Archived: Report on Plans and Priorities 2015-16, Environment and Climate Change Canada, chapter 3


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcomes

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Program 1.1: Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat

Program Description

This program aims to prevent biodiversity loss and enables sustainable use, by: conserving and protecting healthy populations of migratory birds; protecting and recovering species at risk; and monitoring, conserving and restoring significant habitats by establishing and maintaining a network of protected areas, and developing and implementing stewardship programs. It also supports coordinated and coherent national assessment, planning and action to protect biodiversity, including viable populations of species, healthy and diverse ecosystems, and genetic resources. The program forms strategic partnerships for integrated management of Canada's natural capital, including stewardship and the sustainable management of landscapes. This program has responsibilities under the Species at Risk Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, Canada Wildlife Act, Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act. International responsibilities include the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (1992), the Migratory Birds Convention, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna Working Group of the Arctic Council, and the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat (the Ramsar Convention). Contributions in support of Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
122,779,285 122,779,285 124,255,645 123,512,268

*All figures, throughout this document, are net of respendable revenues.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)*
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
500 489 479

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to the rounding of figures. The FTE numbers, throughout this document, include students.

Performance Measurement

Program 1.1: Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Habitats required for the conservation of biodiversity in Canada are protected Percentage of terrestrial area protected as a measure of conservation effort 17% December 2020
Populations of migratory birds and federally-listed species at risk are maintained or restored Proportion of assessed migratory bird species in General Status Reports whose status is considered to be "secure" 81% 2015 General Status Report

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat Program, the Department plans to:

  • Deliver a variety of initiatives under the National Conservation Plan to bolster conservation efforts related to Canada’s lands and waters, support the restoration of degraded ecosystems, foster Canadians’ appreciation for nature, and obtain information on all conservation lands in Canada.
  • In support of commitments under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), continue to deliver scientific assessments and recovery planning documents for species at risk, and continue to implement recovery actions through the Habitat Stewardship Program, and other programs, that foster action to protect and recover species at risk and that ensure protection of species and their critical habitats. A priority will be to reduce the backlog of recovery documents in 2015-16.
  • Collaborate with partners at home and internationally, including with landowners and decision-makers, to support conservation of biodiversity (particularly for species at risk and migratory birds) and to implement the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna in Canada.
  • Continue to monitor the status of and conduct research on migratory birds and their habitats, collaborate with partners to manage key threats to migratory birds, and work to modernize the Migratory Birds Regulations.
  • Develop tools (such as integrated data and maps on species at risk and migratory bird populations and protected and sensitive areas) to support local planning efforts to ensure that wildlife species, migratory birds and their habitats are more readily and fully considered in decision making. This will include the implementation of Bird Conservation Regions Strategies.
  • Maintain Environment Canada’s network of National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, work toward the designation of new National Wildlife Areas, and manage habitat stewardship programs.
  • Participate in and lead Canadian delegations at international meetings in support of biodiversity, including meetings of the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna Working Group (of the Arctic Council).
  • Continue to provide leadership and coordination in support of the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy.
Sub-Program 1.1.1: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities

Sub-Program Description

This program enables Environment Canada to play a national leading role in engaging stakeholders, provincial and territorial governments, and other federal government departments in Canada’s implementation of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. The program provides scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision-makers, and develops and applies models for social, cultural and economic valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision making. This work enables information about the ecosystem and the environmental effects of development proposals to be factored into decisions across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, the industrial sector, the research community and the general public. Strategies used in Canada include the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy, the Biodiversity Outcomes Framework, and Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources. The program also coordinates the federal government’s response to the 2004 Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, implemented by federal science-based and regulatory departments and agencies, including the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. In addition, Canada participates internationally in the Convention on Biological Diversity; the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources; the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress under the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; and Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna under the Arctic Council. As well, the program serves as the Canadian lead and national focal point for the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Funding provided by the program includes Canada’s annual contribution to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and support for international working groups.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2,484,447 2,483,369 2,482,967
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
14 14 14

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Biodiversity goals and targets are integrated into federal, provincial and territorial strategies and plans that have an impact on biodiversity Percentage of federal departments with natural resource or environmental mandates, provinces and territories that have identified and are implementing measures to enhance biodiversity 100% December 2017

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Biodiversity Policy and Priorities Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Prepare for and coordinate Canada’s participation in international meetings related to the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefits Sharing of Genetic Resources, the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Working Group of the Arctic Council, and the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Work will include
    • two planned meetings on the Convention on Biological Diversity, as well as two CAFF meetings focusing on migratory birds and biodiversity assessment recommendations; and
    • continued implementation of the 2014-18 IPBES work program, including the delivery of a global assessment on biodiversity and ecosystem services.
  • Fulfill responsibilities as the National Focal Point for the Convention on Biological Diversity, which includes providing information on Canada’s biodiversity conservation activities and leading/engaging technical expert groups on priority issues.
  • Provide ongoing leadership and coordination with federal, provincial and territorial partners to complete current priorities under the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy, including developing a medium-term action plan in support of biodiversity goals and targets.
  • Continue to develop and apply models for valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decisions and identify future priorities.
  • Update and enhance biodivcanada.ca, the website of the federal, provincial and territorial working group on biodiversity, which profiles biodiversity information, news and events. The group serves as Canada’s nationalbiodiversity Clearing-House Mechanism under the Convention on Biological Diversity.
  • Support the Invasive Alien Species Strategy at the federal and national levels by coordinating issues and liaising with external partners such as the Canadian Council on Invasive Species.
  • Track and communicate the implementation of a range of federal initiatives under the National Conservation Plan, including the management of the Earth Rangers agreement (please refer to sub-programs 1.1.4 to 1.1.5 for details on specific initiatives).
  • Participate in the Arctic Council Ministerial meeting in Iqaluit, Nunavut, marking the end of Canada’s term as chair of the Council.
Sub-Program 1.1.2: Species at Risk

Sub-Program Description

This program’s purpose is to implement the Species at Risk Act (SARA). SARA is the key federal government commitment to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened, and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened. The program provides for publication of recovery documents, identification of critical habitat, legal protection of wildlife species, and progress reports. Species recovery is achieved in part through funding mechanisms such as the Habitat Stewardship Program, the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk, the Interdepartmental Recovery Fund and the Species at Risk Protection on Agricultural Lands initiative, through which Aboriginal peoples and other Canadians are engaged in a variety of conservation and recovery activities for species at risk and protection as well as recovery of critical habitat. The program relies on partnerships with provincial, territorial and other governments, as well as Aboriginal peoples and other organizations (e.g. environmental organizations, industry associations, etc.). A number of advisory bodies and committees have been established to enable key partners to engage in this program. Authority for the program is based on SARA and Canada’s obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, and the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
44,191,258 44,632,906 44,632,858
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
175 173 170

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Species at Risk
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Status of listed species shows improvement upon reassessment Proportion of federally listed species at risk for which recovery is feasible that exhibit, at the time of reassessment by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), population and distribution trends consistent with achieving the objectives of recovery strategiesFootnote 2 35% March 2016
Critical habitat is protected

Percentage of Threatened and Endangered species at risk for which Environment Canada is responsible:
(i) whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part within federal protected areas with that critical habitat described in the Canada Gazette;

(ii) whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part on other federal lands with that habitat legally protected;

(iii) whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part on non-federal lands with an assessment that the habitat is protected.

(i) federal protected areas 100%

(ii) federal lands 100%

(iii) non-federal lands 100%

(i) March 2016

(ii) March 2018

(iii) March 2018

Recovery strategies or management plans that are publicly available are in place for all listed species for which Environment Canada is responsible Percentage of listed wildlife species for which Environment Canada is responsible with a recovery strategy or management plan that is posted as proposed or final on the Species at Risk public registry within legislative timeframes 100% March 2017

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Species at Risk Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Deliver programs for the General Status of Species in Canada, including the analysis and drafting of a required five-year report under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), and fulfill key commitments under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk.
  • Serve as a scientific authority on the Committee of the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Environment Canada will also maintain support to COSEWIC (including for its 2015-16 wildlife assessment meetings) to ensure delivery of species status assessments - the important first step in the Species at Risk cycle.
  • Guide the listing process of species at risk under SARA, including by ensuring that listing recommendations are based on the best available information (including biological and socio-economic data).
  • Maintain recovery strategies and management plans and post them on the Species at Risk Public Registry.
  • Assess the protection of species at risk and their identified critical habitat, as required under SARA, and engage provinces, territories and Aboriginal and other local communities in the conservation, recovery and protection efforts.
  • Conduct a nationally consistent and transparent scientific review of permit applications related to activities that can have impacts on species at risk listed under SARA.
  • Develop operational policies and guidance to ensure consistent application of SARA.
  • Improve tools, such as databases, for maintaining and tracking progress on SARA-listed terrestrial species at risk.
  • Collaborate with other federal departments and provincial and territorial partners to implement the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna in Canada.
Sub-Program 1.1.3: Migratory Birds

Sub-Program Description

This program supports actions to protect and conserve populations of migratory bird species. It is responsible for implementing the Migratory Birds Convention signed with the United States in 1916, via the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. Activities include conserving populations, individual birds, their nests and their habitats through continued monitoring, conservation actions, stewardship, policy development, and enforcement of the Act and its regulations. Other actions include research to understand causes of bird population changes, management of over-abundant migratory bird populations, advice on nuisance birds, protection of important bird habitats, mitigation of other stressors that affect population status, and management of emergencies regarding health and safety issues associated with migratory birds. Monitoring programs are implemented in compliance with recommendations of the Avian Monitoring Review. It is responsible, as a signatory to the North American Bird Conservation Initiative, for supporting the completion of the 25 Bird Conservation Region Strategies and implementing their recommended actions for priority migratory bird species. The Migratory Birds program is delivered in partnership with other governments in Canada and internationally, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations, and industry, with coordination through the North American Bird Conservation Initiative - Canada. Client groups include the Canadian public, game-bird hunters, Aboriginal peoples (subsistence harvesting), natural resource economic sectors and natural resource users, and other governments (provincial/territorial and foreign).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
20,564,432 20,013,523 20,556,972
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
175 170 168

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Migratory Birds
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Migratory bird populations maintained at population goals Proportion of migratory bird species within acceptable bounds of their population goals To be determined once bird population goals are agreed upon and an initial assessment is complete To be determined
Data are available to manage and assess bird populations Proportion of migratory bird species whose population status can be assessed with high reliability 50% 2020

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Migratory Birds Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to monitor the status of migratory birds, undertake research to understand causes of population change, and take action (as required) to protect and conserve their populations, nests and habitats. Using population goals set through the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the national suite of Bird Conservation Regions Strategies (for all species), the Department will:
    • for species in decline, continue work to prioritize monitoring and research activities to better understand these trends and the reasons for them, and to inform activities needed to reverse them; and,
    • for over-abundant species, focus efforts on understanding the causes and effects of overabundance through research, and on reducing these populations and keeping their numbers within a desirable range through landscape and/or habitat modification and increasing mortality risk.
  • Address conservation concerns indicated in Bird Conservation Strategies, Recovery Strategies and departmental research on human-induced mortality to birds through actions to mitigate threats and provide needed habitats. This work will be carried out through partnerships with other levels of government, non-governmental organizations, industry and other partners, with emphasis on compliance promotion, stakeholder engagement and sector education.
  • Continue to support responsible resource development by providing the science necessary to understand and proactively track potential environmental impacts of resource development projects on migratory birds.
  • Provide advice on the requirements for the protection and conservation of migratory birds during environmental assessment processes - notably those referenced in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 - through web publishing, targeted correspondence and provision of expert testimony in review panels.
  • Support effective emergency response efforts associated with shipping activity, including development of better baseline information on the distribution and abundance of birds in marine environments.
  • Promote compliance with the Migratory Birds Regulations and the Migratory Bird Sanctuary Regulations through web publishing and targeted communications and correspondence.
  • Continue to work with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation on conservation efforts.
Sub-Program 1.1.4: Habitat Conservation Partnerships

