Consulting with Canadians on accessibility legislation

From Employment and Social Development Canada

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Between July 2016 and February 2017, the Government of Canada consulted with Canadians on planned accessibility legislation.

Consult the report Creating new national accessibility legislation: What we learned from Canadians to learn about key findings of the consultations on accessibility legislation.

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If you would like to receive information in another format, including large print, braille, e-text, or Digital Accessible Information System (DAISY), please contact the Office for Disability Issues.

New accessibility legislation:

Consulting with Canadians

Canadians, communities and workplaces benefit when everyone can participate equally in everyday life. There has been much progress in making our society more inclusive, but we can do better. Many Canadians continue to face barriers that affect their ability to participate in daily activities that most people take for granted.

From July 2016 to February 2017, the Government of Canada consulted Canadians both in-person in 18 communities and online, to gather valuable information that will help create new accessibility legislation which will benefit us all. Led by the Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, the new planned legislation aims to promote equality of opportunity and increase inclusion and participation of Canadians who have disabilities or functional limitations.

Other activities were held to gain information and insight such as the National Youth Forum – Held on November 1st, 2016 in Ottawa, Ontario. This was a one-day national forum for youth with disabilities and youth who have life experience, work experience or academic experience related to disability.

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Message from the Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Transcript: Message from the Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

In Canada we've made considerable progress in making our society more inclusive. We see this throughout our communities. But there is still work to do.

Canadians with disabilities continue to face barriers in their daily lives. Persistent gaps remain in areas such as employment, income and social inclusion.

As Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, I have been asked to lead a consultation process that will inform the development of new accessibility legislation.

Canadians with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that represent them have been integral to many of the advancements Canada has made in accessibility. To draw on this knowledge and experience, as well as that of businesses, community organizations and government partners, the Government of Canada is conducting consultations to gather input on options for the new legislation.

We have a long road ahead, but this is a big step in helping to ensure our communities become more inclusive for all Canadians.

What does an Accessible Canada mean to you? Please take the time to participate in our online consultation or attend one of our in-person public sessions.

Together, we will make history.

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