Departmental Plan 2018 to 2019 report, Environment and Climate Change Canada, chapter 3

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core responsibilities

Taking Action on Clean Growth and Climate Change

Description

Through engagement with other federal departments and agencies, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples, and other stakeholders, and external experts, the Department will support and coordinate the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (PCF); work to reduce Canadian greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; drive clean growth; develop regulatory instruments; support businesses and Canadians to adapt and become more resilient to climate change; and contribute to international climate change actions to increase global benefits.

Planning highlights

ECCC will continue to lead the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework (PCF) on Clean Growth and Climate Change, which will include ensuring that carbon pricing is in place throughout Canada. The Department will work with provinces and territories as they develop their carbon pricing systems and will put in place a federal backstop pricing system for provinces that choose it or that do not to have their own systems in place in 2018 that align with the federal standard (see sidebar).

The Government of Canada’s $2 billion Low Carbon Economy Fund (LCEF) is an important part of the PCF. The Fund supports the PCF implementation by leveraging investments in projects that will generate innovation and clean growth, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions towards meeting or exceeding commitments under the Paris Agreement.

The LCEF will provide funding over the next five years. The Department will assess proposals so that funding agreements are in place and projects can begin in 2018.

The $2 billion LCEF is comprised of two parts:

  • The Leadership Fund will continue to provide funding to provinces and territories that have adopted the PCF to help them deliver on commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Leadership Fund will see wide-ranging investments: support for the preservation of forests, energy-saving renovations at home, commercial buildings, and assistance for small businesses and homeowners to reduce their energy bills.
  • The Challenge Fund will support ambitious projects that can be submitted by all provinces and territories, municipalities, Indigenous governments and organizations, as well as businesses and no-for-profit and for-profit organizations. It will leverage ingenuity across the country to reduce emissions and generate clean growth.

Carbon Pricing

97 per cent of Canadians live in provinces that are either working towards or already have a price on carbon pollution. Carbon pricing is a low-cost way to reduce pollution and create incentives for companies to innovate and create cleaner solutions. Ensuring polluters pay in every province is central to a credible plan to tackle climate change.

Revenues generated from carbon pricing will remain in the jurisdiction of origin.

Commitment to experimentation: RegPal: Regulation Discovery Tool

A challenge for businesses to comply with those regulations to which they are subject may be lack of a means to easily identify and find relevant federal regulations. RegPal intends to be a quick and efficient digital solution for businesses and stakeholders to find regulations that may apply to them. Through a User Experience Design lens, identifying, understanding and meeting user needs will be of utmost importance. This could have a positive impact on Canadians through ease of use, accountability, availability of information, and regulatory compliance.

The Department will establish a new Canadian Centre for Climate Services. The Centre will be the authoritative federal access point for climate change information, products and tools. It will provide accurate and timely information for emergency management and community planning in collaboration with provinces and territories. An online portal will be launched in 2018 through which users will have access to easy-to-use maps and interpretive products and services for practical planning and decision-making. The importance of sharing climate change information, products and tools was emphasized in recommendations of the horizontal evaluation of the Clean Air Agenda Adaptation Theme.

Transparent and informed decision-making that is supported by scientific evidence is necessary to ensure that actions taken in support of the PCF are effective in helping Canada achieve its 2030 target. ECCC will engage external experts to assess the effectiveness of PCF measures and identify best practices.

A robust regulatory agenda will be applied to combat climate change by reducing GHGs and short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) and to advance Canada’s clean growth and climate change goals. ECCC will:

  • develop the clean fuel standard, building on the Renewable Fuels Regulations, to a 30 megatonnes annual reduction in 2030;
  • finalize regulations to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector;
  • update regulations for coal-fired electricity and propose complementary regulations for natural-gas fired electricity, to support the goal of 90 per cent non-carbon emitting electricity by 2030;
  • phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) consumption;
  • finalize regulations to reduce emissions from heavy-duty vehicles;
  • continue to implement regulations to reduce emissions from light-duty vehicles; and
  • continue developing regulations to reduce emissions from new stationary diesel (compression-ignition) engines.

ECCC will also continue implementing ECCC’s SLCP Strategy which outlines enhanced actions related to SLCP mitigation, science, domestic coordination and collaboration, and international engagement.

Canada’s regulatory agenda is intended to benefit all Canadians, including by alleviating impacts on vulnerable demographic groups. For example, melting permafrost, sea ice, lake ice, and snow affect resource-dependent, northern and coastal communities, including a significant number of Indigenous communities.

Minister McKenna will be at the helm of the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) for 2018. The CCME is Canada’s forum for collective action on environmental issues of national and international concern. The Minister will host a meeting with her provincial and territorial counterparts in Ottawa in 2018. This will be an important opportunity to tackle critical issues facing Canadians including climate change, clean air, clean water and clean growth, and to work collaboratively with Indigenous leaders on shared priorities.