Sub-Program Description

This program supports the delivery of Environment Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and Canada Wildlife Act. It does this by funding projects and encouraging activities that secure, protect, improve and/or restore important and ecologically sensitive habitat to enhance the survival of wildlife - in particular, species at risk and migratory birds. The program provides mechanisms (e.g. tax incentives, funding initiatives) to engage a variety of organizations and individuals, including private land owners, environmental non-governmental organizations (e.g. land trusts) and other levels of government. Activities under the program include delivery of the Ecological Gifts Program, a tax incentive program for private land owners who donate ecologically sensitive land to qualified recipients, the National Wetland Conservation Fund, and supporting the implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP), a Canada-United States-Mexico partnership of federal/provincial/state governments and non-governmental organizations that aims to conserve wetlands in North America. Work under the NAWMP is achieved through participation on the North American Wetlands Conservation Council and Habitat Joint Ventures, and implementation of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. In addition, the program makes an assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention), and to two programs wholly administered by partners - Wildlife Habitat Canada’s Conservation Stamp Initiative and the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Natural Areas Conservation Program. Program delivery includes contributions in support of Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat, and those to the Ramsar Convention.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
39,845,394 39,842,157 39,842,157
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
22 21 21

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Habitat Conservation Partnerships
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Habitats that are needed to achieve waterfowl population goals are secured Total land area secured by Environment Canada and partners to achieve population goals for all priority waterfowl 9,990,000 ha December 2017
Important and ecologically-sensitive habitat is secured to enhance the survival of wildlife, in particular, species at risk and migratory birds Cumulative total ecologically sensitive land area (in hectares) secured (Ecological Gifts Program) 164,876 ha March 2016
Habitats that are needed to achieve waterfowl population goals are enhanced Total land area enhanced by Environment Canada and its partners under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan to achieve population goals for all priority waterfowl 1,660,867 ha December 2017

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Habitat Conservation Partnerships Sub-Program, the Department will continue to:

  • Collaborate with international, federal, provincial, Aboriginal and non-governmental organizations and individuals to protect, improve and/or restore habitat to enhance the survival of migratory birds and species at risk through habitat stewardship programs.
  • Advance the Ecological Gifts Program with a focus on increasing the amount of ecologically sensitive land donated by Canadians.
  • Participate with national and international partners in the implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance to support wetland conservation in Canada.
  • Support high-quality on-the-ground wetland restoration and enhancement projects in Canada through the National Wetland Conservation Fund, a key component of the National Conservation Plan.
  • Work with the Nature Conservancy of Canada (Natural Areas Conservation Program) and Wildlife Habitat Canada to ensure that delivery of their respective programs meets Government priorities.
Sub-Program 1.1.5: Protected Areas

Sub-Program Description

This program supports the delivery of Environment Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and Canada Wildlife Act. It entails managing a network of protected areas (National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and marine National Wildlife Areas) to protect priority habitats required for the conservation of Canada’s migratory birds and species at risk. The program also promotes public awareness and understanding of wildlife and nature conservation, and of Environment Canada’s role in conservation efforts. It carries out strategic planning and coordination in support of protected areas, as well as their management. It requires the support of the public and close collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal groups, other wildlife management or natural resource agencies, non-governmental organizations and property owners. Program activities support initiatives such as the Inuit Impact and Benefits Agreement, and the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy to contribute to the further establishment of National Wildlife Areas in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. The program operates as part of a broader network of protected areas that includes sites of other federal departments (Parks Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada), provincial and territorial agencies, and conservation properties owned and/or managed by non-governmental organizations. The program also directs research and conducts monitoring in its protected areas.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
15,693,754 17,283,690 15,997,314
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
114 111 106

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Protected Areas
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Habitat for the conservation of migratory birds, species at risk and rare or unique species is protected Total area that is under legally-binding protection as National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and Marine Wildlife Areas 12,448,961 ha March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Protected Areas Sub-Program, the Department will continue to:

  • Collaborate with international, federal, provincial, Aboriginal and non-governmental organizations and individuals to protect, improve and/or restore habitat to enhance the survival of migratory birds and species at risk through protected areas initiatives.
  • Develop and advance new protected areas initiatives (including those identified under the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy). This process will involve consultation and negotiation with the various stakeholders in each protected area to consider and address local needs.
  • Negotiate the terms of a new Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement for the Department’s conservation areas in the Nunavut Settlement Area with the Inuit parties to the agreement.
  • Complete management plans for the National Wildlife Areas and make them publicly available. 
  • Make progress on regulatory amendments, including, for example, boundary amendments to officially include land bought within protected areas, and officially replacing existing names with Aboriginal names.
  • Develop an inventory of conserved lands to provide evidence-based scenarios to support a multi-species approach to conservation.
  • Plan and implement activities on all ten sites identified in the National Conservation Plan in support of the theme “Connecting Canadians to Nature,” including invest in construction planning and construction at several interpretation and visitor reception centres; invest in renovation, maintenance, construction and/or repair of trails and bridges; and implementation of partnership agreements with non-government agencies to involve the public in various activities, such as with scientists in bird-banding centres.

Program 1.2: Water Resources

Program Description

This program addresses the risks to and impacts on water resources from industrial activities, agriculture, climate change and other factors. It aims to minimize threats to Canada’s water resources and aquatic ecosystems, and maintain the sustainability of such resources. The program is delivered in collaboration with partners, specifically other federal departments, provinces and territories, and a range of non-governmental organizations. The program focuses on Environment Canada’s contribution to monitoring water quality and conducting water-related research and analysis, and its role in collaborating with other departments to determine priorities for water quality and quantity as well as aquatic ecosystem monitoring and research. It provides scientific information and advice to decision-makers and supports implementation of the Canada Water Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, Fisheries Act, International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, and International River Improvements Act. Contributions in support of Water Resources are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
95,770,859 95,770,859 91,053,461 89,070,180
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
718 709 693

Performance Measurement

Program 1.2: Water Resources
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Threats to Canada's water resources and aquatic ecosystems are minimized and the sustainability of the resource is maintained Percentage of core national monitoring sites whose water quality is rated as good or excellent 50% In the 2011-13 data set (to be reported in the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report)

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Water Resources Program, the Department plans to:

  • Contribute data and expertise to inter-jurisdictional water management, including the International Joint Commission; participate in targeted studies by, among other things, supporting the administration of apportionment agreements and provide expertise in support of flood prediction and emergency response decisions across Canada.
  • Continue to monitor water quality and quantity, including through the ongoing implementation of oil sands monitoring with Alberta and ongoing development of a risk-based approach and tools for more robust water quality monitoring networks and identification of impacts of climate change.
  • Increase the accessibility of hydrometric data and the number of data products available in real time through Environment Canada’s Datamart and other web offerings, in support of the Department’s commitment to meeting Government of Canada Open Data objectives.
  • Participate in a number of international water management initiatives, including with the World Meteorological Organization.
  • Continue to support implementation of the Canada Water Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, Fisheries Act, International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, and the International River Improvements Act. Work will include, for example, maintaining management of licences and related business of the International River Improvements Act to ensure that Canada’s water resources are developed and used in the national interest.
Sub-Program 1.2.1: Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health

Sub-Program Description

This program conducts research and monitoring activities to report on freshwater quality and aquatic ecosystem health of waters within the federal mandate, and to contribute to informed decision making on public policy and regulations related to water management in Canada. The program coordinates several research and monitoring activities in the Great Lakes under the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. It includes collaboration with the Government of Alberta and stakeholders to implement the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring, an industry-funded, scientifically rigorous, comprehensive, integrated and transparent environmental monitoring of the oil sands region that will contribute to an improved understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of oil sands development. The program includes collaboration with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver data and information to inform the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program, a food safety program that aims to protect the health and safety of shellfish-consuming Canadians and that maintains international market access for Canada’s shellfish exports.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
71,945,645 67,123,160 65,059,994
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
472 466 455

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Canadians and their institutions have the water quality data, information and knowledge they need to make water management decisions Client satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent) To be determined once a baseline value is measured (2016) To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health Sub-Program, the Department will continue to:

  • Deliver on Environment Canada’s contribution to the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program in order to protect the health and safety of shellfish-consuming Canadians and Canada’s access to international markets.
  • Deliver freshwater quality monitoring using a suite of risk-based assessment tools that focuses Environment Canada’s monitoring activities and resources on waters within the federal mandate that have higher risks of water quality impairment.
  • Work with the Government of Alberta (Alberta Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Agency) in support of long-term monitoring of air, water, biodiversity and wildlife and related research on the oil sands development.
  • Implement the National Laboratory Management System, which integrates and harmonizes the workflows across Environment Canada’s water laboratories to better support analytical needs for the purposes of monitoring, research, enforcement and emergencies.
  • Identify the hydrologic and aquatic ecosystem impacts of climate change and variability to inform adaptation planning and mitigation action, and to support domestic and international climate and water policy development and decision making.
Sub-Program 1.2.2: Water Resources Management and Use

Sub-Program Description

This program supports integrated water management decisions at the federal, provincial, and territorial levels. It promotes and enables the application of science-based information to inform decision making in an integrated and coherent manner consistent with the Department of the Environment Act, International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, Canada Water Act and International River Improvements Act. The program coordinates water quality and water quantity science and monitoring to inform decisions, policy development and management approaches. It provides science, engineering and monitoring information to domestic and international water boards (e.g. International Joint Commission, Lake of the Woods Control Board), and contributes Departmental expertise to these water boards in order to regulate water levels and flows to protect ecosystems and a wide range of socio-economic interests related to domestic and Canada-U.S. transboundary waters.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2,513,833 2,513,832 2,513,832
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
27 27 26

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Water Resources Management and Use
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Water resource decision-makers have the necessary information and stakeholder perspectives to make responsible and appropriate shared-resource decisions Percentage of survey respondents rating their satisfaction with Environment Canada's involvement on water boards and committees as 8 out of 10 or higher 80% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Water Resources Management and Use Sub-Program, the Department will continue to:

  • Meet its domestic, international and legislative obligations through participation on inter-jurisdictional boards and studies, as well as by providing support to domestic Water Boards and to the International Joint Commission (IJC).
  • Work with the IJC to advance binational activities, including implementing the new regulation plan for outflows of Lake Superior; improving inter-jurisdictional water management through the Richelieu River Study; initiating a Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Adaptive Management Committee for the ongoing review and evaluation of the lake regulation plans; and participating in the Rainy Lake Rule Curve Review to assess effects on Rainy River, Rainy Lake and the Namakan Reservoir, including work on ecohydraulic modelling.
  • Provide information on natural water flows, apportionment and other calculations, using hydrometric data provided by the Water Survey of Canada, to help water resource decision-makers.
  • Provide water quality data in support of reporting on achievement of transboundary water quality objectives.
  • Engage with other federal departments to establish a sustained way to meet the federal government’s obligations to support the Prairie Provinces Water Board in monitoring and risk-based network design.
  • Engage on the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) water resources initiatives, including expert review and advice on the goals and objectives of CCME’s groundwater sustainability initiative. 
  • Manage licences and related business of the International River Improvements Act to ensure that Canada’s water resources are developed and utilized in the national interest.
Sub-Program 1.2.3: Hydrometric Services

Sub-Program Description

Information on the water cycle within Canada is critical to decision making to protect the health and safety of Canadians (e.g. flood forecasting and prevention), to scientific research, and to support improved economic efficiency (e.g. agriculture, hydroelectricity and international shipping). This program provides hydrometric data, information and knowledge that Canadian jurisdictions need to make water management decisions. This program supports the goals and mandates of all levels of government involved in managing water supplies. The hydrometric data, meteorological information and ancillary information provided by Environment Canada are used by international, federal, provincial, territorial and municipal agencies to regulate and respond to changing water levels and flows within Canada and in bodies of water that cross international boundaries. Under the Canada Water Act, monitoring activities of this program are carried out through cost-shared bilateral agreements between Environment Canada and each of the provinces and territories (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada represents Nunavut and the Northwest Territories). These agreements create the national framework within which Environment Canada collects, interprets and provides water level and flow information, and supports both decision making and scientific investigations. For example, hydrometric data provides important information to be used in the response to floods. Program delivery may include Contributions in support of Water Resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
21,311,382 21,416,469 21,496,354
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
219 216 212

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Hydrometric Services
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Canadians and their institutions have the hydrological data, information and knowledge they need to make water management decisions Percentage of survey respondents rating their satisfaction with Environment Canada's hydrometric services as 8 out of 10 or higher 80% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through its Hydrometric Services Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Add to the real-time and historical data products available through the Department’s Wateroffice website; and carry out additional development to improve the new Datamart, which provides the Wateroffice data to provincial and territorial stakeholders and partners in specific downloadable formats, in support of the Department’s commitment to meeting Government of Canada Open Data objectives.
  • Continue to develop risk-based tools to optimize network planning and design activities in support of identifying new monitoring station locations and priorities for resource (re)allocation. Developed through a three-year Natural Science and Engineering Research Council research project (2012-15), the new tools will identify federal priorities by March 2015, in order to satisfy the internal audit recommendation from the 2010 Audit of the National Hydrometric Program. The Department will also continue to evaluate provincial priorities for hydrometric network design to support federal/provincial/territorial cost-share agreements for shared stations.
  • Provide expertise to provincial and territorial partners, including emergency management organizations, in support of their flood prediction and emergency response programs.
  • Work bilaterally with the United States (U.S. Geological Survey and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) on hydrometric training and technology developments to improve monitoring quality and efficiency measurement, and cross-border hydrometric monitoring.
  • Examine new approaches for water management using satellite data to extend water monitoring capability beyond surface measurement.
  • Work with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Hydrology on basic systems in hydrology, flood frequency analysis and capacity building, to support international cooperation on newer hydrologic knowledge, practices, and instrumentation.
  • Continue to work on the WMO Arctic-HYCOS (Hydrological Cycle Observing System) program and move toward its implementation to improve hydrometric monitoring, accuracy and data availability in the Arctic Drainage Basin.

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Program Description

This program aims to sustain Canada’s ecosystems over the long term by providing Canadians, their governments and the private sector with the environmental information and tools required to incorporate social, economic and environmental considerations into decision making and actions. Environmental assessments are a large part of this program. The ecosystem approach to environmental management focuses on maintaining the capacity of a whole system to produce ecological goods and services (such as water resources, and air and water quality) and genetic resources to support the economy, security, and health and well-being. This program focuses on the development and implementation of Environment Canada’s sustainability policies and strategies; providing information to support integrated, ecosystem-scale planning; community engagement in remediation of sites; youth engagement; and research and reporting on environmental status and trends. The program facilitates interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral planning, and information sharing among partners. Contributions in support of Sustainable Ecosystems are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
91,480,613 91,480,613 79,198,765 53,872,746
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
336 305 292

Performance Measurement

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Canadians manage ecosystem resources in a manner consistent with ecosystem sustainability Average score on a 100-point scale based on expert ratings of status and trends of key indicators of the health of selected ecosystems in Canada To be determined To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Sustainable Ecosystems Program, the Department plans to:

  • Implement the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, including developing a report on progress of the federal government in implementing the 2013-16 Strategy and initiating consultations on a draft 2016-19 Strategy.
  • Update and expand the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators to broaden coverage of environmental issues.
  • Continue to participate in and track federal environmental assessments as a federal authority, and participate in the federal government’s Major Projects Management Office.
  • Continue to deliver key funding through community funding and youth employment initiatives. 
  • Continue to provide coordinated activities within priority ecosystems, working within an established framework and with partners across Canada.
Sub-Program 1.3.1: Sustainability Reporting and Indicators

Sub-Program Description

This program works with other government departments through the Sustainable Development Office to implement the Federal Sustainable Development Act, which mandates Environment Canada to lead the implementation, tracking and reporting of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). The Act requires the Minister of the Environment to develop and implement a federal sustainable development strategy that will make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament. In accordance with the Act, every three years the strategy is tabled in Parliament, setting out the federal sustainable development goals, targets and implementation strategies. In addition, the Sustainable Development Office provides, at least once every three years, a report on the federal government’s progress in implementing the FSDS. This program also supports the responsible federal departments and agencies in developing and tabling their individual strategies that support and foster greater transparency and accountability to the public and Parliament. As well, the program works with other government departments, through the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators initiative, to report on environmental indicators that track the progress of the FSDS and issues of concern to Canadians, including air quality and climate, water quality and availability, and protecting nature.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
7,752,534 7,733,082 7,733,082
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
55 54 53

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Sustainability Reporting and Indicators
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Increased use of Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators in sustainable development policy and reporting Annual number of visits to the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators website 100,000 March 2016
Policies and plans of federal government departments reflect the goals and targets in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Percentage of goals, targets and implementation strategies from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy integrated into annual  reporting by departments and agencies designated by the Federal Sustainable Development Act 100% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Sustainability Reporting and Indicators Sub-Program, the Department plans to:  

  • Develop a report on the progress of the federal government in implementing the 2013-2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS).
  • Launch public consultation on the draft 2016-19 FSDS.
  • Develop additional information products to expand the sustainability indicators and to improve reporting to Canadians.
  • Continue to identify indicators required for the FSDS and to develop and expand the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators accordingly.
Sub-Program 1.3.2: Ecosystem and Environmental Assessments

Sub-Program Description

This program consists of a consolidated range of activities that support the assessment, evaluation and management of Canada’s ecosystems in a sustainable manner. The program’s diverse components provide scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision-makers across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, industry, the research community and the general public. The program aims to ensure that ecosystem information and environmental effects of development proposals can be factored into decisions. It conducts research, and monitors, assesses and reports on the health of ecosystems and biodiversity. The program also monitors biodiversity and contaminants as part of the Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Implementation Plan in order to provide an improved understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of oil sands development. Environment Canada participates in federal environmental assessments, including those in the North, and contributes scientific expertise in territorial and provincial environmental assessments, which collectively provide a platform for the Department to contribute to the health of ecosystems.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
21,784,436 19,080,013 18,835,812
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
167 154 152

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Potential significant adverse environmental effects of projects, plans, programs or policies subject to federal environmental assessment legislation and Cabinet Directives are avoided or mitigated Proportion of Environment Canada recommendations on priority environmental outcomes that are incorporated into PanelFootnote 3 reports 60% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Ecosystem and Environmental Assessments Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to participate in federal environmental assessments as a federal authority and in selected strategic regional assessments to contribute to the health of ecosystems in Canada.
  • Provide leadership to the Department in fulfilling its obligation to conduct project reviews on federal lands (under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, section 67).
  • Provide departmental leadership for a whole-of-government approach to project coordination and consultation for the Major Projects Management Office Initiative.
  • Track involvement in environmental assessments and reviews of projects on federal lands to promote continuous improvement of Environment Canada’s engagement in projects, which number approximately 70 each year.
Sub-Program 1.3.3: Community Engagement

Sub-Program Description

This program engages individual Canadians and communities in protecting and restoring the environment through behavioural change, capacity building, community-based funding programs and engagement activities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
9,686,526 9,685,682 9,685,682
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
29 29 29

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Community Engagement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Increased engagement of Canadians in individual and collective activities to protect, conserve or restore the natural environment Number of Canadians engaged in individual and collective actions to protect, conserve or restore the natural environment 130,000 annually March 2018

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Community Engagement Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to strengthen operational processes related to EcoAction Community Funding, as identified in a national evaluation (approved in 2014-15). (See also sub-sub program 1.3.3.1.)
  • Strengthen the Environmental Damages Fund program, including through improvements to program promotion, communication and delivery. (See also sub-sub program 1.3.3.2.)
  • Provide employment opportunities in environmental science disciplines for post-secondary graduates through the Environmental Youth Employment program. (See also sub-sub program 1.3.3.3.)
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.1: EcoAction Community Funding

Sub-sub-program Description

This funding program was established to provide financial support to not-for-profit and non-governmental organizations for community projects that have measurable positive impacts on the environment. Projects funded by EcoAction protect, rehabilitate or enhance the environment, and build the capacity of communities and individuals to sustain these activities. Projects are funded in one of four priority areas: clean air, climate change, clean water or nature. The success of EcoAction projects requires the involvement of community members, including volunteers.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
6,149,918 6,149,918 6,149,918
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
16 16 16

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.3.1: EcoAction Community Funding
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Funded projects achieve their planned goals for nature conservation, clean water and/or climate change Average percentage of project environmental goals achieved 100% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the EcoAction Community Funding Sub-Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to refine and improve operational guidelines and internal management protocols to ensure national consistency of operations.
  • Implement a new management information system aligned with departmental and Government-wide solutions to increase efficiency.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.2: Environmental Damages Fund

Sub-sub-program Description

This program, aimed at improving the quality of Canada’s natural environment, was created in 1995 to implement the polluter-pay principle by managing funds received as compensation for environmental damages. Funds may originate from fines, court-ordered payments, out-of-court settlements and voluntary payments. Funds are disbursed in the geographic region where the original incident occurred (when possible), and are used to finance projects that focus on environmental restoration, including those involving environmental quality improvement, research and development, education and awareness. Eligible recipients include non-governmental organizations, universities and other academic institutions, Aboriginal groups, and provincial, territorial and municipal governments. Partners include Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Parks Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
384,802 384,802 384,802

Note: Amounts reported above are for administration only. Funds received as compensation for environmental damages and funds disbursed through projects will be reported in the Consolidated Specified Purpose Accounts in the Public Accounts of Canada.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
3 3 3

Performance Measurement

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.2: Environmental Damages Fund
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Recognition by judges of the value of the Environmental Damages Fund to restore environmental damage or harm to wildlife Annual number of court awards directing payment to the Environmental Damages Fund via non-directed legislation 10 March 2016
Natural resources similar to those affected are restored Area (hectares) where natural resources similar to those affected has been restored 200 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Environmental Damages Fund (EDF) Sub-Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to direct funds received as compensation for environmental damage to support projects to restore natural resources and the environment under one or more of the EDF’s four components: restoration, environmental quality improvement, education and awareness, and research and development.
  • Enhance awareness and understanding of the program and work to increase the effectiveness of the EDF.
  • Continue to streamline and harmonize national and regional EDF program delivery in order to speed up the assessment of funds received; in turn, this will enable the Department to solicit and support more projects to restore natural resources affected by environmental infractions. 
  • Implement a number of targeted program improvements identified in response to the recent EDF evaluation, including:
    • revising EDF operational guidelines to address governance and management challenges;
    • implementing a new information management system to better support the transfer and tracking of court-ordered award monies to the EDF for project management purposes; and
    • reviewing and updating the EDF website to enhance awareness and understanding of the EDF with internal and external stakeholders.
  • Undertake an evaluation of the current memorandum of understanding with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, in support of maintaining the confidence of enforcement and legal communities, and to permit research and development projects to move forward.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.3: Environmental Youth Employment

Sub-sub-program Description

This program manages two youth employment initiatives: International Environmental Youth Corps (IEYC) and Science Horizons, under the Careers Focus stream of the federal Youth Employment Strategy (YES) led by Employment and Social Development Canada. Consistent with Environment Canada’s mandate to promote the integration of economic, social and environmental aspects of sustainable development, these two initiatives offer opportunities to unemployed and under-employed Canadian youth to gain work experience in the environmental sector. The IEYC offers approximately 130 intern placements across Canada in the environment sector annually, which extend for 6-12 months. IEYC funding is allocated equitably across Canada. In collaboration with universities, non-governmental organizations and industry, Science Horizons annually offers approximately 100 internships, extending 6-12 months, to youths working on environmental science projects allocated across Canada.         

Note: The Government of Canada announced changes to the YES in Economic Action Plan 2014. The changes were initiated to improve the YES to ensure that it is aligned with the evolving realities of the job market and that federal investments in youth employment provide young Canadians with real-life work experience in high-demand fields such as science, technology, engineering, mathematics and the skilled trades. In response to the new direction, Environment Canada will reallocate the IEYC funds to the Science Horizons Youth Internship Program, which is better positioned to deliver on the new priorities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
3,151,806 3,150,962 3,150,962
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
10 10 10

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.3.3: Environmental Youth Employment
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Experienced youth are employed in the environmental sector or seek higher education Percentage of youth participants that either obtain full-time employment in their field or that return to continue education following completion of their internship or placement 80% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, the Department will continue to deliver its Environmental Youth Employment Sub-Sub Program by funding internships to increase employment opportunities for post-secondary graduates in environmental science disciplines. The Science Horizons Youth Internship Program is a collaborative effort through which post-secondary science graduates gain experience working on environmental projects with mentoring and coaching by experienced professionals in academia and the private and non-government sectors.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Great Lakes

Sub-Program Description

This program provides leadership, oversight, coordination, funding and governance mechanisms for the Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative, by managing, delivering and reporting on a number of key initiatives: the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, Canada-Ontario Agreement, Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative, Great Lakes Action Plan, and Action Plan for Clean Water (Great Lakes sediment remediation implementation). Work encompasses policy development, issues management, work planning, reporting, coordination of science and monitoring, and the development, implementation and analysis of agreements, plans and initiatives. The program works in collaboration with other federal departments and other levels of government in Canada and the U.S., Aboriginal groups, conservation authorities and watershed management agencies, municipalities, environmental organizations and stewardship networks. Specifically, it implements Remedial Action Plans and Lakewide Action and Management Plans to improve environmental quality and achieve the vision of a healthy and prosperous Great Lakes ecosystem. It uses funding from the Great Lakes Action Plan to restore beneficial use impairments in identified Areas of Concern, and implements contaminated sediment remediation projects with funding from the Action Plan for Clean Water. Funding from the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative is used to determine phosphorus targets and identify possible actions to reduce levels that contribute to harmful algae. The program develops action plans and strategies to address evolving and historic issues of emerging concern in the Great Lakes - including species and habitat protection, chemicals of concern to Canada and the United States, and the identification of climate change impacts on Great Lakes water quality. The program also regularly reports federally and provincially through the Canada-Ontario Agreement and bi-nationally through the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, including specifically through the State of the Great Lakes reports on environmental indicators, the Progress Report of the Parties (Canada-U.S.), updates on Lakewide Action and Management Plans, Canada-Ontario Agreement Progress Reports, and a report on groundwater science.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
37,721,798 28,843,304 12,376,476
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
64 49 49

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Great Lakes
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Environment Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in beneficial use impairments and environmental quality of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem Estimated progress achieved against near-term goals identified in the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA) 100% December 2019
Environment Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in beneficial use impairments and environmental quality of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem Number of beneficial uses whose status is listed as “impaired” or “requires further assessment” for Canada’s 17 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes 70 December 2019 (end of the 2014-2019 COA)

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Great Lakes Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Begin implementation of the renewed Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health, which coordinates domestic actions over five years to help deliver Canada’s obligations under the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).
  • Continue to coordinate research and monitoring activities with the U.S. in the Great Lakes in order to fulfill obligations under the Canada-U.S. GLWQA. Work will include identifying the first group of Chemicals of Mutual Concern under the Agreement.
  • Initiate construction of the Randle Reef Contaminated Sediment Remediation Project in the Hamilton Harbour Area of Concern (with Public Works and Government Services Canada as the project manager).Footnote 4
  • Undertake targeted stakeholder consultation on draft phosphorus targets for Lake Erie. In addition, the Department will develop draft lake ecosystem objectivesFootnote 5 for Lake Erie.
  • Complete an assessment of the effectiveness of Canadian programs, policies and legislation related to the management of phosphorus, and develop policy options to strengthen identified weaknesses and address gaps.
  • Continue to implement priority protection, restoration and conservation actions under lakewide habitat and species protection, restoration and conservation strategies.
  • In collaboration with all parties to the GLWQA, identify priorities for science activities and actions for groundwater management, protection and remediation.
  • Develop and release the annual Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) updates for each of the Canadian Great Lakes, and publish the 2015 Lake Superior LAMP under the GLWQA.
  • Draft a nearshore framework for public review - a commitment in the GLWQA. Work will include developing a binational (Canada and U.S.) process for assessing and managing nearshore waters. The final framework is to be developed by 2016. Once implemented, it will allow the Parties to determine the state of nearshore waters, identify areas of high stress and areas of high ecological value, and assess change over time.
  • Develop draft indicators for use in assessing overall conditions of the Great Lakes ecosystem.
Sub-Program 1.3.5: St. Lawrence

Sub-Program Description

This program provides leadership, oversight and coordination to the overall governance of the St. Lawrence Action Plan, and reports results achieved collectively between the Government of Canada and Government of Quebec. It works to establish cooperative partnerships between the federal and provincial governments and non-governmental organizations, in order to address biodiversity conservation, water quality improvement, and sustainability of beneficial uses. It also supports stakeholder participation in collaboration processes and communities in improving environmental quality, through grants and contribution agreements. The program conducts and coordinates research, monitoring and prediction activities in the St. Lawrence with other federal and provincial departments, and releases reports regularly on the state of the St. Lawrence, fact sheets on 21 environmental indicators, and results of the St. Lawrence Action Plan.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2,896,464 2,896,464 2,896,464
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
6 6 6

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.5: St. Lawrence
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Environment Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem Estimated progress achieved against near-term goals identified in the St. Lawrence Action Plan 100% March 2016
Non-federal government partners contribute to near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem Average number of participating external organizations per project funded by Environment Canada under the St. Lawrence Action Plan 3 March 2016
Non-federal government partners contribute to near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem Funds contributed by non-federal government organizations per dollar contributed by Environment Canada to projects under the St. Lawrence Action Plan 3.5 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the St. Lawrence Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Monitor and follow up on the projects under the 2011-16 Joint Action Program of the St. Lawrence Action Plan. This will be achieved through the Steering Committee, which was established under the Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence 2011-26 and is composed of federal and provincial partners. Follow-up activities will be carried out to ensure that projects are on track. A public report on the results will be prepared at the end of the Agreement.
  • Conduct promotional activities (for example, use of Environment Canada’s Facebook and Twitter presence, websites and trade shows) to reach a larger public audience and to increase the number of proposals submitted to the Community Interactions Program.
Sub-Program 1.3.6: Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay

Sub-Program Description

This program provides financial and technical support through the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund to implement priority projects through contributions to citizens, non-governmental organizations, provincial ministries, conservation authorities, land owners, universities and industry. The Fund also supports key research within federal departments. Priority objectives of the Fund are to support projects that: improve monitoring, assessment and information required to improve decision making for phosphorus reduction strategies; conserve critical aquatic habitat and associated species through targeted aquatic habitat protection, restoration and creation; reduce rural and urban non-point sources of nutrients, including implementation of best management practices for the management of soil, crops, livestock, etc. and creating and rehabilitating wetlands and naturalizing watercourses; and reduce discharges of phosphorus from point sources, including sewage, combined sewer overflows and urban storm water systems. This includes support to develop and test innovative approaches to manage urban storm water and wastewater. The initiative is administered by Environment Canada’s Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay office in consultation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Province of Ontario, the Lake Simcoe Conservation Authority and other key stakeholders. Program investments are expected to improve water quality for recreational use, substantially reduce phosphorus loads from urban and rural sources, and advance the restoration of a sustainable cold-water fishery, as well as ecological integrity. This initiative is a key component of the Government’s Action Plan for Clean Water and supports commitments of the federal government related to the Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
7,231,690 7,233,055 16,818
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
7 6 2

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.6: Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Environment Canada and partners achieve reductions in phosphorus loads and restoration and protection of fish and aquatic dependent wildlife populations of Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay Estimated annual reductions in phosphorus inputs to the Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay watersheds due to projects supported by the program 4,000 kg March 2017

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian Bay Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Contribute to the Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund program evaluation as part of the departmental Risk Based Audit and Evaluation Plan.
  • Initiate an evaluation of results achieved by recipients as of September 2015. The evaluation will focus on project outputs such as livestock exclusion fencing installed, metres of streambank stabilized, or hectares of aquatic habitat created.
  • Initiate and complete negotiation of contribution agreements for successful funding applicants whose projects start in April 2015. Continue to support current funding recipients and initiate the application intake, review and approval process for projects starting in April 2016 - the final year of the Fund.
  • Maintain the Georgian Bay Science Consortium in order to refine research and monitoring priorities, and develop new partnerships for science activities that support the watershed.
Sub-Program 1.3.7: Lake Winnipeg

Sub-Program Description

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative (LWBI) focuses on three key areas: science (research, monitoring and information sharing); transboundary partnerships; and the implementation and administration of the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund, which provides financial support for high-impact, solution-oriented projects aimed at reducing nutrient loads and improving the long-term ecological health of the Lake and watershed. National science and governance initiatives, aligned with Environment Canada’s Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health program (1.2.1), also support the LWBI. The Initiative’s activities are managed and coordinated by the Lake Winnipeg Basin Office. The program works with existing water governance bodies to explore options and opportunities to cooperatively develop and support implementation of a basin-wide nutrient strategy, in addition to providing a forum for communication. This includes working with the Province of Manitoba to continue implementation of the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg, which provides for a long-term collaborative and coordinated approach between the two Governments to support the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin. The program financially supports the Lake Winnipeg Research Consortium, to facilitate and enhance community-led scientific research via the only lake-based research vessel in existence, i.e., the MV Namao. As well, the program financially supports the ongoing development and expansion of the single-window web information portal, housed at the University of Manitoba, to better promote and enable data sharing and analysis with partners and other networks, in order to support research on Lake Winnipeg.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2,078,753 1,398,753 0
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
6 6 0

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.7: Lake Winnipeg
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Reduced nutrient loading in the Lake Winnipeg basin Estimated reduction of phosphorus load in the Lake Winnipeg basin resulting from projects funded by Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund 10,800 kg March 2017

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Lake Winnipeg Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Participate in the planned program evaluation of the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative and begin the process for renewal of the Initiative, which, under its current terms, will end in March 2017.
  • Continue to engage with the Manitoba-led Lake Friendly Stewards Alliance and its Steering Committee.
  • Continue its science-related work, which will include:
    • implementing the Science Subsidiary Arrangement under the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding;
    • core monitoring on all Lake Winnipeg major tributaries and identifying sources and impacts of nutrient loadings to advance the remediation of water quality in Lake Winnipeg;
    • developing eutrophication-related indicators to summarize the ecological health of Lake Winnipeg, track and describe changes in nutrient concentrations in the Lake and provide performance measurements for ecologically relevant nutrient objectives;
    • conducting research studies on impacts of human activities on the delivery of nutrients in Lake Winnipeg tributaries and on knowledge gaps in nutrient processing in Lake Winnipeg; and
    • developing an integrated modelling framework for Lake Winnipeg to develop predictive capabilities and evaluate a range of nutrient management scenarios in support of reducing nutrient loads in Lake Winnipeg and its basin.
  • Deliver funding (Round 8) under the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund and launch the process for Round 9 of funding.
  • Continue to engage domestic and international transboundary water boards and organizations on nutrient issues in Lake Winnipeg and its basin.
Sub-Program 1.3.8: Ecosystems Partnerships

Sub-Program Description

This program coordinates and oversees initiatives in targeted ecosystems in the Atlantic, Pacific and northern regions of Canada, with the goal of ensuring their health, productivity and long-term sustainability. The program’s focuses are building partnerships, supporting actions, and strengthening collaboration between several levels of government, academia, industry, Aboriginal groups and non-governmental organizations, to enhance science and research and share knowledge and information that increase our understanding of and help to protect and restore these ecosystems. In Atlantic Canada, this program implements the Atlantic Ecosystem Initiatives, which is working collaboratively to address needs and issues regarding habitat and biodiversity, nearshore water quality, and the impacts of climate change. In the Okanagan Basin ecosystem, collaborative work continues on the use of water balance models to guide economic development, land use planning, and the protection of habitat and biodiversity; and efforts in the Salish Sea (Georgian Basin) focus on the development and support of collaborative science regarding the issues of habitat and biodiversity.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2,328,412 2,328,412 2,328,412
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
2 2 2

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.8: Ecosystems Partnerships
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Achievement of objectives for improvements in beneficial uses and environmental quality in priority ecosystems set by Environment Canada and collaborating organizations Percentage of project expected results achieved 90% May 2016
Engagement of partners in projects involving targeted ecosystems Number of partners or organizations participating in Environment Canada supported projects which address program priorities in targeted ecosystems 30 May 2016
Engagement of partners in projects involving targeted ecosystems Ratio of resources contributed by partners per dollar contributed by Environment Canada 1 May 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Ecosystems Partnerships Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

In support of Atlantic Ecosystem Initiatives (AEI)

  • Implement a transformed grants and contributions program with enhanced integrated planning and decision making, and undertake actions that reach across Atlantic Canada to conserve, restore and enhance ecosystem health. Through this partnered and science-focused program, the Department will support ecosystem-based projects in Atlantic Canada that address the priority environmental issues of nearshore water quality, conservation of habitat and biodiversity, and understanding the impacts of climate change.
  • Continue to implement an outreach plan to increase awareness of the open and competitive AEI grants and contributions program and to encourage increased participation and active partnerships in projects.

In support of West and North Ecosystems

  • Develop a revised strategic plan for program activities in the Region that better aligns with the program’s objectives, delivery model and expected roles.
  • Continue to support wetland restoration and biodiversity conservation in the Okanagan, as well as pursue opportunities in several ecosystems across British Columbia and Yukon to further pilot ecosystem health indicators that consider First Nations traditional knowledge.

Program 1.4: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Wildlife

Program Description

This program works to conserve and protect the natural environment through compliance promotion and enforcement of the Species at Risk Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act, and Canada Wildlife Act. The program promotes compliance through the communication of information, education, and consultation with parties affected by these statutes. It maintains a contingent of enforcement officers whose activities consist of verifying conformity with laws, regulations and permits pertaining to wildlife and Environment Canada Protected Areas, as well as gathering intelligence, conducting inspections and pursuing investigations regarding alleged offenders. The program also works with the United States and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen wildlife enforcement. These actions aim to reduce damages and threats to biodiversity for the benefit of Canadians and the international community.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
16,115,510 16,115,510 15,917,518 15,537,176
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
118 117 114

Performance Measurement

Program 1.4: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Wildlife
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Targeted regulatees are penalized when non-compliant with wildlife laws and regulations administered by Environment Canada Percentage of prosecutions that result in convictions 90% March 2016

Planning Highlights

(See also Program 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution.)

In 2015-16, through the Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Wildlife Program, the Department will continue to:

  • Implement risk-based approaches to support effective targeting of, and (where appropriate) application of penalties to, those non-compliant with wildlife laws and regulations. Efforts will focus on species that are at high risk of requiring conservation and/or are at high risk of being affected by non-compliance, including:
    • Canadian and foreign species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora as well as species at risk in Canada;
    • Northern Canadian species; and
    • habitats or Protected Areas in Northern Canada.
  • Increase intelligence capacity through a national Intelligence Renewal Project, as described in the Wildlife Enforcement Directorate Annual Summary 2013-2014, to support improved risk-based enforcement decisions by ensuring that Environment Canada acquires a comprehensive understanding of wildlife and conservation crime, by targeting the worst offenders, and by maintaining focused and effective activities within an increasingly broad mandate.
  • Advance work on a number of established multi-year priorities, including by:
    • enhancing enforcement capabilities in the North through the Northern Environmental Enforcement Strategy - a collaborative effort among federal organizations to share assets, resources, planning opportunities and information;
    • further developing a new enforcement information system;
    • identifying enforcement priorities based on consultations with partners (such as the United States and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission on Environmental Cooperation) and compliance information; and
    • further action on combatting wildlife trafficking.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Program 2.1: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Program Description

This program strives to provide reliable, accurate and timely forecasts and warnings, as well as weather and environmental intelligence, which are used to anticipate, manage and adapt to the risks and opportunities of changing weather, water, air quality and climate conditions. It includes monitoring, research, prediction and service delivery based on sound science, to help Canadians make informed decisions in order to protect their health, safety, security and economic prosperity. Because a global effort is needed to monitor, understand and predict constantly changing weather, water, air quality, sea ice and climate conditions, the program works with various collaborators in Canada and around the world. Key partners include the United Nations World Meteorological Organization and its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, as well as the news media, academia and all levels of government in Canada. The program carries out the Department’s responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Weather Modification Information Act, Emergency Management Act (2007), Convention of the World Meteorological Organization, and memoranda of agreement with national meteorological and space agencies. It provides forecasts and information in case of environmental emergencies associated with the release of toxic and radioactive material in the atmosphere. Grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians are used as components of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
192,103,008 192,103,008 166,752,893 168,201,006
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
1,107 1,010 995

Performance Measurement

Program 2.1: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Canadians use Environment Canada's weather and environmental services Weather Warning Index (a weighted index of weather warning timeliness and accuracy) 7.6 July 2015
Canadians use Environment Canada's weather and environmental services Percentage of the population of a warned area who report having seen or heard a recent weather warning and who took actions in response 30% July 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to support the federal government’s policy agenda, including the Open Government initiative, the transformation of the Space Program, the Federal Geospatial Platform, emergency management, the North, and climate and water services. 
  • Progress with improvements to the weather monitoring infrastructure through upgrading and modernizing equipment in all key networks to support delivery of timely, accurate and accessible weather information to Canadians. The Department will also continue to test new innovations and technologies from industry, such as modernized marine buoys and instruments to measure snow.
  • Expand and improve the Air Quality Health Index service, to support better air quality forecasts in support of Canadians’ health.
  • Maintain mission-critical information technology services through strong governance practices and strong relationships with Shared Services Canada, as part of ongoing collaboration.
  • Continue to implement internal transformation projects that support availability of monitoring data and weather prediction, and make a range of climate data and models, focusing on products and services offered to specialized users, more widely available.
  • Enhance and maintain domestic and international partnerships and collaboration, and contribute to joint initiatives through research, monitoring, and provision and exchange of data and expert advice.
Sub-Program 2.1.1: Weather, Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

Sub-Program Description

This program provides all-day, every-day weather warnings, forecasts and information, with lead times that vary from minutes to weeks. Its purpose is to help Canadians and a variety of economic sectors anticipate dangerous meteorological events and afford enough time to protect themselves, their livelihood, and their property. The program also provides a variety of economic and commercial sectors (such as news media, natural resource sectors and specialized users) with climate and meteorological services, including data from the Canadian Lightning Detection Network. Program activities combine research in science and modelling with regional monitoring, prediction and service delivery. These activities depend on the supercomputing capacity managed by Shared Services Canada. The program is delivered through collaborations involving data, science and information distribution in Canada and internationally. Key partners are the news media, all levels of government, academia, other national meteorological services, and research and space agencies. In particular, the program contributes approximately $2 million annually to the United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in support of Canada’s international commitments in meteorology and hydrology. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act and Weather Modification Information Act, and supports other departments acting under the Emergency Management Act (2007). Program delivery includes assessed contributions to the WMO, and may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
162,902,870 144,680,986 146,337,172
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
878 832 819

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditions Percentage of the population who report that they are somewhat or very likely to access weather information during a typical day 90% July 2016
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditions Percentage of public forecast maximum temperatures for Day 3 and Day 5 that are accurate to within 3 degrees Day 3: 82%
Day 5: 72%
April 2017

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Build on work underway to improve and update monitoring infrastructure through lifecycle management and replacement of equipment in the radar, surface, marine, upper-air and lightning networks, in support of improved capacity to observe, diagnose and predict severe weather. Work will include exploring new technologies and innovations from industry.
  • Continue key internal transformative projects, including: 
    • implementing a “network of networks” approach for exchange of monitoring data with selected provinces;
    • modernizing the data management system to support improved data quality and to increase interoperability of monitoring data;
    • implementing initiatives to improve weather prediction system in storm prediction centres;
    • delivering innovations in the incorporation of weather observations in computer forecasts to gain efficiency in the weather prediction systems; and
    • modernizing the weather warning and forecast system to ensure that Canadians are warned in a timely fashion.
  • Deliver up-to-date, high-quality information about severe weather and environmental events, in support of the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games.
  • Continue to conduct meteorological research and development to improve weather and environmental prediction, and make this new knowledge available in the scientific literature and through national and international fora.
  • Maintain ongoing engagement with multi-lateral partners, such as the World Meteorological Organization, the Group on Earth Observations and major national meteorological and hydrological organizations, to enable Canada to benefit from science information and technologies developed abroad.
Sub-Program 2.1.2: Health-related Meteorological Information

Sub-Program Description

This program provides forecasts, tools, data and information on atmospheric conditions that affect health, such as air quality, extreme temperatures and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It supports the mandates of Environment Canada, Health Canada and many public and non-governmental health agencies. The program includes work on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) and other projects that assist Canadians in making informed decisions to protect their health and reduce pollution, and that enable health agencies to help vulnerable populations respond to changing atmospheric conditions. It is delivered across Canada through collaborations promoting data and information dissemination. Collaborators include the media, public health agencies at all levels of government, provincial environment agencies and non-governmental agencies. This program also conducts systematic observations and monitoring of background air pollutants (CAPMon Network) and ozone in the atmosphere, and hosts the World Ozone and UV Data Centre, operated on behalf of the World Meteorological Organization and used by over 75 government agencies around the world. Program delivery may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
10,487,098 3,576,437 3,624,010
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
76 29 29

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Health-related Meteorological Information
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditions Percentage of targeted sensitive populations within selected regions receiving information on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information 15 - 25% of sensitive population (range is due to regional variation) March 2016
Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditions Percentage of the general population within selected regions receiving Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information 15 - 20% of general population (range is due to regional variation) March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Health-related Meteorological Information Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Expand the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) service with a focus on northern communities. In addition, work will include implementation of the AQHI in Ontario; service will extend to the entire province by 2016.
  • Test cost-effective tools and indices during the Pan Am/Parapan Am Games to further the understanding and use of air quality and other meteorological conditions with health impacts.
  • Improve Environment Canada’s air quality forecast model by including the impact of smoke from forest fires in the model.

The Department will also continue to do the following:

  • Refine techniques to combine observational data and model predictive values to produce scientifically rigorous maps of fine particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and AQHI values. These refinements include the continued modernization of data transmission across the National Air Pollution Surveillance program and upgrades to Environment Canada’s numerical air quality forecast model.
  • Provide data and scientific advice on ozone and UV radiation to the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre, and continue to operate the World Brewer Calibration Centre for the global scientific community monitoring the ozone layer. 
Sub-Program 2.1.3: Climate Information, Predictions and Tools

Sub-Program Description

This program generates new knowledge and information about past, present and future states of the climate system and how it functions, as well as the changing composition of the atmosphere and related impacts. Its work includes: developing global and regional climate models and scenarios; detecting human influence on climate change in Canada, including extremes; understanding the North and the Canadian cryosphere; and tracking atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and aerosols across Canada, including in remote locations. These activities increase understanding of the impacts of climate change on economic sectors and ecosystems. Results from the program’s analysis and research activities provide the scientific basis for policy development, mitigation, adaptation planning and decision making for programs such as the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework, as well as products, services and tools to Canadians. In particular, climate services inform and assist users in adapting to both present climate variability and medium- to long-term changes in climate. The program shares data, science and information with all levels of government in Canada, academia, industry, consortia, standards councils, and the national and international scientific community, including organizations such as the World Meteorological Organization, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1999), Emergency Management Act (2007), National Research Council Act (Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes), and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (articles 4 and 5: monitoring and research). Program delivery may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
18,713,040 18,495,470 18,239,824
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
153 149 147

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Climate Information, Predictions and Tools
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Clients and users have the information they require on climate projections, scenarios and climate data sets on various time and spatial scales Annual number of downloads of climate datasets 25,000 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Climate Information, Predictions and Tools Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to provide high-quality climate data and services to the public and key clients, including station and spatially integrated climate monitoring data products, and climate model outputs on various temporal and spatial scales, in support of the Department’s commitment to meeting Government of Canada Open Data objectives.
  • Provide ongoing support for the application of building codes in Canada, including providing information on wind and snow loads and temperature and precipitation extremes to support application of the National Building Code of Canada.  
  • Develop a climate services strategy to explore potential for developing additional products and services.
  • Contribute to the implementation of the Global Framework for Climate Services at the international, national and regional levels, including enhancing delivery of climate services in support of climate adaptation in Canada.
  • Advance climate science of relevance to adaptation and mitigation planning, and make this new knowledge available in the scientific literature and through national and international fora.
  • Deliver ongoing data management to ensure that accessibility of climate data is aligned with Government of Canada Open Data principles.
  • Contribute to international climate assessments, including new results focusing on climate extremes in Canada and globally.

Program 2.2: Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users

Program Description

Environment Canada provides predictions and services for targeted, weather-sensitive sectors, through formal arrangements and revenue contracts. Building on the core capabilities offered under Program 2.1, this program provides reliable, accurate and timely weather, water, climate, air quality and ice observations, predictions and services to support the decision-making needs of the aviation, marine transportation, military, commercial and other sectors. It delivers services through various collaborations within Canada (including with other government departments), and internationally with the World Meteorological Organization, as well as with other countries and international bodies such as the International Civil Aviation Organization. This program supports the Department in meeting obligations and responsibilities conferred by the Department of the Environment Act and the Convention of the World Meteorological Organization. It also helps other government departments meet their obligations under the Aeronautics Act and the Treaty in Support of International Civil Aviation, the Oceans Act and the Fisheries Act, and supports memoranda of agreement with Transport Canada, the Department of National Defence, and various provincial and territorial agencies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
15,792,293 15,792,293 15,822,293 15,618,888
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
361 355 349

Performance Measurement

Program 2.2: Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Targeted sectors have the meteorological and environmental information and services they need to operate efficiently and safely Combined level of satisfaction of the main clients of the Meteorological Service of Canada (MSC) in terms of accessibility, timeliness and accuracy of products and services 7.5 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users Program, Environment Canada plans to:

  • Continue to deliver tailored services to targeted users, including NAV CANADA, Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), and the Department of National Defence (DND). 
  • Provide weather and ice information in Canada’s North in collaboration with the CCG, DND and others.
  • Continue to leverage investments in Program 2.1 (Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians) by ensuring that signature and other transformation projects, such as the Next Generation Weather Prediction System, are designed and implemented as an integrated system.
Sub-Program 2.2.1: Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation

Sub-Program Description

This program provides the aviation industry and its regulatory agency with meteorological services (observations, forecasts and warnings) 24 hours/day, 365 days/year. It supports the goals and missions of NAV CANADA and Transport Canada, and supports the domestic and international airlines operating in Canadian territory in making tactical decisions in order to maximize their efficiency, effectiveness and safety. The program also includes the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), one of nine such centres around the world operating under the authority of the International Civil Aviation Organization. The VAAC forecasts the transport of airborne volcanic ash to reduce the risk of aircraft disasters, and provides operational support and backup to other VAACs worldwide. The program is delivered under a contract between Environment Canada and NAV CANADA.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
4,803,857 4,803,857 4,837,492
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
150 147 145

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
NAV CANADA and the aviation industry have the meteorological information and services they need to maximize their efficiency and aviation safety Average rating, on a scale of 1 (very unsatisfactory) to 10 (very satisfactory), of client satisfaction with aviation weather services provided by Environment Canada 7.5 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to provide high-quality, relevant and timely 24/7 aviation weather forecasts and services to NAV CANADA.
  • Update program production tools and techniques to capitalize on advances in production methods, such as promoting the automation of forecasting tools, and improved data transfer technology.
Sub-Program 2.2.2: Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation

Sub-Program Description

This program provides marine industries and regulatory agencies with forecasts of the sea state, ice conditions and weather 24 hours/day, 365 days/year. It supports the International Maritime Organization by providing meteorological information for Canadian and international Arctic waters, and supports the goals and mandates of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). The program helps marine industries and other interests operating in Canadian waters, including organizations involved in shipping, fisheries and resource extraction, to make tactical decisions (such as ship routing), in order to maximize their safety and efficiency. As a key collaborator, the CCG broadcasts information related to this program to marine interests, and provides in-situ weather, sea-state and ice information to Environment Canada. The program is operated in part through a memorandum of understanding with DFO for services related to current and forecast ice conditions over Canadian navigable waters. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Oceans Act and Fisheries Act. It also supports commitments to the International Convention on Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System, and the North American Ice Service.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
8,167,645 8,197,645 7,960,605
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
111 109 107

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Marine communities have the weather, wave and ice information they need to operate safely and efficiently in Canadian waters Percentage of mariners who indicate satisfaction with the available products, including ability to access this information 90% March 2016
Marine communities have the weather, wave and ice information they need to operate safely and efficiently in Canadian waters Percentage of clients and organizations within the targeted sector who report that they have factored ice information into their decisions To be determined To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to provide high-quality, timely, relevant weather and ice forecasts and services to the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG).
  • Continue to collaborate with domestic and international partners to develop products and to enhance services, including those compatible with electronic marine navigation systems.
  • Initiate work to re-design marine weather information products, with a focus on impact-based warnings to meet the needs of mariners.
  • Finalize a renewed collaborative agreement with the CCG for continued provision of marine weather and ice information to support safe marine transportation, particularly in the North.
  • Continue to improve weather and ice computer models in order to better predict sea ice concentration, movement, and internal ice pressure and ocean currents.
Sub-Program 2.2.3: Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations

Sub-Program Description

This program provides the Department of National Defence (DND) with meteorological and oceanographic information, predictions and tools needed for operations of the Canadian Forces (CF) in Canada and abroad. It is a collaborative program, operating under a memorandum of understanding with DND, responding to CF-specific needs and recovering its incremental costs from DND. The program is critical to CF operations, as it contributes to the effectiveness and safety of tactical, operational and strategic manoeuvres within Canada and in various active military areas globally. It also supports DND’s legal and statutory responsibilities under the Aeronautics Act, the legal foundation for military aviation safety.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2,820,791 2,820,791 2,820,791
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
100 99 97

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
The Department of National Defence has the meteorological and oceanographic information and knowledge it needs to optimize its operations in Canada and abroad Average rating, on a scale of 1 (very dissatisfied) to 10 (very satisfied), of client satisfaction with services provided by Environment Canada to the Department of National Defence 7.5 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations Sub-Program, the Department  plans to:

  • Continue to provide high-quality, relevant, timely 24/7 weather services to the Canadian Forces.
  • Achieve full operational status of the new Joint Meteorological Centre at Canadian Forces Base Gagetown.
  • Continue to collaborate with DND and other federal departments in Arctic areas to support (where possible) cost-effective solutions for deploying equipment and important emergency management planning and exercises, and to determine emerging areas for enhanced services.

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

Program Description

Activities in this program reduce threats to human health and the environment posed by pollution and waste from human activities. The program assesses risks to the environment from substances that are already in commercial use (existing substances) and substances proposed for use in Canada (new substances). It also develops and implements measures to prevent or manage the risks from these substances and waste. Contributions in support of Substances and Waste Management are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
85,149,099 85,149,099 50,311,880 44,144,891
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
613 437 409

Performance Measurement

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management
Expected Result Performance Indicator Targets Date to be achievedFootnote 6
Threats to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances and waste are reduced Percentage of drainage regions where Canadian or Federal Environmental Quality Guidelines are not exceeded for selected substances in sediment, water and/or biota

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) in sediments and in fish: 80%

Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) in water and in fish: 80%

PBDEs: September 2015 (To be reported in the 2016-17 Departmental Performance Report (DPR))

PFOS: September 2014 (To be reported in the 2015-16 DPR)

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Substances and Waste Management Program, the Department will continue to:

  • Deliver on the Chemicals Management Plan through a range of activities, including assessments of new and existing substances; development of environmental quality guidelines; development and implementation of risk management instruments; integrated environmental monitoring and surveillance; targeted research on priority substances; maintaining the National Pollutant Release Inventory; and participation in a range of international chemical and biotechnology-related fora.
  • Implement regulatory programs, including Disposal at Sea, the Environmental Emergency Regulations and the Notification Regulations and associated agreements.
  • Lead the delivery of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan.
  • Administer the Fisheries Act legislative and regulatory responsibilities related to effluent management.
Sub-Program 3.1.1: Substances Management

Sub-Program Description

This program is responsible for assessing and managing risks to the environment from all existing substances identified under the Chemicals Management Plan, as well as new substances (upon notification by industry of their import or manufacture) for risks to the environment. The program uses science-based risk assessment, priority setting, and timely regulatory actions (or other measures where appropriate) to manage risks associated with substances determined to be harmful. It works to improve substance management through research and monitoring, tracking of pollutant releases (through reporting to the National Pollutant Release Inventory) and ongoing performance assessment of control-risk measures. The program uses regulations and other control measures, under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, Part 5, Controlling Toxic Substances, to address the risk posed by substances of concern throughout their life cycle (e.g. released to the environment from industrial processes, contained in consumer and commercial products, or released from end-of-life products and waste). Also included is the international and interprovincial movement of waste and hazardous recyclable material. The program maintains transparency with stakeholders through consultation processes, including through engagement at the national and international levels. International engagement occurs in a vast array of fora, such as: implementing Canada’s legal commitments under the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution and the Minamata Convention; the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Cooperative Chemicals Assessment Programme; and the United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
50,121,399 27,591,415 26,975,150
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
404 271 264

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Substances Management
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Reduced releases to the environment of toxic and other substances of concern Percentage reduction of isoprene releases from the rubber manufacturing sector 80% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Substances Management Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Conduct targeted research on priority substances and issues under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and publish (on the CMP website) draft and/or final assessments of existing substances flagged for future consideration.
  • Assess the approximately 500 notified new chemicals, nanomaterials and products of biotechnology prior to their introduction into Canada and intervene as early as possible when the assessment identifies a risk to human health or the environment.
  • Carry out integrated environmental monitoring and surveillance of priority chemicals in air, water, sediment, fish, birds and wastewater to detect and characterize environmental change.
  • Continue to develop, implement and administer regulatory and voluntary risk management instruments to manage risks from harmful substances, including emissions of air pollutants (volatile organic compounds) in selected consumer and commercial products.
  • Collect and publish (through the National Pollutant Release Inventory) information on releases, disposals and recycling of over 300 substances of concern.
  • Support the sound management of chemicals, wastes and products of biotechnology through:
    • participating in a range of international initiatives that support our domestic efforts; and
    • implementing domestic measures, including in response to commitments under the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, and the Minamata Convention.
  • Identify and implement tools/instruments for managing waste to reduce releases of toxic substances, in consultation with the provinces and territories and other stakeholders.
  • Continue to develop modern information technology and information management solutions for program delivery, including an electronic reporting system for hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable materials.
  • Develop and provide economic models for factoring environmental effects into decisions.
Sub-Program 3.1.2: Effluent Management

Sub-Program Description

This program supports management of risks to the environment and human health from the discharge and deposit of waste residues into water (e.g. effluent). This is achieved through the development, implementation and administration of strategies and programs, such as pollution prevention plans, regulations, codes of practice, guidelines and environmental performance agreements. Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and Fisheries Act, the program addresses waste discharges and substances of concern in the effluent of industrial and public sectors, including but not limited to mining and processing, forest products, municipal wastewater and other sectors. Key activities include: conducting research and risk analysis; developing and implementing regulations and other control instruments; assessing the results of environmental effects monitoring of regulated facilities; providing technical advice to environmental assessments; and acting as the focal point for the Fisheries Act pollution prevention provisions (FA-PPP). Specifically, the program administers the FA-PPP, including the development of risk management instruments, and administers the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations, Metal Mining Effluent Regulations and Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations to control or manage the deposit of deleterious substances into water in order to reduce the threats to fish, fish habitat and human health from fish consumption. Program delivery requires collaboration with partners (including other federal government departments, other levels of government and associations) and consultation with industry, Aboriginal groups and other stakeholders.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
6,896,052 6,883,911 6,707,787
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
68 67 64

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Effluent Management
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Risk of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act is minimized Percentage of facilities whose releases are within regulatory limits.
Regulations included in this indicator:
Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER); Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations (PPER);
Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER)

95% for MMER and PPER

To be determined for WSER as initial reporting is not yet complete

Target will be established in 2016-17

March 2016 for MMER and PPER

To be determined for WSER

Risk of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act is minimized Loading (in tonnes) of biological oxygen demand (BOD) matter and total suspended solids from wastewater treatment facilities

To be determined, as initial reporting is not yet complete

Target will be established in 2016-17

To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Effluent Management Sub-Program, the Department plans to:  

  • Administer the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations and Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations, and work with provinces and territories to streamline administration and, wherever possible, use bilateral agreements to avoid duplication.
  • Engage Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Aboriginal communities and stakeholders, and the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador on minimum effluent quality standards for wastewater effluent for the Far North.
  • Implement the Pollution Prevention Provisions of the Fisheries Act and work with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to enable a more efficient and streamlined administration of the Fisheries Act.
  • Continue to administer the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations, including engaging with federal partners, such as Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Aboriginal communities and other stakeholders, on the management of mine waste disposal from mining projects. In addition, the Department will continue multi-stakeholder consultations for review of the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations.
Sub-Program 3.1.3: Marine Pollution

Sub-Program Description

This program assesses, controls and monitors the disposal at sea of wastes and other matter, and advises on marine pollution from ships. As of 2010, the program is responsible for assessing and controlling the risks to the marine environment resulting from Canadians or Canadian maritime traffic in the Antarctic. The program uses a mix of regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to prevent marine pollution. It addresses impacts on sediments and other wastes, administers prohibitions and controls, and assesses and issues permits for disposal at sea and Antarctic expeditions. Two cost-recovery fees are applicable to disposal at sea permits: an application fee assessed on all permits, and a permit fee assessed on dredged and inert inorganic material. The program conducts research and develops decision making and monitoring tools as well as standards, and makes contributions to federal coordination of marine pollution prevention (ship-sourced). Relevant legislation for the program includes the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, including Part 7, Division 3 (Disposal at Sea), and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act, 2003. International obligations include the London Convention and Protocol, the Antarctic Treaty and Madrid Protocol. The program also works to advance Canadian positions to influence global rules aimed at reducing and managing global marine pollution from all sources.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
1,193,963 1,191,696 1,191,696
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
12 12 12

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Marine Pollution
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Reduced marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea Percentage of disposal site monitoring events that do not require site management action 85% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Marine Pollution Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Initiate the development of a strategy for the domestic implementation of marine geo-engineering amendments of the London Protocol that would enable Canada to ratify the London Protocol amendment.
  • Continue to improve guidance for permit applicants for the Disposal at Sea program and the Antarctic program.
  • Continue to assess placement and disposal at sea regimes to support updating of requirements, including those under the London Protocol.
Sub-Program 3.1.4: Environmental Emergencies

Sub-Program Description

This program protects Canadians and their environment from the effects of emergency pollution incidents, through the provision of science-based expert advice and regulations. Specifically, it aims to reduce the frequency and consequences of emergency pollution incidents through five major activities: prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and research and development. Prevention involves providing expert advice to proponents of large development projects, through the environmental assessment process and through regulating chemical facilities to develop and implement environmental emergency plans. Effective preparedness is built on role clarity, effective decision making and communication, and trust and cooperation among government, industry and communities. During an emergency response, the National Environmental Emergencies Centre is Environment Canada’s focal point for provision of scientific advice, such as weather forecasting, contaminant trajectory modelling, the fate and behaviour of hazardous substances, sensitivity mapping, the establishment of clean-up priorities, and the protection of sensitive ecosystems and wildlife such as migratory birds. Recovery activities include assessing damage and providing advice to polluters on repairing environments damaged by environmental emergencies. By providing trusted, science-based expert advice, the program is able to assist emergency response agencies and industries to make responsible decisions about the environment before, during and after an environmentally significant pollution incident.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
15,105,097 12,722,905 7,348,305
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
87 84 66

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Environmental Emergencies
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Regulatees comply with the requirements and obligations of the Environmental Emergency Regulations Percentage of facilities requiring environmental emergency plans that have them in place as required by the Environmental Emergency Regulations 90% March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Environmental Emergencies Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue implementation of the Environmental Emergency Regulations, the Notifications Regulations (under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and the Fisheries Act) and the associated notification agreements that enable the timely transfer of pollution incident information to the Department.
  • Conduct studies on spilled diluted bitumen in support of the federal World Class Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime. Studies will encompass physical and chemical properties of the spilled bitumen and its fate and behaviour, as well as spill modelling, countermeasures and shoreline interactions.
  • Contribute to the implementation of World Class Initiatives on offshore, pipeline, tanker and rail safety, including the development of Net Environmental Benefit Analysis guidelines and the development of area response plans for four pilot areas in Canada.
  • Provide environmental emergency advice for environmental assessments.
Sub-Program 3.1.5: Contaminated Sites

Sub-Program Description

This program is primarily directed to Environment Canada’s responsibilities in supporting the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). The FCSAP is a 15-year Government of Canada horizontal program aimed at reducing environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and associated federal financial liabilities. Fifteen federal departments (including Environment Canada), agencies and consolidated Crown corporations responsible for contaminated sites are currently involved in the FCSAP program, either as custodians of sites or in a supporting role. Environment Canada’s responsibilities include hosting the FCSAP Secretariat, developing guidance and program policies, and providing expert support to federal custodians for the assessment and remediation/risk management activities at their sites. In addition, the FCSAP Secretariat coordinates implementation of the Shared Sites Policy Framework.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
11,832,588 1,921,953 1,921,953
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
42 3 3

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.5: Contaminated Sites
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Reduced liability at higher-risk federal contaminated sites Reduction in liability at all Class 1 and Class 2 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) funded sites during Phase II of FCSAP $1.17 billion Fiscal year 2015-16
Reduced risk to the environment and human health from federal contaminated sites Number of Class 1 and Class 2 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) funded sites where risk reduction activities have been completed 368 March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through theContaminated Sites Sub-Program, the Department will continue to: 

  • Provide program oversight for the ongoing delivery of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) in partnership with other federal departments and agencies and consolidated Crown corporations.
  • Provide expert advice to help federal custodians assess and remediate their contaminated sites to ensure that the highest-priority sites are remediated under FCSAP and to reduce the ecological risks they pose.
  • Provide site-specific guidance to improve risk reduction, and provide guidance and training to custodians.
  • Assess and remediate sites for which Environment Canada is responsible.

In addition, the Department plans to:

  • Prepare a public report on the results of the FCSAP Program describing the progress made on managing federal contaminated sites.

Program 3.2: Climate Change and Clean Air

Program Description

This program aims to protect the health of Canadians, the environment and Canada’s economy from the harmful effects of air pollutants and the impacts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, through the development and implementation of regulations and other control measures. Actions are based on sound scientific and economic analysis, and emissions monitoring and reporting. Work under this program includes: continued collaboration with other governments and stakeholders; expert environmental science and technology advice, assessment, and program management in support of technology investment decisions, policy making and regulations; and cooperation with the United States to align GHG regulations as appropriate, reduce transboundary air pollution and advance the development of clean technologies. It also involves participation and negotiation in, and contributions to, international fora, in order to address climate change and transboundary air pollution, and bilateral and multilateral processes in order to support Canada’s positions and objectives. This program includes contributions in support of Climate Change and Clean Air, and grants for implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
122,872,074 122,872,074 91,678,186 86,918,393
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
712 327 320

Performance Measurement

Program 3.2: Climate Change and Clean Air
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Threats to Canadians, their health and their environment from greenhouse gas emissions are minimized Canadian emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) in megatonnes Canada's national target is a 17% reduction from 2005 levels 2020
Improved air quality in Canada Percentage of the Canadian population living in areas where the 24-hour and the annual Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard (CAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) of 28 µg/m3 and 10 µg/m3 are exceeded Decline in the three-year average December 2015
Improved air quality in Canada Percentage of the Canadian population living in areas where the 8-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard (CAAQS) for ground-level ozone of 63 parts per billion (ppb) are exceeded Decline in the three-year average December 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Climate Change and Clean Air Program, the Department plans to:

  • Continue to deliver the federal government’s sector-by-sector regulatory approach to reducing Canada’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
  • Continue to provide expert advice in support of policy making and regulatory development as they relate to climate change and clean air.
  • In collaboration with the provinces, territories and stakeholders, continue to implement the Air Quality Management System.
  • Begin implementing regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to reduce air pollutant emissions for those industrial sectors for which the instruments have been completed and continue to develop instruments for the remaining major industrial sectors.
  • Continue to collaborate with the United States to reduce transboundary air pollution.
  • Continue to participate in international fora related to climate change and clean air, and implement actions through international partnerships.
  • Deliver relevant and sound science results, data collection and analysis to inform air pollutant and GHG policy and regulatory decision making and activities that impact Canadians, their health and their environment.
Sub-Program 3.2.1: Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program

Sub-Program Description

This program develops domestic approaches to climate change and air pollution by controlling emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants (APs), and promotes science-based approaches to develop new standards and regulations. Core program activities focus on developing and implementing regulations to achieve the reduction of emissions from the industrial and transportation sectors while maintaining economic competitiveness. The program also undertakes analysis related to cross-cutting issues, develops compliance flexibilities, and negotiates equivalency agreements with provinces. It works with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment to implement the Air Quality Management System, which includes establishing new outdoor air quality standards and finalizing and implementing the industrial emissions requirements. The program’s core activities are supported by legal and economic analysis, as well as scientific research, monitoring and modelling of GHGs and APs emissions in order to provide a basis for developing, implementing and evaluating standards and regulations. Activities encompass data collection, emissions estimation and reporting to support domestic programs and meet international requirements, including compiling and submitting international reports on GHGs and APs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
93,647,508 32,712,959 32,833,778
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
618 266 262

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Reduced emissions of air pollutants from regulated and/or targeted sectors Canadian emissions of air pollutants from industrial and mobile sources Decline in the three-year average 2020
Reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from targeted and/or regulated sectors Canadian emissions of greenhouse gases in megatonnes (Mt) from industrial and mobile sources Decline in emissions To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Sub-Program, the Department plans to:  

Address air quality

  • Continue collaboration with provinces, territories and stakeholders to implement the Air Quality Management System (AQMS), which includes new ambient air quality standards, a framework for managing air quality through local air zones and regional airsheds, and emissions requirements for major industrial sectors and equipment types.
  • Finalize and begin implementing the Multi-Sector Air Pollutants Regulations.
  • Finalize and publish alternative instruments to reduce air pollution from the emissions- intensive trade-exposed sectors.
  • Provide air quality monitoring data, expertise, maps and analysis to guide implementation of the AQMS and the tracking benefits of the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement.
  • Develop Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in collaboration with provinces, territories and stakeholders through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment.
  • Continue delivery of relevant and timely research results and ambient air quality monitoring data to contribute to understanding how changes in air pollutant emissions (including those from the transportation and fuels sectors) impact air quality, Canadians’ health and the environment.
  • Update, improve and expand satellite air quality products for monitoring and trend analysis, including the first satellite-derived Canada-wide maps of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide surface deposition.
  • Continue to develop a multi-media (air-water-soil) mercury modelling system to further understand the impact of mercury contamination on the ecosystem.

Address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

  • Maintain GHG and other air pollutant inventories to meet both international and domestic reporting requirements, and improve the regional picture of GHG sources and sinks in Canada.
  • In support of Canada’s commitment to meet its national GHG emissions target, continue to provide policy and economic analysis, and regulatory support to advance the federal sector-by-sector regulatory approach to reducing GHG emissions, aligned with the U.S. as appropriate. This includes cross-cutting policy and regulatory work such as developing compliance mechanisms for GHG reduction measures.
  • Continue to work with interested provinces and territories to develop equivalency agreements for GHG regulations.
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.1: Industrial Sector Emissions

Sub-sub-program Description

This program aims to reduce emissions of air pollutants (APs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) from industrial sectors under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Key activities include the development of GHG standards and regulations for electricity, oil and gas, and emissions-intensive trade-exposed (EITE) sectors and the finalization of standards, regulations and other risk management instruments for air pollutants, as part of the Air Quality Management System. This also includes negotiating and developing equivalency agreements with interested provinces or territories. The program also undertakes monitoring, emissions quantification and reporting, verification, research and modelling, as well as economic and scientific assessments of current and future levels of air pollutants and GHG emissions. It is responsible for reporting requirements under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 for tracking and reporting releases of harmful substances, in order to meet domestic obligations (e.g. National Pollutant Release Inventory) and international obligations (e.g. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change), and is responsible for the design and implementation of an electronic data collection and management system (to provide a harmonized system to report on GHG and AP emissions). The program also provides information to Canadians and decision-makers about the environmental and health impacts associated with air pollutants, including results of scientific monitoring and short-term studies regarding impacts from the oil sands.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
77,369,811 26,809,966 26,930,785
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
481 201 198

Performance Measurement

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.1: Industrial Sector Emissions
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Industrial sectors meet regulated emission intensity levels of greenhouse gases Percentage of coal-fired electricity generation units meeting their regulated greenhouse gas emissions performance requirement 100% March 2016
Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates Percentage of targeted industrial facilities, equipment or regulatees meeting their regulated air pollutant emissions reduction requirement 100% To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Industrial Sector Emissions Sub-Sub-Program, the Department will continue to carry out work on the regulatory and scientific fronts:   

On the regulatory front

  • Continue to implement and administer the federal Coal-Fired Generation of Electricity Regulations and further the development of regulations in support of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from other sectors.
  • Finalize and begin implementing the Multi-Sector Air Pollutants Regulations (MSAPR) for boilers and heaters, stationary engines and the cement sector. This will include continuing to develop an electronic data collection and management tool for regulatees reporting on MSAPR, as well as developing future amendments to include other sectors.
  • Work toward the finalization and implementation of the Base-Level Industrial Emissions Requirements for various equipment types and sectors. 

On the scientific front

  • Deliver science activities to support a better understanding of the fate and trans-provincial/ transboundary transport of air pollutants from industrial sectors.
  • Develop a characterization of long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide, methane and black carbon from the Canadian regional-scale atmospheric monitoring networks to improve understanding of regional-scale source influences.
  • Collect and publish, through the National Pollutant Release Inventory, information on releases, disposals and recycling of key air pollutants.
  • Continue work with interested provinces to manage and expand the Department’s Single Window Reporting System for regulatory reporting of air emissions (including GHGs), pollutant releases and chemical substances.
  • Develop a Canadian Black Carbon Inventory to support work done by the Department and the Arctic Council.
  • Implement the new GHG Reporting Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, which are submitted annually in April, to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.
  • Deliver science activities in support of the assessment of airborne contaminants’ effects on the health of wildlife species, and produce reports and information to inform decision making concerning the effects of these contaminants on wildlife health and ecosystem quality.
  • Evaluate predictions from a high-resolution version of the Department’s air quality forecast model and use the results to assess the effects of oil sands-related activities on air quality and their impacts on ecosystem health.
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.2: Transportation Sector Emissions

Sub-sub-program Description

This program aims to reduce emissions from transportation sources (vehicles, engines and fuels, including biofuels) through the development, implementation and administration of regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Key activities include: development of greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations for vehicles and engines; development of air pollutant regulations for various vehicles, engines and fuels, including biofuels; and implementation and administration of those regulations, including scientific testing and emissions verification to ensure compliance with standards. The program works with Transport Canada to address air pollutant and GHG emissions from maritime shipping, through development of new domestic and international standards, and recommends practices for marine vessels in collaboration with the International Maritime Organization. As well, it shares information and identifies areas of joint interest with provinces and territories toward reducing emissions, through a Mobile Sources Working Group.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
16,277,697 5,902,993 5,902,993
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
137 65 64

Performance Measurement

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.2: Transportation Section Emissions
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions from new motor vehicles, engines and fuels sold in Canada

Rate of compliance with the standards set out in the Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations for:

(i) submission of end-of-model year reports; and

(ii) fleet average emission standards.

100%

(i) May 2014 (for the 2013 model year)

(ii) May 2015 (for the 2011 model year)

Reduced air pollutant emissions from new motor vehicles, engines and fuels sold in Canada Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in grams/mile for new light-duty, on-road vehicles offered for sale in Canada (by model year) 0.07 grams/mile annually from 2011 until the coming into force of the new Tier 3 standards Model year ending December 2012 (to be reported in the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report)

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Transportation Sector Emissions Sub-Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Establish more stringent air pollution emission standards for new cars, trucks and some heavy-duty vehicles, and lower sulphur content in gasoline by developing final Regulations Amending the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations (in Canada Gazette Part II) and final Regulations Amending the Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations to align with the new U.S. Tier 3 standards.
  • Establish more stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) emission standards for post-2018 heavy-duty vehicles by developing proposed Regulations Amending the Heavy-duty Vehicle and Engine Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations.
  • In collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, undertake a technical evaluation of the stringency of the GHG emission standards applicable to passenger automobiles and light trucks of model years 2022-2025.
  • Continue to co-chair the Mobile Sources Working Group with the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, and assist with the ongoing implementation of the Group’s three-year Action Plan.
  • Administer vehicle, engine and fuel regulations, including compliance testing.
  • Carry out an assessment of the impact of air pollutant emissions from marine shipping in the Canadian Arctic.
  • Undertake analysis to support measures to reduce air pollutants from small marine diesel engines and initiate work to update the national marine emissions inventory for marine shipping.
  • Support Transport Canada’s work with the International Maritime Organization to develop global regulations to reduce GHGs from marine shipping.
Sub-Program 3.2.2: International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships

Sub-Program Description

This program leads the development and implementation of bilateral and international agreements to address air pollutants and global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and coordinates Canada’s policy, negotiating positions and participation in relevant international fora. The program leads and participates in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and complementary international processes to negotiate a comprehensive, binding international climate change agreement. It also leads Canada’s participation in international fora, notably the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short Lived Climate Pollutants, the Arctic Council, and the Global Methane Initiative. The program meets international obligations by contributing to organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research, and works under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement to manage transboundary air pollution. It works to implement the U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue to support bilateral collaboration on clean energy priorities, as well as with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to address common issues related to climate change and air quality. The program also participates in the negotiation and implementation of the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Using pollutant data for air and GHG emissions, the program supports Canada in meeting international reporting requirements. It coordinates Canada’s participation under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and its Multilateral Fund, toward the gradual elimination of ozone-depleting substances at a global level. The program supports, in cooperation with other departments and in alignment with international programs, implementation of domestic and international commitments regarding climate change.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
16,800,815 10,977,002 9,374,521
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
41 8 7

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.2.2: International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
International negotiations and agreements on air pollutants and greenhouse gases are proceeding in a direction consistent with Canadian priorities and interests Percentage of stated objectives to be achieved in international negotiations and/or agreements which were met or mostly met Negotiations: 70%
Agreements: 70%
March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Lead Canada’s efforts under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The Department will work with other international partners toward finalizing the framework of a global climate change agreement (December 2015) that includes all major emitters, and continue to develop arrangements for its potential implementation by 2020.
  • Continue to fulfill Canada’s obligations under the UNFCCC.
  • Work with international partners to reduce short-lived climate pollutants under the Arctic Council, the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (Canada is a founding member), the Gothenburg Protocol to the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP), the Global Methane Initiative, the Montreal Protocol, and the International Maritime Organization.
  • Continue to promote an amendment to the Montreal Protocol to phase down the production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons and develop complementary domestic regulations. 
  • Continue collaboration in multilateral fora and international organizations, such as the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Commission for Environmental Cooperation and the United Nations Environment Programme. The Department will also support Canadian input on climate change to the G-7, the G-20 and the World Meteorological Organization.
  • Deliver on Canada’s obligations to international science-based organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research.
  • Collaborate in bilateral partnerships on climate change and clean air. For example, through the U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue, continue to advance joint research, development and demonstration of clean energy technologies that support the transition to a low-carbon economy, and continue to collaborate with the U.S. to reduce transboundary air pollution through the 1991 Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement.
  • Continue to work with international partners under the LRTAP convention to address transboundary air pollution on a regional basis in Europe, Canada and the United States.
  • Prepare Canada’s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory for submission to the UNFCCC annually in April.
  • Prepare a national report to the Arctic Council on black carbon and methane emissions and planned mitigation actions.
Sub-Program 3.2.3: Environmental Technology

Sub-Program Description

This program supports scientific assessments of the impacts of technologies on Canada’s natural environment, and contributes program management to the Government of Canada’s clean air and greenhouse gas technology investment decisions, policy making and regulations. It oversees the operations of Sustainable Development Technology Canada (with Natural Resources Canada) and other science and technology programs aimed at advancing clean technology. It provides expert analysis and assessment of clean technologies to address government priorities regarding clean air, climate change mitigation and green infrastructure.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
12,423,751 47,988,225 44,710,094

Note: The year to year variation in planned spending reflects the funding profile for contributions to the SD Tech FundTM.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
53 53 51

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Environmental Technology
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Reduced emissions from the implementation of environmental technologies funded under the SD Tech FundTM Annual reduction of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to environmental technologies supported by the SD Tech FundTM 9 Mt December 2015
Reduced emissions from the implementation of environmental technologies funded under the SD Tech FundTM Annual reduction of air pollutant emissions attributable to environmental technologies supported by the SD Tech FundTM

SOx: 6155 t

NOx: 3293 t

PM: 459 t

December 2015
Reduced emissions from municipal projects supported by the Green Municipal Fund Annual reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) and air pollutants (criteria air contaminants) resulting from capital projects supported by the Green Municipal Fund 100 kt GHGs
100 t CACs
March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, through the Environmental Technology Sub-Program, the Department plans to:

  • Participate in key federal technology programs (Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), Green Municipal Fund (GMF) and Environmental Technology Verification (ETV)) to maximize environmental benefits and align intended outcomes with departmental priorities (see Environment Canada’s webpage on Science and Technology).
  • Continue to lead the development of an international standard (under the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)) for ETV through the two final stages (Draft International Standard and Final Draft International Standard).
  • Promote harmonization of environmental technology verification among Canadian jurisdictions. This will include establishing linkages with other federal departments and programs to facilitate the use of performance verification, in order to reduce investment risk and increase technology adoption.
  • Enhance collaboration and partnerships among private-sector, academic and not-for-profit organizations in the development and demonstration of sustainable technologies, including streamlining engagement to complement the existing roles of other jurisdictions and the private sector.
  • Continue to promote positive environmental outcomes as a key consideration in federal technology investment decisions, through: 
    • implementing a performance measurement strategy for the SD Tech FundTM that includes both economic and environmental indicators and expected outcomes; and
    • providing an environmental perspective on interdepartmental initiatives such as the Genomics Research and Development Initiative, federal energy research, development and demonstration programs, and the Polar Continental Shelf Program.

Program 3.3: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution

Program Description

This program contributes to minimizing damage and threats to the natural environment and biodiversity through the promotion and enforcement of legislation administered by Environment Canada. Activities focus on pollution, including the release of toxic substances to air, water or land, and the import and export of hazardous waste that presents a risk to the environment and/or human health. The program maintains a contingent of compliance promotion and enforcement officers. Compliance promotion officers deliver activities to increase regulatees’ awareness, understanding and compliance with regulations and other risk management instruments under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and Fisheries Act, with the goal of increasing effectiveness in achieving desired environmental results. Compliance promotion officers also provide information on risk management instrument requirements, the benefits of compliance and the potential penalties of non-compliance, when applicable. Enforcement officers gather intelligence, conduct inspections to verify compliance with laws and regulations, and pursue investigations to take appropriate enforcement measures against offenders. The program works with the United States and Mexico through the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, to strengthen transboundary environmental enforcement. It provides officer training and information management systems for new regulations and administration, and is informed by scientific analyses and expertise, including science advice to support compliance promotion and enforcement actions.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
37,560,222 37,560,222 29,830,876 29,362,896
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
290 234 229

Performance Measurement

Program 3.3: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be achieved
Compliance with pollution laws and regulations administered by Environment Canada Compliance with regulatory requirements for selected regulations 10% increase in compliance relative to the baseline value

Dry Cleaning Regulations: 2015-16

Metal Mining Effluent Regulations: 2017-18

Planning Highlights
(See also Program 1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Wildlife)

In 2015-16, through the Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution Program, the Department will continue to: 

  • Conduct and report on compliance promotion activities on regulatory requirements under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and environmental provisions of the Fisheries Act, with an emphasis on small- and medium-sized enterprises, the Federal HouseFootnote 7 and First Nations, and contribute to promotion of regulations under the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) and the Chemicals Management Plan.
  • Deliver scientific analysis, technical support and data interpretation, conduct forensic investigations, and provide evidence and expert scientific advice for the enforcement of regulations under CARA and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.
  • Implement Phase 2 of the Tetrachloroethylene (Use in Dry Cleaning and Reporting Requirements) Regulations project, the purpose of which is to increase the compliance rate by 10% by 2015-16.
  • Identify enforcement priority areas in consultation with experts and partners (including the U.S. and Mexico, through the Commission for Environmental Cooperation) and in consideration of compliance information.
  • Minimize the risk of surrounding soil and water contamination from high-risk storage tank systems required to have been withdrawn from service by June 2012 (under the Storage Tank Systems for Petroleum and Allied Petroleum Products Regulations) through inspections and, if warranted, enforcement actions.
  • Advance on a number of established multi-year priorities, including by: 
    • enhancing enforcement capabilities in the North through the Northern Environmental Enforcement Strategy - a collaborative effort among federal organizations to share assets, resources, planning opportunities and information; and
    • further developing a new enforcement information system.

Internal Services

Internal Services Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
181,428,113 181,428,113 168,449,053 167,510,201
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
1,412 1,321 1,297

Planning Highlights

In 2015-16, Environment Canada’s Internal Services will undertake key initiatives to enable the Department to contribute to and align with Government-wide goals. This includes initiatives under the Department’s corporate transformation agenda, in line with the Government of Canada’s Blueprint 2020 vision (e.g., Government-wide web renewal; email and information consolidation; modernizing telephony from landlines to more cost-effective Voice over Internet Protocol; streamlining the Department’s financial and asset management systems and office space consolidation.) Specifically, the Department will:

1. Continue to re-engineer departmental systems and operations to increase efficiency

  • Align with the Government of Canada direction and implement the new departmental financial management system (SAP), which includes project- and asset-management modules, to standardize and integrate financial, material and asset business processes.
  • Standardize procurement and financial reporting to provide reliable and timely information for effective decision making, stewardship and efficient policy and program delivery.
  • Develop a departmental action plan on Open Government while continuing work underway to strengthen data management and recordkeeping practices and capacity.
  • Continue to rationalize the Department’s software applications inventory to reduce redundant or obsolete Information Technology solutions.
  • Continue to implement the Departmental Security Plan.

2. Improve business processes and common services to maintain or improve levels of service and client satisfaction.

  • Lead the development of the “Environment and Natural Resources” theme on Canada.ca in support of the Government-wide directive on web renewal, which will make the Government of Canada more efficient and responsive to Canadians.
  • Implement a new financial management service model.
  • Continue to standardize and implement procurement documents and processes across the Department, and begin to implement a new national procurement model.
  • Continue with the National Accommodations Strategy in the National Capital Region and begin implementing the action plan for other urban areas.

3. Implement the Departmental People Management Strategy and initiatives to create an adaptive and mobile workforce and a modern workplace.

  • Continue to implement a change management strategy to support staff through the Government-wide transition and departmental changes that affect people and business processes, including supporting the Clerk of the Privy Council's Destination 2020 vision.
  • Strengthen linkages with colleges and universities in order to meet departmental needs for training, development and recruitment.
  • Transition to and implement common human resources business processes and a new Human Resources Information Management System (including PeopleSoft 9.1, Pay Modernization, Pay Consolidation).
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Privacy statement

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: