2015 Occupational injuries amongst federal jurisdiction employers

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The following data is derived from Employer Annual Hazardous Occurrence Reports (EAHOR) submitted to the Labour Program by federally-regulated employers as stipulated in Section 15.10 of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.

New injury rates were developed for the 2015 reporting year: The Disabling Injury Frequency Rate (DIFR-Number of disabling and fatal injuries per one million hours worked) and the Fatal Injury Frequency Rate (FIFR-Number of fatal injuries per one billion hours worked). Providing rates by full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) and by hours worked allows for more comparability between different jurisdictions. The Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR) and the Fatal Injury Incidence Rate (FIIR) will continue to be produced alongside the new rates.

National injury highlights

  • The national DIIR (Number of disabling and fatal injuries per 100 FTEs) is 1.85, an increase of 3.2% from the 2014 DIIR of 1.68. The national DIFR is 9.42, an increase of 1.9% from the 2014 DIFR of 9.25. This is the sixth lowest DIIR and the fifth lowest DIFR since 1982.
  • The national FIIR (Number of fatal injuries per 100,000 FTEs) is 5.19, an increase of 19.3% from the 2014 FIIR of 4.35. The national FIFR is 26.44, an increase of 17.8% from the 2014 FIFR of 22.45. This is the highest FIIR value since 2007 and the highest FIFR value since 2011.
  • There were 52,389 total injuries (disabling, fatal and minor) reported to the Labour Program in 2015, a 3% decrease from 2014 (54,031). Of this number, 20,963 (40.0%) were disabling injuries, 59 (0.11%) were fatal injuries and 31,367 (59.9%) were minor injuries. Only the proportion of minor injuries decreased from 2014.
  • Of the six sectors with the highest 2015 DIIR and DIFR values, the Grain elevators sector underwent the most noted increase over the last five years. The DIIR for this sector increased by 50.4% going from 1.28 in 2011 to 1.93 in 2015 while the DIFR increased by 44.8% from 6.41 to 9.28. The sector with the most marked decrease was Water transport. The DIIR for this sector decreased by 47.1% from 4.19 in 2011 to 2.21 in 2015 while the DIFR decreased by 46.2% from 21.05 in 2011 to 11.32 in 2015. See Charts 1.4 and 1.5 for DIIR and DIFR values for all sectors.
  • The three sectors with FIIR and FIFR values above the 2015 national FIIR (5.19) and FIFR (26.44) rates were Road transport, Aboriginal and Air transport. Since 2011, Road and Air transport have almost consistently reported FIIR and FIFR values above the national rates whereas the Aboriginal Sector has fluctuated, reporting no fatalities in 2011 and 2013. Besides Road transport and Air transport, the only other two sectors which reported fatalities in every year from 2011 and 2015 were the Public service departments and Rail transport sectors; however, both these sectors were below the 2015 national FIIR and FIFR. See Charts 1.6 and 1.7 for FIIR and FIFR values for all sectors.

Important note: More detailed injury data is available through the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal.

Occupational injuries for federal jurisdiction by industry sector

Disabling injuries: Combined, the Road transportation and Postal contractors industry sectors make up just over half of all reported disabling injuries in the federal jurisdiction in 2014; however, these two sectors only represent a little more than a fifth of total employment in the federal jurisdiction. This distribution is roughly identical to the 2014 figures.

Chart 1.1 Percentage of disabling injuries within federal jurisdiction industry sectors, 2015
Chart 1.1 Percentage of disabling injuries within federal jurisdiction industry sectors, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.1
Industry Percentage of disabling injuries
Air transport 15
Postal contractors 19
Public service departments 14
Road transport 32
All others* 20
  • * All others: Communications: 5%; Banking: 4%; Rail transport, Water transport: 3%; Long shoring, Broadcasting, Crown corporations, Feed/flour/seed, Aboriginal, Grain elevators: 1%; Pipelines, Energy and mining: 0.1%; Bridges and tunnels: 0.03%
Chart 1.2 Percentage of employees within federal jurisdiction industry sectors, 2015
 Percentage of employees within federal jurisdiction industry sectors, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.2
Industry Percentage of employees
Air transport 9
Postal contractors 5
Public service departments 25
Road transport 16
All others* 45
  • * All others: Banking: 20%; Communications: 9%; Broadcasting, Rail transport, Crown corporations: 3%; Aboriginal, Water transport: 2%; Feed/flour/seed, Pipelines, Long shoring, Grain elevators: 1%; Energy and mining: 0.3%; Bridges and tunnels: 0.03%

