Child Care (Investment) — This initiative increases financial support to families with dependent children who require child care in order to seek and retain employment or are involved in post-secondary pursuits, but for various reasons, cannot access licensed child care. This service increases benefits to families receiving income support and ensures families are not worse off as a result of going to work. This initiative came into effect October 1, 1998.

Family Home Child-Care Agencies (Investment) — Refers to community-based, non-profit organizations that monitor and provide support to private child care providers in family settings. The agency may receive operational funding from the Department of Health and Community Services and is licensed to monitor homes by the various Integrated Health Authorities. In Newfoundland and Labrador, two family child-care agencies are funded through the NCB.

Child-Care Subsidy Program (Investment)NCB funding builds on the base provincial allocation for the Child-Care Subsidy Program. The program is income-tested and available to families in receipt of income support and to low-income families (below an annual income of $24,000). NCB funding has allowed an increase in the subsidy rate and funding to support two new service provisions: family child care and infant care. Funding also supports transportation.

Funding to Centres (Investment)NCB funding supports the provision of annual equipment grants to licensed child-care centres. This component assists in supporting quality care for young children and their parents.

School-Based Infant Care (Investment) — This initiative offers group infant child care in high schools for students who require on-site care and increased support to continue their high school education. This initiative combines access to quality child care and direct supportive assistance to the high-school parent(s). During the school day, the young parents are encouraged to spend breaks and free time in the centre for purposes of interacting with their baby and to gain insights and support on parenting skills. Transportation to and from the school for babies and parents is provided through other means.

Early Childhood Education Certification (Investment) — This component supports two ongoing initiatives: (1) the provision of courses for people employed in licensed child-care facilities that require either Level I or Level II Early Childhood Education to meet legislation standards; and (2) the Registrar of Certification Office for Early Childhood Educators, which maintains a system of registration and provides orientation courses for Early Childhood Educators. Both of these initiatives are intended to support the provision of quality child care for families that require licensed care for their children.

Child-Care Service Consultants (Investment) — On an annual basis, NCB funding supports six Child-Care Consultant positions in the province. These positions are located across the province within Health and Community Services Regional Board structures. These positions add to the licensing and child-care expertise available in the province.

Extended Drug Card (Investment) — This initiative extends health-care benefits for six months after individuals/families leave income support for employment or training. This initiative helps recipients make the transition from dependence on income support to employment.

Family Resource Programs (Investment) — These community-based programs are designed to provide a range of drop-in support services and learning activities for young children and their families. Objectives of the initiative are to improve child development outcomes, to support adults in their respective care-giving roles, and to increase community involvement in the support available for young children and families. The target group is primarily children up to six years of age (and up to 12 where needed), pregnant women, parents, family members and other caregivers. Funding supports eight projects in the province (six of these projects have three or more service sites).

Intervention Program Supports (Investment) — Intervention Program Supports encompass two initiatives: support for the implementation of home-based intensive intervention services to children under age six diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder; and increased support for families of children with disabilities that require increased support in their home environment. These combined activities are designed to support families that have children with special needs and require additional support to improve both child and family outcomes.

Child, Youth and Family Services (Reinvestment) — This initiative provides programs and services designed to support the safety, health and well-being of children, youth and families. They include support services for families, protection intervention (including children in care), youth services and adoptions.

Community Youth Network (Investment) — The Community Youth Network provides community-based facilities for youth aged 12 to 18 years, in addition to offering programs and services to other ages from 5 to 29 years. There are nine hub sites with an additional 10 satellites throughout the province, all with the capacity to serve several other communities within their respective catchment areas. This initiative aims to provide services and support along four business lines: learning, employment, community building and services. Services and support are provided in youth-friendly settings that combine many positive strategies to encourage youth participation and learning. Programs that involve intensive one-on-one support and skill development, group social, academic, recreational and leadership approaches are used to enhance the lines of business. The projects are run by community coalitions (including youth participation); they are designed to build partnerships and support young people, especially youth who require increased assistance to achieve success in life. The Community Youth Network is very highly regarded at the community level, and an independent formative evaluation of the initiative is presently being carried out. A final evaluation report has been completed and will be reviewed by Departmental officials for later release.

Residential/Mental Health Services (Investment) — This refers to funding available to Health and Community Services Regions to support youth aged 12 to 18 years. At the regional board level, the funding is dedicated to residential and mental health services to support youth-at-risk and to implement preventive, community-based solutions for supporting young people.

Project Administration (Investment)— This is funding reserved to support overall administration of the NCB initiative under the responsibility of the Department of Health and Community Services.

Table 19
Newfoundland and Labrador: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
Newfoundland and Labrador
Child Benefit (NLCB)*
7,977 8,233 8,169 8,155
Child/ Day Care
Unlicensed Child Care 600 600 600 600
Family Home Child-Care Agencies 311 221 244 252
Child-Care Subsidy Program 1,803 1,375 1,736 1,736
Funding to Centres 345 250 251 197
School-Based Infant Care 57 59 62 49
Early Childhood Education
Certification
60 70 74 84
Child-Care Service Consultants 300 300 320 320
Supplementary Health Benefits
Extended Drug Card Program 754 737 733 793
Early Childhood/Children
at-Risk Services
Family Resource Centres 1,159 1,150 1,348 1,593
Intervention Program Supports 275 639 1,048 1,206
Child, Youth and Family Services 305 396 1,022 1,217
Youth Initiatives
Community Youth Network 1,817 1,817 1,817 1,412
Residential/Mental Health
Services
964 964 964 964
Other
Project Administration 107 158 521 174
Total 16,834 16,969 18,909 18,752

* Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement was added to the NLCB in December 2001. Funding for this initiative is provided through redirecting funds from the income support program into the NLCB.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 20
Newfoundland and Labrador: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit 20,000 32,000 20,314 31,500 19,800 30,000 18,834 29,306
Unlicensed Child Care** 461 680 424 630 425 650 366 525
School-Based Infant Care n/a 11 n/a 13 n/a 5 n/a 10
Extended Drug Card Program** 300 450 340 550 400 600 600 883
Family Resource Centres** 1,475 1,853 2,217 3,008 3,000 4,000 2,601 2,748
Community Youth Network 6,599 7,689 3,469 5,733 3,120 5,159 3,567 8,469

* Programs with no available data are not listed.

** Represents monthly averages.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

Prince Edward Island

In Prince Edward Island, the NCB has a dual focus: to support parents to join and remain in the workforce and to enhance early childhood services. Prince Edward Island has put in place a number of reinvestment initiatives that serve both purposes.

Benefits received under the NCB are considered income under the social assistance program. These benefits are deducted dollar for dollar from social assistance recipients. Since 2001, any increases in the NCB Supplement have been used to fund an increase in the Healthy Child Allowance, which is a social-assistance benefit.

Prince Edward Island reinvestments and investments include:

PEI Child-Care Benefit — An enhancement to the Child-Care Subsidy Program. This benefit has provided increased access and financial support for licensed child care for Island children.

PEI Family Health Benefit — This program helps lower-income families with the cost of prescription drugs. Eligibility is based on family size and net family income for the previous year.

Speech Therapy Innovation — This program is part of the Healthy Child Development Strategy, which recognizes the importance of early intervention in the development of children. Through this program, speech therapy initiatives are provided to preschool children, parents and community groups. As of 2004-2005, this program is funded by the federal transfers under the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care.

Autism Integration Project — This program is also part of the Healthy Child Development Strategy. Therapeutic interventions are provided directly to preschool children with autism. As of 2004-2005, this program is funded by the federal transfers under the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care.

Looking After ChildrenNCB funds have been key to implementing this project for the delivery of services to children in public care. The project has included the development of research-based policies, training for care providers, materials and review processes.

Children-in-Care InitiativesNCB funds have also been used to support the delivery of children-in-care services to children in Prince Edward Island. Staff increases within the renewed child protection services have resulted in enhanced quality-of-service planning with children and their families.

Children’s Mental HealthNCB has provided the funding necessary to establish a new multidisciplinary children’s mental health clinical team. This team provides an improved response to Island families who have children with complex mental health problems.

Healthy Child Allowance — This is a social assistance benefit payable to families with children under the age of 18 to provide for participation in sport, recreation and/or cultural activities. Effective July 2004, the benefit amount was increased to $59 per month (from $55 per month).

Employment Enhancement and Job Creation ProgramsNCB funds have been used to help increase activity under these programs. The NCB contribution has enabled parents on social assistance to upgrade their job skills and obtain employment.

