Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2016

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Message from the Minister

2016

Canada is a nation that ensures all Canadians have real opportunities for success, where opportunities are based solely on skills and abilities, where there are no barriers to inclusive employment, and where the workforce is reflective of Canadian society.

With this in mind as the Minister responsible for employment equity, I present the Employment Equity Act: Annual Report 2016. The report outlines the progress made by federally regulated private-sector employers to achieve equality and fairness in workplaces across Canada.

I am pleased to report that we have seen progress. For example, from 2014 to 2015, the representation of Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities increased at the overall level, despite the decreased number of jobs available in the federal jurisdiction during the reporting period.

What’s more, our annual Employment Equity Achievement Awards highlight some innovative approaches and best practices by industry to improve inclusion and diversity in the federal sector, and we have seen that employers are showing increased interest and commitment to this.

The report also shows that more work needs to be done. The number of women in the federally regulated private sector has decreased, and the representation of underrepresented groups must increase much more substantially. We can do more.

The Government of Canada is committed to doing our part to be a model of inclusion for employers. Through the Labour Program, we will continue to work with employers to identify and remove workplace employment barriers to ensure that federally regulated private-sector workplaces are inclusive and provide all Canadians with employment opportunities. Equity is everyone’s right, and everyone’s responsibility.

I look forward to reporting further progress on these commitments. In the meantime, take a look around your workplace. Do you see employment equity? If not, I encourage you to take action.

The Honourable Patricia A. Hajdu, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour

Introduction

The purpose of this Act is to achieve equality in the workplace so that no person shall be denied employment opportunities or benefits for reasons unrelated to ability and, in the fulfilment of that goal, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment experienced by women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities by giving effect to the principle that employment equity means more than treating persons in the same way but also requires special measures and the accommodation of differences.

Section 2 of the Employment Equity Act

The Employment Equity Act requires the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour to submit a report to Parliament on the status of employment equity in the federally regulated private sector. Footnote 1 This report, Employment Equity Act: Annual Report 2016, consolidates and highlights results achieved by employers during the 2015 calendar year regarding the four designated groups: women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities.

Indicators of progress include salary ranges as well as shares of hires, promotions and terminations. However, the most common indicator is the representation rate, which provides effective insights on the status of employment equity at the overall level and in each of the four sectors of the federally regulated private sector. The representation of each designated group is compared to their labour market availability (LMA). Progress has been made when the gap between a group's representation and its LMA narrows, or when a group's representation exceeds its LMA.

Representation is the share of designated groups in a given labour force (e.g. the entire federally regulated private-sector workforce, the banking sector or an individual bank).

Labour market availability refers to the share of designated group members in the workforce from which the employers could hire.

About the data

The LMA data for women, Aboriginal peoples and members of visible minorities is obtained from Statistics Canada's 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). Data for persons with disabilities is obtained from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) also conducted by Statistics Canada.

There is a time lag in measuring representation gaps in this report because the 2014 representation is being compared to 2011 NHS and 2012 CSD availability data.

Federally regulated private sectors

The federally regulated private-sector workforce comprises four sectors:

Banking
Includes all major Canadian banks.
Communications
Comprises radio and television broadcasting, telecommunications and postal and courier services.
Transportation
Consists of employers in the air, rail, bus and water transportation industries; inter-provincial trucking; pipelines; and investigation and security services.
‘Other’
Encompasses a diverse group of employers working in industries such as nuclear power generation; warehousing and storage; metal ore mining; professional, scientific and technical services; finance; construction management; food, wood and equipment manufacturing; wholesale trade; arts, entertainment and recreation; and public administration.

Section 1 - Year in review

Overview of the federally regulated private sector

A total of 486 employers submitted a report to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour for the 2015 calendar year. Together, these employers had a total of 730,485 employees across Canada, representing approximately 4% of the Canadian workforce. Table 1 below summarizes the composition of the federally regulated private-sector workforce for the 1987, 2014 and 2015 calendar years by the four sectors.

Table 1: Number of employers and employees (1987, 2014 and 2015) in the federally regulated private sector

Sector

Employers

Employees

1987

2014

2015

1987

2014

2015

Banking

23

25

28

169,632

231,812

230,358

Communications

90

71

66

179,247

227,310

222,348

Transportation

208

332

317

203,207

225,770

221,850

'Other'

52

73

75

43,331

55,848

55,929

All Sectors

373

501

486

595,417

740,740

730,485

The total number of employers decreased by 15 from 2014 to 2015. Footnote 2 The banking and the ‘other’ sectors increased by three and two employers respectively. The communications sector decreased by five employers and the transportation sector decreased by 15 employers. The transportation sector continued to have the most employers (317 or 65.2%).

Between 2014 and 2015, there was a net decrease of 10,255 employees in the federally regulated private sector (-1.4%). In 2015, most workers in the federally regulated private sector were evenly distributed among the banking (31.5%), communications (30.4%) and transportation (30.4%) sectors. The smallest sector, ‘other’, employed 7.7% of the federally regulated private-sector workforce. Reductions in the number of employees were noted in the banking (-0.6%), communications (-2.2%) and transportation (-1.7%) sectors.Most workers in the federally regulated private sector were evenly distributed among the banking (31.3%), communications (30.7%) and transportation (30.5%) sectors. The smallest sector, 'other', employed 7.5% of the federally regulated private-sector workforce.

Workforce summary

In 2015, employers continued to make progress towards achieving a fully representative Footnote 3 workforce. The representation of members of visible minorities continued to exceed LMA. Women are the only designated group whose representation decreased, which suggests that women were the most impacted by overall workforce shrinkages in 2015. The overall representation of three of the four designated groups — Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities — increased from 2014 to 2015 and reached its highest level since the adoption of the Employment Equity Act in 1987. Chart 1 provides an overview of progress in representation over time.

To allow for a comparative analysis, data from 1987 (the year data was first collected) is included. It should be noted that the representation of women and persons with disabilities fluctuated between 1987 and 2015 and did not follow a linear growth pattern.

Chart 1: Progress in representation over time in the federally regulated private sector (percent)

Chart 1: Progress in representation over time in the federally regulated private sector (percent). Details in table following the chart.

*Sources: Statistics Canada, 2011 NHS and 2012 CSD.

Chart 1 – Text version
1987 Representation 2014 Representation 2015 Representation Labour Market Availability*

Women

40.9%

41.4%

41.0%

48.2%

Aboriginal Peoples

0.7%

2.1%

2.2%

3.5%

Persons with Disabilities

1.6%

2.8%

3.0%

4.9%

Members of Visible Minorities

5.0%

20.4%

21.2%

17.8%

Table 2 provides the representation of the designated groups in each of the sectors comprising the federally regulated private sector in 2014 and 2015.

Table 2: Designated Group Representation by Sector (percent)

Sector

Women

Aboriginal peoples

Persons with disabilities

Members of visible minorities

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

Banking

61.5%

60.2%

1.3%

1.3%

4.0%

4.0%

30.2%

30.6%

Communications

37.4%

37.3%

1.8%

1.9%

2.3%

2.7%

18.6%

19.9%

Transportation

27.2%

27.4%

2.8%

3.0%

2.0%

2.3%

14.2%

14.9%

'Other'

30.9%

31.1%

4.5%

4.3%

2.6%

2.6%

12.2%

12.5%

All sectors

41.4%

41.0%

2.1%

2.2%

2.8%

3.0%

20.4%

21.2%

Availability*

48.2% 3.5% 4.9% 17.8%

*Sources: Statistics Canada, 2011 NHS and 2012 CSD.

While the overall representation in the federally regulated private sector continues to be below LMA for all designated groups except members of visible minorities, specific sectors have made progress in 2015. As such, although the overall representation of women decreased, it increased in the transportation and ‘other’ sectors.In addition, the transportation sector was the only sector to show increases in the representation of all designated groups. The communications sector most significantly increased its representation of persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities. While the banking sector saw a decrease in the representation of women in 2015, it nevertheless continues to significantly surpass the overall LMA for this designated group. The ‘other’ sector continued to surpass LMA for Aboriginal peoples in 2015, the only sector to do so.