Fatal injuries: The total number of reported fatalities in 2015 has increased by 18% from 50 in 2014 to 59 in 2015. The increase is partly attributable to the fact that the Road transport sector reported 15 more fatalities in 2015 (38) than in 2014 (23).

Chart 1.3 Percentage of fatal work injuries in federal jurisdiction industries, 2015
Chart 1.3 Percentage of fatal work injuries in federal jurisdiction industries, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.3
Industry Percentage of fatal work injuries
Aboriginal 5
Air transport 14
Postal contractors 3
Public service departments 7
Road transport 64
All others* 7
  • * All others include one fatality in each of the following sectors: Banking, Crown corporations, Rail transport and Water transport

DIIR and DIFR: Six of the 17 industry sectors reported values higher than the national DIIR (1.85) and DIFR (9.42). The top five industry sectors were identical for the DIIR and DIFR. The Grain elevators sector was the sixth to report a DIIR above the national rate while the Bridges and tunnels sector was the sixth to report a DIFR value above the national rate. Of these sectors, Postal contractors, Air transport, Bridges and tunnels and Grain elevators were the only sectors to report an increased DIIR and DIFR from 2014 to 2015. The top five sectors in both years were identical.

Chart 1.4 Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Chart 1.4 Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.4
Industry Disabling Injury Incidence Rate
Postal contractors 7.21
Long shoring 4.00
Road transport 3.77
Air transport 3.18
Water transport 2.21
Grain elevators 1.93
Bridges and tunnels 1.78
Rail transport 1.68
Feed, flour and seed 1.54
Public service departments 1.00
Communications 1.00
Federal crown corporations 0.83
Broadcasting 0.81
Aboriginal 0.80
Energy and mining 0.49
Banking 0.36
Pipelines 0.18
National rate 1.85
Chart 1.5 Disabling Injury Frequency Rate (DIFR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Chart 1.5 Disabling Injury Frequency Rate (DIFR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.5
Industry Disabling Injury Frequency Rate
Postal contractors 43.65
Long shoring 19.07
Road transport 17.59
Air transport 16.71
Water transport 11.32
Bridges and tunnels 9.71
Grain elevators 9.28
Rail transport 8.30
Feed, flour and seed 7.65
Communications 5.13
Public service departments 5.09
Broadcasting 4.27
Federal crown corporations 4.27
Aboriginal 4.24
Energy and mining 2.77
Banking 1.86
Pipelines 0.88
National rate 1.85

FIIR and FIFR: Nine of the 17 industry sectors under federal jurisdiction reported fatalities in 2015. Three industry sectors (Road transport, Aboriginal and Air transport) all reported FIIR and FIFR values above the national rate. When compared to 2014, the Road transport and Aboriginal industry sectors were the only two sectors above the national rate in both years. Along with these sectors, the Air transport, Rail transport and Public service departments reported fatalities in both years.

Chart 1.6 Fatal Injury Incidence Rate (FIIR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Chart 1.6 Fatal Injury Incidence Rate (FIIR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.6
Industry Fatal Injury Incidence Rate
Road transport 21.17
Aboriginal 10.72
Air transport 8.04
Water transport 4.05
Postal contractors 3.67
Federal crown corporations 3.19
Rail transport 3.05
Public service departments 1.40
Banking 0.43
National rate 5.19
Chart 1.7 Fatal Injury Frequency Rate (FIFR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Chart 1.7 Fatal Injury Frequency Rate (FIFR), by federal jurisdiction industry sector, 2015
Show data table for Chart 1.7
Industry Fatal Injury Frequency Rate
Road transport 98.65
Aboriginal 56.77
Air transport 42.18
Postal contractors 22.22
Water transport 20.72
Federal crown corporations 16.48
Rail transport 15.06
Public service departments 7.09
Banking 2.24
National rate 26.44

Occupational injuries for federal employers by province or territory, 2015

Disabling injuries: In 2015, Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta accounted for 81% of all disabling injuries. This is understandable due to their large combined share (84%) of all federal jurisdiction employment. These numbers remain largely unchanged from 2014.

Chart 2.1 Percentage of disabling injuries by province/territory, 2015
Chart 2.1 Percentage of disabling injuries by province/territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.1
Province and territory Percentage of disabling injuries
Ontario 32
Quebec 21
British Columbia 16
Alberta 12
All others* 19
  • * All others: Manitoba: 7%; Nova Scotia: 4%; Saskatchewan: 3%; New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador: 2%; Prince Edward Island: 0.3%; Nunavut, Northwest Territories: 0.2%; Yukon, Foreign: 0.1%
Chart 2.2 Percentage of federal jurisdiction employment by province/ territory, 2015
Chart 2.2 Percentage of federal jurisdiction employment by province/ territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.2
Province and territory Percentage of federal jurisdiction employment
Ontario 44
Quebec 19
British Columbia 11
Alberta 10
All others* 16
  • * All others: Manitoba: 4%; Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan: 3%; New Brunswick: 2%; Newfoundland and Labrador, Foreign, Prince Edward Island: 1%; Northwest Territories: 0.3%; Yukon: 0.2%; Nunavut: 0.1%

Fatal Injuries: Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta accounted for 80% of all fatal injuries in 2015. Of these provinces, only Ontario saw its share of fatal injuries increase from 2014 to 2015, from 26% to 32% and British Columbia decrease from 20% to 17%. Even though Quebec and Ontario combined to account for almost 50% of all fatalities, they both reported FIIR and FIFR values below the national rate due to their large FTE and hours worked counts. (see Charts 2.6 and 2.7).

Chart 2.3 Percentage of fatal work injuries by province/territory, 2015
Chart 2.3 Percentage of fatal work injuries by province/territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.3
Province and territory Percentage of fatal work injuries
Ontario 32
Quebec 17
British Columbia 17
Alberta 14
Manitoba 7
Nova Scotia 7
Saskatchewan 7

DIIR: Seven provinces or territories reported DIIR and DIFR values above the national rate of 1.85 and 9.42 respectively. Saskatchewan also reported a DIIR value above the national rate. Six of these eight provinces, with the exceptions of Quebec and Saskatchewan, reported higher DIIR and DIFR values in 2015 than in 2014.

Chart 2.4 Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR) by province/territory, 2015
Chart 2.4 Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR) by province/territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.4
Province and territory Disabling Injury Incidence Rate
Nunavut 3.82
Manitoba 2.96
British Columbia 2.56
Newfoundland and Labrador 2.46
Nova Scotia 2.45
Alberta 2.17
Quebec 2.03
Saskatchewan 1.86
New Brunswick 1.84
Northwest Territories 1.40
Ontario 1.37
Yukon 1.25
Prince Edward Island 1.11
Foreign 0.16
National rate 1.85
Chart 2.5 Disabling Injury Frequency Rate (DIFR) by province/territory, 2015
Chart 2.5 Disabling Injury Frequency Rate (DIFR) by province/territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.5
Province and territory Disabling Injury Frequency Rate
Nunavut 19.56
Manitoba 14.64
British Columbia 13.34
Nova Scotia 12.59
Newfoundland and Labrador 12.37
Alberta 10.81
Quebec 10.36
Saskatchewan 9.37
New Brunswick 9.27
Ontario 7.04
Northwest Territories 7.00
Yukon 6.47
Prince Edward Island 5.66
Foreign 0.77
National rate 9.42

FIIR and FIFR: Of the seven provinces to report fatalities in 2015, only Ontario and Quebec were below the national FIIR and FIFR rates. These two provinces also both reported FIIR and FIFR values below the 2014 national rates. Compared to 2014, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Alberta remain above the national FIIR and FIFR. Of these seven provinces, six reported an increase in their FIIR and FIFR values from 2014 to 2015, the exception being British Columbia.

Chart 2.6 Fatal Injury Incidence Rate (FIIR) by province/territory, 2015
Chart 2.6 Fatal Injury Incidence Rate (FIIR) by province/territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.6
Province and territory Fatal Injury Incidence Rate
Nova Scotia 11.92
Saskatchewan 11.04
Manitoba 8.35
British Columbia 7.71
Alberta 6.80
Quebec 4.64
Ontario 3.83
National rate 5.19
Chart 2.7 Fatal Injury Frequency Rate (FIFR) by province/territory, 2015
Chart 2.7 Fatal Injury Frequency Rate (FIFR) by province/territory, 2015
Show data table for Chart 2.7
Province and territory Fatal Injury Frequency Rate
Nova Scotia 61.20
Saskatchewan 55.63
Manitoba 41.24
British Columbia 40.19
Alberta 33.80
Quebec 23.64
Ontario 19.65
National rate 26.44

Glossary

The following definitions are provided for the purposes of this publication only.

Disabling injury
Any occupation injury or disease that:
  • prevents an employee from reporting for work, or from effectively performing all the duties connected with the employee’s regular work, on any day subsequent to the day on which the occupational injury occurred, whether or not that subsequent day is a working day for that employee;
  • results in the loss by an employee of a body member or a part thereof, or in a complete loss of the usefulness of a body member or part thereof; or
  • results in the permanent impairment of a bodily function of an employee.
Disabling Injury Incidence Rate (DIIR)
Defined as the total number of disabling and fatal occupational injuries per 100 employees, expressed as full-time equivalents (FTEs). It is calculated by taking the sum of the total number of disabling and fatal injuries on the job, dividing that by the total number of FTEs and multiplying by 100.
Disabling Injury Frequency Rate (DIFR)
Defined as the total number of disabling and fatal occupational injuries per one million hours worked. It is calculated by taking the sum of the total number of disabling and fatal injuries on the job, dividing that by the total number of hours worked and multiplying by one million.
Employee
Any person who has entered into or is employed under a contract of service or apprenticeship, written or oral, expressed or implied, whether by way of manual labour or otherwise, as well as any other person subject to the provisions of a workers’ compensation board act or any direction or order of a board.
Employment
  • All work or activities performed in carrying out assignments or requests made by the employer. It includes related activities not specifically covered by an assignment or request.
  • Any voluntary work or activities undertaken while on duty for the benefit of the employer.
  • Any activities undertaken while on duty with the consent or approval of the employer.
Fatal injury
An occupational injury or disease resulting in death.
Fatal Injury Frequency Rate (FIFR)
Defined as the total number of fatal occupational injuries per one billion hours worked. It is calculated by taking the total number of fatal injuries on the job, dividing that by the total number of hours worked and multiplying by one billion.
Fatal Injury Incidence Rate (FIIR)
Defined as the total number of fatal occupational injuries per 100,000 employees. It is calculated by taking the total number of fatal injuries on the job, dividing that by the total number of employees (expressed as full-time equivalents) and multiplying by 100,000.
Federal jurisdiction
Federal jurisdiction covers those works, undertakings or businesses that are within the legislative authority of Parliament. It also includes any work declared to be for the general advantage of two or more provinces outside the exclusive authority of the provincial legislatures. Federal jurisdiction defined under the Canada Labour Code covers specific industries and their infrastructures.
Full-time Equivalent (FTE)
Refers to the employment of one person full-time, or more than one person part-time, such that the total working time is the equivalent of one person working full-time. FTEs are measured in person-years. For instance, 100 people employed full-time equals 100 FTEs; 10 people employed half time equals 5 FTEs; and all 110 people combined represent 105 FTEs.
Minor injury
An occupation injury or disease, excluding disabling injuries, for which treatment at a medical facility is provided.
Occupational injury
Any injury, disease or illness incurred by an employee in the performance of, or in connection with, his or her work.

Industry sectors under federal jurisdiction

According to the Canada Labour Code, the federal jurisdiction encompasses any work, undertaking or business that is within the legislative authority of the Parliament of Canada. This includes all work deemed to be for the common good of at least two provinces and outside the exclusive authority of provincial legislatures. The industrial sectors included are as follows:

  • Aboriginal (ABORIG)
  • Air transport (AIRT)
  • Banking (BANK)
  • Bridges and tunnels (BRID)
  • Broadcasting (BROAD)
  • Communications (COMM)
  • Federal crown corporations (CRWN)
  • Public service departments (PUBS)
  • Feed, flour and seed mills (FEED)
  • Grain elevators (GRAN)
  • Long shoring (LONG)
  • Energy and mining (ENER)
  • Pipelines (PIPE)
  • Postal contractors (POST)
  • Rail transport (RAIL)
  • Inter-provincial road transport (ROAD)
  • Water transport (WATR)

Annex: Data charts

Chart 3.1 (a): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIIR values, 2011-2015
Chart 3.1 (a): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIIR values, 2011-2015
Show data table for Chart 3.1 (a)
Industry 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Postal contractors 4.89 4.14 3.73 7.08 7.21
Long shoring 6.07 6.06 5.21 4.32 4.00
Road transport 4.06 4.08 3.84 3.89 3.77
National 1.73 1.77 1.68 1.79 1.85
Chart 3.1 (b): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIIR values, 2011-2015
Chart 3.1 (b): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIIR values, 2011-2015
Show data table for Chart 3.1 (b)
Industry 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Air transport 4.05 3.33 3.43 2.81 3.18
Water transport 4.19 3.01 2.94 2.39 2.21
Grain elevators 1.28 1.95 1.64 1.04 1.93
Bridges and tunnels 1.36 1.04 0.27 1.63 1.78
National 1.73 1.77 1.68 1.79 1.85
Chart 3.2 (a): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIFR values, 2011-2015
Chart 3.2 (a): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIFR values, 2011-2015
Show data table for Chart 3.2 (a)
Industry 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Postal contractors 32.98 27.90 25.17 42.74 43.65
Long shoring 28.40 29.04 25.52 20.81 19.07
Road transport 22.15 20.02 18.47 18.38 17.59
National 9.43 9.36 8.76 9.25 9.42
Chart 3.2 (b): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIFR values, 2011-2015
Chart 3.2 (b): Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 DIFR values, 2011-2015
Show data table for Chart 3.2 (b)
Industry 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Air transport 4.05 3.33 3.43 2.81 3.18
Water transport 4.19 3.01 2.94 2.39 2.21
Grain elevators 1.28 1.95 1.64 1.04 1.93
Bridges and tunnels 1.36 1.04 0.27 1.63 1.78
National 9.43 9.36 8.76 9.25 9.42
Chart 3.3: Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 FIIR values, 2011-2015
Chart 3.3: Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 FIIR values, 2011-2015
Show data table for Chart 3.3
Industry 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Road transport 22.15 16.12 17.77 12.98 21.17
Aboriginal 0.00 7.38 0.00 17.86 10.72
Air transport 11.60 11.09 15.56 3.91 8.04
National 5.15 4.09 5.06 4.35 5.19
Chart 3.4: Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 FIIR values, 2011-2015
Chart 3.4: Federal jurisdiction industry sectors with highest 2015 FIIR values, 2011-2015
Show data table for Chart 3.4
Industry 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Road transport 119.01 79.14 85.44 61.33 98.65
Aboriginal 0.00 43.52 0.00 94.68 56.77
Air transport 66.51 80.69 86.48 22.38 42.18
National 28.01 21.62 26.37 22.45 26.44
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