Literacy/Adult Basic Education Program — One of the stepping stones to independence is literacy. This program, delivered by the PEI Institute of Adult and Community Education, has helped make adult literacy education available at the community level. NCB funds annually help low-income parents to take advantage of this program.

Family Legal Aid Program (formerly called Family Support Orders Program) — This program provides legal services to low-income custodial parents and their children to determine matters of custody and access/support in relation to matters of family law. In 2004-2005, this program was moved from Social Services to the Office of the Attorney General and expanded to include services to a larger segment of the population.

Table 21
Prince Edward Island: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child/Day Care
PEI Child-Care Benefit 700 700 700 700
Supplementary Health Benefits
PEI Family Health Benefit 170 220 250 250
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Speech Therapy Innovation — 75 75 —
Autism Integration Project — 125 125 —
Looking After Children 50 50 50 50
Children-in-Care Initiatives 150 150 450 450
Children’s Mental Health 250 250 250 250
Healthy Child Allowance 970 1,180 1,392 1,590
Other
Employment Enhancement and
Job Creation Programs
200 200 200 200
Literacy/Adult Basic
Education Program
100 100 100 100
Family Legal Aid Program* — — 80 80
TOTAL 2,590 3,050 3,672 3,670

* Formerly called Family Support Orders Program.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 22
Prince Edward Island: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting Under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
PEI Child-Care Benefit 1,100 1,100 1,000 1,200 1,000 1,200 950 1,100
PEI Family Health Benefit 400 800 400 700 400 720 564 760
Speech Therapy Innovation — — 250 300 250 300 — —
Autism Integration Project — — 50 50 50 50 — —
Looking After Children 400 600 300 600 300 600 250 500
Children-in-Care Initiatives 200 200 275 300 250 300 200 225
Children’s Mental Health 335 500 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,200 1,300
Healthy Child Allowance 1,350 2,500 1,300 2,500 1,050 2,000 1,260 2,370
Employment Enhancement and Job Creation Programs 150 300 150 300 125 250 100 200
Literacy/Adult Basic Education Program 100 200 100 200 100 200 100 200
Family Legal Aid Program* — — — — 24 29 25 30

* Formerly called Family Support Orders Program.

Nova Scotia

The government of Nova Scotia has made some important strides in addressing child poverty and supporting parents to join and remain in the workforce as part of the joint federal, provincial and territorial NCB initiative. The Nova Scotia government has expanded and strengthened programs and services to help low-income families with children. Over the past several years, Nova Scotia has demonstrated its commitment to the health and well-being of its children in a number of ways. The province’s commitment remains strong with estimated total spending on NCB programs of $30.6 million during 2003-2004.

Many of the commitments made by the government of Nova Scotia were fully realized in 2001. In July 2001, the offset of social assistance by an amount equal to the NCB Supplement officially ended. In August 2001, the province introduced a new Employment Support and Income Assistance Act. Together, these developments have contributed to a significant overall improvement in the health and well-being of low-income families with children in Nova Scotia.

Low-income families whether they were working or receiving income assistance saw an increase in the total amount of Nova Scotia Child Benefit they received. This resulted in a substantial increase to their household incomes and helped with the costs of raising a child. But this was only one way in which the change made an impact on the depth of child poverty in the province.

Providing child benefits outside the income assistance system made it easier and more financially viable for parents receiving income assistance to return to work. Working parents saw an increase in their net incomes and received additional financial assistance for transportation and employment-related expenses through the new Employment Support program.

Enhancements to employment supports were also a positive development for children, as parents received additional assistance for child-care expenses and children became eligible for extended Pharmacare coverage.

Today, the Canada Revenue Agency delivers the Nova Scotia Child Benefit, as well as the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB), and the NCB Supplement, for a total of approximately $364 million to 90,000 families in 2003-2004 in Nova Scotia. The number of Nova Scotian children needing the NCB Supplement decreased from 2002 and continues to decline, as the economy improves and more low-income families earn higher incomes through secure employment.

Although Nova Scotia has made great strides in addressing the issue of child poverty, the government recognizes that more needs to be done. The province is committed to the reduction and prevention of child poverty and will continue to work toward that objective.

Nova Scotia’s NCB initiatives include:

Nova Scotia Child Benefit — In 1998, the government established the Nova Scotia Child Benefit to provide low-income families with monthly payments to assist them with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. This benefit is fully funded by the province and is provided in addition to the NCB Supplement. The Nova Scotia Child Benefit is delivered as a combined payment with the CCTB and the NCB Supplement.

In 1999, the Nova Scotia government promised that any future increases to the NCB Supplement would flow directly through to families.

In July 2001, as part of Nova Scotia’s redesign of its social assistance system, children’s benefits were removed from social assistance. This policy change meant that parents with low income would receive child benefits from both governments whether or not they were receiving income assistance. The Nova Scotia Child Benefit was enhanced and now provides a maximum annual benefit of $445 for the first child, $645 for the second child and $720 for the third and each additional child in low-income families.

Centre-Based Child Care — Two hundred and thirty new subsidized centre-based child-care spaces have been funded under the auspices of the NCB since 1998, including 30 spaces for children with special needs.

Early Intervention Programs — These programs help preschool aged children with developmental disabilities to reach their potential. Additional operating grants have been made to existing centres, and new programs have been initiated to ensure all families throughout the province have access to this service.

Community-Based Prevention Programs — These build on existing programs across the province, to promote the well-being of children and families and prevent child abuse and neglect. Prevention programs are specifically designed to support low-income families.

Table 23
Nova Scotia: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
Nova Scotia Child Benefit 26,698 28,334 28,400 28,400
Child/Day Care
Centre-Based Child Care 1,537 1,537 1,537 1,537
Early Childhood/Children
at-Risk Services
Early Intervention Programs 675 675 675 675
Community-Based Prevention Programs* 564 350 — —
Total  29,474 30,896 30,612 30,612

*NCB funding for the Community-Based Prevention Programs was discontinued. The programs are now funded from other sources.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 24
Nova Scotia: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Nova Scotia Child Benefit 33,224 55,986 31,905 53,961 30,743 52,054 29,292 49,732
Centre-Based Child Care n/a 230 n/a 230 n/a 230 n/a 230
Early Intervention Programs n/a 105 n/a 105 n/a 105 n/a 105

*Programs with no available data are not listed.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

New Brunswick

The government continues to build upon programs and services that help reduce and prevent child and family poverty, promote labour market attachment and foster early childhood development.

In 1998-1999, New Brunswick passed on the full value of the federal

NCB Supplement to families on social assistance, and has continued to pass on all subsequent increases. In August of 1998, the province made investments under the NCB initiative through increased funding for child care and the creation of the Alternative Child-Care Assistance Program. New Brunswick has consistently maintained or increased the level of funding for each of its initiatives since the creation of the NCB in 1998.

New Brunswick’s investments include:

Day-Care Assistance Program — The Day-Care Assistance Program is designed to help families get the best possible child care. This program offers parents or guardians financial assistance to help them access quality, affordable care at an approved day-care facility. In 1997-1998, prior to the NCB initiative, New Brunswick invested $4.23 million in the Day-Care Assistance Program. New Brunswick has devoted additional incremental funds to the Day-Care Assistance Program to support the goals of the NCB each year since the initiative began in 1998.

Alternative Child-Care Assistance — Financial assistance may also be available to low-income parents or guardians who are in school or are working and do not have access to licensed day care. This program is designed to assist those who require child care during evenings, nights and weekends or who have no licensed child-care facilities in their community.

Provincial Breastfeeding Strategy — This initiative assists in the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding.

Healthy Minds Nutritional Partnership — This program addresses the nutritional needs of elementary school students by providing basic breakfast items. Approximately 2,150 children benefited from the pilot. The program was significantly expanded in 2000-2001, and was renamed the Healthy Minds Nutritional Partnership. The program benefited as many as 26,000 students across the province in 2003-2004.

Positive Learning Environment — This program addresses the unmet needs of children by identifying best practices for discipline in the school system when a positive environment alone is not enough. These include setting limits for behaviour and identifying the responsibilities of all partners in the school system.

Youth Addictions — The Regional Addiction Services Youth Treatment Program is a community-based program offered by the Department of Health and Wellness, through regional hospital corporations. It provides treatment to young substance abusers within their own community. In 1997-1998, prior to the NCB, New Brunswick invested $0.6 million in youth addiction treatment. Prior spending, combined with incremental investments, resulted in a significant increase to New Brunswick’s expenditures in this program. Enhanced funding provided increased education, prevention and chemical dependency treatment for approximately 1,700 children and youth aged 12 to 19 in 2003-2004.

In addition to its NCB initiatives, New Brunswick is also supporting the needs of families with children by funding the New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit, which includes the Working Income Supplement, with over $20 million every year.

Table 25
New Brunswick: NCB Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child/ Day Care
Day-Care Assistance Program 1,233 1,310 1,360 2,368
Alternative Child-Care Assistance 738 789 746 650
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Provincial Breastfeeding Strategy 40 3 9 12
Healthy Minds Nutritional Partnership 880 816 708 708
Positive Learning Environment 3,000 4,000 4,000 4,000
Youth Initiatives
Youth Addictions 1,262 1,393 1,539 1,603
TOTAL 7,153 8,311 8,361 9,341

Notes:

  • Figures exclude funds that were invested in the above program areas prior to the introduction of the NCB in 1998. Total expenditures for the above programs in 2001-2002 were $12.0 million; in 2002-2003 total expenditures were $14.8 million, and are estimated to be $13.2 million in 2003-2004 and $12.5 million in 2004-2005.
  • Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 26
New Brunswick: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Day-Care Assistance Program n/a 2,303 n/a 1,886 n/a 1,987 n/a 3,000
Alternative Child-Care Assistance n/a 283 n/a 533 n/a 665 n/a 300
Healthy Minds Nutritional Partnership** n/a 27,600 n/a 34,684 n/a 26,062 n/a 25,378
Positive Learning Environment n/a 122,792 n/a 120,600 n/a 118,869 n/a 117,600
Youth Addictions n/a 1,665 n/a 1,790 n/a 1,779 n/a 1,663

* Programs with no available data are not listed.

** The number of participating children for the Healthy Minds Nutritional Partnership differs from those reported in The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003, due to the reporting of actual numbers, rather than numbers based on the funding formula.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

Ontario

Ontario’s NCB initiatives aim to prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty, encourage labour force attachment, and foster the learning and development of children in low-income families.

Ontario adjusts social assistance payments by the amount of a recipient’s NCB Supplement through an income charge (i.e. the actual NCB Supplement amount the client receives is charged as income against the social assistance allowance).

In the 2004 Budget, Ontario announced that social assistance benefits would not be reduced by the federal government’s July 2004 increase to the NCB Supplement for one year. Similarly, in the 2005 Budget, Ontario announced that social assistance benefits would not be reduced by either the July 2004 or the July 2005 increases to the NCB Supplement for one year.

In Ontario, the provincial government and municipalities have made significant investments in NCB initiatives. Since social assistance is cost-shared between the province and municipalities, each has a role to play in Ontario’s reinvestment strategy.

Reinvestments and investments include:

The Ontario Child-Care Supplement for Working Families (OCCS) — Each year, over $200 million is spent on the OCCS, funded from the NCB reinvestment funds and additional provincial investments, including $40 million carried forward from the former Ontario Child Care Tax Credit. The OCCS, created in 1998, provides low- to moderate-income working families with a benefit for each child under age seven. Families are eligible for the OCCS if they have employment earnings exceeding $5,000 for the year, regardless of whether they have child-care expenses. It is also available to families where parents are attending school or training programs and have qualifying child-care expenses. The benefit starts decreasing when family net income reaches $20,000.

In 2000-2001, Ontario introduced an additional $210 per child supplement for single parent families, bringing the maximum annual benefits for single-parent families to $1,310 per child (Maximum benefits for two-parent families are $1,100 per child) under the age of seven. Funding for the single parent supplement represents an additional provincial investment in children in low-income families.

4-Point Plan for Children’s Mental Health — The province spent $20 million towards critical service areas in children’s mental health. The Plan supports intensive child and family services, mobile crisis services, telepsychiatry and common intake and assessment tools.

Children’s Treatment Centres — The province spent $22 million towards the development of innovative approaches to assisting children with special needs.

Municipal Reinvestment Strategies — Ontario municipalities are implementing their own initiatives as part of Ontario’s overall reinvestment strategy. These strategies, designed to meet local needs and priorities, include initiatives such as early intervention, child care, employment supports and prevention programs.

Table 27
Ontario: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002* 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child/Day Care
Ontario Child-Care Supplement
(OCCS) for Working Families**
149,422 148,736 164,520 170,000
Early Childhood/Children
at-Risk Services
4-Point Plan for Children’s
Mental Health
20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000
Children’s Treatment Centres 20,000 22,000 22,000 22,000
Other
Municipal Reinvestments Strategies 38,317 40,507 42,822 43,591
Total 227,740 231,243 249,342 255,591

* Some of the expenditures for 2001-2002 differ from those reported in The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003 due to data revisions.

**Figures for 2004-2005 consist of NCB reinvestments of $133 million and additional Ontario investments of $37 million. Figures exclude an additional $40 million previously committed to the former Ontario Child Care Tax Credit. The OCCS is an application-based program. Benefits are based on the previous year’s tax return, and families have three years to file their tax return. After filing their tax return, families are given 18 months to return their OCCS application. Historically, it has taken about three years after the close of a given OCCS benefit year to achieve full take-up for that benefit year.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 28
Ontario: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Ontario Child-Care Supplement
(OCCS) for Working Families**
210,885 336,227 197,837 314,225 222,000 367,000 222,000 367,000

*Programs with no available data are not listed.

** The OCCS is an application-based program. Benefits are based on the previous year’s tax return, and families have three years to file their tax return. After filing their tax return, families are given 18 months to return their OCCS application. Historically, it has taken about three years after the close of a given OCCS benefit year to achieve full take-up for that benefit year.

Manitoba

Manitoba29 has continued to invest in programs and services that help reduce and prevent child and family poverty, promote labour market attachment and foster early childhood development.

In 1998, when the National Child Benefit (NCB) Supplement was introduced, Manitoba, like most provinces, reduced benefit levels for families receiving income assistance by the amount of the supplement and redirected those funds into programs and services for low-income families with children living in Manitoba.

In mid-2000 however, as a means of providing additional assistance to families receiving income assistance, Manitoba began a phased in restoration of the NCB Supplement. In January 2004 the final phase of the restoration was implemented and the NCB Supplement was fully restored for all families receiving income assistance.

In addition to the restoration of the NCBS, Manitoba’s investments and reinvestments include:

Manitoba Child Care Program (formerly Child Day Care) — Between April 1999, and March 2005, child-care funding in Manitoba has increased by over 51 percent to $78.3 million30, improving salaries, as well as training opportunities and supports for early childhood educators and providing additional subsidies for children. Increased funding has also been provided to integrate more children with disabilities into the child-care system and to expand the number of funded child-care spaces.

Children’s Special Services — Family-centred services are provided to an increased number of families to maintain children with developmental and/or physical disabilities in their own homes to the greatest extent possible and to promote the development of normalized community arrangements.

Healthy Baby — Healthy Baby is a program of support for pregnant women and new families that consists of two components: the Manitoba Prenatal Benefit and Healthy Baby Community Support Programs. The Manitoba Prenatal Benefit is a monthly financial benefit to help low- to moderate-income women with their extra nutritional needs during pregnancy. The Prenatal Benefit is intended to also provide a bridge to other services, such as the Healthy Baby Community Programs. Healthy Baby Community Support Programs are designed to assist pregnant women and new parents in connecting with other parents, families and health professionals to ensure healthy outcomes for their babies.

BabyFirst — BabyFirst is a community-based program designed to support overburdened families who have children up to three years of age. BabyFirst is delivered by the public health program through Regional Health Authorities and begins with universal screening of all families with newborns by a public health nurse. Based on the family’s identified strengths and needs, the program offers a continuum of support to families, including intensive home visiting support from a trained paraprofessional and/or referral to community-based services.

Early Start — Early Start is a community-based home visiting program for preschool children offered primarily through licensed child-care facilities. Home visitors work with families to enhance parenting and attachment, to assist in preparing children for success at school entry and to connect families to existing resources in their communities.

Parent-Child Centred Approach — This approach brings resources together through community coalitions across the province that support parenting, improve children’s nutrition and literacy, and build capacity for helping families in their own communities. Each parent-child centred coalition determines the unique form that activities will take based on the needs of the community.

STOP FAS — STOP FAS is a three-year mentoring program for women at risk of having a child with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Following on the success of two Winnipeg sites, STOP FAS was expanded to Thompson and The Pas in northern Manitoba.

Special Needs Programs for Children in Schools — This initiative provides funding and consultative support for the development and operation of school-based programming for students with special needs.

Healthy Schools — Healthy Schools is Manitoba’s comprehensive school health initiative intended to promote the physical, emotional, and social health of students, their families, school staff, and school communities. The initiative recognizes that good health is important for learning, and that schools are in a unique position to positively influence the health of children, youth and their families. Healthy Schools focuses on priority health issues such as physical activity, healthy eating, safety and injury prevention and mental health promotion. This initiative links the health and education communities to promote healthy children and healthy schools.

Other Programs — Consistent with the Healthy Child Framework, these programs are for at-risk mothers and children and are provided by community-based organizations. For example, the Parent Support Project, a two-stage initiative aimed at providing support and assistance to "at-risk" adolescent mothers, is included in this category.

Education, Citizenship and Youth — Early Childhood Development Initiative (ECDI) — ECDI assists school divisions in their efforts to provide intersectoral services for preschoolers (birth to school age). ECDI, in partnership with parents, the community and Healthy Child Manitoba, is designed to facilitate preschoolers’ readiness to learn prior to school entry.

Early Literacy — This grant program supports school divisions in their efforts to implement early literacy intervention programs that will accelerate the literacy development of the lowest-achieving grade one students.

Healthy Adolescent Development — Healthy Child Manitoba provides funding to community groups to support healthy adolescent development, including initiatives for teen pregnancy prevention through health and wellness programs and mentoring initiatives.

Workforce Attachment — Workforce Attachment initiatives provide low-income parents who are either working or on social assistance with a range of supports that help them obtain and maintain employment. Employment supports include needs/skills assessments, labour market information, job-focused education/skills development and job search/job placement assistance.

Building Independence/New Income Assistance Initiatives — Manitoba has increased supports for parents to enter or re-enter the labour market, and has improved benefits for families receiving income assistance. Job-centre supports and work incentives have been enhanced, and supports to help citizens become independent have been improved.

Table 29
Manitoba: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

c
  2001-2002* 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child/ Day Care
Manitoba Child Care Program** *** **** 6,394 3,197 2,534 6,674
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Children’s Special Services ** *** 326 318 2,500 2,852
Healthy Child Manitoba:
Healthy Baby *** 3,170 4,394 4,388 4,597
BabyFirst *** ***** 4,255 5,864 6,023 6,577
Early Start *** ***** 1,096 1,475 1,417 1,934
Parent-Child Centred Approach *** 920 2,136 2,659 3,000
Stop FAS *** 581 717 704 714
Special Needs Programs for
Children in Schools
770 955 2,519 3,602
Healthy Schools 92 234 370 40
Other Programs 818 981 1,001 1,004
Education, Citizenship and Youth
Early Childhood Development
Initiative (ECDI)***
547 551 681 668
Early Literacy 5,700 5,700 5,700 6,200
Youth Initiatives
Healthy Adolescent Development 313 294 295 286
Other
Workforce Attachment 2,069 2,364 2,098 2,102
Building Independence/New Income
Assistance Initiatives ** *****
7,324 9,024 12,724 15,424
Total*** 34,375 38,205 45,612 55,674

* Some of the expenditures for 2001-2002 differ from those reported in The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003 due to data revisions.

** The amounts indicated for the Manitoba Child Care Program, Children’s Special Services and New Income Assistance Initiatives represent new incremental funding amounts only and do not include base funding in place prior to the introduction of the NCB.

*** Figures include funding which is provided through remaining NCB Supplement recoveries, Children’s Special Allowance recoveries and the federal transfers under the 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement ($11.1 million in 2001-2002, $14.7 million in 2002-2003, 18.3 million in 2003-2004 and $18.3 million in 2004-2005) as well as provincial revenue.

****Figure includes funding received through the federal transfers under the 2003 Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care ($0.9 million in 2003-2004 and $5.5 million in 2004-2005).

***** Reinvestments and Investments include expenditures for the Employment and Income Assistance Rate Increase and the Restoration of the NCB Supplement for families in receipt of Employment and Income Assistance benefits. In 2001-2002, Rate Increase and Restoration of the NCB Supplement expenditures totalled $5.6 million. In 2002-2003, $7.3 million was spent on the Restoration of the NCB Supplement. It is estimated that in 2003-2004, $11.0 million was spent on the Restoration of the NCBSupplement, and that in 2004-2005, $13.7 million was spent.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 30
Manitoba: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Manitoba Child Care Program n/a 11,020 n/a 11,455 n/a 11,568 n/a 11,027
Children’s Special Services n/a 3,536 n/a 3,593 n/a 3,712 n/a 4,175
Healthy Baby 6,622 n/a 7,231 n/a 8,379 n/a 8,505 n/a
BabyFirst 825 825 1,114 1,114 1,150 1,150 1,342 1,342
Early Start 235 500 270 533 318 509 148 213
Stop FAS 86 n/a 120 n/a 130 n/a 130 n/a
Special Needs Programs for Children in Schools 33 33 57 57 69 69 78 78
Other Programs 896 1,439 939 1,518 579 789 639 814
Education, Citizenship and Youth - Early Childhood Development Initiative (ECDI) n/a 13,540 n/a 12,908 n/a 12,338 n/a 12,310
Early Literacy n/a 2,466 n/a 2,477 n/a 3,178 n/a 3,300
Healthy Adolescent Development n/a 1,075 n/a 1,085 n/a 1,085 n/a 1,080
Workforce Attachment 828 n/a 761 n/a 647 n/a 580 n/a
Building Independence/New Income Assistance Initiatives
Work Incentives 2,900 n/a 2,900 n/a 2,900 n/a 2,900 n/a
Job Centre Supports 2,214 n/a 2,214 n/a 2,214 n/a 2,214 n/a
Individual Development Accounts 15 n/a 15 n/a 15 n/a 15 n/a
School Supplies 6,940 n/a 6,940 n/a 6,940 n/a 6,940 n/a

* Programs with no available data are not listed.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan has reinvested savings from federal NCB expenditures into initiatives that reduce and prevent child poverty, support parents’ labour force attachment, and increase harmonization of child benefit programs.

NCB initiatives in Saskatchewan provide mainstream supports, outside of social assistance, designed to help citizens enjoy a better quality of life through greater economic independence and social inclusion.

When the NCB was introduced in 1998, Saskatchewan supplemented reinvestment funds with additional provincial investment funds. This additional funding allowed the province to move children’s basic benefits completely outside of welfare—simulating a fully mature NCB immediately, rather than over time—and extended comparable benefits to low-income working families. The new structure was designed to support the NCB strategy of lowering the ’welfare wall’ and providing income-tested child benefits that remain portable as families move from welfare into work. The restructured benefit, known as the Saskatchewan Child Benefit, is delivered as an integrated payment with the Canada Child Tax Benefit to reduce duplication and simplify administration.

The Saskatchewan Child Benefit is adjusted by the amount of federal increases to the NCB Supplement. Families receive the same in combined federal/ provincial child benefits as they would have received under the previous welfare model of child benefits. Over time, the Saskatchewan Child Benefit will phase out, as it is replaced by increases to the NCB Supplement. It is expected that the Saskatchewan Child Benefit will be fully phased out by July 2006.

In 2004-2005, a new program was announced to make quality housing more affordable for low-income families. The Saskatchewan Rental Housing Supplement will be available to low-income households in the labour market as well as to those on welfare. The program was developed in 2004 and implemented in 2005.

Saskatchewan’s other NCB initiatives include:

Saskatchewan Child Benefit — This payment to low-income parents is designed to help with the costs of raising a child. Together with the NCB Supplement, the program replaces social assistance for children and provides child benefits to low-income families, whether parents are on social assistance or employed. Paying child benefits outside of social assistance makes it easier for parents to move to or remain in the labour market.

Saskatchewan Employment Supplement — This benefit is paid to low-income parents who are employed or who receive maintenance payments. The supplement supports employment by offsetting child-related costs that a parent may incur through working. It also improves incentives to collect maintenance payments by increasing the net value of the payment to the family.

Child Day-Care Program — Access to suitable child-care arrangements is a critical support that helps parents enter and remain in the labour force, especially those whose children have special needs. Incremental funding has been provided to enhance child-care subsidy rates and to develop additional child-care spaces and supports for the inclusion needs of low-income and high-needs families. These targeted supports provide low-income families with affordable, reliable child care so they can go to work or school and feel secure about the care of their children.

Family Health Benefits — This program extends supplementary health coverage to low-income families to assist with the cost of raising children. The program provides children’s coverage for dental, optometry, chiropractic services, prescription drugs, ambulance transportation, and medical supplies. More limited coverage for eye care, drugs, and chiropractic services is also provided to parents. With this program, low-income families are assured of retaining health benefits as they leave social assistance for work opportunities and are not forced onto assistance due to children’s health costs.

Community Schools Program — In 2001-2002 and 2002-2003, incremental funding was provided to expand the Community Schools Program. Located in low-income areas, community schools attempt to address the barriers to success in school and in life, by drawing parents and community resources into the schools. Parenting, pre-kindergarten, teen-parent, and child nutrition programs are offered in community schools.

Employment Support Programs — These programs provide on-the-job training, job coaching, and productivity supports to assist individuals to attach to and remain in the labour force. Incremental funding was provided in 2002-2003 to enable families on social assistance and high-risk youth under 18 years, who are at risk of becoming reliant on social assistance, to access employment opportunities and make the transition to independence.

Maintenance Enhancement Project — This initiative, introduced in 2002-2003, assists low-income single parents to receive or increase maintenance income for their children. Three additional legal staff were added to assist single parents to obtain child support orders, or to obtain variations in existing orders where non-custodial parents have experienced increased incomes. The income from child maintenance payments helps parents achieve greater financial independence, and is eligible for additional supplementation under the Saskatchewan Employment Supplement.

Table 31
Saskatchewan: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
Saskatchewan Child Benefit* 17,496 12,995 7,776 9,189
Saskatchewan Employment
Supplement
11,632 12,833 12,292 13,993
Child/ Day Care
Child Day-Care Program — 915 2,015 1,014
Supplementary Health Benefits
Family Health Benefits 5,926 6,430 6,446 7,258
Youth Initiatives
Community Schools Program 4,532 6,901 8,091 8,538
Other
Employment Support Programs — 578 425 66
Maintenance Enhancement Project — 98 138 167
Saskatchewan Rental Housing
Supplement
— — — 298
Total** 39,586 40,750 37,183 40,523
Unallocated Reinvestment Funds***   410 4,857 5,157

*Not including funds recovered from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

**Total expenditures shown in the above table include incremental provincial investment funds of $1.6 million in 2001-2002.

***Unspent reinvestment funds are not included in the total, but are carried over and included in the estimated reinvestment funds for the following year.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 32
Saskatchewan: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Saskatchewan Child Benefit 29,020 56,960 26,090 53,530 15,260 40,070 18,770 42,520
Saskatchewan Employment Supplement 7,510 14,810 7,870 15,540 7,650 15,190 7,710 15,280
Child Day-Care Program** — — 210 290 200 260 760 1,000
Family Health Benefits 23,260 37,860 21,860 35,960 20,190 34,220 20,190 35,320
Community Schools Program n/a 23,000 n/a 25,000 n/a 28,000 n/a 27,000
Employment Support Programs — — 230 450 430 820 260 490
Maintenance Enhancement Project — — 6 9 13 21 n/a n/a

*Programs with no available data are not listed.

**Data based on the number of families and children at March 31.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

Alberta

Alberta’s National Child Benefit initiatives support the shared goals of helping reduce the depth of child poverty and encouraging parents to participate in the workforce by ensuring they are better off working while reducing overlap and duplication between government programs. Alberta’s initiatives also support low-income families with the costs associated with raising their children.

Since 2003, Alberta has enhanced the mix of income and in-kind benefits and services to families receiving assistance through the Alberta Works—Income Support Program31 by flowing through the full increase of the NCB Supplement directly to them.

Alberta’s reinvestments and investments include:

Child-Care Subsidy — The Child-Care Subsidy program supports low-income families with child-care costs for their preschool children attending licensed day-care centres or approved family day homes. Parents may apply for a subsidy if they have a valid reason for child care, such as if they are currently working or looking for work, attending school, or if they or their children have special needs. Giving eligible, low-income families the choice of accessible and affordable child-care services promotes family independence and supports the family’s goal for financial self-sufficiency through work and training opportunities. The Kin Child Care Pilot Project, launched September 2003, enhances parental child-care choices by providing funding to eligible non-custodial relatives who serve as regular caregivers.

Quality Child Care (formerly called Developmental Child Care) — The NCB funds for this initiative support respite options for families in need, as well as a child-care nutritional program. The respite care program ensures that a number of child-care spaces are available for short-term placements. These placements assist families of children with disabilities in need of relief care, and also enable families who need support to participate in counselling or treatment programs to benefit their children. The funds directed to the child-care nutritional program enhance the nutritional quality of meals and snacks served to children in child-care settings, and provide information about preschool nutritional needs to parents of children in child-care programs. In 2004-2005, funds were refocused to targeted programs based on the previous years’ outcomes.

Alberta Child Health Benefit (ACHB) — This program was initially created by using NCB reinvestment funds. It provides health benefits for children in low-income families. The ACHB helps low-income families stay independent of income support and allows them to provide their children with health benefits they otherwise could not afford. The ACHB provides premium-free prescription drugs, optical and dental services, emergency ambulance, and essential diabetic supplies.

Alberta Adult Health Benefit (AAHB) — This program provides families and individuals with the same health benefits they had when receiving income support. NCB reinvestment dollars fund the costs of the program for parents with children who leave the Alberta Works—Income Support Program31 for work. Ensuring that health benefits are provided outside of income support programs removes a potential barrier to employment, while assisting families to stay healthy.

Protection of Children Involved in Prostitution (PCHIP) — This initiative encompasses the introduction of ground-breaking legislation designed to protect children from sexual exploitation. Under this initiative, children and youth are provided a safe environment, substance-abuse counselling, medical supports, psychological services and educational and life skills support.

Transitional Support for Youth Leaving Child Welfare — This initiative supports youth who are making the transition from the child welfare system to independent living. In 2003-2004, funds were re-focused to support the Advancing Futures Bursary Program, launched in November 2003. Tuition costs, school-related expenses and living expenses for the academic term are provided to youth who have been in care for at least 18 months between the ages of 13 to 18 years and are currently between the ages of 16 and 22.

Shelter Benefits — This reinvestment increased shelter benefits for Alberta Works—Income Support Program31 recipient families with children.

School Allowance Benefit — This reinvestment increased the school expense benefit and is paid annually to Alberta Works—Income Support Program31 recipients, when school starts, for children attending kindergarten to grade 12. It helps cover the costs of school and gym supplies, registration fees, and other education-related costs.

Earnings Exemption IncreaseNCB reinvestment dollars were used to increase the earnings exemption for Alberta Works—Income Support Program31 single-parent recipients who are working, thereby allowing them to earn additional income per month before their benefits are reduced.

Employment Maintenance Benefit — A benefit of $120 per year is made available to working parents to provide additional support for work-related expenses such as transportation and clothing.

Table 33
Alberta: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child/Day Care
Child-Care Subsidy 6,200 6,300 7,300 7,300
Quality Child Care* — 2,200 1,000 1,000
Supplementary Health Benefits
Alberta Child Health Benefit 16,943 18,579 20,953 22,228
Alberta Adult Health Benefit — 188 987 1,834
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Protection of Children Involved
in Prostitution
600 600 600 600
Youth Initiatives
Transitional Support for Youth
Leaving Child Welfare
1,250 1,250 2,250 2,250
Other
Shelter Benefits** 4,640 4,650 6,848 5,643
School Allowance Benefit** 1,151 1,184 2,401 2,545
Earnings Exemption Increase** 940 2,840 2,914 3,452
Employment Maintenance Benefit** 315 327 313 363
Total 32,039 38,118 45,566 47,215

* Formerly called Developmental Child Care.

** In The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003, these initiatives were shown as part of the Supports for Independence (SFI) program. Effective April 1, 2004, Alberta Works - Income Support Program replaced the SFI program.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 34
Alberta: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Child-Care Subsidy n/a 11,015 n/a 10,158 n/a 9,802 n/a 9,932
Quality Child Care* - - n/a 21,496 n/a 21,600 n/a 7,747
Alberta Child Health Benefit n/a 66,293 n/a 68,277 n/a 66,901 n/a 69,774
Alberta Adult Health Benefit - - 767 n/a 1,493 n/a 2,053 n/a
Protection of Children Involved in Prostitution n/a 87 n/a 86 n/a 78 n/a 100
Transitional Support for Youth Leaving Child Welfare n/a 1,671 n/a 1,852 n/a 1,673 n/a 238
Shelter Benefits** 11,384 22,845 11,386 22,646 13,399 27,797 11,437 22,710
School Allowance Benefit** n/a 20,014 n/a 20,459 n/a 20,431 n/a 21,366
Earnings Exemption Increase** *** 2,773 n/a 2,752 n/a 2,824 n/a 3,345 n/a
Employment Maintenance Benefit** 2,571 n/a 2,694 n/a 2,588 n/a 2,996 n/a

* Formerly called Developmental Child Care.

** In The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003, this program was under the Supports for Independence (SFI) program, but effective April 1, 2004, the Alberta Works - Income Support Program replaced the SFI program.

*** Monthly average.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

British Columbia

British Columbia’s NCB initiatives aim to prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty, to assist low-income families with the costs associated with raising children, and to encourage parents to join the workforce and to remain employed. The Province’s commitment to this type of initiative began before the NCB was established with the BC Family Bonus. This program was implemented two years before the NCB and served as one of the models for the national program.

As in previous years, British Columbia continues to adjust the BC Family Bonus payments with respect to increases in the NCB Supplement, such that families receive the same or increased benefits when combined with the NCB Supplement. As part of the BC Family Bonus, BC also adjusted the BC Earned Income Benefit by any increase in the NCB Supplement in excess of the current BC Family Bonus payment.

In 2003-2004, an Autism Intervention initiative was introduced. This program provides families of children (aged 6 to 18 years) with autism spectrum disorder, with up to $6,000 per year in direct funding to purchase autism intervention services for out-of-school hours. This funding is in addition to the educational program and special education services provided through school boards.

British Columbia’s reinvestments and investments include:

BC Earned Income Benefit (BCEIB) — The BCEIB was introduced in July 1998 as an additional incentive for low-income families to seek work and remain employed. The BCEIB pays an additional monthly amount based upon the earned income that a family receives from working.

BC Family Bonus (BCFB) Increase — The BCFB is a tax-free monthly benefit paid to low- and modest-income families with children. The program was implemented in 1996, two years prior to the implementation of the NCB. In 1998, the BCFB was combined with the Canada Child Tax Benefit into a single monthly payment for families with children. The BCEIB and the BCFB are tax-free monthly benefits that make it more attractive for those on income assistance to seek work and to remain employed.

The combined BCFB and NCB Supplement have increased steadily. For example, the maximum monthly benefit for a first child was $103 in July 1998. As of July 2004, it had increased to $125.92.

Supported Child Development — This program helps facilitate the inclusion of children (aged 6 — 13 years) with special needs into child-care settings. Funds are directed to a child-care provider of the parent’s choice to provide additional staff support and resources as needed.

Before and After School Care — Ministry of Employment and Income Assistance (MEIA) expanded access to before- and after-school care for children in kindergarten until they reach 12 years of age. In June 2004, all child-care programs were centralized within the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development. Therefore, starting in 2003-2004, Before and After School Care was reported within Child-Care Subsidy and Child-Care Benefit Programs.

Child-Care Subsidy (non-regulated) — In June 2004, all child-care programs were centralized within the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development. Under this subsidy, a monthly payment assists eligible BC low-income families (who are working, preparing for work or looking for work) with the cost of child care and maintaining labour force attachment. The subsidy is available to parents who meet eligibility criteria to help cover the fee for eligible child care.

Child-Care Benefit Programs — In June 2004, all child-care programs were centralized within the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development. This reporting line captures all day-care funding, other than subsidies that is not reported under the Early Childhood Development Agreement.

Healthy Kids Dental and Optical — The Healthy Kids program extends basic dental treatment and eyewear to children in low- and moderate-income families. Healthy Kids removes one of the barriers to moving from income assistance to work by providing coverage to children receiving services through MEIA.

Pharmacare Plan C — Plan C provides prescription drug and designated medical supply coverage to BC residents under age 19 years who are receiving medical benefits and income assistance through MEIA. As of 2002-2003, Pharmacare Plan C was provided under alternate funding arrangements and is not reported as an ongoing NCB reinvestment.

Foster Care 2000 — Foster Care 2000 provided for continuing improvements to training and support for foster parents.

Family Support Programs — These are community-based services intended to promote the well-being of families. The services are designed to increase the strength and stability of families, to increase parents’ confidence and competence in their parenting abilities, to give children a stable and supportive family environment, and to enhance child development. Core elements of family support programs include: home visiting; child development; parent training and education; and social, emotional and educational support for families. Since 2003-2004, some family support programs have been regionalized and combined with other community services.

Aboriginal Strategy — This funding is devoted to developing administrative and service structures for Aboriginal organizations and training of staff who will develop and deliver services for children and families.

CommunityLINK (formerly called School-based Programs) — Funding is provided to school boards to improve the educational performance, including academic achievement and social functioning, of vulnerable students. Supports funded by school districts include, for example, youth and family counsellors, inner-city school programs and school meals programs, etc.

Youth Initiatives — A continuum of services is provided through this program that targets youth at risk of family breakdown, and those youth living apart from family in high-risk situations. Key service functions include youth-family mediation, outreach, youth support workers, safe housing, youth agreements and specialized youth services. Specialized youth services are developed to meet the specific needs of at-risk youth populations, such as young parents and Aboriginal people, sexually exploited and sexual minority youth.

Youth Alcohol and Drug Strategy — This funding is devoted to youth detox beds, youth residential services beds, youth residential detox and treatment services beds, intensive day-treatment programming and family and youth counselors, and strategies to address Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Since 2004, the Youth Alcohol and Drug Strategy was provided under alternate funding arrangements and in 2004-2005 is not reported as an ongoing NCB reinvestment.

Youth Community Action — This initiative wound down in 2001-2002. It provided young people with the opportunity to earn credit for tuition fees while participating in approved community service projects. A maximum of $2,400 could be applied towards post-secondary tuition fees.

Other Youth Programs — Other Youth Programs cover a range of community-based services for youth. These include the Safe Streets and Safe Schools Grant Program, which support schools and community strategies that enhance public safety and local crime prevention efforts; and the Community Capacity Building Project Fund which helps communities develop programs that address the issues of prostitution, particularly when they involve the sexual exploitation of children and youth. It also includes the Youth Against Violence Line, which provides youth a safe, confidential way to prevent and report incidents of youth violence or crime and seek help from local police; and the Child and Youth Guardian of Estate, which protects the legal and property rights of children and youth.

Social Housing — Housing assistance is provided to low-income families across the Province and is targeted to households in the greatest need. As new housing units reach completion, additional subsidy dollars are required to support these families.

Family Earnings Exemption — A flat-rate earnings exemption was introduced in January 2000, which allowed families on income assistance to keep up to $200 of earned income each month for non-disabled income assistance recipients.

This program was eliminated in April 2002, with the reform to the British Columbia Employment and Assistance system.

Table 35
British Columbia: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004* 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
BC Earned Income Benefit 68,378 69,700 65,000 64,000
BC Family Bonus Increase ** 57,230 76,500 99,500 107,620
Child/Day Care
Supported Child Development *** 1,725 2,100 12,780 13,642
Before and After School Care **** 25,077 30,300 — —
Child-Care Subsidy (non-regulated) — — 47,437 46,198
Child-Care Benefit Programs — — 8,281 10,029
Supplementary Health Benefits
Healthy Kids Dental and Optical 5,450 5,100 5,636 6,204
Pharmacare Plan C ***** — 7,200 — —
Autism Intervention — — 11,315 11,884
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Foster Care 2000 2,292 0 2,823 3,853
Family Support Programs ***** 28,400 24,500 12,714 12,937
Aboriginal Strategy 6,220 15,100 5,133 6,282
CommunityLINK 2,508 8,400 36,037 42,141
Youth Initiatives
Youth Initiatives 8,522 7,500 17,716 20,838
Youth Alcohol and Drug
Strategy *****
6,524 7,100 1,388 —
Youth Community Action 1,765 — — —
Other Youth Programs ****** 1,137 1,300 1,300 1,300
Other
Social Housing 36,877 43,000 51,900 50,100
Family Earnings Exemption 18,212 — — —
TOTAL 270,317 297,800 378,960 397,028

* For the 2003-2004 reporting period, the estimated expenditures in this reportdiffer significantly from those for the same reporting period in The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003 as a result of improved processes in program reporting.

**Figures do not include the total BC Family Bonus; they include only reinvestments related to increases in the BC Family Bonus since 1998.

*** This program was formerly called Supported Child Care.

**** In June 2004, all child-care programs were centralized within the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development. Commencing in 2003-2004, Before and After School Care was reported within the child-care programs.

***** These programs have not been substantially reduced, or discontinued. After 2002-2003, these programs have been provided in BC under alternate funding arrangements.

****** These programs include those formerly reported as Youth Safety Programs in The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2003, and Safe Schools in The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2002.

Notes:

  • All expenditures and estimates exclude the amounts reported under other federal/provincial agreements.
  • Figures have been rounded.

Table 36
British Columbia: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
BC Earned Income Benefit 96,400 166,700 94,800 164,100 95,630 163,560 95,240 162,880
BC Family Bonus Increase 204,000 364,433 194,000 368,637 203,700 348,390 151,620 259,320

*Programs with no available data are not listed.

Yukon

Yukon’s savings associated with the NCB Supplement have been invested in programs supporting healthy children, healthy families and healthy communities. These initiatives support the national goals of helping to reduce the depth of child poverty and encouraging parents to participate in the work force while ensuring they are better off working. Yukon’s initiatives also support low-income families with the costs of raising children and recognize the long-term benefits of early childhood interventions.

Social Assistance adjustments are made monthly by treating the actual amount of the NCB Supplement received as a separate category under income. This results in a deduction from Social Assistance that is not subject to either the flat rate income exemption ($150 per month per family) or the earned income exemption (25 percent of earned income). For non-taxfilers, the amount of the NCB Supplement is covered by Social Assistance, but the client must sign an "agreement to repay" which is collected when their NCB Supplement is issued for the portion that Social Assistance covered. This situation happens rarely.

Yukon’s reinvestments and investments include:

Yukon Child Benefit (YCB) (Investment) — Yukon families in receipt of the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and the NCB Supplement are automatically considered for the Yukon Child Benefit (YCB). The YCB is an investment that supplements the NCB Supplement and is based on the same objectives and principles. The benefit is tax-free and is not considered as income (i.e. not counted) when calculating social assistance benefits. In July 2004, the YCB was increased to $450 per year per child, and is now available for families with net annual incomes below $25,000 (turning point), at which point the tax-back rate applied is 2.5 percent for one-child families and 5 percent for families with two or more children. The Yukon Government negotiated a recovery from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) for costs of the YCB associated with status Indian children in the Yukon.

Yukon Children’s Drug/Optical Program (CDOP) (Reinvestment) — This program is designed to assist low-income families with the cost of prescription drugs and eye care for children up to 18 years of age. While families with incomes above $23,500 per year pay a deductible, there is no deductible for families with incomes below $23,500 per year. Families must reapply each fiscal year.

Kids Recreation Fund (KRF) (Reinvestment) — The fund covers registration fees, equipment and supplies for sports, arts, cultural, recreational or social activities. It is available to families whose net income is under $30,000 per year or who have other special family circumstances, including recent financial hardship, family illness, large family size or family crisis. Each application is assessed on the family’s individual circumstances. Eligible families can apply for up to $200 per child, per activity, to a maximum of $300 per year. The KRF is a special fund administered by Sport Yukon and supported in part by the Government of Yukon through the NCB initiative.

Healthy Families Initiative (Reinvestment) — The Government of Yukon in March 1999, implemented the early intervention program, Healthy Families, to improve the long-term outcomes of Yukon children. The Healthy Families program is a culturally appropriate, intensive home-based family support service offered to expectant parents and parents of children under three months of age. The service is voluntary and is offered on a long-term basis, up to when the child is five years old. Weekly home visits are offered to the family in the first nine to twelve months, with criteria to increase/decrease the level of service as the child becomes older. The goals of Healthy Families Yukon are:

  • to systematically assess the strengths and needs of new parents and assist them in accessing community services as needed;
  • to enhance family functioning by:
    • building trusting, nurturing relationships,
    • teaching problem-solving,
    • improving the family’s support system;
  • to promote positive parent-child relationships; and
  • to promote healthy childhood growth and development.

Food for Learning (Investment) — The Yukon Food for Learning Society provides funds to assist schools in providing nutrition programs such as breakfast, lunch or snacks for students who do not have enough to eat. The Yukon Government provided a one-time reinvestment of $30,000 in 1998-1999 to enhance the Food for Learning Project. The project is a special fund administered by a non-government organization and supported in part by the Government of Yukon through the NCB initiative.

Table 37
Yukon: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
Yukon Child Benefit* 273 218 277 350
Supplementary Health Benefits
Yukon Children’s
Drug/Optical Program
37 23 29 31
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Kids Recreation Fund 69 69 69 69
Healthy Families Initiative 573 873 1,062 1,069
Food for Learning 30 30 30 30
Total  981 1,212 1,467 1,549

* Not including funds recovered from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 38
Yukon: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Yukon Child Benefit 1,065 1,958 1,003 1,799 971 1,722 1,500 2,000
Yukon Children’s Drug/Optical Program n/a 321 180 195 189 200 191 220
Kids Recreation Fund n/a 743 225 740 224 464 221 290
Healthy Families Initiative 92 76 138 141 155 180 178 214

* Programs with no available data are not listed.

Note: n/a indicates the data for this category is not available.

Northwest Territories

The Government of the Northwest Territories NCB initiatives have two main objectives: encouraging families to stay in the workforce, and providing programs that help ensure children from birth to five years of age and their families have access to programs and services that give them a strong, positive start in their early years that leads to self-sufficiency in the future.

As it matures and benefits increase, the NCB Supplement is playing a more significant role in helping low-income families support their children without having to turn to income support. Parents can be confident that the well-being of their children is secure when they leave income support for work. The NCB provides a stable income, which they can count on, while income support continues to be a responsive program that assists families that are in financial difficulty due to fluctuating incomes.

The Northwest Territories offsets the NCB Supplement as income from income support payments and reinvests the funds in the Northwest Territories Child Benefit (NWTCB) and the Healthy Children Initiative. In 2003-2004, the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) added $1.6 million to the approximately $814,000 reinvestment to fund its commitment under these two programs. In order to reduce duplication and streamline efficiency, the Canada Revenue Agency delivers the NWTCB for the Northwest Territories as an integrated payment with the federal child benefits.

Northwest Territories reinvestments and investments include:

Northwest Territories Child Benefit (NWTCB) — This cash benefit provides a maximum of $330 annually per child for families with income of $20,921 or less in the previous year.

Territorial Workers’ Supplement — This program provides families who have earned between $3,750 and $10,000 in working income for the previous year with annual benefits of up to $275 for the first child and $75 for the second.

Healthy Children Initiative (HCI) — While the 1998-1999 reinvestment and the GNWT investment continues to fund the NWTCB, subsequent increases have been directed to the HCI, which has been in place in the GNWT since 1997. The program is recognized as playing a major role in communities by providing programs for children six years of age and under and their families. Funding is provided to community groups to plan and deliver programs that promote and enable families and communities to make healthy choices. The development of family skills and knowledge supports children so that they can reach their full potential.

The effect of these benefits and the positive economy is apparent in the significant reduction in NWTCB expenditures. Expenditures on the NWTCB have fallen by approximately 25 percent, from $2.0 million in 1999-2000 to $1.5 million in 2003-2004. It is evident that Northwest Territories residents continue to access training and jobs available in the mining, oil and gas and service sectors, in order to provide better lives for their families.

Table 39
Northwest Territories: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
NWT Child Benefit/Territorial
Workers’ Supplement
1,740 1,560 1,509 1,500
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Healthy Children Initiative 419 419 419 419
Total 2,159 1,979 1,928 1,919

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 40
Northwest Territories: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
NWT Child Benefit 2,500 5,000 2,300 4,500 2,200 4,300 2,000 4,100

* Programs with no available data are not listed.

Nunavut

The Government of Nunavut, through its Pinasuaqtavut mandate, is working to improve the health, prosperity and self-reliance of Nunavummiut. The goals of the NCB correspond to the Inuit principle of Pijitsirniq (providing for families and the community) by helping to prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty and assisting low-income families with the costs associated with raising children. The NCB also provides an incentive to parents to (re)join the workforce, consistent with the government’s interest in encouraging economic self-reliance.

The Government of Nunavut continues to treat the NCB Supplement as income, thereby reducing the amount of social assistance payable to a family.

Nunavut’s reinvestments and investments include:

Nunavut Child Benefit (NUCB) — This is the primary reinvestment program used by the Government of Nunavut for funds derived from the recovery of social assistance payment. Canada Revenue Agency delivers the Nunavut Child Benefit as an integrated payment with the federal child benefits. The NUCB is cash benefit paid to all families with net income of $20,921 or less in the previous year. These families receive $330 for each eligible child under the age of 18 living at home.

Territorial Workers’ Supplement — This is an additional benefit for working families with children under the age of 18 living at home. Nunavut uses recovered funds to provide the Territorial Workers’ Supplement for working parents, and Canada Revenue Agency delivers this benefit as an integrated payment with the federal child benefits. Eligible participants may receive up to $275 per year for the first child and $75 for the second. To qualify, the family must have earned income of at least $3,750 in the previous year.

Healthy Children Initiative (HCI) — HCI is a joint initiative between the Department of Education and the Department of Health and Social Services. HCI provides funding through two programs. The first is a community initiative that funds family-centered early intervention services and programs for young children (0 to 6 years) and their families. The second program focuses on supportive services that fund out-of-school programs and services for children (0 to 6 years) that require extra supports to reach their full developmental potential. Funding is administered through a yearly Nunavut-wide proposal call. Proposals are submitted from community early childhood organizations, District Education Authorities or Hamlet offices, and are administered by regional committees.

Table 41
Nunavut: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
Nunavut Child Benefit/Territorial
Workers’ Supplement
2,300 2,746 2,750 2,775
Early Childhood/Children-at-Risk Services
Healthy Children
Initiative (HCI)*
325 — — —
Total  2,625 2,746 2,750 2,775

* From 2002-2003 to 2004-2005, the HCI Program did not receive funding through NCB reinvestments.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 42
Nunavut: Estimated Number of Families and Children Benefiting under NCB Reinvestments and Investments

NCB Initiatives by Program Name* 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Nunavut Child Benefit/Territorial Workers’ Supplement 2,881 6,576 2,828 6,420 2,800 6,400 2,810 6,414

* Programs with no available data are not listed.

First Nations

First Nations, with the help of the federal government, designs a wide range of programs to address social, health and related problems in First Nation communities. The First Nations’ NCB reinvestment component is a key element in the shared effort of about 500 First Nations and the Government of Canada to improve social programs for First Nation low-income families and children.

It is in accordance with the Government of Canada’s policy that, like other Canadians, First Nation people should benefit from national social service programs. The First Nations’ NCB reinvestment component provides low-income families with children living on reserve with services and benefits comparable to those received by people living off reserve. The services and benefits also aim at ensuring that First Nation children have the best possible opportunity to fully develop their potential as healthy, active and contributing members of their communities.

The savings to First Nations income assistance budgets are used to develop a wide range of programs and services for low-income families with children. Reinvestments projects in First Nations are categorized under five activity areas:

Child/Day Care — These programs enhance day-care facilities to enable more low-income families to access spaces. Emphasis may be placed on accommodating children of parents who are working or in training, or on reducing the amount of child-care costs.

Child Nutrition — These programs are designed to improve the health and well-being of children by providing breakfast, lunch or snacks to school children, or by educating parents about the nutritional needs of children and meal preparation. Food hampers may also be delivered to homes of low-income families to support good child nutrition.

Early Childhood Development — These programs support parents by giving their children a sound start in life through early intervention services. Projects may include drop-in centres for parents or training in parenting skills.

Employment Opportunities/Training — These programs are directed at increasing the skills of parents and youth in order to improve their prospects for employment. Included are employment and skills development, summer work projects for youth, and personal development workshops.

Community Enrichment — Included in this category are projects such as the teaching of traditional culture (e.g., art, music and storytelling), support projects for youth, celebrations, peer support groups, family and community supports such as life skills, financial management training, and other group activities that bring together community elders, children and youth.

Table 43
First Nations: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

Program Type 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005*
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates*
($000)
Child/Day Care 814 984 866 n/a
Child Nutrition 6,972 7,042 5,111 n/a
Early Childhood Development 1,289 947 1,750 n/a
Employment Opportunities/Training 5,739 7,900 8,886 n/a
Community Enrichment 19,219 17,775 12,491 n/a
Sub-Total 34,032 34,648 29,104 n/a
Additional Expenditures by First Nations with Multi-Year Agreements and Comprehensive Funding Agreements 17,206 18,901 22,658 n/a
Additional Investment Envelope**  5,763 2,439 1,414 2,379
Total 57,001 55,988 53,177 52,537

* A breakdown of 2004-2005 estimates is not available.

** The additional investment envelope includes funding to reimburse Saskatchewan and the Yukon for the portion of provincial/territorial children’s benefits paid on reserve.

Notes:

  • n/a indicates the data is not available.
  • Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada does not fund social assistance in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Reinvestments in these areas are not included in this table.
  • Some bands funded under multi-year agreements and self-government arrangements may not have reported.

Table 44
First Nations: Estimated Number of Families and Children on Reserve by Region, Benefiting from NCB Reinvestments

Region 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Families
#
Children
#
Yukon 250 506 98 526 479 366
British Columbia 15,125 26,088 25,238 43,409 40,693 74,586
Alberta 8,218 22,273 5,998 15,054 9,798 21,460
Saskatchewan 3,117 9,598 7,404 18,803 33,363 76,474
Manitoba 6,662 16,444 6,752 14,301 2,936 7,016
Ontario 4,500 9,713 7,958 16,240 2,945 7,768
Quebec 4,379 9,610 3,945 8,720 2,971 5,984
Atlantic 683 1,086 574 681 431 776

Notes:

  • Estimates for 2004-2005 are not available.
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada does not fund social assistance in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
  • Some bands funded under multi-year agreements and self-government arrangements may not have reported.
  • Numbers may include duplicates where a family or a child benefits from more than one service in the community.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is committed to the objectives of the National Child Benefit. CIC continues to aid Government-Assisted Refugees (GARs) by reinvesting income support adjustments into benefits for refugee families and their children.

CIC administers the NCB through its local and regional offices following provincial/territorial social assistance guidelines which help to maintain a national standard for clients.

The Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) for GARs provides income support and a range of essential services. Income support is provided for up to 12 months, with a maximum of up to 24 months for GARs with special needs. Clients who are not self-sufficient at the end of the period of RAP support are entitled to provincial/territorial assistance.

The Kosovo project was a one-time project which saw the funding provided for a period of two years, and the project is now complete. Reporting for the Kosovo project ceased after 2002. There are no longer any Kosovo clients eligible for the RAP income support.

CIC’s reinvestments and investments include:

Newborn Allowance — This supplement assists government-assisted refugee families with the costs of a newborn.

Children under 6 Years Allowance — This benefit recognizes the additional costs associated with raising young children.

School Start-Up Allowance — This supplement assists government-assisted refugee families with the costs of equipping young children for elementary school.

NCB Transportation Allowance — This supplement assists government-assisted refugee families with their transportation costs.

Table 45
Citizenship and Immigration Canada: NCB Reinvestments and Investments

  2001-2002 2002-2003 2003–2004 2004-2005
Expenditures
($000)
Expenditures
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Estimates
($000)
Child Benefits & Earned Income Supplements
Newborn Allowance, Children under 6 Allowance, School Start-up Allowance 562 400 681 681
Other
NCB Transportation Allowance 2,292 1,492 1,174 1,174
Total* 2,854 1,892 1,855 1,855

*Amounts from 2002-2003 to 2004-2005 have decreased due to phasing out of the Kosovo movement initiative.

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.


27 This report does not include data for Quebec. All Quebec residents benefit in the same way as other Canadians from the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Moreover, they benefit from substantial investments made by the Quebec government, in the context of its family policy, in services for families with children.

28 Between July 1998 and June 1999, a third source of reinvestment funds was Transitional Assistance. It ensured that no families that previously received the Working Income Supplement experienced a reduction in the overall benefits they received as a result of the introduction of the NCB Supplement.

29 Effective July 2000, Manitoba discontinued recovering increases to the NCB Supplement for all families receiving income assistance. Effective July 2001, Manitoba stopped recovering the NCB Supplement for children age six and under. Effective January 2003, it stopped recovering the NCB Supplement for children age 7 to 11 years; and, effective January 2004, it stopped recovering the NCB Supplement for children age 12 to 17 years.

30 Includes funding provided through federal 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement and 2003 Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care transfers as well as provincial revenue funds.

31 Effective April 1, 2004, the Alberta Works — Income Support Program replaced the Supports for Independence (SFI) program.

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