The Minister and the Department will continue to demonstrate their commitment to taking action on climate change by playing a leadership role at key fora, and in meeting international commitments and obligations.

Canada will host the G7 Leaders' Summit in the Charlevoix region of Québec in June, 2018. In its capacity as G7 president, Canada will put forward an ambitious and progressive agenda. Canada’s themes for the Summit include climate change, oceans, and clean energy. Minister Mckenna will also host a meeting with her counterparts in the fall, as well as a women climate leaders event.

Canada will also host the 2018 Global Methane Forum, bringing together governments, private sector experts and innovators to consider and commit to ways to further reduce methane emissions from all sectors.

As part of its ongoing commitment to taking action on climate change, the Department will advance Canada’s priorities in the 24th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 24) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Poland in December 2018. As a leader in the UNFCCC, Canada will advocate for the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the operationalization of the Local Communities and Indigenous peoples Platform. In addition, Canada will continue advocating for the mainstreaming of gender perspective into all elements of global climate action, including through the UNFCCC Gender Action Plan. Canada will further demonstrate global leadership on climate change and the Paris Agreement by co-convening the Ministerial on Climate Action together with China and the European Union.

The Department will also promote the global reduction of GHGs through the 20-partner Powering Past Coal Alliance. The Alliance brings together a diverse group of governments, businesses, and organizations united in taking action to accelerate clean growth and climate protection through the rapid phase-out of traditional coal power.

Canada will pursue meeting its obligations under the Montreal Protocol, including reducing consumption of HFCs, in accordance with the Kigali amendment. The Montreal Protocol is designed to phase out the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances to protect the earth’s fragile ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol, with its Kigali Amendment to phase down HFCs, will directly contribute to the objectives of the Paris Agreement and the UNFCCC, while continuing to protect the earth’s ozone layer.

Canada is committed to supporting climate action in developing countries, in particular the poorest and most vulnerable, and will continue delivering on its $2.65 billion pledge by 2020 to help them transition to low-carbon and resilient economies. This support will be delivered consistently with the Government of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy.

Collaboration with China

Under the December 2017 Canada-China Joint Leaders Statement on Climate Change and Clean Growth, the two countries will champion the transition to a competitive low-carbon economy and society, and will collaborate on issues related to climate change, renewable energy, clean technology, and emissions trading, through a range of high-level dialogue mechanisms. Canada will continue its leadership role in the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development.

Canada’s clean growth and climate change and other environmental priorities, including GHG reductions, will be reflected in environmental provisions of bi-lateral and multi-lateral trade agreements and relationships, including those with the European Union, the U.S., Mexico, China (see sidebar), and key economic organizations.

In addition to global efforts to address climate change, ECCC will continue to support the Government of Canada’s low-carbon goal of a 40% reduction in GHGs from its operations by 2030 (over 2005–06 levels), through such initiatives as reducing its real property footprint and adopting green procurement practices within ECCC.

Departmental Result: Canadian greenhouse gas and short-lived climate pollutant emissions are reduced
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
GHG emissions from light duty vehicles 21.1% improvement in performance for manufacturer model year 2017 reporting relative to 2011 model year 2018 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
GHG emissions from heavy duty vehicles

Percentage improvement in GHG emissions performance for manufacturer model year 2018–2020 reporting relative to the 2010 model year:

  • 13%: heavy-duty pick-up trucks and vans
  • 11%: Combination Tractors
  • 5%: Vocational vehicles
2020 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.Footnote 1 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.Footnote 1 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.Footnote 1
Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada’s Black Carbon Emissions Inventory 10.5Kt reduction by 2025 (Equivalent to 25% decrease from a baseline of national emissions of 42Kt in 2013) 2025 41Kt in 2014 38Kt in 2015

Results not yet availableFootnote 2

HFC emissions 10% reduction in consumption relative to 2017–18 levels 2019 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Reduced methane emissions from the oil and gas sector 40-45% reduction, relative to 2012 levels 2025 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.Footnote 3 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.Footnote 3 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.Footnote 3
Emissions reductions are being achieved under the Clean Fuel Standard building on the Renewable Fuels Regulations 30 Mt annual GHG emissions reduction in 2030 2030 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Percentage of coal-fired electricity generation units meeting their regulated GHG emissions intensity performance requirement 100%

Dec. 2019

100% 100% 100%
Carbon pricing systems are in place in Canada 13 Provinces and Territories have in place carbon pricing that meets the benchmark in 2018 or federal backstop applies Dec. 2018 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
GHG emissions from ECCC operations

40% GHG emissions reduction relative to 22,793 tonnes in 2005–06Footnote 4

2030–31 4.7% 10.3% 23.1%Footnote 5
Departmental Result: Indigenous peoples are engaged in clean growth and climate change
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Co-development of indicators with Indigenous peoples to ensure they are engaged in the implementation of the PCF, through three distinct senior-level joint tables with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation. These indicators are developed by the target date (i.e. March 31, 2019). March 31, 2019 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Departmental Result: Canada contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing climate resilience globally
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Canada’s public sector investments leverage private sector climate finance Ratio of private sector finance leveraged by Canada’s public sector investments, of at least 1 to 0.5 March 31st of each year This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
GHG reductions resulting from international initiatives funded by Canada Higher cumulative reductions from year to year, from the 2018–19 baseline, reaching minimum reduction of 200 Mt of GHGs. Long term cumulative indicator This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Number of people in developing countries who benefited from Canada’s adaptation funds Higher cumulative number of people in each consecutive year, reaching at least 10M people by 2030. 2030 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Departmental Result: Canadian communities, economies and ecosystems are more resilient
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Number of individuals, businesses, and governments accessing climate services and using that information to inform decision makingFootnote 6 Increase from baselineFootnote 7 March 31, 2021 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
575,300,731 575,300,731 570,276,685 578,444,049

*All figures, throughout the document, are net of respendable revenues and do not reflect either potential investments and associated funding that were announced through the Federal Budget 2018, or potential funding that may be received if sunsetting initiatives are renewed.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)**
2018–19 Planned 2019-20 Planned 2020-21 Planned
823 811 795

**Totals may differ within and between tables due to the rounding of figures. The FTE numbers, throughout the document, include students.

Preventing and Managing Pollution

Description

Collaborate with provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and others to develop and administer environmental standards, guidelines, regulations and other risk management instruments to reduce releases and monitor levels of contaminants in air, water and soil; and promote and enforce compliance with environmental laws and regulations.

Planning highlights

Pollutants and toxic substances are released into air, water and on land and, because they cross Canadian and international jurisdictions; collaborative efforts with partners are needed to prevent their release and reduce their impacts on human health and the environment.

Chemicals

The Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) is a key program for protecting the environment and human health from the harmful effects of toxic substances under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA, 1999). CMP will progress with its third phase, which will see (by March 31, 2021) the remaining 1,550 priority chemicals (of 4,300 initially identified) be assessed and, if required, managed. In 2018–19, ECCC plans to publish draft screening assessment reports covering approximately 360 substances and final screening assessment reports covering approximately 370 substances. The Department will also assess approximately 500 new substances before their introduction to the Canadian market.

For the substances that are determined to be toxic to human health or the environment, risk management documents proposing potential risk management instruments will be published for consultation with stakeholders. These include a proposed Pollution Prevention Planning Notice for triclosan and a proposed Volatile Organic Compound (VOCs) Concentration Limits for Certain Products Regulations. ECCC will also publish final regulations to limit releases of VOCs, including petroleum and refinery gases, from Canadian petroleum refineries, upgraders, and certain petrochemical facilities, as well as Prohibition of Asbestos and Asbestos Products Regulations.

To ensure the sound management of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material, the Department will continue to advance updates to regulations that control the international and interprovincial movements of these materials. ECCC will work with provincial and territorial governments through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment and with many stakeholders to accelerate actions to reduce the amount of waste produced and to move Canada towards a low-carbon circular economy.

Plastic Waste

Plastics are vital material in our economy and daily lives. However, here in Canada and globally, we are inefficient in our use of this valuable resource. Globally, less than 10% of all plastics are recycled and kept in the economy. Far too many plastics are sent to landfills, and in many countries far too much plastic enters waterways, much of it ending up in the oceans.

Addressing this issue requires action focused throughout the plastics lifecycle. Building on commitments made as part of the G7 and at other international fora, the department will work with all levels of government, industry and the public to develop a national commitment and action plan towards a long-term vision of zero plastic waste.

Actions to reduce air pollution

The federal government is committed to improving air quality to protect Canadians’ health and their environment. Despite improvements in air quality over the past two decades, some areas in Canada have not yet met ambient air quality standards. ECCC takes specific domestic and international actions to reduce air pollution, including by monitoring, studying, mitigating and reporting on air quality.

Domestically, the Department will continue to work with Canadian, provincial, and territorial governments to implement the Air Quality Management System (AQMS), a collaborative system that includes ambient air quality standards for key pollutants and actions to reduce emissions from significant sources of air pollution in order to improve air quality, the health of Canadians, and the environment.

At the international level, ECCC will continue to work with the U.S. and international partners under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement and the Convention of Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution to address transboundary air pollution that affects air quality in Canada.

In 2018–19, ECCC will also undertake a review of the adequacy of the 2020 Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for ground-level ozone. The Department will continue to work to reduce industrial emissions by implementing the Multi-sector Air Pollutants Regulations and non-regulatory instruments.  ECCC will develop and enforce air pollutant standards for vehicles and fuels, develop regulations to address air pollutant emissions from consumer products, and will finalize regulations to limit toxic emissions from refineries and petrochemical plants.

