Departmental Plan 2017 to 2018, lower-level programs, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Sub-program 1.1.1: Biodiversity policy and priorities

Sub-program description

This program enables Environment and Climate Change Canada to play a national leading role in engaging stakeholders, provincial and territorial governments, and other federal government departments in Canada’s implementation of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. The program provides scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision makers, and develops policies and initiatives to advance conservation and sustainable development. The program leads and coordinates, at the federal and national level, key initiatives such as biodiversity information reporting and developing and applying models for social, cultural and economic valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision-making. Strategies used in Canada include the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy and the Biodiversity Outcomes Framework. The program also coordinates the federal government’s response to the 2004 Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, implemented by federal science-based and regulatory departments and agencies, including the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. In addition, Canada participates internationally in the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources, the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress under the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, and the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna working group of the Arctic Council. As well, the program serves as the Canadian lead and national focal point for the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Funding provided by the program includes Canada’s annual contribution to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and support for international working groups. This program may also use funding from the Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat transfer payment.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Biodiversity goals and targets are integrated into federal, provincial and territorial strategies and plans that have an impact on biodiversity Percentage of federal departments with natural resource or environmental mandates that have integrated relevant cross-cutting and sectoral 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets into their strategies and/or plans 100% December 2017 100% as of March 2014 100% as of March 2015 n/aa
Biodiversity goals and targets are integrated into federal, provincial and territorial strategies and plans that have an impact on biodiversity Percentage of provincial and territorial governments that have publicly identified goals, targets or specific actions that directly support the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets 100% March 2019 n/ab 100% as of March 2015 n/ac

a. Indicator is reported every other year.

b. Initial reporting from provinces and territories was not completed in time for 2013-14 reporting.

c. Indicator is reported once every four years.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2,476,086 2,475,765 2,385,370
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
16 16 15

Sub-program 1.1.2: Species at risk

Sub-program description

This program’s purpose is to implement the Species at Risk Act (SARA). SARA is the key federal government commitment to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened, and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened. The program provides for publication of recovery documents, identification of critical habitat, protection of wildlife species and their critical habitat, and progress reports. Species recovery is achieved in part through the Habitat Stewardship Program, the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk, the Interdepartmental Recovery Fund and the Species at Risk Protection on Agricultural Lands initiative, through which Indigenous peoples and other Canadians are engaged in a variety of conservation and recovery activities for species at risk and protection as well as recovery of critical habitat. The program relies on partnerships with provincial, territorial and other governments, as well as Indigenous peoples and other organizations (e.g., environmental organizations, sector associations). Authority for the program is based on SARA and Canada’s obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act. This program may use funding from the following transfer payments: Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat, Habitat Stewardship Contribution Program and Assessed Contribution to CITES.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Critical habitat is protected

Percentage of Threatened and Endangered species at risk for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is responsible:

(i) whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part within federal protected areas with that critical habitat described in the Canada Gazette;

(ii) whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part on other federal lands with that habitat legally protected

(i) federal protected areas 100%

(ii) federal lands 100%

(i) March 2018

(ii) March 2025

n/aa

(i) 53%

(ii) 12%
as of March 31, 2015

(i) 96%

(ii) 6%
as of March 31, 2016

Important habitat is secured, protected, improved and/or restored to enhance the recovery of species at risk Total land area (in hectares) that has been (i) secured; (ii) protected (new); or (iii) protected (renewed)

(i) 5,000

(ii) 14,000

(iii) 93,000

March 2018

(i) 9,142

(ii) 10,386

(iii) 128,765

(i) 3,744

(ii) 20,263

(iii) 24,130

n/aa
Recovery strategies and management plans are developed Percentage of species listed as Extirpated, Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is responsible with a recovery strategy or management plan that is posted as proposed or final on the Species at Risk public registry 100% March 2018 44% as of March 31, 2014 61% as of March 31, 2015 78% as of March 31, 2016

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
57,218,289 45,245,780 44,896,225
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
244 200 197

Sub-program 1.1.3: Migratory birds

Sub-program description

This program supports actions to protect and conserve migratory bird populations. It is responsible for implementing the Migratory Birds Convention, signed with the United States in 1916, via the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and associated regulations. Activities include conserving populations, individual birds, and their nests and eggs, as well as efforts to conserve habitats of importance to birds. One of the key activities undertaken in this program is monitoring the status and trends of the wide diversity of bird species, as well as the broad range of landscapes where they occur. Another key component of the program is to undertake research to understand causes of change in bird populations in order to inform future conservation actions, whether for species below accepted targets or for species above their targets (e.g., overabundant species). Conservation actions—both within Canada and in other countries that share responsibility for migratory birds—are undertaken on the basis of the results of the monitoring programs and are informed by the results of research. Conservation actions include the promotion of management practices and stewardship actions that protect and conserve birds and their habitats, mitigation of stressors/factors that affect the population status of birds (including actions on habitats of importance to birds), development of policies and guidance to support the conservation of birds while also minimizing socio-economic impacts of birds (including managing health and safety issues associated with migratory birds), and taking actions to enforce the Act and associated regulations. The Migratory Birds program is delivered in partnership with other governments in Canada and internationally, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations, and industry, with coordination through the North American Bird Conservation Initiative - Canada. Client groups include the Canadian public, game-bird hunters, Indigenous peoples (subsistence harvesting), natural resource economic sectors and natural resource users, and other governments (provincial/territorial and foreign). This program may use funding from the Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat transfer payment.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Migratory bird populations maintained at population goals Proportion of migratory bird species within acceptable bounds of their population goals 60% December 2020 n/aa n/aa 57%
Data are available to manage and assess bird populations Proportion of migratory bird species whose population status can be assessed with high reliability 50% December 2020 n/aa n/aa 33% in 2014

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
17,920,182 18,109,517 18,128,417
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
151 149 147

Sub-program 1.1.4: Habitat conservation partnerships

Sub-program description

This program supports the delivery of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and Canada Wildlife Act. It does this by funding projects and encouraging partnership and habitat conservation activities that secure, protect, improve and/or restore important and ecologically sensitive habitat to enhance the survival of wildlife—in particular, species at risk and migratory birds. The program provides mechanisms (e.g., tax incentives, funding initiatives) to engage a variety of organizations and individuals, including private land owners, environmental non-governmental organizations (e.g., land trusts) and other levels of government. Activities under the program include the National Wetland Conservation Fund, which supports on-the-ground activities to restore and enhance wetlands, helps identify areas where restoration activities should be prioritized, monitors the impacts of on-the-ground activities (i.e., through scientific assessments), and encourages stewardship and wetland appreciation by a wide variety of partners to build support for future wetland conservation and restoration activities, with a focus on working landscapes. Other activities include the delivery of the Ecological Gifts Program, a tax incentive program for private land owners who donate ecologically sensitive land to qualified recipients, and support for the implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP), a Canada-United States-Mexico partnership of federal/provincial/state governments and non-governmental organizations that aims to conserve wetlands in North America. Work under the NAWMP is achieved through participation on the North American Wetlands Conservation Council and Habitat Joint Ventures, and implementation of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. In addition, the program makes an assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention) and to three programs wholly administered by partners—Wildlife Habitat Canada’s Conservation Stamp Initiative, the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Natural Areas Conservation Program, and Earth Rangers. This program may use funding from the following transfer payments: Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat, Grants in support of the Natural Areas Conservation Program, and Assessed Contributions to the Ramsar Convention.

 
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Priority habitat for waterfowl is retained in support of North American Waterfowl Management Plan objectives Cumulative total priority waterfowl habitat (in hectares) retained in the medium term or permanently by Environment and Climate Change Canada and partners in support of North American Waterfowl Management Plan objectives 8,426,188 ha March 2020 8.03 million as of December 2013 8.07 million as of March 2015 8.07 million as of December 2015
Important and ecologically-sensitive habitat is secured to enhance the survival of wildlife, in particular, species at risk and migratory birds Cumulative total ecologically-sensitive land area (in hectares) secured (Ecological Gifts Program) 210,000 ha March 2020 n/aa 170,554 as of March 2015 175,181 as of March 2016
Priority habitats for waterfowl are restored in support of North American Waterfowl Management Plan objectives Cumulative total priority waterfowl habitat restored by Environment and Climate Change Canada and partners in support of North American Waterfowl Management Plan objectives 1,854,217 ha March 2020 n/ab 1,439,553 as of March 2015 1,449,375 as of December 2015

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

b. The indicator methodology was revised starting in 2014-15.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
40,411,603 40,411,602 7,059,527
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
26 26 20

Sub-program 1.1.5: Protected areas

Sub-program description

The Protected Areas program supports the delivery of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s obligations under the Canada Wildlife Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and the Species at Risk Act. The program manages a network of marine and terrestrial protected areas (National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries) to protect key biodiversity areas required for the conservation of Canada’s migratory birds, species at risk, and other wildlife. The Protected Areas program also promotes public awareness and understanding of wildlife and nature conservation and of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s role in conservation efforts. It carries out strategic planning and coordination in support of the establishment of new protected areas, as well as the management of the existing network. It requires the support of the public and close collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, Indigenous groups, other wildlife management or natural resource agencies, non-governmental organizations and property owners. Program activities support initiatives that contribute to the further establishment of National Wildlife Areas, such as the Connecting Canadians to Nature initiative under the National Conservation Plan, the implementation of the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy, and the fulfillment of the Crown’s obligations under the Inuit Impact and Benefits Agreement. The program operates as part of a broader network of protected areas, including those managed by other federal departments (Parks Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada) and provincial and territorial agencies, along with conservation properties owned and/or managed by non-governmental organizations. The program directs research and conducts wildlife and habitat monitoring in its protected areas. Program work also includes landscape conservation assessment and planning, which plays a key role in consolidating species population, observation and habitat data to inform planning and decision-making for priority habitat protection and conservation, using regulatory (SAR critical habitat protection) and non-regulatory (stewardship funding) tools. This also includes monitoring and reporting on habitat conservation activities with the aim of tracking gains made towards Canada’s Biodiversity 2020 and Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals. This program may use funding from the Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat transfer payment.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Habitat for the conservation of migratory birds, species at risk and rare or unique species is protected Total area that is under legally-binding protection as marine and terrestrial National Wildlife Areas and as Migratory Bird Sanctuaries 12,710,691 ha March 2020 n/aa n/aa 12,448,961 ha as of December 31, 2015
Canadians connect with nature in National Wildlife Areas close to urban areas Annual number of visitors to the ten National Wildlife Areas selected for improvement under the National Conservation Plan 321,000 March 2020 n/aa n/aa n/aa

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
17,296,293 15,118,052 14,993,926
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
109 107 101

Sub-program 1.2.1: Water quality and aquatic ecosystems health

This program conducts research and monitoring activities to report on freshwater quality and aquatic ecosystem health of waters within the federal mandate and to contribute to informed decision making on public policy and regulations related to water management in Canada (e.g., under the Canada Water Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, Fisheries Act, and International Boundary Waters Treaty Act). The program monitors and reports on the status and trends of freshwater quality and aquatic ecosystem health at provincial, territorial and international boundaries, within federal lands, and on nationally significant bodies of water using a cooperative and risk-based approach. The program identifies the hydrologic and aquatic ecosystem impacts of climate change and variability to inform adaptation planning and mitigation actions, including responsible resource development, and to support the development of domestic and international climate and water policy decision making. The program includes collaboration with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver data and information to inform the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program, a food safety program that aims to protect the health and safety of shellfish-consuming Canadians and that maintains international market access for Canada’s shellfish exports. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions in support of Water Resources.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Institutions engaged in trans-boundary water management have the water quality data, information and analysis they need to make water management decisions Percentage of clients representing institutions engaged in trans-boundary water management who rank their satisfaction with water quality monitoring surveillance data, information and/or advice as 7 out of 10 or higher on a client satisfaction index 75% February 2020 n/aa n/aa 72% as of February 2016

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
44,269,481 45,019,739 43,313,140
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
311 306 302

Sub-program 1.2.2: Water resources management and use

Sub-program description

This program supports integrated water management decisions at the federal, provincial, and territorial levels. It promotes and enables the application of science-based information to inform decision making in an integrated and coherent manner consistent with the Department of the Environment Act, International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, Canada Water Act and International River Improvements Act. The program coordinates water quality and water quantity science and monitoring to inform decisions, policy development and management approaches. It provides science, engineering and monitoring information to domestic water boards and Canada-U.S. water boards (e.g., International Joint Commission boards) and contributes Departmental expertise to these water boards in order to regulate water levels and flows to protect ecosystems and a wide range of socio-economic interests related to domestic and Canada-U.S. transboundary waters.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Water resource decision makers have the necessary information and stakeholder perspectives to make responsible and appropriate shared-resource decisions Percentage of external water board members rating their satisfaction with Environment and Climate Change Canada's involvement on water boards and committees as 8 out of 10 or higher 80% March 2018 n/aa 70% in 2013-14b 65% as of April 2016

a. Actual results were not available in time for reporting in 2013-14 due to the timing of distribution of the survey.

b. The value reported in 2014-15 was derived from a program evaluation conducted in 2013-14.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2,633,482 2,633,481 2,651,615
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
28 28 27

Sub-program 1.2.3: Hydrometric services

Sub-program description

This program provides critical hydrometric data, information and knowledge needed by Canadian jurisdictions to make informed water management decisions. The information provided by this program protects the health and safety of Canadians by supporting the goals and mandates of all levels of government that manage water. The data is used for flood forecasting, emergency response, infrastructure design and scientific research. The data is essential for improving economic efficiency in the agriculture, hydroelectricity and transportation sectors. Domestic and international water management boards under program 1.2.2. and international, federal, provincial, territorial and municipal agencies rely on the outputs of this sub-program for regulation of, and response to, changing water levels and flows. Under the Canada Water Act, the monitoring activities of this program are carried out through cost-shared bilateral agreements between Environment and Climate Change Canada and each of the provinces and territories (Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada represents Nunavut). These agreements create the national framework within which Environment and Climate Change Canada collects, interprets and provides water level and flow information.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Canadians and their institutions have the hydrological data, information and knowledge they need to make informed water management decisions Percentage of provincial and territorial partners rating their satisfaction with Environment and Climate Change Canada's hydrometric services as 8 out of 10 or higher 80% March 2018 n/aa 79% 73%

a. The indicator methodology was revised starting in 2014-15.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
22,819,877 24,499,261 24,308,235
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
259 256 252

Sub-program 1.3.1: Sustainability reporting and indicators

Sub-program description

The Sustainability Reporting and Indicators program provides consolidated information to Parliament and Canadians on key environmental issues in Canada and related federal government activities, specifically through the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) initiative. To support the Federal Sustainable Development Act, this program ensures that Environment and Climate Change Canada meets its obligation to lead the implementation, tracking and reporting of the FSDS, whose mandate is to support and foster transparency and accountability to the public and Parliament. In accordance with the Act, a strategy is tabled in Parliament every three years, setting out the federal sustainable development goals, targets and implementation strategies. In addition, this program provides, at least once every three years, a report on the federal government’s progress in implementing the FSDS. The CESI is integral to the implementation of both the FSDS and Environment and Climate Change Canada’s broader public information mandate. Through close collaboration with science and data experts across the federal government, CESI develops and regularly reports on a wide range of environmental indicators used to track and report on the progress of the FSDS and to keep Parliament and Canadians informed and up-to-date on the state and trends of environmental issues of concern, including air quality and climate, water quality and availability, and protecting nature. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14 Actual results 2014-15 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results
Canadians have access to and use environmental sustainability indicators produced by the Government of Canada Annual number of visits to the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators website 55,000 March 2018 n/aa n/aa 54,589
Policies and plans of federal government departments reflect the goals and targets in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Percentage of goals, targets and implementation strategies from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy integrated into annual reporting by departments and agencies designated by the Federal Sustainable Development Act 100% March 2018 94% in the 2012-13 Departmental Performance Reports and the 2014-15 Reports on Plans and Priorities 95% in the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Reports and the 2015-16 Reports on Plans and Priorities 95% in the 2014-15 Departmental Performance Reports and the 2016-17 Reports on Plans and Priorities

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
7,746,536 7,746,536 7,746,536
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
55 54 53

Sub-program 1.3.2: Ecosystem and environmental assessments

Sub-program description

This program consists of a consolidated range of activities that support the assessment, evaluation and management of Canada’s ecosystems in a sustainable manner. The program’s diverse components provide scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision makers across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, industry, the research community and the general public. The program aims to ensure that ecosystem information and environmental effects of development proposals can be factored into decisions. The program activities involve conducting research, monitoring, assessing and reporting on the health of ecosystems and biodiversity. It includes collaboration with Alberta to implement an industry-funded, scientifically rigorous, environmental monitoring program for the Oil Sands region that integrates air, water, land and biodiversity components and results in an enhanced understanding of cumulative effects and environmental change. Environment and Climate Change Canada participates in federal environmental assessments, including those in the North, and contributes scientific expertise in territorial and provincial environmental assessments, which collectively provide a platform for the Department to contribute to the health of ecosystems. Elements of this program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Potential significant adverse environmental effects of projects, plans, programs or policies subject to federal environmental assessment legislation and Cabinet Directives are avoided or mitigated Percentage of Environment and Climate Change Canada recommendations that are fully or partially incorporated into Decision Statements 60% March 2018 65% 74% 89%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
20,765,186 19,934,281 19,816,398
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
206 194 191

Sub-program 1.3.3: Community engagement

Sub-program description

This program engages individual Canadians and communities in protecting and restoring the environment through behavioural change, capacity building, community-based funding programs and engagement activities.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Projects achieve their projected engagement of Canadians in individual and collective activities to protect, conserve or restore the natural environment Number of Canadians engaged in individual and collective actions to protect, conserve or restore the natural environment 130,000 March 2018 183,792 165,214 n/aa

a. Reporting for 2015-16 is not yet available due to the timing of completion of final reports from proponents for projects funded by the program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
9,426,802 9,426,802 9,426,802
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
19 19 19

Sub-sub-program 1.3.3.1: EcoAction community funding

Sub-Sub-program description

This funding program was established to provide financial support to not-for-profit and non-governmental organizations for community projects that have measurable positive impacts on the environment. Projects funded by EcoAction protect, rehabilitate or enhance the environment and build the capacity of communities and individuals to sustain these activities. Projects are funded in one of four priority areas: clean air, climate change, clean water or nature. The success of EcoAction projects requires the involvement of community members, including volunteers. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: EcoAction 2000 - Community Funding Service.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Funded projects achieve their planned goals for nature conservation, clean water and/or climate change Average percentage of project environmental goals achieved 80% March 2018 115%a 151% n/ab

a. The reported value in the 2013-14 DPR was for the 2012-13 fiscal year, as more recent data were not available at the time of reporting.

b. Reporting for 2015-16 is not yet available due to the timing of completion of final reports from proponents for projects funded by the program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
5,789,392 5,789,392 5,789,392
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
14 14 14

Sub-sub-program 1.3.3.2: Environmental damages fund

The Environmental Damages Fund (EDF), administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada on behalf of the Government of Canada, provides a mechanism for directing monies received as a result of fines, court orders and voluntary payments related to environmental infractions to priority projects that will benefit Canada’s natural environment. Environment and Climate Change Canada works closely with other government departments to ensure that court-awarded fines are used for projects with positive environmental impacts and in a manner as intended by the court. EDF projects, including restoration, environmental quality improvement, research and development, and education and awareness, are managed with oversight from Environment and Climate Change Canada. Eligible recipients include non-governmental organizations, universities and other academic institutions, Indigenous groups, and provincial, territorial and municipal governments. EDF program partners include Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Parks Canada.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Recognition by judges of the value of the Environmental Damages Fund to restore environmental damage or harm to wildlife Annual number of court awards directing payment to the Environmental Damages Fund via non-directed legislation 5 March 2018 15 5 9
Natural resources similar to those affected are restored Area (in hectares) where natural resources similar to those affected have been restored 500 March 2018 n/aa n/aa 3.1

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
486,118 486,118 486,118
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
5 5 5

Sub-sub-program 1.3.3.3: Environmental youth employment

Sub-Sub-program description

This program manages the Science Horizons Youth Internship Program, which is part of the federal Youth Employment Strategy led by Employment and Social Development Canada. Under the Science Horizons Youth Internship Program, wage subsidies are provided to qualifying organizations to support youth employment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Funding recipients include small and medium enterprises, post-secondary educational institutions, provincial and municipal governments, and non-government organizations across Canada. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions for the Science Horizons Youth Internship Program.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Increased employment or return to advanced-level studies of participating youth in science, technology, engineering or mathematics Percentage of youth participants that either obtain employment in, or return to advanced-level studies in, science, technology, engineering or mathematics 80% March 2018 81% 80% n/aa

a. Due to program expansion in 2015-16, reporting on internships was delayed and data were not available in time for reporting.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
3,151,292 3,151,292 3,151,292
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
0 0 0

Sub-program 1.3.4: Great Lakess

Sub-program description

This program provides leadership, oversight, coordination, funding and governance mechanisms for the Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative by managing, delivering and reporting on a number of key initiatives: the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health, Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative, Great Lakes Action Plan, and Action Plan for Clean Water (Great Lakes sediment remediation implementation). Work encompasses policy development, issues management, planning, reporting, coordination of science and monitoring, and the development, implementation and analysis of agreements, plans and initiatives. The program works in collaboration with other federal departments and other levels of government in Canada and the U.S., Indigenous groups, conservation authorities and watershed management agencies, municipalities, environmental organizations and stewardship networks. Specifically, it implements Remedial Action Plans and Lakewide Action and Management Plans to improve environmental quality and achieve the vision of a healthy and prosperous Great Lakes ecosystem. Through the Great Lakes Action Plan, it works to restore beneficial use impairments in identified Areas of Concern, and implements contaminated sediment remediation projects through the Action Plan for Clean Water. Through the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative, it also works to determine phosphorus targets and identify possible actions to reduce levels that contribute to harmful algae. The program monitors and assesses the water quality and ecosystem health of the Great Lakes and develops action plans and strategies to address evolving and historic issues of concern in the Great Lakes, including species and habitat protection, chemicals of concern to Canada and the United States, and the identification of climate change impacts on Great Lakes water quality. The program also regularly reports federally and provincially through the Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health and bi-nationally through the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, including specifically through the State of the Great Lakes reports on environmental indicators, the Progress Report of the Parties (Canada-U.S.), updates on Lakewide Action and Management Plans, Canada-Ontario Agreement Progress Reports, and a report on groundwater science. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Environment and Climate Change Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in beneficial use impairments and environmental quality of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem Number of beneficial uses whose status is listed as “impaired” or “requires further assessment” for Canada’s 17 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes 70 December 2019 104 as of February 2014 103 as of March 2015 97 as of March 2016
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
36,767,872 18,653,656 15,456,032
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
89 88 83

Sub-program 1.3.5: St. Lawrence

Sub-program description

This program provides leadership, oversight and coordination to the overall governance of the St. Lawrence Action Plan and reports results achieved collectively by the Government of Canada and Government of Quebec. It works to establish cooperative partnerships between the federal and provincial governments and non-governmental organizations in order to address biodiversity conservation, water quality improvement, and sustainability of beneficial uses. It also supports stakeholder participation in collaboration processes and communities in improving environmental quality through grants and contribution agreements. The program conducts and coordinates research, monitoring and prediction activities in the St. Lawrence with other federal and provincial departments and releases regular reports on the state of the St. Lawrence, fact sheets on 21 environmental indicators, and the results of the St. Lawrence Action Plan. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Environment and Climate Change Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem Estimated progress achieved against near-term goals identified in the St. Lawrence Action Plan 100% March 2019 77% as of March 2014 89% as of March 2015 85% as of March 2016
Non-federal government partners contribute to near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem Average number of participating external organizations per project funded by Environment and Climate Change Canada under the St. Lawrence Action Plan 3 March 2021 n/aa 3.9 as of March 2015 7.25 as of March 2016
Non-federal government partners contribute to near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem Funds contributed by non-federal government organizations per dollar contributed by Environment and Climate Change Canada to projects under the St. Lawrence Action Plan 3.5 March 2021 n/aa 3.76 as of March 2015 3.3 as of March 2016

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
4,313,823 4,333,865 4,313,823
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
20 19 19

Sub-program 1.3.6: Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay

Sub-program description

This program provides financial and technical support through the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund to implement priority projects through contributions to citizens, non-governmental organizations, provincial ministries, conservation authorities, land owners, universities and industry. The Fund also supports key research within federal departments. Priority objectives of the Fund are to support projects that: improve monitoring, assessment and information required to improve decision making for phosphorus reduction strategies; conserve critical aquatic habitat and associated species through targeted aquatic habitat protection, restoration and creation; reduce rural and urban non-point sources of nutrients, including implementation of best management practices for soil, crops, livestock, etc. creation and rehabilitation of wetlands and naturalization of watercourses; and reduce discharges of phosphorus from point sources, including sewage, combined sewer overflows and urban storm water systems. This includes support to develop and test innovative approaches to manage urban storm water and wastewater. The initiative is administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada in consultation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Province of Ontario, the Lake Simcoe Conservation Authority and other key stakeholders. Program investments are expected to improve water quality for recreational use, substantially reduce phosphorus loads from urban and rural sources, advance the restoration of a sustainable cold-water fishery, and restore ecological integrity. This initiative is a key component of the Government’s Action Plan for Clean Water and supports commitments of the federal government related to the Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Environment and Climate Change Canada and partners achieve reductions in phosphorus loads and restoration and protection of fish and aquatic-dependent wildlife populations of Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay Estimated annual reductions in phosphorus inputs to the Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay watersheds due to projects supported by the program New target to be determined To be determined n/aa 1,325 kg as of March 2015 1,858 kg as of March 2016

a. Actual results were not reported for 2013-14 because many of the funded projects were multi-year and had not been completed.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
1,081,428 1,041,300 1,041,300
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
11 11 11

Sub-program 1.3.7: Lake Winnipeg

Sub-program description

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative (LWBI) focuses on three key areas: science (research, modelling and monitoring); transboundary partnerships; and the implementation and administration of the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund, which provides financial support for high-impact, solution-oriented projects aimed at reducing nutrient loads and improving the long-term ecological health of the lake and watershed. The program works with existing water governance bodies to explore options and opportunities to cooperatively develop and support implementation of a basin-wide nutrient strategy, in addition to providing a forum for communication. This includes working with the Province of Manitoba to continue implementation of the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg, which provides for a long-term collaborative and coordinated approach between the two governments to support the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin. The program financially supports the Lake Winnipeg Research Consortium to facilitate and enhance community-led scientific research via the only lake-based research vessel in existence (i.e., the MV Namao). As well, the program financially supports the ongoing development and expansion of the single-window web information portal, housed at the University of Manitoba, to better promote and enable data sharing and analysis with partners and other networks, in order to support research on Lake Winnipeg. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Reduced nutrient loading in the Lake Winnipeg basin Estimated reduction of phosphorus load in the Lake Winnipeg basin resulting from projects funded by Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund New target to be determined To be determined n/aa 8,316 kg as of March 2015 36,065 kg as of March 2016

a. Actual results were not reported for 2013-14 because many of the funded projects were multi-year and had not been completed.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
1,330,550 1,330,550 1,330,550
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
13 13 13

Sub-program 1.3.8: Ecosystems partnerships

Sub-program description

This program coordinates and oversees initiatives in targeted ecosystems in the Atlantic, Pacific and northern regions of Canada with the goal of ensuring their health, productivity and long-term sustainability. The program focuses on building partnerships, supporting actions, and strengthening collaboration between several levels of government, academia, industry, Indigenous groups and non-governmental organizations to enhance science and research and share knowledge and information in order to increase our understanding of and help to protect and restore these ecosystems. In Atlantic Canada, the Atlantic Ecosystem Initiatives supports collaborative ecosystem-based projects that lead to action to maintain healthy habitats and biodiversity, improve water quality, and address the impacts of climate change. The Gulf of Maine Initiative promotes effective conservation and responsible development in the Gulf of Maine Ecosystem through partnerships and collaboration. In Pacific and Northern ecosystems, including the Okanagan Basin and the Salish Sea, work continues on the development and implementation of water balance models and ecosystem health indicators to support informed decision-making on economic development, land use planning and the protection of habitat and biodiversity. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Sustainable Ecosystems.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Achievement of objectives for improvements in beneficial uses and environmental quality in priority ecosystems set by Environment and Climate Change Canada and collaborating organizations Percentage of project expected results achieved 90% May 2018 n/aa n/aa 91% as of June 2016
Engagement of partners in projects involving targeted ecosystems Number of partners or organizations participating in Environment and Climate Change Canada-supported projects which address program priorities in targeted ecosystems 100 May 2018 n/aa n/aa 114 as of June 2016
Engagement of partners in projects involving targeted ecosystems Value of resources contributed by partners per dollar contributed by Environment and Climate Change Canada 1 May 2018 n/aa n/aa 0.8 as of June 2016

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
3,088,648 2,912,649 2,528,597
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
9 9 8

Sub-program 2.1.1: Weather observations, forecasts and warnings

Sub-program description

This program provides 24/7 weather warnings and atmospheric and environmental forecasts and information, with lead times of minutes to weeks. Its purpose is to help Canadians and a variety of economic sectors anticipate dangerous meteorological events to allow sufficient time to protect themselves and their property. Product and service quality depends upon research, science, modelling, and the supercomputing capacity managed by Shared Services Canada. The program is delivered through collaborations involving data, science and information distribution in Canada and internationally. Collaborators are the media, all levels of government, academia, other national meteorological services, and research and space agencies. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act and Weather Modification Information Act, and supports other departments acting under the Emergency Management Act (2007). This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Assessed Contributions to the World Meteorological Organization and Grants and Contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditions Percentage of the population who report that they are somewhat or very likely to access weather information during a typical day 90% July 2018 n/aa n/aa 91% as of January 2016
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditions Percentage of public forecast maximum temperatures that were predicted within 3°C of the observed values three days in advance 82% March 2018 n/ab n/ab 85%
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditions Percentage of public forecast maximum temperatures that were predicted within 3°C of the observed values five days in advance 72% March 2018 n/ab n/ab 75%

a. This indicator is measured only once every four or five years.

b. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
170,105,102 163,309,529 167,535,464
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
887 836 810

Sub-program 2.1.2: Health-related meteorological information

This program provides forecasts, tools, data and information on atmospheric conditions that affect health, such as air quality, extreme temperatures and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It supports the mandates of Environment and Climate Change Canada, Health Canada and many provincial government agencies, along with public and non-governmental health agencies. The program includes work on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI), info smog, UV Index forecast and other projects that assist Canadians in making informed decisions to protect their health and reduce pollution, and that enable health agencies to help vulnerable populations respond to changing atmospheric conditions. It is delivered across Canada through collaborations promoting data and information dissemination. Collaborators include the media, public health agencies at all levels of government, provincial environment agencies and non-governmental agencies. This program also makes use of systematic observations and monitoring of air pollutants, including data collected under the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) program, stratospheric ozone and UV radiation in the atmosphere. The program hosts the World Brewer Calibration Centre and World Ozone and UV Data Centre, operated on behalf of the World Meteorological Organization and used by over 75 government agencies around the world. The Centre generates a number of products delivered from various stratospheric ozone and UV observation sources, which are available online for use by the public and international meteorological community. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditions Percentage of targeted sensitive populations within selected regions receiving information on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information 15 - 25% of sensitive population (range is due to regional variation) March 2018 17% as of October 2011 n/aa n/aa
Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditions Percentage of the general population within selected regions receiving Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information 15 - 20% of general population (range is due to regional variation) March 2018 15% as of October 2011 n/aa n/aa

a. This indicator is measured only once every four or five years.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
7,535,384 7,762,742 7,537,290
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
51 50 53

Sub-program 2.1.3: Climate information, predications and tools

Sub-program description

This program generates new knowledge and information about past, present and future states of the climate system and how it functions, as well as on the changing composition of the atmosphere and related impacts. Its work includes: developing global and regional climate models and scenarios; detecting human influence on climate change in Canada, including extremes; understanding the North and the Canadian cryosphere; and tracking atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and aerosols across Canada, including in remote locations. These activities increase understanding of the impacts of climate change on society, economic sectors and ecosystems. Results from the program’s analysis and research activities provide the scientific basis for policy development, mitigation, adaptation planning and decision making for programs such as the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework, as well as products, services and tools to Canadians. In particular, climate services inform and assist users in adapting to both present climate variability and medium- to long-term changes in climate. The program shares data, science and information with all levels of government in Canada, academia, industry, consortia, standards councils, and the national and international scientific community, including organizations such as the World Meteorological Organization, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1999), Emergency Management Act (2007), National Research Council Act (Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes), and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (articles 4 and 5: monitoring and research). This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Clients and users have the information they require on climate projections, scenarios and climate data sets on various time and spatial scales Annual number of downloads of climate datasets 25,000 March 2018 15,666 for 2013-14 22,935 for the period 2012 to 2015 (3-year average) 53,036 for the period 2013 to 2016 (3-year average)
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
16,937,924 16,697,818 17,022,577
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
134 132 130

Sub-program 2.2.1: Meteorological services in support of air navigation

Sub-program description

The Aviation Weather program provides a range of aviation weather services, including forecasts and warnings 24 hours/day, 365 days/year. The services are provided under a cost-recovery agreement with NAV CANADA, Canada’s air navigation system operator, and support decision-making throughout the aviation industry, including domestic and international airlines and the regulating body, Transport Canada. Information supports both tactical and strategic decisions to optimize air transportation safety and efficiency.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
NAV CANADA and the aviation industry have the meteorological information and services they need to maximize their efficiency and aviation safety Average rating, on a scale of 1 (very unsatisfactory) to 10 (very satisfactory), of client satisfaction with aviation weather services provided by Environment and Climate Change Canada 7.5 March 2018 7.1 7.2 7.4
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
4,684,512 4,676,394 4,656,352
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
145 142 140

Sub-program 2.2.2: Meteorological and ice service in support of marine navigation

Sub-program description

This program provides mariners, marine industries and regulatory agencies with forecasts of the weather, sea state and ice conditions 24/7. It supports the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the World Meteorological Organization and the International Hydrographic Organization by providing meteorological information for Canadian and international Arctic waters, and supports the goals and mandates of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The program helps marine industries and other interests operating in Canadian waters, including organizations involved in shipping, fisheries and resource extraction, to make tactical decisions (such as ship routing), in order to maximize their safety and efficiency. As a key collaborator, the CCG broadcasts information generated by this program to marine interests and provides in-situ weather, sea-state and ice information through their fleet operations to Environment and Climate Change Canada. The program also provides detailed sea- and lake-ice analyses and forecast information to CCG under a cost-recovered arrangement in support of the CCG ice management responsibilities. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Oceans Act and Fisheries Act. It also supports commitments to the IMO, International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, and the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Marine communities have the weather, wave and ice information they need to operate safely and efficiently in Canadian waters Average level of agreement of Canadian Coast Guard Commanding Officers that they have the weather, wind and wave information they need and are able to access it 7.6 March 2018 n/aa n/aa 91% as of January 2016
Marine communities have the weather, wave and ice information they need to operate safely and efficiently in Canadian waters Index of accuracy and timeliness of marine gale warnings 8.2 March 2018 n/aa n/aa n/aa

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
11,361,102 11,348,055 11,613,448
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
136 134 134

Sub-program 2.2.3: Meteorological services in support of military operations

Sub-program description

This program provides the Department of National Defence (DND) with the meteorological and oceanographic information, predictions and tools needed for the operations of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in Canada and abroad. It is a collaborative program, operating under a memorandum of understanding with DND, responding to CAF-specific needs and recovering its incremental costs from DND. The program is critical to CAF operations, as it contributes to the effectiveness and safety of tactical, operational and strategic missions and exercises within Canada and in various active military areas globally. It also supports DND’s legal and statutory responsibilities under the Aeronautics Act, the legal foundation for military aviation safety.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
The Department of National Defence has the meteorological and oceanographic information and knowledge it needs to optimize its operations in Canada and abroad Average rating, on a scale of 1 (very dissatisfied) to 10 (very satisfied), of client satisfaction with services provided by Environment and Climate Change Canada to the Department of National Defence 7.5 March 2018 8.4 8.5 8.5
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2,683,093 2,683,093 2,683,093
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
90 89 87

Sub-program 3.1.1: Substances management

Sub-program description

This program is responsible for assessing and managing risks to the environment from all existing substances identified under the Chemicals Management Plan, as well as from new substances (upon notification by industry of their import or manufacture). The program uses science-based risk assessment, priority setting and timely regulatory actions (or other measures where appropriate) to manage risks associated with substances determined to be harmful. It works to improve substance management through research and monitoring, cyclical updates of the Domestic Substances List, tracking of pollutant releases (through reporting to the National Pollutant Release Inventory) and ongoing performance assessment of control-risk measures. The program uses regulations and other control measures under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (Part 4 and 5, Controlling Toxic Substances) to address the risk posed by substances of concern throughout their life cycle (e.g., released to air, water, soil and sediments from industrial processes, consumer and commercial products, or end-of-life products and waste). Also included is the international and interprovincial movement of waste and hazardous recyclable material. The program maintains transparency with stakeholders through consultation processes, including engagement at the national and international levels. International engagement occurs through such organizations as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. International obligations include commitments under the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm and Vienna Conventions, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution and the Minamata Convention on Mercury. This program may use funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions in support of Substances and Waste Management and Assessed Contributions to the OECD.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Use of road salt by road organizations is minimized Percentage of road organizations reporting under the Code of Practice that use pre-wetting or pre-treated road salts 95% December 2019 n/aa n/aa n/aa
Reduced volume of legacy PCBs in industrial equipment Cumulative percentage of high concentration PCBs in equipment subject to end-of-use extensions that has been taken out of use 100% March 2018 n/aa n/aa n/aa
Releases of siloxane D4 to the environment by manufacturers and industrial users are reduced Total estimated release of siloxane D4 from reporting industrial facilities subject to the Pollution Prevention Notice 47 kg June 2017 n/aa n/aa n/aa

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
53,252,938 52,130,909 52,248,018
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
432 415 409

Sub-program 3.1.2: Effluent management

Sub-program description

This program supports management of risks to the environment and human health from the discharge and deposit of waste residues into water (e.g. effluent). This is achieved through the development, implementation and administration of strategies and programs, such as pollution prevention plans, regulations, codes of practice, guidelines and environmental performance agreements. Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and Fisheries Act, the program addresses waste discharges and substances of concern in the effluent of industrial and public sectors, including but not limited to mining and processing, forest products, municipal wastewater and other sectors. Key activities include: conducting policy research and risk analysis; developing and implementing regulations and other control instruments; assessing the results of environmental effects monitoring conducted by regulated facilities; providing technical advice to environmental assessments; and acting as the focal point for the Fisheries Act pollution prevention provisions (FA-PPP). Specifically, the program administers the FA-PPP, including the development of risk management instruments, and administers the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations, Metal Mining Effluent Regulations and Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations to control or manage the deposit of deleterious substances into water in order to reduce the threats to fish and fish habitat and to human health from fish consumption. Program delivery requires collaboration with partners (including other federal government departments, other levels of government and associations) and consultation with industry, Indigenous groups and other stakeholders.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Risk of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act is minimized Percentage of test results within regulatory limits for the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) 98% March 2018

Over 99% compliance for metals and pH

98.6% compliance for cyanide

96.3% for total suspended solids (TSS)

98.8 % for acute lethality testing

All results are for calendar year 2012.a

Over 99% compliance for metals and pH 99.3% compliance for cyanide 97.9% for TSS 96.8% for acute lethality testing

All results are for calendar year 2013.a

Over 99% compliance for metals and pH

97.6% for total suspended solids

99.5% for radium 226

99.0% for acute lethality testing

All results are for calendar year 2014.a

Risk of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act is minimized Percentage of test results within regulatory limits for the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations (PPER) 95% March 2018

99.8% for TSS

99.8% for biochemical oxygen demand

98.3% for effluent non-lethality requirements

All results are for calendar year 2012.b

99.8% for total suspended solids (TSS); 99.9% for biochemical oxygen demand; and 96.2% for effluent non-lethality requirements All results are for calendar year 2013.b

99.86% for total suspended solids

99.96% for biochemical oxygen demand

97.5% for effluent non-lethality requirements

All results are for calendar year 2014.b

Risk of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act is minimized Percentage of wastewater systems whose releases are within regulatory limits (Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations) 90% March 2018 n/ac n/ac n/ac
Risk of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act is minimized Loading (in tonnes) of carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD) and suspended solids (SS) from wastewater systems Decline December 2020 n/ac n/ac n/ac

a. Reported results are for an earlier period due to the time required to receive data from facilities and complete quality control checks.

b. Reported results are for an earlier period due to the time required to receive data from facilities and complete quality control checks.

c. Regulated limits came into force on January 1, 2015 and will be reported for the first time in the 2016-17 DPR.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
4,587,651 4,587,651 4,587,651
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
41 41 40

Sub-program 3.1.3: Marine pollution

Sub-program description

This program assesses, controls and monitors the disposal at sea of wastes and other matter, and advises on marine pollution from ships. As of 2010, the program is responsible for assessing and controlling the risks to the environment resulting from Canadian activities in the Antarctic. The program uses a mix of regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to prevent marine pollution. It addresses impacts on sediments and other wastes, administers prohibitions and controls, and assesses and issues permits for disposal at sea and Antarctic expeditions. Two cost-recovery fees are applicable to disposal at sea permits: an application fee assessed on all permits, and a permit fee assessed on dredged and inert inorganic material. The program conducts research and develops decision-making and monitoring tools and standards and makes contributions to the federal coordination of marine pollution prevention (ship-sourced). Relevant legislation for the program includes the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, including Part 7, Division 3 (Disposal at Sea), and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act, 2003. International obligations include the London Convention and Protocol, the Antarctic Treaty and the Madrid Protocol. The program also works to advance Canadian positions to influence global rules aimed at reducing and managing global marine pollution from all sources. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions in support of Substances and Waste Management.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Reduced marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea Percentage of monitored sites assessed as sustainable 85% March 2018 92% in 2012a 89% in 2013a 100% in 2014a

a. Reported results are for an earlier period due to the time required to receive results of monitoring tests.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2,884,689 2,884,689 2,884,689
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
34 33 33

Sub-program 3.1.4: Environmental emergencies

Sub-program description

This program protects Canadians and their environment from the effects of emergency pollution incidents, through the provision of science-based expert advice and regulations. Specifically, it aims to reduce the frequency and consequences of emergency pollution incidents through five major activities: prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and research and development. Prevention involves providing expert advice to proponents of large development projects through the environmental assessment process and regulating chemical facilities to develop and implement environmental emergency plans. Effective preparedness is built on role clarity, effective decision-making and communication, and trust and cooperation among government, industry and communities. During an emergency response, the National Environmental Emergencies Centre is Environment and Climate Change Canada’s focal point for provision of scientific advice, such as weather forecasting, contaminant trajectory modelling, the fate and behaviour of hazardous substances, sensitivity mapping, the establishment of clean-up priorities, and the protection of sensitive ecosystems and wildlife, such as migratory birds and species at risk, as well as the protection of culturally significant sites. Recovery activities include assessing damage and providing advice to polluters on repairing environments damaged by environmental emergencies. By providing trusted, science-based expert advice and information in a variety of formats, the program is able to assist emergency response agencies and industries in making responsible decisions about the environment before, during and after an environmentally significant pollution incident.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Regulatees comply with the requirements and obligations of the Environmental Emergency Regulations Percentage of facilities requiring environmental emergency plans that have them in place as required by the Environmental Emergency Regulations 90% March 2018 93% as of March 2014 86% as of March 2015 96% as of March 2016
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
12,036,153 6,398,947 5,414,130
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
67 53 46

Sub-program 3.1.5: Contaminated sites

Sub-program description

This program is primarily directed to Environment and Climate Change Canada’s responsibilities in supporting the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). The FCSAP is a 15-year Government of Canada horizontal program aimed at reducing environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and associated federal financial liabilities. Fifteen federal departments (including Environment and Climate Change Canada), agencies and consolidated Crown corporations responsible for contaminated sites are currently involved in the FCSAP program, either as custodians of sites or in a supporting role. Environment and Climate Change Canada’s responsibilities include hosting the FCSAP Secretariat, developing guidance and program policies, providing expert support to federal custodians for the assessment and remediation/risk management activities at their sites, and completing assessment and remediation/risk management activities at its own contaminated sites. In addition, the FCSAP Secretariat coordinates implementation of the Shared Sites Policy Framework.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Reduced uncertainty associated with environment and human health risk from federal contaminated sites Number of funded sites where assessment activities have been conducted during Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 453 March 2018 n/aa n/aa n/aa
Reduced liability at higher-risk federal contaminated sites Reduction in liability at all Class 1 and Class 2 funded sites during Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan $946 million March 2018 $370 million as of March 2013 $592 million as of March 2014 $1.039 billion as of March 2016
Reduced risk to the environment and human health from federal contaminated sites Number of Class 1 and Class 2 funded sites where risk reduction activities have been completed during Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 319 March 2018 77 as of March 2013 140 as of March 2015 177 as of March 2016

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
11,595,610 25,452,073 31,976,165
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
55 42 42

Sub-program 3.2.1: Climate change and clean air regulatory program

Sub-program description

This program develops domestic approaches to climate change and air pollution by controlling emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants (APs). The program develops and implements regulations and other instruments to reduce emissions while maintaining economic competitiveness, develops compliance flexibilities, negotiates equivalency agreements with provinces, and analyzes cross-cutting and emerging issues such as short-lived climate pollutants. It works with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment to implement the Air Quality Management System, which includes establishing new outdoor air quality standards and finalizing and implementing industrial emissions requirements. These activities are supported by legal and economic analysis, as well as extensive scientific research, monitoring and modelling. The program collects data using the National Pollutant Release Inventory and prepares regular reports on GHG and AP emissions to meet domestic and international reporting requirements (e.g., Air Pollutant Emission Inventory and National GHG Inventory Report to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change).

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Reduced emissions of air pollutants from regulated and/or targeted sectors Canadian emissions of air pollutants from industrial and mobile sources Decline in the three-year average December 2021 (interim)
2036
PM10: 244,758 t
SOx: nr
NOx: 1,878,040 t
VOC: 1,188,040 t
Hg: 2,717 kg
CO: nr

in the period 2010 to 2012a
PM10: 221,687 t
SOx: nr
NOx: 2,033,645 t
VOC: 1,240,750 t
Hg: 2,399 kg
CO: nr

in the period 2011 to 2013a
PM10: 209,226 t
SOx: 1,169,529 t
NOx: 1,860,278 t
VOC: 1,277,914 t
Hg: 2,349 kg
CO: 3,722,851 t

in the period 2012 to 2014a

a. Reported results are for an earlier period due to the time required to receive data from facilities and complete quality control checks.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
108,848,633 60,790,757 61,140,206
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
699 387 389

Sub-sub-program 3.2.1.1: Industrial sector emissions

Sub-Sub-program description

This program aims to reduce emissions of air pollutants (APs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) from industrial sectors under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999). Key activities include the development of GHG standards and regulations for electricity, oil and gas, and emissions-intensive trade-exposed sectors and the finalization of AP standards, regulations and other risk management instruments for major industrial sectors and equipment types, as part of the Air Quality Management System. This also includes negotiating and developing equivalency agreements with interested provinces or territories. It is responsible for reporting requirements under CEPA 1999 for tracking and reporting releases of harmful substances and for the design and implementation of an electronic data collection and management system, which provides a harmonized system for reporting on GHG and AP emissions. The program provides information to Canadians and decision makers about the environmental and health impacts associated with air pollutants. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Climate Change and Clean Air.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Industrial sectors meet regulated emission intensity levels of greenhouse gases Percentage of coal-fired electricity generation units meeting their regulated greenhouse gas emissions intensity performance requirement 100% December 2019 n/aa n/aa n/aa

a. The regulated greenhouse gas emissions performance requirement only applies to new coal-fired electricity generation units, or units reaching their end-of-life. No new units have been built and the first coal-units to reach end-of-life will be in December 31st 2019. The first compliance reports will be due in June 2021.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
86,965,640 55,336,229 56,075,114
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
548 344 347

Sub-sub-program 3.2.1.2: Transportation sector emissions

Sub-Sub-program description

Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, this program aims to reduce emissions from transportation sources (vehicles, engines and fuels) through key activities such as the delivery of sound science and scientific advice, the development of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant regulations and the implementation and administration of those regulations. These activities also include scientific testing and emissions verification to ensure compliance with standards. In addition, the program works with Transport Canada to address air pollutant and GHG emissions from maritime shipping, through development of new domestic and international standards, and recommends practices for marine vessels in collaboration with the International Maritime Organization. As well, it shares information and identifies areas of joint interest with provinces and territories toward reducing emissions through the Mobile Sources Working Group. This program may use funding from the following transfer payment: Climate Change and Clean Air.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions from new motor vehicles, engines and fuels sold in Canada Average greenhouse gas emissions performance (in grams / mile) of fleets of 2016 model year passenger automobiles sold in Canada < 266.7 grams/mile March 2018 n/aa n/aa n/aa
Reduced air pollutant emissions from new motor vehicles, engines and fuels sold in Canada Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in grams/mile for 2015 model year light-duty, on-road vehicles offered for sale in Canada 0.07 grams/mile March 2018 n/aa 0.065 g/mile for the 2011 model year 0.062 g/mile for the 2013 model year

a. The indicator was not included in the Performance Measurement Framework for this year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
21,882,993 5,454,528 5,065,092
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
151 43 42

Sub-program 3.2.2: International climate change and clean air partnerships

Sub-program description

This program leads the development and implementation of international agreements and cooperation programs to address air pollution and climate change. This includes coordinating the development of Canada’s policy and negotiating positions and participation in relevant international fora. The program leads and participates in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and complementary international processes that help shape and implement collective actions to address climate change. It also leads Canada’s participation in international partnerships, notably the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants, the Arctic Council Task Force on Black Carbon and Methane and the Global Methane Initiative. The program meets international obligations by contributing to organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research. It works under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement to manage transboundary air pollution, implements the U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue to support bilateral collaboration on clean energy priorities, and participates in the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) to address common issues related to climate change mitigation and adaptation. The program also participates in negotiations to implement the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, and coordinates Canada’s participation under the Montreal Protocol and its Multilateral Fund towards the gradual elimination of ozone-depleting substances and promotes the control of hydrofluorocarbons at a global level. This program may use funding from the following transfer payments: Climate Change and Clean Air, Assessed contribution for Canada’s share of the CEC budget and Grants under the Montreal Protocol.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
International negotiations on air pollutants and greenhouse gases are proceeding in a direction consistent with Canadian priorities and interests Percentage of stated objectives to be achieved in international negotiations which were met or mostly met 70% March 2018 71% 86% 90%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
31,253,516 31,318,456 23,918,443
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
55 51 51

Sub-program 3.2.3: Environmental technology

Sub-program description

The program objective is to improve the environmental performance of technologies and processes, particularly with respect to clean air, climate change and sustainable development. The program achieves its results by providing policy analysis, technical and scientific support, and program oversight to select Government of Canada environmental or energy programs such as Sustainable Development Technology Canada and the Green Municipal Fund. This program may also use funding from the Climate Change and Clean Air transfer payment.

Planned results
Expected result Performance indicator Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Emissions avoided as a result of completed municipal projects supported by the Green Municipal Fund Total annual emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants avoided as a result of capital projects supported by the Green Municipal Fund since its inception GHGs: 380,000 t
CACs: 460,000 kg
March 2019 GHGs: 5.3 kt/yr
CACs: 3.1 t/yr
GHGs: 11.5 kt/yr
CACs: 4.2 t/yr
n/aa

a. Reporting for 2015-16 is not yet available due to the timing of completion of final reports from project proponents.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
7,016,537 7,210,612 6,379,217
Human resources (FTEs)
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
59 58 55
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