Section 2 - Designated groups

Women

From 2014 to 2015, the total number of women in the federally regulated private sector decreased by 6,608 women (-2.2%), indicating that more women left than entered the workforce. The representation of women declined for the second year in a row, dropping from 41.4% in 2014 to 41.0% in 2015 — 7.2 percentage points below the 48.2% LMA. This result represents an LMA attainment rate of 85.1%, a shortfall of 14.9% compared to a shortfall of 14.1% in 2014.

Chart 2: Representation and availability of women in the federally regulated private sector (percent)

Chart 2: Representation and availability of women in the federally regulated private sector (percent). Details in table following the chart.

* Sources: Statistics Canada, 1986 to 2006 Census and 2011 NHS.

Chart 2 – Text version

Year

All employees

Women

Total

Representation

Availability

1987

595,417

243,744

40.9%

44.0%

1988

613,688

257,417

41.9%

44.0%

1989

631,015

268,340

42.5%

44.0

1990

631,423

276,161

43.7%

44.0%

1991

615,135

271,927

44.2%

45.9%

1992

602,265

269,089

44.7%

45.9%

1993

582,363

264,804

45.5%

45.9%

1994

599,311

265,950

44.4%

45.9%

1995

588,047

261,437

44.5%

45.9%

1996

571,883

256,250

44.8%

46.4%

1997

571,138

254,325

44.5%

46.4%

1998

589,218

260,204

44.2%

46.4%

1999

588,759

262,629

44.6%

46.4%

2000

600,220

262,602

43.8%

46.4%

2001

634,759

284,720

44.9%

47.3%

2002

629,916

279,817

44.4%

47.3%

2003

621,457

273,496

44.0%

47.3%

2004

651,048

282,747

43.4%

47.3%

2005

672,652

291,198

43.3%

47.3%

2006

698,210

300,747

43.1%

47.9%

2007

733,789

313,385

42.7%

47.9%

2008

744,011

316,937

42.6%

47.9%

2009

743,837

314,430

42.3%

47.9%

2010

755,966

315,109

41.7%

47.9%

2011

768,547

316,755

41.2%

48.2%

2012

772,480

315,930

40.9%

48.2%

2013

738,053

306,763

41.6%

48.2%

2014

740,740

306,397

41.4%

48.2%

2015

730,485

299,789

41.0%

48.2%

The largest proportion of women in the federally regulated private sector continued to be in the banking sector (46.3%). This was followed by the communications (27.6%), transportation (20.3%) and ‘other’ sector (5.8%). Table 3 provides details on the employment situation of women overall and in each of the four sectors comprising the federally regulated private sector.

Table 3: Number, Representation, Hires, Promotions and Terminations of Women in the Federally Regulated Private Sector by Sector Footnote 4

Women

All Sectors

Banking

Communications

Transportation

'Other'

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

Number employed

306,397

299,789

142,643

138,774

84,981

82,885

61,502

60,717

17,271

17,413

Representation

41.4%

41.0%

61.5%

60.2%

37.4%

37.3%

27.2%

27.4%

30.9%

31.1%

Number of hires

39,903

37,934

16,862

16,595

9,006

8,607

11,842

10,587

2,193

2,145

Number of promotions

22,716

22,915

16,189

16,030

3,408

3,582

1,814

1,810

1,305

1,493

Number of terminations

41,128

44,377

17,681

19,270

12,154

12,415

9,135

10,441

2,158

2,251

Share of hires

35.0%

35.7%

51.7%

50.7%

32.0%

33.7%

25.6%

25.7%

31.1%

31.2%

Share of promotions

47.9%

48.2%

57.1%

57.1%

36.1%

37.3%

30.3%

30.5%

35.6%

37.9%

Share of terminations

37.0%

38.1%

59.1%

58.2%

35.4%

37.1%

23.0%

24.5%

29.4%

31.2%

At the sector level, representation increased by 0.2 percentage points in the transportation and ‘other’ sectors but decreased in the banking and communications sectors by 1.3 percentage points and 0.1 percentage point respectively. All sectors combined, the share of terminations for women continued to exceed their share of hires and women left the workforce at a higher rate than they were entering it. The share of promotions increased to 48.2% surpassing their representation and matching the LMA.

Banking sector

  • While the banking workforce decreased by 0.6% and the number of women decreased by 2.7%, the sector continued to have the highest representation of women (60.2%) in 2015, the only sector to surpass the 48.2% overall LMA. The decrease in representation indicates that women were more impacted by workforce shrinkages than those who did not self-identify as women.
  • This sector reported shares of terminationsFootnote 5 that exceeded shares of hires of women.

Communication sector

  • While the communications sector saw a decline in the total workforce of 2.2% from 2014 to 2015, the number of women decreased by 2.5%, leading to a decrease in representation from 37.4% to 37.3%. This indicates that women in the communications sector were also more impacted by workforce shrinkages than those who did not self-identify as women.
  • The communications sector reported shares of terminations that exceeded shares of hires.

Transportation sector

  • The number of all employees in the transportation sector decreased by 1.7% and the number of women by 1.3%; however, the representation of women increased from 27.2% in 2014 to 27.4% in 2015, which denotes that the representation of women was not negatively impacted by the decrease in the size of the workforce.
  • The transportation sector reported a positive net effect between the number of hires and terminations, meaning that more women entered this sector’s workforce than left it.
  • The transportation sector reported shares of promotions for women that exceeded internal representation.

'Other sector'

  • The representation of women remained relatively stable in this sector in 2015, increasing by 0.2 percentage points, a nominal increase of 142 women employees, mirroring the relative stability of the size of the workforce for the sector.
  • The sector reported equivalent shares of hires and terminations, and a share of promotions for women that exceeded their internal representation in 2015.

As shown in Table 4, a higher proportion of women in permanent full-time positions earned a salary of $60,000 or more in 2015 than in 2014 (44.5% compared to 41.5%), while 35.6% of women remained in the lowest salary range of below $50,000. In contrast, 59.8% of men were in the top salary range and only 22.9% of men earned below $50,000.

Table 4: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender (percent)

Salary range

Distribution of permanent full-time employees

2014

2015

Men

Women

Men

Women

$60,000 and above

57.7%

41.5%

59.8%

44.5%

$50,000 to $59,999

18.3%

20.1%

17.3%

19.9%

Below $50,000

24.0%

38.4%

22.9%

35.6%

Aboriginal peoples

From 2014 to 2015, the total number of Aboriginal employees increased by 359 (+2.3%) in the federally regulated private-sector workforce. This led to an increase in the representation of Aboriginal peoples from 2.1% in 2014 to 2.2% in 2015. While representation of this designated group remains below its LMA of 3.5%, this represents an attainment rate of 62.9%, a reduced shortfall of 37.1% in 2014 compared to a shortfall of 40.0% in 2014.

Chart 3: Representation and availability of Aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector (percent)

Chart 3: Representation and availability of Aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector (percent). Details in table following the chart.

* Sources: Statistics Canada, 1986 to 2006 Census and 2011 NHS.

Note: In 1996, the Census methodology for calculating LMA of Aboriginal peoples changed, causing a drop in LMA.

Chart 3 – Text version

Year

All employees

Aboriginal peoples

Total

Representation

Availability

1987

595,417

3,921

0.7%

2.1%

1988

613,688

4,386

0.7%

2.1%

1989

631,015

4,993

0.8%

2.1%

1990

631,423

5,387

0.9%

2.1%

1991

615,135

5,923

1.0%

3.0%

1992

602,265

6,092

1.0%

3.0%

1993

582,363

6,079

1.0%

3.0%

1994

599,311

6,600

1.1%

3.0%

1995

588,047

6,895

1.2%

3.0%

1996

571,883

6,955

1.2%

2.1%

1997

571,138

7,354

1.3%

2.1%

1998

589,218

7,764

1.3%

2.1%

1999

588,759

8,581

1.5%

2.1%

2000

600,220

8,867

1.5%

2.1%

2001

634,759

9,865

1.6%

2.6%

2002

629,916

10,468

1.7%

2.6%

2003

621,457

10,276

1.7%

2.6%

2004

651,048

10,956

1.7%

2.6%

2005

672,652

11,854

1.8%

2.6%

2006

698,210

12,364

1.8%

3.1%

2007

733,789

13,920

1.9%

3.1%

2008

744,011

13,958

1.9%

3.1%

2009

743,837

14,013

1.9%

3.1%

2010

755,966

14,686

1.9%

3.1%

2011

768,547

15,166

2.0%

3.5%

2012

772,480

15,778

2.0%

3.5%

2013

738,053

15,669

2.1%

3.5%

2014

740,740

15,786

2.1%

3.5%

2015

730,485

16,145

2.2%

3.5%

In 2015, the largest proportion of Aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector continued to be in the transportation sector (40.7%). This was followed by the communications, banking and ‘other’ sectors with 26.5%, 18.0% and 14.8% respectively. Table 5 provides details on the employment situation of Aboriginal peoples overall and in each of the four sectors comprising the federally regulated private sector.

Table 5: Number, representation, hires, promotions and terminations of Aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector by sector

Aboriginal peoples

All sectors

Banking

Communications

Transportation

'Other'

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

Number employed

15,786

16,145

2,934

2,899

4,009

4,280

6,345

6,570

2,498

2,396

Representation

2.1%

2.2%

1.3%

1.3%

1.8%

1.9%

2.8%

3.0%

4.5%

4.3%

Number of hires

2,912

2,696

368

353

624

585

1,570

1,461

350

297

Number of promotions

913

925

360

375

193

231

202

170

158

149

Number of terminations

2,907

3,032

447

514

733

701

1,468

1,454

259

363

Share of hires

2.6%

2.5%

1.1%

1.1%

2.2%

2.3%

3.4%

3.5%

5.0%

4.3%

Share of promotions

1.9%

1.9%

1.3%

1.3%

2.0%

2.4%

3.4%

2.9%

4.3%

3.8%

Share of terminations

2.6%

2.6%

1.5%

1.6%

2.1%

2.1%

3.7%

3.4%

3.5%

5.0%

At the sector level, the number of Aboriginal employees decreased by 35 (-1.2%) in banking and by 102 (-4.1%) in ‘other’. Their numbers increased in the communications and transportation sectors by 271 (+6.8%) and 225 (+3.5%) respectively. Their representation continued to be highest in the ‘other’ and transportation sectors (4.3% and 3.0% respectively). In 2015, at the overall sector level, the share of terminations for Aboriginal peoples was higher than the share of hires. This means that all sectors combined, more Aboriginal peoples left the federally regulated private-sector workforce than entered it. Between 2014 and 2015, their share of promotions remained stable at 1.9% and below their internal representation of 2.2%.

Banking sector

  • While the number of all employees in this sector decreased by 0.6%, the number of Aboriginal peoples decreased by 1.2%. Nevertheless, the representation of Aboriginal peoples in the banking sector remained stable at 1.3% between 2014 and 2015.
  • For Aboriginal employees, the banking sector reported shares of terminations that exceeded shares of hires and shares of promotions that were at least equal to internal representation.

Communications sector

  • While the total number of employees in this sector decreased by 2.2%, the number of Aboriginal peoples increased by 6.8%, and there was an increase in representation from 1.8% in 2014 to 1.9% in 2015.
  • This means that the sector was successful in hiring and retaining Aboriginal employees.
  • The communications sector reported shares of promotions for Aboriginal employees that exceeded their internal representation and higher shares of hires than terminations.

Transportation sector

  • While the total number of employees in the transportation sector decreased by 1.7%, the number of Aboriginal peoples increased by 3.5% between 2014 and 2015. This led to an increase in representation for the sector from 2.8% in 2014 to 3.0% in 2015, which may be attributable to the sector’s ability to hire and retain Aboriginal employees.
  • The transportation sector reported a positive net effect between the number of hires and terminations, meaning that more Aboriginal employees entered this sector’s workforce than left it.
  • The share of hires in the transportation sector met the overall LMA in 2015, resulting in equitable levels of hiring for Aboriginal peoples.

‘Other’ sector

  • The representation of Aboriginal peoples in the sector decreased from 4.5% in 2014 to 4.3% in 2015. As this sector is the smallest one, slight changes in the number of employees impact representation. In nominal terms, the decrease in this sector was of 102 Aboriginal employees.
  • The representation of Aboriginal peoples in this sector remained well above the overall LMA of 3.5%, the only sector for which this is the case.
  • The ‘other’ sector reported a share of terminations that exceeded share of hires in 2015, but the share of hires exceeded the overall LMA, resulting in equitable levels of hiring for Aboriginal peoples.

As shown in Table 6, a higher proportion of Aboriginal peoples in permanent full-time positions earned a salary of $60,000 or more in 2015 than in 2014. However, the proportion of Aboriginal men and women in this salary range continued to be lower than all men and all women respectively. Aboriginal women in particular remained much less likely (35.4%) to earn $60,000 or more compared to Aboriginal men (57.5%) and to all women (44.5%). The largest proportion of Aboriginal women (43.7%) earned salaries below $50,000.

Table 6: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender (percent)

Salary range

Distribution of permanent full-time employees

2014

2015

Men

Women

Aboriginal men

Aboriginal women

Men

Women

Aboriginal men

Aboriginal women

$60,000 and above

57.7%

41.5%

55.5%

32.2%

59.8%

44.5%

57.5%

35.4%

$50,000 to $59,999

18.3%

20.1%

17.6%

20.9%

17.3%

19.9%

16.8%

20.8%

Below $50,000

24.0%

38.4%

26.8%

46.9%

22.9%

35.6%

25.7%

43.7%

Persons with disabilities

From 2014 to 2015, the total number of persons with disabilities increased by 1,071 employees (+5.2%) in the federally regulated private-sector workforce, leading to an increase in representation of 0.2 percentage points from 2.8% in 2014 to 3.0% in 2015, remaining below an overall LMA of 4.9%. While this attainment rate of 61.2% in 2015 remains the lowest attainment rate for all designated groups, it marks an improvement over the attainment rate of 57.1% in 2014.

Chart 4: Representation and availability of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector (percent)

Chart 4: Representation and availability of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector (percent). Details in table following the chart.

* Sources: Statistics Canada, 1986 and 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey, 2001 and 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey and 2012 CSD.

Note: In 2001, Statistics Canada began using the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework to define disability rather than the 1980 International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps; this resulted in a drop in LMA.

Chart 4 – Text version

Year

All employees

Persons with disabilities

Total

Representation

Availability

1987

595,417

9,440

1.6%

5.4%

1988

613,688

10,343

1.7%

5.4%

1989

631,015

14,746

2.3%

5.4%

1990

631,423

15,119

2.4%

5.4%

1991

615,135

15,438

2.5%

6.5%

1992

602,265

15,318

2.5%

6.5%

1993

582,363

14,937

2.6%

6.5%

1994

599,311

15,736

2.6%

6.5%

1995

588,047

16,063

2.7%

6.5%

1996

571,883

15,207

2.7%

6.5%

1997

571,138

13,228

2.3%

6.5%

1998

589,218

13,319

2.3%

6.5%

1999

588,759

14,068

2.4%

6.5%

2000

600,220

13,929

2.3%

6.5%

2001

634,759

14,519

2.3%

5.3%

2002

629,916

14,793

2.3%

5.3%

2003

621,457

14,425

2.3%

5.3%

2004

651,048

16,558

2.5%

5.3%

2005

672,652

18,163

2.7%

5.3%

2006

698,210

18,662

2.7%

4.9%

2007

733,789

19,777

2.7%

4.9%

2008

744,011

19,786

2.7%

4.9%

2009

743,837

19,758

2.7%

4.9%

2010

755,966

19,658

2.6%

4.9%

2011

768,547

19,649

2.6%

4.9%

2012

772,480

20,232

2.6%

4.9%

2013

738,053

20,053

2.7%

4.9%

2014

740,740

20,556

2.8%

4.9%

2015

730,485

21,627

3.0%

4.9%

The largest proportion of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector continued to be in the banking sector (42.7%). This was followed by the communications, transportation and ‘other’ sectors with 27.5%, 23.1% and 6.7% respectively. Table 7 provides details on the employment situation of persons with disabilities overall and in each of the four sectors comprising the federally regulated private sector.

Table 7: Number, representation, hires, promotions and terminations of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector by sector

Persons with disabilities

All sectors

Banking

Communications

Transportation

'Other'

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

Number employed

20,556

21,627

9,307

9,242

5,224

5,942

4,599

5,002

1,426

1,441

Representation

2.8%

3.0%

4.0%

4.0%

2.3%

2.7%

2.0%

2.3%

2.6%

2.6%

Number of hires

1,849

2,093

654

754

439

584

667

652

89

103

Number of promotions

1,202

1,200

848

821

187

199

92

100

75

80

Number of terminations

2,793

3,336

1,078

1,364

828

881

695

905

192

186

Share of hires

1.6%

2.0%

2.0%

2.3%

1.6%

2.3%

1.4%

1.6%

1.3%

1.5%

Share of promotions

2.5%

2.5%

3.0%

2.9%

2.0%

2.1%

1.5%

1.7%

2.0%

2.0%

Share of terminations

2.5%

2.9%

3.6%

4.1%

2.4%

2.6%

1.8%

2.1%

2.6%

2.6%

At the sector level, the number of persons with disabilities decreased by 65 (-0.7%) in the banking sector. Their numbers increased in the communications, transportation and ‘other’ sectors by 718 (+13.7%), 403 (+8.8%) and 15 (+1.1%) respectively. The representation of persons with disabilities remained at the same levels in the banking and ‘other’ sectors but increased by 0.4 percentage points in the communications sector and by 0.3 percentage points in the transportation sector. All sectors combined, the share of terminations for persons with disabilities continued to exceed their share of hires, while the share of promotions remained stable and below representation.

Banking sector

  • The majority of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector worked in the banking sector.
  • While the number of all employees in the banking sector decreased by 0.6%, the number of persons with disabilities decreased by 0.7%, leaving the representation rate unchanged at 4.0%. This rate continued to be highest in the banking sector but remained below the 4.9% overall LMA.
  • The share of terminations for persons with disabilities continued to exceed their share of hires. This means that persons with disabilities were leaving the workforce at a higher rate than they were entering it.
  • Share of promotions for persons with disabilities continued to be below their internal representation in this sector.

Communications sector

  • While the communications sector saw a decline in the total workforce of 2.2%, the number of persons with disabilities increased by 13.7%, increasing the representation of this group from 2.3% in 2014 to 2.7% in 2015.
  • The share of terminations for persons with disabilities continued to exceed the share of hires. This means that persons with disabilities were leaving the workforce at a higher rate than they were entering it.
  • Share of promotions for persons with disabilities continued to be below internal representation in 2015 but has increased when compared to the previous year.

Transportation sector

  • While the total number of employees in the transportation sector decreased by 1.7%, the number of persons with disabilities increased by 8.8%, increasing the representation of persons with disabilities from 2.0% in 2014 to 2.3% in 2015.
  • The share of terminations for persons with disabilities continued to exceed the share of hires. This means that persons with disabilities were leaving the workforce at a higher rate than they were entering it.
  • Share of promotions for persons with disabilities continued to be below internal representation in 2015 but has increased when compared to the previous year.

‘Other’ sector

  • The representation of persons with disabilities in the sector remained at 2.6%, with a slight increase of 15 employees.
  • The share of terminations for persons with disabilities continued to exceed the share of hires while the share of promotions remained at the 2014 level and below internal representation.

As shown in Table 8, a higher proportion of persons with disabilities in permanent full-time positions earned a salary of $60,000 or more in 2015 than in 2014. However, the proportion of men and women with disabilities in this salary range continued to be lower than all men and all women respectively. Women with disabilities in particular remained much less likely (40.9%) to earn $60,000 or more compared to men with disabilities (56.3%) and to all women (44.5%). A higher proportion of women with disabilities (36.8%) earned salaries below $50,000 than men with disabilities (24.6%) and all women (35.6%).

Table 8: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender (percent)

Salary Range

Distribution of permanent full-time employees

2014

2015

Men

Women

Men with disabilities

Women with disabilities

Men

Women

Men with disabilities

Women with disabilities

$60,000 and above

57.7%

41.5%

54.4%

37.3%

59.8%

44.5%

56.3%

40.9%

$50,000 to $59,999

18.3%

20.1%

19.8%

22.6%

17.3%

19.9%

19.1%

22.3%

Below $50,000

24.0%

38.4%

25.8%

40.1%

22.9%

35.6%

24.6%

36.8%

Members of visible minorities

From 2014 to 2015, the total number of members of visible minorities increased by 3,547 employees (+2.3%) in the federally regulated private-sector workforce. The representation of members of visible minorities increased from 20.4% in 2014 to 21.2% in 2015, surpassing the group’s LMA of 17.8%. Members of visible minorities was the only designated group to have achieved a representation level that was above LMA, a trend that has continued since 2007.

Chart 5: Representation and availability of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector

Chart 5: Representation and availability of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector. Details in table following the chart.

* Sources: Statistics Canada, 1986 to 2006 Census and 2011 NHS.

Chart 5 – Text version

Year

All employees

Members of visible minorities

Total

Representation

Availability

1987

595,417

29,760

5.0%

6.3%

1988

613,688

34,785

5.7%

6.3%

1989

631,015

42,092

6.7%

6.3%

1990

631,423

44,768

7.1%

6.3%

1991

615,135

46,542

7.6%

9.1%

1992

602,265

47,618

7.9%

9.1%

1993

582,363

46,895

8.1%

9.1%

1994

599,311

49,324

8.2%

9.1%

1995

588,047

51,967

8.8%

9.1%

1996

571,883

52,600

9.2%

10.3%

1997

571,138

55,236

9.7%

10.3%

1998

589,218

58,078

9.9%

10.3%

1999

588,759

61,379

10.4%

10.3%

2000

600,220

64,072

10.7%

10.3%

2001

634,759

74,049

11.7%

12.6%

2002

629,916

76,952

12.2%

12.6%

2003

621,457

79,119

12.7%

12.6%

2004

651,048

86,572

13.3%

12.6%

2005

672,652

94,573

14.1%

12.6%

2006

698,210

104,114

14.9%

15.3%

2007

733,789

116,491

15.9%

15.3%

2008

744,011

123,262

16.6%

15.3%

2009

743,837

127,302

17.1%

15.3%

2010

755,966

134,256

17.8%

15.3%

2011

768,547

139,665

18.2%

17.8%

2012

772,480

143,968

18.6%

17.8%

2013

738,053

144,488

19.6%

17.8%

2014

740,740

151,185

20.4%

17.8%

2015

730,485

154,732

21.2%

17.8%

The largest proportion of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector continued to be in the banking sector (45.5%). This was followed by the communications, transportation and ‘other’ sectors with 28.6%, 21.4% and 4.5% respectively. Table 9 provides details on the employment situation of members of visible minorities overall and in each of the four sectors comprising the federally regulated private sector.

Table 9: Number, representation, hires, promotions and terminations of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector by sector

Members of visible minorities

All Sectors

Banking

Communications

Transportation

'Other'

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

Number employed

151,185

154,732

70,097

70,392

42,171

44,234

32,121

33,089

6,796

7,017

Representation

20.4%

21.2%

30.2%

30.6%

18.6%

19.9%

14.2%

14.9%

12.2%

12.5%

Number of hires

26,101

24,893

8,689

8,086

7,439

7,272

8,924

8,541

1,049

994

Number of promotions

12,647

12,872

9,555

9,373

1,718

1,980

894

915

480

604

Number of terminations

22,560

24,628

7,696

8,964

7,642

7,819

6,367

6,909

855

936

Share of hires

22.9%

23.4%

26.6%

24.7%

26.5%

28.4%

19.3%

20.7%

14.9%

14.4%

Share of promotions

26.7%

27.1%

33.7%

33.4%

18.2%

20.6%

14.9%

15.4%

13.1%

15.3%

Share of terminations

20.3%

21.2%

25.7%

27.1%

22.3%

23.4%

16.0%

16.2%

11.7%

13.0%

At the sector level, the representation of members of visible minorities increased in each of the four sectors. It continued to be highest in the banking and communications sectors (30.6% and 19.9% respectively), surpassing the 17.8% overall LMA. All sectors combined, the share of hires of members of visible minorities continued to exceed the share of terminations. This means that at the overall level, more members of visible minorities entered the federally regulated private-sector workforce than left it. The share of promotions of this designated group increased by 0.4 percentage points to 27.1%, well above the internal representation rate of the combined workforce of 21.2%.

Banking sector

  • While the number of all employees in the banking sector decreased by 0.6%, the number of members of visible minorities increased by 0.4%. In 2015, the representation of members of visible minorities continued to be highest in the banking sector (30.6%) and to surpass the 17.8% overall LMA.
  • In 2015, the banking sector reported a share of terminations that exceeded share of hires, more members of visible minorities left the sector than entered it. The growth in representation may therefore be attributable to an increase in the number of self-identification for this designated group.
  • This sector also reported recruitment levels that exceeded the group’s overall LMA and shares of promotions that surpassed internal representation.

Communications sector

  • While the total number of employees in this sector decreased by 2.2%, the number of members of visible minorities increased by 4.9%, leading to an increase in representation from 18.6% in 2014 to 19.9% in 2015 and continuing to exceed the 17.8% overall LMA.
  • The communications sector reported shares of hires that surpassed shares of terminations, meaning that members of visible minorities were entering the sector at a higher rate than leaving it.
  • This sector also reported recruitment levels that were above the group’s overall LMA and share of promotions that surpassed internal representation in 2015.

Transportation sector

  • While the number of all employees in the transportation sector decreased by 1.7% in 2015, the number of members of visible minorities increased by 3.0%, leading to an increase in representation from 14.2% in 2014 to 14.9% in 2015 but remaining below the overall LMA.
  • The transportation sector reported a positive net effect between the number of hires and terminations, meaning that more members of visible minorities entered this sector’s workforce than left it.
  • The sector reported recruitment levels that exceeded the group’s overall LMA and shares of promotions that surpassed the representation of members of visible minorities.

‘Other’ Sector

  • While the total number of all employees in the sector remained relatively stable, the number of members of visible minorities increased by 3.3%, increasing the representation from 12.2% to 12.5% but remaining below the overall LMA.
  • This sector reported a positive net effect between the number of hires and terminations, meaning that more members of visible minorities entered the sector than left it.
  • The sector also reported shares of promotions that surpassed representation of members of visible minorities.

As shown in Table 10, a higher proportion of members of visible minorities in permanent full-time positions earned a salary of $60,000 or more in 2015 than in 2014. However, the proportion of visible minority men and women in this salary range continued to be lower than all men and all women respectively. Visible minority women in particular remained much less likely (43.7%) to earn $60,000 or more compared to visible minority men (55.3%) and to all women (44.5%). A higher proportion of visible minority women (38.1%) earned salaries below $50,000 than visible minority men (28.3%) and all women (35.6%).

Table 10: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender

Salary range

Distribution of permanent full-time employees (percent)

2014

2015

Men

Women

Visible minority men

Visible minority women

Men

Women

Visible minority men

Visible minority women

$60,000 and above

57.7%

41.5%

52.1%

39.8%

59.8%

44.5%

55.3%

43.7%

$50,000 to $59,999

18.3%

20.1%

17.2%

18.5%

17.3%

19.9%

16.4%

18.2%

Below $50,000

24.0%

38.4%

30.6%

41.7%

22.9%

35.6%

28.3%

38.1%

Conclusion

The Employment Equity Act: Annual Report 2016 indicates that progress has been made by federally regulated private-sector employers in achieving employment equity. From 2014 to 2015, the representation of Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities increased at the overall level, despite the decrease in the overall workforce size. While women, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities continue to be under-represented when compared to their LMA, the sectors have continued to show progress despite workforce shrinkages. For example, the communications sector was able to improve the representation of Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities despite having been the sector most impacted by the reduction in the overall number of employees. The success of the transportation sector in increasing representation of all four designated groups even though the sector’s overall workforce shrunk is noteworthy.

Employers are showing increasing interest and commitment to diversity and inclusion. Special measures, policies and positive measures undertaken by employers to support the implementation of employment equity include barrier-free hiring and retention practices and policies, diversity and inclusion training programs, diversity-related performance objectives at all levels of the organization, the creation of targeted internship and apprenticeship programs, knowledge and practice sharing between employers, and partnerships with community stakeholders. While work remains to be done, building on these positive practices will lead to greater employment equity results for all four designated groups.

The federally regulated private-sector employers are encouraged to continue their work to implement measures in their workplaces to eliminate barriers to the recruitment, promotion and retention of under-represented groups. Through employment equity, diversity and inclusion efforts, the Labour Program and employers will be contributing to the creation of fair, safe and productive workplaces for all Canadians.

Appendix A

Tables - Federally regulated private-sector employers

The following tables consolidate data from the annual reports submitted by federally regulated private-sector employers. To allow for comparative analysis, data from 1987 (the year data was first collected) is included with 2014 and 2015 data.

Tables 1 to 3 in this appendix present data aggregated to include permanent full-time, permanent part-time and temporary employees. Table 4 summarizes information for the four industrial sectors: number, representation, hires, promotions, terminations and the net effect of hires less terminations. Tables 5 and 6 present salary data for permanent full-time and permanent part-time employees respectively.

List of tables :

Table 1: Representation (1987, 2014 and 2015) and availability (2011/2012) of federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group, census metropolitan area, province and territory (percent)

Census metropolitan area and province/territory

Women

Aboriginal peoples

Persons with disabilities

Members of visible minorities

Representation

Availability*

Representation

Availability*

Representation

Availability*

Representation

Availability*

1987

2014

2015

2011

1987

2014

2015

2011

1987

2014

2015

2012

1987

2014

2015

2011

Halifax

41.2%

42.6%

42.8%

49.6%

0.5%

2.1%

2.2%

2.6%

1.6%

4.2%

5.0%

N/A

1.9%

7.0%

7.6%

7.6%

Montréal

39.0%

41.6%

40.9%

48.4%

0.3%

0.7%

0.8%

0.7%

1.1%

1.7%

2.0%

N/A

3.0%

14.9%

15.8%

18.0%

Toronto

47.1%

44.8%

44.4%

48.7%

0.6%

0.9%

1.0%

0.6%

1.5%

2.8%

3.0%

N/A

12.0%

36.1%

36.6%

44.1%

Winnipeg

32.7%

33.7%

33.3%

48.8%

0.8%

6.7%

6.8%

9.0%

1.8%

3.2%

3.4%

N/A

2.9%

15.7%

17.5%

18.9%

Regina

42.9%

46.1%

46.8%

48.6%

0.4%

3.3%

3.0%

7.2%

2.4%

3.8%

3.6%

N/A

1.6%

11.5%

13.2%

9.8%

Calgary

47.6%

43.8%

43.9%

47.1%

0.5%

1.9%

2.0%

2.5%

1.9%

2.4%

2.6%

N/A

5.6%

20.6%

21.4%

25.7%

Edmonton

44.5%

40.8%

40.1%

47.1%

0.7%

2.7%

2.7%

4.5%

2.0%

2.6%

2.7%

N/A

4.4%

20.2%

19.5%

21.0%

Vancouver

40.4%

38.7%

38.5%

48.6%

0.5%

1.8%

1.9%

2.1%

1.5%

2.7%

2.9%

N/A

7.9%

34.7%

34.7%

41.8

Newfoundland and Labrador

38.4%

47.2%

46.1%

48.2%

0.6%

5.6%

5.7$

6.7%

1.0%

2.7%

3.2%

5.6%

0.7%

2.0%

2.2%

1.3%

Prince Edward Island

38.0%

34.8%

34.4%

49.5%

0.2%

0.5%

0.8%

1.4%

1.2%

1.6%

2.0%

5.7%

1.0%

1.2%

2.7%

2.4%

Nova Scotia

34.4%

44.4%

44.6%

49.2%

0.4%

2.1%

2.3%

3.4%

3.5%

4.3%

5.0%

7.2%

1.3%

5.9%

6.7%

4.5%

New Brunswick

32.2%

49.5%

48.8%

48.3%

0.4%

1.2%

1.3%

2.6%

1.8%

3.3%

3.3%

5.3%

1.1%

2.9%

3.2%

2.2%

Quebec

39.8%

40.8%

40.2%

47.9%

0.4%

0.9%

1.0%

1.6%

1.1%

1.6%

1.8%

3.0%

2.6%

12.2%

13.1%

9.8%

Ontario

44.2%

43.4%

43.1%

48.7%

0.7%

1.4%

1.5%

2.1%

1.6%

3.1%

3.3%

5.5%

7.3%

26.2%

27.0%

24.4%

Manitoba

30.5%

33.6%

33.0%

48.0%

1.0%

7.7%

7.9%

12.1%

1.7%

3.3%

3.4%

5.9%

2.6%

13.2%

14.8%

13.2%

Saskatchewan

35.1%

36.5%

36.4%

47.3%

1.4%

8.6%

8.1%

10.4%

1.8%

2.9%

2.9%

5.6%

1.2%

8.0%

8.7%

6.3%

Alberta

45.3%

41.7%

41.7%

46.6%

0.7%

2.5%

2.5%

4.7%

1.9%

2.6%

2.7%

4.9%

4.0%

18.1%

18.5%

17.3%

British Columbia

41.5%

39.0%

38.6%

48.5%

0.7%

2.6%

2.7%

4.6%

1.7%

2.9%

3.0%

5.8%

6.2%

27.0%

27.2%

25.8%

Yukon

31.4%

41.6%

41.8%

49.5%

3.8%

9.0%

9.4%

19.0%

0.8%

3.2%

3.8%

6.9%

1.4%

12.0%

11.5%

5.9%

Northwest Territories

21.9%

24.2%

22.5%

47.8%

9.6%

10.0%

10.9%

40.3%

1.4%

1.7%

1.7%

3.6%

2.5%

8.4%

9.3%

7.8%

Nunavut

N/A

26.0%

24.9%

46.9%

N/A

35.6%

36.1%

75.1%

N/A

2.8%

2.2%

2.6%

N/A

7.7%

7.9%

2.6%

Canada

40.9%

41.4%

41.0%

48.2%

0.7%

2.1%

2.2%

3.5%

1.6%

2.8%

3.0%

4.9%

5.0%

20.4%

21.2%

17.8%

* Sources: Statistics Canada, 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) and 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

Table 2: Representation (2014 and 2015) and availability (2011/2012) of federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group and occupational group

Occupational group

Women

Aboriginal peoples

Persons with disabilities

Members of visible minorities

Representation

Availability*

Representation

Availability*

Representation

Availability*

Representation

Availability*

2014

2015

2011

2014

2015

2011

2014

2015

2012

2014

2015

2011

Senior managers

24.8%

25.5%

27.4%

0.8%

1.0%

2.9%

2.6%

2.9%

4.3%

8.1%

8.8%

10.1%

Middle and other managers

42.0%

42.1%

38.9%

1.2%

1.2%

2.2%

2.9%

3.1%

4.3%

20.4%

21.5%

15.0%

Professionals

45.5%

44.5%

55.0%

1.1%

1.1%

2.1%

2.7%

2.9%

3.8%

28.3%

28.8%

19.9%

Semi-professionals and technicians

19.7%

19.4%

52.0%

2.3%

2.4%

3.7%

2.0%

2.3%

4.6%

11.6%

12.5%

16.3%

Supervisors

63.9%

61.9%

56.5%

2.2%

2.3%

3.6%

3.2%

3.3%

**13.9%

18.8%

20.2%

18.5%

Supervisors: crafts and trades

8.1%

8.3%

11.2%

3.2%

3.5%

3.7%

2.0%

2.1%

**7.8%

8.1%

9.0%

9.5%

Administrative and senior clerical personnel

76.8%

77.4%

82.6%

1.9%

1.9%

3.0%

3.1%

3.4%

3.4%

24.7%

24.7%

14.1%

Skilled sales and service personnel

55.6%

55.0%

49.9%

1.7%

1.6%

3.2%

3.2%

3.0%

3.5%

26.9%

26.9%

22.8%

Skilled crafts and trades workers

4.7%

4.8%

3.9%

3.6%

3.6%

4.5%

2.0%

2.4%

3.8%

11.8%

12.6%

10.3%

Clerical personnel

54.6%

58.3%

68.4%

1.9%

2.1%

3.4%

3.8%

4.0%

7.0%

21.3%

22.7%

19.0%

Intermediate sales and service personnel

65.9%

63.9%

66.8%

2.3%

2.3%

3.7%

2.7%

2.8%

5.6%

23.2%

22.9%

20.7%

Semi-skilled manual workers

13.3%

13.3%

17.9%

3.1%

3.3%

4.1%

2.3%

2.6%

4.8%

16.3%

17.3%

18.7%

Other sales and service personnel

40.2%

41.5%

57.5%

5.0%

4.3%

5.1%

3.9%

3.8%

6.3%

13.3%

13.8%

21.9%

Other manual workers

11.3%

10.9%

22.7%

5.6%

6.2%

6.0%

2.7%

3.1

**5.3%

15.5%

15.9%

17.3%

Total

41.4%

41.0%

48.2%

2.1%

2.2%

3.5%

2.8%

3.0%

4.9%

20.4%

21.2%

17.8%

* Sources: Statistics Canada, 2011 NHS and 2012 CSD.

** Use with caution. The coefficient of variation of the estimate is between 16.5% and 33.3%.

Table 3: Distribution of federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group and occupational group (2014 and 2015)
Occupational Group Women Men Aboriginal Peoples Non-Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Persons without Disabilities Members of Visible Minorities Non-Visible Minority Members
2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015
Senior Managers 0.5 0.5 1.1 1.1 0.3 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.4 1.0 1.0
Middle and Other Managers 10.0 10.9 9.8 10.5 5.4 6.0 10.0 10.8 10.3 11.2 9.9 10.6 9.9 10.8 9.9 10.6
Professionals 18.6 19.8 15.7 17.2 8.4 9.1 17.1 18.5 16.4 17.6 17.0 18.3 23.5 24.8 15.3 16.5
Semi-Professionals and Technicians 3.1 3.2 9.0 9.2 7.2 7.2 6.6 6.7 4.7 5.3 6.7 6.8 3.8 4.0 7.3 7.5
Supervisors 5.2 5.1 2.1 2.2 3.4 3.6 3.3 3.4 3.9 3.8 3.3 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.4
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades 0.3 0.3 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.4 1.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 0.6 0.6 1.8 1.7
Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 5.3 5.4 1.1 1.1 2.6 2.5 2.9 2.9 3.2 3.3 2.9 2.9 3.5 3.4 2.7 2.8
Skilled Sales and Service Personnel 3.9 4.3 2.2 2.5 2.3 2.4 2.9 3.3 3.4 3.3 2.9 3.2 3.8 4.1 2.6 3.0
Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 0.9 0.9 13.1 13.2 13.6 13.4 8.0 8.0 5.8 6.5 8.1 8.2 4.7 4.9 9.0 9.0
Clerical Personnel 21.9 19.0 12.8 9.5 14.8 12.6 16.6 13.4 22.5 18.3 16.4 13.2 17.4 14.4 16.4 13.1
Intermediate Sales and Service Personnel 25.3 25.4 9.2 10.0 16.9 17.0 15.9 16.3 15.4 15.6 15.9 16.4 18.0 17.7 15.3 16.0
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers 4.3 4.3 19.6 19.5 19.3 19.9 13.1 13.1 11.0 11.6 13.3 13.3 10.6 10.8 13.9 13.9
Other Sales and Service Personnel 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4 1.0 0.9 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.5
Other Manual Workers 0.2 0.2 1.4 1.4 2.4 2.6 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.7 0.7 1.0 1.0
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Table 4: Federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group and sector: number, representation, hires, promotions, terminations and net effect (1987, 2014 and 2015)*

All employees

Women

Aboriginal peoples

Persons with disabilities

Members of visible minorities

1987

2014

2015

1987

2014

2015

1987

2014

2015

1987

2014

2015

1987

2014

2015

Banking (number)

Employees

169,632

231,812

230,358

129,076

142,643

138,774

951

2,934

2,899

3,053

9,307

9,242

16,062

70,097

70,392

Hires

21,879

32,617

32,734

16,704

16,862

16,595

109

368

353

158

654

754

2,211

8,689

8,086

Promotions

39,456

28,349

28,081

27,599

16,189

16,030

204

360

375

607

848

821

3,778

9,555

9,373

Terminations

21,715

29,892

33,113

16,819

17,681

19,270

150

447

514

331

1,078

1,364

1,432

7,696

8,964

Net effect

164

2,725

-379

-115

-819

-2,675

-41

-79

-161

-173

-424

-610

779

993

-878

Banking (percent)

Representation

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

76.1%

61.5%

60.2%

0.6%

1.3%

1.3%

1.8%

4.0%

4.0%

9.5%

30.2%

30.6%

Share of hires

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

76.3%

51.7%

50.7%

0.5%

1.1%

1.1%

0.7%

2.0%

2.3%

10.1%

26.6%

24.7%

Share of promotions

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

69.9%

57.1%

57.1%

0.5%

1.3%

1.3%

1.5%

3.0%

2.9%

9.6%

33.7%

33.4%

Share of terminations

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

77.5%

59.1%

58.2%

0.7%

1.5%

1.6%

1.5%

3.6%

4.1%

6.6%

25.7%

27.1%

Communications (number)

Employees

179,247

227,310

222,348

71,038

84,981

82,885

1,090

4,009

4,280

2,512

5,224

5,942

7,257

42,171

44,234

Hires

17,416

28,120

25,568

7,515

9,006

8,607

49

624

585

129

439

584

975

7,439

7,272

Promotions

11,099

9,444

9,591

4,900

3,408

3,582

55

193

231

112

187

199

445

1,718

1,980

Terminations

16,020

34,311

33,436

6,176

12,154

12,415

36

733

701

112

828

881

437

7,642

7,819

Net effect

1,396

-6,191

-7,868

1,339

-3,148

-3,808

13

-109

-116

17

-389

-297

538

-203

-547

Communications(percent)

Representation

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

39.6%

37.4%

37.3%

0.6%

1.8%

1.9%

1.4%

2.3%

2.7%

4.0%

18.6%

19.9%

Share of hires

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

43.1%

32.0%

33.7%

0.3%

2.2%

2.3%

0.7%

1.6%

2.3%

5.6%

26.5%

28.4%

Share of promotions

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

44.1%

36.1%

37.3%

0.5%

2.0%

2.4%

1.0%

2.0%

2.1%

4.0%

18.2%

20.6%

Share of terminations

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

38.6%

35.4%

37.1%

0.2%

2.1%

2.1%

0.7%

2.4%

2.6%

2.7%

22.3%

23.4%

Transportation (number)

Employees

203,207

225,770

221,850

34,423

61,502

60,717

1,479

6,345

6,570

2,892

4,599

5,002

5,318

32,121

33,089

Hires

33,535

46,326

41,175

7,316

11,842

10,587

211

1,570

1,461

118

667

652

691

8,924

8,541

Promotions

14,723

5,992

5,941

2,655

1,814

1,810

123

202

170

198

92

100

376

894

915

Terminations

32,588

39,714

42,562

6,028

9,135

10,441

168

1,468

1,454

231

695

905

478

6,367

6,909

Net effect

947

6,612

-1,387

1,288

2,707

146

43

102

7

-113

-28

-253

213

2,557

1,632

Transportation (percent)

Representation

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

16.9%

27.2%

27.4%

0.7%

2.8%

3.0%

1.4%

2.0%

2.3%

2.6%

14.2%

14.9%

Share of hires

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

21.8%

25.6%

25.7%

0.6%

3.4%

3.5%

0.4%

1.4%

1.6%

2.1%

19.3%

20.7%

Share of promotions

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

18.0%

30.3%

30.5%

0.8%

3.4%

2.9%

1.3%

1.5%

1.7%

2.6%

14.9%

15.4%

Share of terminations

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

18.5%

23.0%

24.5%

0.5%

3.7%

3.4%

0.7%

1.8%

2.1%

1.5%

16.0%

16.2%

'Other' (number)

Employees

43,331

55,848

55,929

9,207

17,271

17,413

401

2,498

2,396

983

1,426

1,441

1,123

6,796

7,017

Hires

4,500

7,041

6,886

1,485

2,193

2,145

46

350

297

37

89

103

150

1,049

994

Promotions

3,248

3,667

3,943

856

1,305

1,493

23

158

149

64

75

80

85

480

604

Terminations

5,080

7,339

7,220

1,402

2,158

2,251

40

259

363

93

192

186

86

855

936

Net effect

-580

-298

-334

83

35

-106

6

91

-66

-56

-103

-83

64

194

58

'Other' (percent)

Representation

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

21.2%

30.9%

31.1%

0.9%

4.5%

4.3%

2.3%

2.6%

2.6%

2.6%

12.2%

12.5%

Share of hires

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

33.0%

31.1%

31.2%

1.0%

5.0%

4.3%

0.8%

1.3%

1.5%

3.3%

14.9%

14.4%

Share of promotions

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

26.4%

35.6%

37.9%

0.7%

4.3%

3.8%

2.0%

2.0%

2.0%

2.6%

13.1%

15.3%

Share of terminations

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

27.6%

29.4%

31.2%

0.8%

3.5%

5.0%

1.8%

2.6%

2.6%

1.7%

11.7%

13.0%

All sectors (number)

Employees

595,417

740,740

730,485

243,744

306,397

299,789

3,921

15,786

16,145

9,440

20,556

21,627

29,760

151,185

154,732

Hires

77,330

114,104

106,363

33,020

39,903

37,934

415

2,912

2,696

442

1,849

2,093

4,027

26,101

24,893

Promotions

68,526

47,452

47,556

36,010

22,716

22,915

405

913

925

981

1,202

1,200

4,684

12,647

12,872

Terminations

75,403

111,256

116,331

30,425

41,128

44,377

394

2,907

3,032

767

2,793

3,336

2,433

22,560

24,628

Net effect

1,927

2,848

-9,968

2,595

-1,225

-6,443

21

5

-336

-325

-944

-1,243

1,594

3,541

265

All sectors (percent)

Representation

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

40.9%

41.4%

41.0%

0.7%

2.1%

2.2%

1.6%

2.8%

3.0%

5.0%

20.4%

21.2%

Share of hires

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

42.7%

35.0%

35.7%

0.5%

2.6%

2.5%

0.6%

1.6%

2.0%

5.2%

22.9%

23.4%

Share of promotions

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

52.5%

47.9%

48.2%

0.6%

1.9%

1.9%

1.4%

2.5%

2.5%

6.8%

26.7%

27.1%

Share of terminations

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

40.4%

37.0%

38.1%

0.5%

2.6%

2.6%

1.0%

2.5%

2.9%

3.2%

20.3%

21.2%

* The number of employees and representation of the designated groups cover permanent full-time, permanent part-time and temporary employees. The hires, promotions, terminations and net effect data cover only the permanent full-time and permanent part-time employees.

** The number of employees hired reduced by those terminated.

Table 5: Federally regulated private-sector employees in permanent full-time employment by designated group, gender and salary range as of December 31, 2015

Salary Range

All employees

Aboriginal peoples

Persons with disabilities

Members of visible minorities

Total

Men

Women

Percent

Total

Percent

Men

Women

Total

Percent

Men

Women

Total

Percent

Men

Women

Under $15,000

4,463

2,905

1,558

34.9

197

4.4

128

69

83

1.9

55

28

884

19.8

626

258

$15,000 - $19,999

1,054

616

438

41.6

51

4.8

32

19

33

3.1

24

9

201

19.1

127

74

$20,000 - $24,999

3,917

2,297

1,620

41.4

118

3.0

75

43

95

2.4

57

38

852

21.8

530

322

$25,000 - $29,999

10,106

4,824

5,282

52.3

318

3.1

156

162

289

2.9

148

141

2,417

23.9

1,252

1,165

$30,000 - $34,999

23,397

10,710

12,687

54.2

707

3.0

344

363

848

3.6

339

509

5,955

25.5

2,926

3,029

$35,000 - $37,499

17,225

8,219

9,006

52.3

439

2.5

198

241

565

3.3

257

308

4,487

26.0

2,210

2,277

$37,500 - $39,999

19,707

9,612

10,095

51.2

466

2.4

229

237

664

3.4

302

362

4,909

24.9

2,370

2,539

$40,000 - $44,999

47,373

24,098

23,275

49.1

1,071

2.3

537

534

1,488

3.1

656

832

11,484

24.2

5,741

5,743

$45,000 - $49,999

44,240

23,657

20,583

46.5

931

2.1

501

430

1,431

3.2

697

734

10,777

24.4

5,460

5,317

$50,000 - $59,999

112,907

65,724

47,183

41.8

2,435

2.2

1,436

999

3,762

3.3

1,970

1,792

22,258

19.7

12,343

9,915

$60,000 - $69,999

80,746

50,641

30,105

37.3

1,799

2.2

1,246

553

2,350

2.9

1,385

965

15,725

19.5

9,178

6,547

$70,000 - $84,999

86,837

58,278

28,559

32.9

1,746

2.0

1,260

486

2,459

2.8

1,576

883

17,686

20.4

11,154

6,532

$85,000 - $99,999

54,536

36,800

17,736

32.5

1,083

2.0

785

298

1,475

2.7

890

585

11,901

21.8

7,554

4,347

$100,000 and over

110,561

81,213

29,348

26.5

1,995

1.8

1,632

363

2,823

2.6

1,961

862

19,993

18.1

13,657

6,336

Total

617,069

379,594

237,475

38.5

13,356

2.2

8,559

4,797

18,365

3.0

10,317

8,048

129,529

21.0

75,128

54,401

Table 6: Federally regulated private-sector employees in permanent part-time employment by designated group, gender and salary range as of December 31, 2015

Salary range

All employees

Aboriginal peoples

Persons with disabilities

Members of visible minorities

Total

Men

Women

Percent

Total

Percent

Men

Women

Total

Percent

Men

Women

Total

Percent

Men

Women

Under $5,000

3,513

1,867

1,646

46.9

83

2.4

29

54

109

3.1

64

45

735

20.9

451

284

$5,000 - $7,499

2,333

1,007

1,326

56.8

56

2.4

14

42

67

2.9

32

35

306

13.1

168

138

$7,500 - $9,999

3,028

1,314

1,714

56.6

88

2.9

34

54

123

4.1

55

68

415

13.7

213

202

$10,000 - $12,499

7,642

3,903

3,739

48.9

190

2.5

76

114

192

2.5

95

97

1,734

22.7

1,057

677

$12,500 - $14,999

7,363

3,529

3,834

52.1

213

2.9

99

114

181

2.5

79

102

1,904

25.9

1,111

793

$15,000 - $17,499

8,138

3,850

4,288

52.7

283

3.5

138

145

211

2.6

96

115

2,121

26.1

1,215

906

$17,500 - $19,999

8,382

3,739

4,643

55.4

247

2.9

121

126

245

2.9

89

156

2,037

24.3

1,138

899

$20,000 - $22,499

9,509

4,447

5,062

53.2

231

2.4

109

122

277

2.9

107

170

2,513

26.4

1,396

1,117

$22,500 - $24,999

9,833

4,563

5,270

53.6

241

2.5

109

132

269

2.7

101

168

2,774

28.2

1,609

1,165

$25,000 - $29,999

14,709

5,148

9,561

65.0

358

2.4

104

254

493

3.4

151

342

3,145

21.4

1,419

1,726

$30,000 - $34,999

11,886

4,652

7,234

60.9

267

2.2

105

162

408

3.4

142

266

2,616

22.0

1,261

1,355

$35,000 - $39,999

8,458

3,402

5,056

59.8

169

2.0

61

108

244

2.9

79

165

1,759

20.8

882

877

$40,000 - $49,999

8,412

3,864

4,548

54.1

153

1.8

61

92

204

2.4

87

117

1,766

21.0

1,027

739

$50,000 and over

4,629

2,087

2,542

54.9

94

2.0

48

46

174

3.8

70

104

646

14.0

343

303

Total

107,835

47,372

60,463

56.1

2,673

2.5

1,108

1,565

3,197

3.0

1,247

1,950

24,471

22.7

13,290

11,181

Appendix B

Technical notes

Employers covered under the Employment Equity Act

The Act covers:

  • federally regulated private-sector employers, federal Crown corporations and other federal government business enterprises with 100 or more employees;
  • core public administration organizations listed under Schedule I or IV of the Financial Administration Act (FAA) (federal government departments and agencies);
  • separate employer organizations in the federal public sector with 100 or more employees listed in Schedule V of the FAA (separate agencies);
  • other public-sector employer organizations with 100 or more employees, including the Canadian Forces (officers and non-commissioned members in the Regular and Reserve Forces) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (regular and civilian members, excluding federal public service employees); and
  • federal contractor organizations that are provincially-regulated suppliers of goods and services with at least 100 permanent full-time and/or permanent part-time employees in Canada that receive contracts at or above $1 million from the federal government.

Limitations of the employment equity data

While this report provides the most recent information on employment equity data, it has the following limitations:

  • To measure the progress of the designated groups covered by the Act, their percentage representation (i.e. the number of designated group employees divided by the number of all employees) in the federally regulated private sector is compared to their availability in the workforce population. Availability data is obtained from censuses or surveys conducted every five years by Statistics Canada. As a result, there is a time lag in measuring representation gaps. The current LMA is based on the 2011 National Household Survey and 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability. More information on LMA can be found in the 2011 Employment Equity Data Report.
  • In some cases, data reported by employers is received after publication deadlines. As a result, there may be differences in the data reported in annual reports for particular years.
  • Data is received annually from employers; however, the number of employers may differ from one year to the next.
  • The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat is responsible for reporting on employment equity in the federal departments, agencies and commissions that make up the core public administration. This information is available on the Canada.ca website. Other areas of the federal public sector are responsible for preparing their own employment equity reports, which can be found on their respective websites or obtained upon request. Federal contractors are not required to report annually.
  • Data on the investigation and security services subsector was reclassified in 2011 to the transportation sector. Prior to 2011, it was classified under the ‘other’ sector.

For detailed descriptions of the terms and statistical approaches used in this report, please refer to the Employment Equity Technical Guide.

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