In addition, ECCC will work with its provincial and territorial partners to keep Canadians informed about air quality across Canada, air pollution and its effects, and actions to improve the air that Canadians breathe. Information is available through the interactive State of the Air Report, released by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), in November 2017.

According to this report, it is estimated by Health Canada that 14,400 premature deaths occur annually in Canada due to air pollution. Therefore, reducing air pollutants and toxic emissions will benefit all Canadians, in particular groups more vulnerable to air pollutant emissions, such as children and the elderly. Air pollution also degrades the environment and can reduce economic productivity.

Source: CCME Air Pollutants

Long description

Pollutant Sources
Forest Wildfires
Volcanoes
Lightning
Chemical Transformations
Wet and Dry Deposition

Fertilizer
Livestock
Cities

Power Generation Plants
Oil and Gas Extraction and Production
Industrial Facilities
Institutions
Residential Homes

Motorcycles
Cars Trucks
Buses
Airplanes

Actions to reduce water pollution

As part of Canada’s $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan, ECCC will contribute to a whole-of-government strategy to better protect whales on Canada’s west coast (Southern Resident Killer Whale), in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga) and on the Atlantic coast (North Atlantic Right Whale). Under its existing national programs, ECCC will undertake new activities to address contaminants that threaten the health of whales and their prey. These include scientific research to identify key sources of contaminants that contribute to the declining whale populations. Research findings will support evidence-based action, as well as promoting the importance of international action to protect marine mammals from disposal and dredging operations.

In 2018–19, ECCC will also undertake a review of the adequacy of the 2020 Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for ground-level ozone. The Department will continue to work to reduce industrial emissions by implementing the Multi-sector Air Pollutants Regulations and non-regulatory instruments.  ECCC will develop and enforce air pollutant standards for vehicles and fuels, develop regulations to address air pollutant emissions from consumer products, and will finalize regulations to limit toxic emissions from refineries and petrochemical plants.

In addition, ECCC will work with its provincial and territorial partners to keep Canadians informed about air quality across Canada, air pollution and its effects, and actions to improve the air that Canadians breathe. Information is available through the interactive State of the Air Report, released by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), in November 2017.

According to this report, it is estimated by Health Canada that 14,400 premature deaths occur annually in Canada due to air pollution. Therefore, reducing air pollutants and toxic emissions will benefit all Canadians, in particular groups more vulnerable to air pollutant emissions, such as children and the elderly. Air pollution also degrades the environment and can reduce economic productivity.

Actions to reduce water pollution

As part of Canada’s $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan, ECCC will contribute to a whole-of-government strategy to better protect whales on Canada’s west coast (Southern Resident Killer Whale), in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga) and on the Atlantic coast (North Atlantic Right Whale). Under its existing national programs, ECCC will undertake new activities to address contaminants that threaten the health of whales and their prey. These include scientific research to identify key sources of contaminants that contribute to the declining whale populations. Research findings will support evidence-based action, as well as promoting the importance of international action to protect marine mammals from disposal and dredging operations.

Commitment to experimentation: Applying behavioural insights within the regulatory lifecycle

ECCC is building capacity to explore and experiment with applying behavioural insights (combination of knowledge and research methods from diverse behavioural science fields) to the selection, development, and implementation of regulations and non-regulatory instruments to improve public policy outcomes. This work will, for example, test the effectiveness of new approaches and techniques to encourage greater stakeholder engagement.

Healthier lakes contribute to the health of Canadians and wildlife species, economic growth for industries that rely on them, more recreational opportunities, and a healthy, sustainable ecosystem. ECCC will continue to invest in safeguarding Canada’s important and valuable freshwater including by acting on recommendations of an evaluation of the Department’s Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health program. To provide strong support for the restoration and improvement of water quality in Lake Winnipeg (the 10th largest lake in the world) and its basin, the Department will invest close to $26 million to reduce nutrient pollution in the lake, including to engage and collaborate with Indigenous peoples. In line with a recent Lake Winnipeg Basin evaluation, collaboration will help to integrate Indigenous knowledge to increase understanding of the lake ecosystem and to protect it from pollution. The Department will also continue to work with the Government of Manitoba, and all other levels of government in Canada and the U.S. regarding shared water resources in the basin.

The Great Lakes-St Lawrence region supplies over 50 million jobs in Canada and the U.S., representing almost one third of the countries’ combined workforce.Footnote 8 

Restoring Hamilton Harbour

ECCC will continue to work with the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change, Stelco, Hamilton Port Authority, City of Hamilton, City of Burlington and Halton Region to clean up Randle Reef, the last major project required in the Hamilton Harbour Area of Concern in Lake Ontario. Better water quality and reduced contamination will benefit fish, wildlife and people in the area, and will generate over $150 million in economic benefits. The federal contribution is $46 million (of $140 million investment by partners).

In 2018 and 2019, sediments will be dredged and contained within a six hectare, double walled “box” that will be sealed by 2020. Once completed, the surface area will be turned into valuable port lands and any remaining contaminated sediments in the area will be capped. For more details, please consult the Randle Reef Supplementary Information Table.

To address issues that matter to Canadians, from cleaner drinking water, to beaches all can enjoy and waters in which Canadians can fish and swim, a federal investment of $45 million (Budget 2017) will enable sustained restoration of the Great Lakes. Through the Great Lakes Protection Initiative, ECCC will take action to reduce the release of harmful substances, address the issue of toxic and nuisance algae, restore the quality of Canadian Areas of Concern, enhance the resilience of coastal wetlands, identify at-risk nearshore waters, and engage Canadians through citizen science. ECCC will also engage Indigenous peoples and other partners to restore water quality, building on the strong foundation of collaboration under the Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health, and the Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, in keeping with recommendations of a recent evaluation of its Great Lakes program.

Building on years of successful ongoing collaboration to improve water quality and protect nature under the St. Lawrence Action Plan 2011-2026, ECCC and the Government of Québec will invest $57.5 million over the next five years to conserve and enhance the St. Lawrence River. Through the joint Community Interaction Program, the investment will fund local projects aimed at protecting biodiversity, supporting sustainable use of water and improving water quality.

To further progress in protecting freshwater in Canada, ECCC will propose amendments to the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) that will further limit the release into water of harmful substances related to mining activities. The Department will develop, amend and continue to administer other regulations under the Fisheries Act to limit or prevent the release of harmful substances into water.

As president of the G7 in 2018, Canada will build momentum for concerted actions to prevent marine litter, including microplastics, from entering the environment and to improve the management of plastics throughout their lifecycle. ECCC is also leading the development of a National Strategy for Safe and Environmentally Sound Disposal of Lamps Containing Mercury, in collaboration with provinces, territories and other interested governments in Canada that are responsible for the environment.

Federal Sustainable Development

In collaboration with federal departments and agencies involved in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), ECCC will continue to lead the development of the FSDS, setting out the federal government sustainable development priorities. ECCC will also report on the progress of implementing the FSDS in 2018–19 using indicators drawn largely from the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators program.

To provide greater transparency and accountability, the Minister tabled proposed amendments to the Federal Sustainable Development Act in June 2017. The proposed amendments call for tripling the number of federal departments and agencies required to report under the Act (from 26 to more than 90), creating a whole-of-government approach, providing more frequent sustainable development progress updates, in line with recommendations of a recent evaluation of ECCC’s Sustainability Reporting and Indicators program, promoting engagement of Indigenous peoples, businesses, communities and the public in building a sustainable Canada.

Planned results

Departmental Result: Canadians have clean air
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Percentage of Canadians living in areas where air quality standards are achieved 85% 2030 64% 70% Results not yet availableFootnote 9
Departmental Result: Canadians have clean water
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Percentage of wastewater systems where effluent quality standards are achieved 100%    2040 Indicator not yet in existence. 77% Results not yet availableFootnote 10
Departmental Result: The Canadian environment is protected from harmful substances
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Number of substances assessed, identified as toxic, and for which control measures were put in place All substances assessed as toxic have a control measure in placeFootnote 11 March 31, 2021 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
353,189,584 353,189,584 333,742,741 306,391,097

* This summary does not reflect either potential investments and associated funding that were announced through the Federal Budget 2018, or potential funding that may be received if sunsetting initiatives are renewed.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2018–19 Planned 2019–20 Planned 2020–21 Planned
1,700 1,656 1,584

Conserving Nature

Description

Protect and recover species at risk and their critical habitat; conserve and protect healthy populations of migratory birds; engage and enable provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, stakeholders, and the public to increase protected areas and contribute to conservation and stewardship activities; expand and manage the Department’s protected areas; and collaborate with domestic and international partners to advance the conservation of biodiversity and sustainable development.

Planning highlights

ECCC’s mandate to conserve nature encompasses securing natural habitat for birds and wildlife; protecting species and recovering species at risk; and enforcing Canadian wildlife laws and regulations, including those that implement international agreements on the conservation of migratory birds and the regulation of trade in endangered species.

ECCC will implement Canada’s Natural Legacy, which will allow solid progress in reaching Canada’s goals for protected areas, protecting and recovering species at risk, and maintaining biodiversity. As part of this initiative, ECCC will establish the Nature Fund to leverage partnerships with corporate, not-for-profit, provincial, territorial and other partners. The Nature Fund will make it possible to secure private land, support provincial and territorial species protection efforts and help build indigenous capacity to conserve land and species.

To prevent further decline and build sustainable populations of species at risk, the Department will collaborate with its partners across Canada and internationally, and will deliver on obligations under the Species at Risk Act.

To restore populations of the Boreal Caribou and the South Mountain Caribou to sustainable levels, ECCC will conduct research to enhance the understanding of disturbances to their key habitat. The Department will continue to work with provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders (such as non-governmental organizations and industry) on innovative and collaborative projects to protect these key species.

For Canada’s Wood Bison, ECCC will complete a science-based assessment of imminent threats facing this species at risk, and determine with Indigenous peoples and other partners needed actions to sustain the Wood Bison’s populations and habitat.

To strengthen protection of the Western Chorus Frog, the Department will collaborate with the Government of Québec to further support protection for this species and its habitat including on federal lands.

To support and enhance biodiversity and species habitat across Canada, the Department will continue to adopt innovative ways and work with its federal, provincial, and Indigenous partners to reach the Government’s ambitious goal of conserving 17 percent of terrestrial areas and inland water and 10 percent of coastal and marine areas by 2020. For example, ECCC, working with Indigenous partners, will explore the creation of Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas to increase the conservation of ecologically important habitat for the benefit of wildlife and for Canadians.

Working towards a new protected area on Canada’s Pacific coast

Scott Islands and surrounding waters on Canada’s Pacific coast form one of that region’s most productive and biologically diverse marine ecosystems. Its designation (under the Canada Wildlife Act) as a marine National Wildlife Area will help protect the 5-10 million migratory birds (including some threatened species, such as the Short-tailed Albatross and the Pink-footed Shearwater) that feed on the local small fish and zooplankton in the area. The area is also home to the most intensive seabird research in Canada.

An important component of ECCC’s mandate to protect and conserve biodiversity is the ongoing management and expansion of Canada’s National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries. These provide important habitat for the sustainability of diverse wildlife species, including many migratory bird species. To support ECCC’s mandate under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA) to maintain healthy populations of some 450 migratory bird species that are in Canada for part of the year, ECCC will continue to monitor population trends, prepare an updated 2018 report on the State of Canada’s Birds, and develop a strategy, with the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI), to engage stakeholders to undertake conservation actions to reduce human-related mortality and maintain healthy habitats for birds.

ECCC will continue to make progress on the federal Action Plan for Boreal Caribou that was released in July 2017. This action plan focuses on three pillars: improving knowledge, accelerating recovery and protection, and reporting to the public.

ECCC is working with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Indigenous partners and ranchers to protect the rich biodiversity in native prairie grasslands formerly used as pasture and managed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in southwestern Saskatchewan. The lands are critical habitat to the Greater Sage-grouse (a species at risk) and provide important nesting sites for Burrowing Owls, Ferruginous Hawks and many other species.

ECCC is committed to designating the Scott Islands Marine National Wildlife Area as a protected area before 2020, adding important marine and coastal areas to Canada’s protected areas network (see sidebar.) Moreover, in collaboration with the Dehcho First Nations and Tłįchǫ Government and the Government of Northwest Territories, ECCC will to continue to work toward establishing the Edéhzhíe National Wildlife Area, a rich and diverse area of ecological and cultural importance.

The Government of Canada is proposing a new impact assessment regime that will foster sustainability. The new impact assessment process will serve as a planning tool that takes into consideration the whole range of environmental, health, social and economic effects of projects. Under the proposed new system of impact assessment, ECCC will continue to provide expert advice and knowledge to impact assessments for subjects within its mandate.

ECCC will also support the development of a new, deliberate approach to cumulative effects, to help address some of the “big picture” issues associated with development. The cumulative effects of development in a region are the changes to the environment caused by a variety of activities over time. To better understand cumulative effects on the environment, the Department will conduct regional and strategic assessments outside the context of a single project review, beginning with a strategic assessment of climate change. In addition, ECCC will establish a publicly-accessible, single-window platform containing environmental science, knowledge and data, with tools that enable users to help understand the potential impacts of a project.

To further broaden the base of information considered in development project decisions, ECCC will engage Indigenous peoples in the co-application of science and Indigenous traditional knowledge in environmental assessments. The Department will continue to provide expert policy, technical and scientific analysis to determine the potential environmental effects of development projects.

Commitment to experimentation: Integrated conservation action initiative

ECCC will pilot the Integrated Conservation Action (ICA) Initiative as a standardized approach that integrates the work of multiple organizations with common conservation agendas. The ICA initiative is designed to enable collaborative planning and efficient use of resources, funding and action to conservation.

The Initiative will initially focus on conservation in Southwest Nova Scotia, where ECCC will partner with more than 15 First Nations, non-government and government organizations and authorities in 2018–19 to implement three case studies. Results of this pilot will help determine if the process can be used more widely to further support the conservation of wildlife species and management of threats to them, and to identify if and how the approach needs to be adapted.

As part of a multi-faceted regime to protect biodiversity and wildlife in Canada and around the world, ECCC will continue to work with partners to promote compliance with and enforce wildlife laws and regulations that ensure the protection of sensitive habitats, vulnerable species and sustainable trade in wild species of plants and animals. ECCC contributes through crime prevention, regulatory inspections, intelligence-driven criminal investigations and use of penalties in the increasingly complex field of wildlife non-compliance.

The Department will represent Canada at the next Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Conference of the Parties in Egypt, where Canada will continue its leadership role with respect to protected areas, sustainable wildlife trade, promoting the importance of Indigenous traditional knowledge, and actively participating in addressing environmental issues. The Department will also work with other federal departments, provinces, territories and Indigenous organizations to track and report on progress towards the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada, as part of Canada’s National Report to the CBD.

Planned results

Departmental Result: Canada’s wildlife and habitat are conserved and protected 
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Percentage of migratory bird species that are within target population ranges 60% 2020 57% Indicator not measured (data is collected every two years)

Results not yet available.Footnote 12

Percentage of Canadian areas conserved as protected areas and other effective areas-based conservation measures Increase toward achievement of 17% from a baseline of 10.6% in 2015 (Terrestrial lands & inland waters) 2020 10.6% 10.6% 10.5%
Departmental Result: Canada’s species at risk are recovered
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Percentage of species at risk for which changes in populations are consistent with recovery objectives 60% May 2025 52% 43% 43%
Departmental Result: Departmental Result : Indigenous peoples are engaged in conservation
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful Target will be identified once the 2018–19 baseline is established. To be identified once baseline is established in 2018–19. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
172,066,587 172,066,587 136,751,137 139,020,288

* This summary does not reflect either potential investments and associated funding that were announced through the Federal Budget 2018, or potential funding that may be received if sunsetting initiatives are renewed.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2018–19 Planned 2019–20 Planned 2020–21 Planned
856 828 807

Predicting Weather and Environmental Conditions

Description

Monitor weather, water, air quality and climate conditions; provide forecasts, information and warnings to the Canadian public and targeted sectors through a range of service delivery options; conduct research; develop and maintain computer-based models for predicting weather and other environmental conditions; and collaborate and exchange data with other national meteorological services and with international organizations.

Planning highlights

Storms, floods, droughts and other extreme weather-related events are occurring with greater frequency and severity both in Canada and globally. In delivering on its mandate to predict weather and environmental conditions, ECCC will place greater emphasis on meeting Canadians’ needs for information about severe weather events. The Department will continue to provide timely information to decision-makers (such as municipal governments, emergency response agencies) and individual Canadians as they make decisions and plans related to their health and safety. ECCC will continue to support the work of other federal departments with the provision of weather information, data and tools, such as partnering with Health Canada (on air quality alerts), and Fisheries and Oceans (on ocean modelling). ECCC will also endeavour to make its data holdings accessible by third parties, including the private sector and academia, to underpin and facilitate value-added services and products.

Innovation in action

ECCC’s new supercomputer is among the fastest in the world, with processing speed that is close to 70 million times faster than the first supercomputer (of the 1970s). Its capacity enables faster and more accurate weather forecasting. Using artificial intelligence, it enables ECCC to process large-scale simulations, for example, to model how weather systems and storms are likely to behave and their impacts on the environment and human safety.

The Department will continue to provide weather and environmental forecasts and warnings with support from its new (2017) state-of-the-art supercomputer (see sidebar). With the support of additional investments announced in Budget 2018, ECCC will work to increase both the speed and accuracy of information it makes available to Canadians, in order to support their safety and decision-making as they adapt to climate change.

ECCC will also increase its capacity to provide earlier and more accurate weather and environmental forecasts, including extreme weather notifications, through the installation of up to 33 new radars to replace the existing network, one additional radar in the lower Athabaska region, and one training site. The first of 20 confirmed new radars was installed in 2017 (Radisson, Saskatchewan), where communities and agricultural operations in the province now have access to more reliable weather information to help them plan and adapt to a changing climate. In 2018–19, five radars will be replaced, with the remainder to be installed by 2023.

Together, the supercomputer and new radars will also better support ECCC’s storm prediction centres. Accurate and fast delivery of storm prediction data will support decision-making, such as municipal planning for safety in severe storms or wildfires, and to support planning in the agriculture, transportation and recreation sectors.

The data that ECCC collects will provide 24/7 support to emergency operations and contribute to national and international security by modelling the movement of smoke, volcanic ash and radioactive material. Both current and archival environmental data will support the priorities of the new Canadian Centre for Climate Services, including providing trusted climate change information, data and tools through an online climate portal to support decisions related to climate change adaptation.  

Commitment to experimentation: Mining social media and other non-conventional information feeds for complementing current real-time weather surface observation networks

ECCC will use crowdsourced information feeds, such as those available on Twitter, weather mobile apps, Smart City open data streams (e.g., water and air quality sensors; real-time car and truck sensors), etc. to complement its conventional source of weather information (such as surface weather stations). The Department will work with partners to develop an experimental web site displaying maps with the different sources of information.

There has recently been an observable change in water availability in Canada, resulting from changes in weather patterns and overall climate (such as droughts and flooding) in many areas of the country. Provincial and territorial partners, along with many stakeholders, rely on ECCC water information for planning their day-to-day operations, developing infrastructure and supporting Canadian industry.

Budget 2018 announced significant new investments in Canada’s National Hydrological Services, the program that monitors freshwater quantity and supports federal, transboundary and international water management decision-making. Through this new 5-year funding, ECCC will improve the physical infrastructure, as well as the technical and engineering capacity supporting the water quantity-monitoring program.  It will investigate innovative new technologies for water measurement and will set Canada on a path to develop water forecasts analogous to the weather forecasts upon which Canadians rely today.

ECCC will continue to provide hydrometric information and water resource advice to Canada’s transboundary treaty obligations, as well as to support all sectors of the economy, including agriculture, tourism and the transportation sector.

Other federal departments and agencies, such as Department of National Defence, Canadian Coast Guard, and NAV CANADA, rely on ECCC sound science and data on weather, water, ice and environmental conditions to deliver on their mandates. ECCC will continue to meet its commitments to these organizations.

ECCC will continue to collaborate internationally on science and data sharing, both bilaterally with other countries, and multilaterally through international organizations, such as the World Meteorological Organization. Through partnerships and adoption of international best practices, ECCC will continue to improve its meteorological and water services.

Monitoring volcano action

To support the International Civil Aviation Organization for aviation safety, the Department runs the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre in Montreal. The Centre is one of only eight volcanic ash programs globally that continuously monitors volcanic activities. During the November 2017 eruption of Mount Agung in Bali, Indonesia, the Department monitored the volcanic activities, issued warnings and predicted the movement of ash in the atmosphere.

Planned results

Departmental Result: Canadians use authoritative weather and related information to make decisions about their health and safety
Departmental result indicators Targets Date to achieve target 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Index of the timeliness and accuracy of severe weather warnings on a scale of 0 to 10 7.9 2018

8.3
(three year rolling average 2012–14)  

8.3
(three year rolling average 2013–15)

8.2
(three year rolling average 2014–16)

Percentage of Canadians that use ECCC information to address water-related impacts on health, safety, economy and environmentFootnote 13 80% 2018-19 This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years. This is a new indicator. Results are not available from previous years.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
218,314,208 218,314,208 222,871,514 219,851,665

* This summary does not reflect either potential investments and associated funding that were announced through the Federal Budget 2018, or potential funding that may be received if sunsetting initiatives are renewed.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2018–19 Planned 2019–20 Planned 2020–21 Planned
1,501 1,468 1,443

Financial, human resources and performance information for Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Program Inventory is available on the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

In 2018–19, ECCC Internal Services will support the Department as it delivers on its priorities and manages complex and sensitive environmental issues.

ECCC will continue to leverage its strategic human resources planning to ensure current and future employees have the skills required to deliver the Department’s mandate and priorities in areas such as weather science and monitoring, climate change research, and to support the development of tools, including regulations, which are central ECCC responsibilities.

The Department will continue to develop and apply tools and facilitate workshops to promote diversity and inclusion in the workplace. ECCC will also continue to raise awareness for managers and employees on important mental health issues and to promote treating others with respect (see sidebar).

ECCC will continue to collaborate with Shared Services Canada and other departments to safeguard information, and support the federal government’s Open Data and Open Information initiatives, which will contribute to providing Canadians with information on matters such as weather trends and GHG emissions. The Department’s information management/information technology services will also provide tools and infrastructure to support the data collection and integration to launch and maintain the new Canadian Centre for Climate Services.

Respect Day

ECCC employees will come together to celebrate the annual Respect Day, a joint management-and-union initiative. ECCC’s senior executives will take time to engage with employees about respect in the workplace. The Respect Day will be another opportunity to acknowledge that people are all unique and to celebrate differences.

The Department’s communication services will support the launch of ECCC’s new mobile weather application, which will be user tested in April 2018, and available to Canadians through Google Play and Apple in August 2018. As the use of mobile applications and social media continues to increase as a vehicle for information dissemination, ECCC will support the use of new and emerging media to communicate with Canadians. The Department will strengthen its capacity to enable work to be conducted on an “anytime, anywhere” basis through, for example, the increased use of wi-fi and videoconferencing.

ECCC’s work to support employees affected by the government-wide pay transformation initiative will continue.

Commitment to experimentation: #iwantasciencejob recruitment campaign

This initiative will experiment with the development of a recruitment model for the science community across government. The model will be designed to attract a wide range of candidates and will include the use of social media and to pre-assess candidates on key behavioural competencies, therefore maximizing technology and making use of modern assessment tools.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
196,994,198 196,994,198 195,817,311 191,396,683

* This summary does not reflect either potential investments and associated funding that were announced through the Federal Budget 2018, or potential funding that may be received if sunsetting initiatives are renewed.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2018–19 Planned 2019–20 Planned 2020–21 Planned
1,388 1,363 1,340
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: