Departmental Plan 2021 to 2022, supplementary tables, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Details on transfer payment programs

Canada Nature Fund

Start date
April 1, 2018
End date
March 31, 2023
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s wildlife are conserved and protected

Canada’s species at risk are recovered

Indigenous peoples are engaged in conservation

Link to department’s Program Inventory
Species at Risk and Habitat Conservation and Protection.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canada Nature Fund is a critical tool for advancing actions by others that conserve and protect Canada’s habitat and biodiversity.

The Canada Nature Fund will secure private land, support provincial and territorial species protection efforts and help build Indigenous capacity to conserve land and species. It will support and enable others to undertake actions that conserve wildlife and protect and improve their habitat.

Expected results

The Canada Nature Fund will support and increase collaboration and momentum for conserving Canada’s biodiversity and habitat and demonstrate the federal government’s leadership in enabling the establishment of protected and conserved areas, protecting and recovering species at risk and preventing other priority species from becoming a conservation concern.

Projects funded will contribute to the departmental core responsibility of Conserving Nature, and will contribute to the following key expected results:

  • Canada’s wildlife and habitat are conserved and protected
  • Canada’s species at risk are recovered
  • Indigenous peoples are engaged in conservation
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

A formative evaluation of the Canada Nature Fund is planned to be completed in fiscal year 2021-22.

A summative evaluation of the Nature Legacy Initiative is planned to be completed in fiscal year 2022-23.

General targeted recipient groups
Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Indigenous organizations; domestic or international research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; domestic or international for-profit organizations; local organizations; Provincial, territorial, municipal and local governments and provincial Crown corporations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements; and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 109,175,597 101,573,097 97,828,097 1,447,500
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 109,175,597 101,573,097 97,828,097 1,447,500

Taking Action on Clean Growth and Climate Change

Start date
April 1, 2018
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to departmental result(s)

Canadian greenhouse gas and short-lived climate pollutant emissions are reduced.

Indigenous peoples are engaged in clean growth and climate change.

Canada contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing climate resilience globally.

Canadian communities, economies, and ecosystems are more resilient.

Link to the department’s Program Inventory
Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation, International Climate Change Action and Climate Change Adaptation
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program
The purpose is to promote change towards sustainable environmental development and policies.
Expected results
  • Support and coordinate the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (PCF);
  • Increase awareness on climate and climate change initiatives;
  • Increase youth, student and Indigenous participation in climate change initiatives;
  • Support actions that reduce Canadian greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions;
  • Develop regulatory instruments;
  • Support businesses and Canadians to adapt and become more resilient to climate change; and
  • Contribute to international climate change actions to increase global benefits.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation
N/A
General targeted recipient groups
Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Indigenous organizations; domestic or international research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; domestic or international for-profit organizations; local organizations; provincial, territorial, and municipal governments and provincial Crown corporations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements; and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Total grants 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000
Total contributions 27,235,765 15,420,016 13,511,411 11,610,161
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 30,235,765 18,420,016 16,511,411 14,610,161

Conserving Nature

Start date
April 1, 2018
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s wildlife and habitat are conserved and protected

Canada’s species at risk are recovered

Indigenous peoples are engaged in conservation

Link to the department’s Program Inventory
Species at Risk; Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships; Migratory Birds and other Wildlife; Environmental Assessment; Habitat Conservation and Protection; and Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program
The purpose is to advance conservation of biodiversity and sustainable development. The overall objective of the Conserving Nature Program is to conserve, protect and recover Canada’s wildlife including; species at risk and their habitat (including critical habitat); and healthy populations of migratory birds. Actions taken will also contribute to Canada’s biodiversity strategy and related domestic and international partnership interests, including the establishment and management of protected areas, other effective conservation measures, Indigenous protected and conserved areas and Indigenous people’s capacity and participation in conservation.
Expected results

The Conserving Nature Program will support biodiversity conservation domestically and internationally. Specifically, projects funded will contribute to the departmental core responsibility of Conserving Nature, and will contribute to the following key expected results:

  • Canada’s wildlife and habitat are conserved and protected
  • Canada’s species at risk are recovered
  • Indigenous peoples are engaged in conservation
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation
Unknown
General targeted recipient groups
Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Indigenous organizations; domestic or international research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; domestic or international for-profit organizations; local organizations; Provincial, territorial, municipal and local governments and provincial Crown corporations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements; and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 29,545,797 30,432,296 23,966,326 22,256,316
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 29,545,797 30,432,296 23,966,326 22,256,316

Low Carbon Economy Fund

Start date
April 1, 2017
End date
March 31, 2024
Type of transfer payment
Grant and Contribution
Type of appropriation
The program is appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-2019
Link to departmental result(s)
Canadian greenhouse gas and short-lived climate pollutant emissions are reduced
Link to Program Inventory
Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Low Carbon Economy Fund (LCEF) is a critical tool for advancing incremental domestic mitigation action under the Pan-Canadian Framework (PCF) to support its implementation, transition Canada to a low-carbon economy, and work towards meeting or exceeding commitments under the Paris Agreement.

The LCEF supports provincial and territorial mitigation action in the context of the PCF. Specifically the LCEF is to support actions that materially reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (includes actions that materially increase removals where relevant), are incremental to current plans, and achieve significant reductions within the period of Canada’s first Nationally Determined Contribution under the Paris Agreement. Also, where possible, resources will be allocated towards those projects that yield the greatest absolute greenhouse gas reductions for the lowest cost-per-tonne.

Expected results
Continue to support collaboration and maintain momentum with provinces and territories that are signatories to the PCF, while also demonstrating the Government’s leadership in addressing climate change; and effectively implementing proposals approved for funding under the LCEF in order to contribute to Canada’s transition to a resilient, low-carbon economy.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
The LCEF has not yet undergone an evaluation.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation
An evaluation of the Low Carbon Economy Fund is planned to begin in fiscal year 2022-23 and continue through 2023-24.
General targeted recipient groups
Provincial, territorial, and municipal governments and provincial Crown corporations; Indigenous organizations and communities; not-for-profit non-governmental organizations; individuals; research, academic and educational institutions; private corporations and businesses
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

For the Leadership Fund, ECCC conducted face-to-face meetings with all provinces and territories to provide clarification on the program and discuss initial proposals.

ECCC also responded to applicant questions via email throughout the Champions and Partnerships stream application processes.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Total grants 2,000,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000
Total contributions 605,153,546 421,242,415 174,221,565 148,041,178
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 607,153,546 423,742,415 176,721,565 150,541,178

Preventing and Managing Pollution

Start date
April 1, 2018
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to departmental result(s)

Canadians have clean air

Canadians have clean water

The Canadian environment is protected from harmful substances

Link to the department’s Program Inventory
Air Quality; Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships; Community Eco-Action; and Substances and Waste Management
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program
The purpose is to protect, conserve and have a positive impact on the environment.
Expected results
  • Reduce releases and monitor levels of contaminants in air, water and soil;
  • Promote and enforce compliance with environmental laws and regulations;
  • Develop and administer on the ground projects that have positive impact on the environment, environmental standards, guidelines, regulations and other risk management instruments by collaborating with provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples, community based groups and other stakeholders.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation
N/A
General targeted recipient groups
Not-for-profit organizations; Indigenous organizations; research, academic and educational institutions; individuals; for-profit organizations; local organizations; environmental groups; community groups; youth and senior groups; community-based associations; service clubs; and/or provincial, territorial, municipal and local governments and provincial Crown corporations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: recipients through application-based process, and/or recipients on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; email correspondence with targeted interest groups; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 32,491,141 29,477,591 24,125,726 24,045,186
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 32,491,141 29,477,591 24,125,726 24,045,186

Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million

Name of transfer payment program End date Type of transfer payment Type of appropriation Link to departmental results Link to department’s program inventory Purpose and main objective Planned spending for 2021-22 Fiscal year of last completed evaluation Fiscal year of next planned evaluation General targeted recipient group
Assessed contribution to the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) Not applicable (N/A) C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Canada contributes to reducing greenhouse as emissions and increasing climate resilience globally International Climate Change Action To enable Canada’s obligation to cost share the core and projected expenses of the CEC. $3,460,777 2012-2013 (Evaluation of Canada’s Participation in the CEC) Not planned for evaluation Commission for Environmental Cooperation
Assessed contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. The Canadian environment is protected from harmful substances Substances and Waste Management Canada is a signatory to this convention and is thus bound by the requirements of the international convention, including the obligation to pay the assessed contribution. $121,214 2019-2020 (Evaluation of Chemicals Management Plan) Not planned for evaluation Convention on the OECD, Environment Directorate
Assessed contribution to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Canadians use authoritative weather and related information to make decisions about their health and safety Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings Canada has been a member of the WMO since 1950 as one of the initial signatories to the convention. The annual assessed contribution is based on the U.N. Scale as agreed to every three years by the U.N. General Assembly and adapted, as is normal practice, to accommodate the varying membership of U.N. organizations. $2,167,785

2015-2016 (Evaluation of the Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings (Sub-program 2.1.1))

2009–2010 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)

2021-2022 (Evaluation of Weather, Observations, Forecasts and Warnings including Radar) World Meteorological Organization
Assessed contribution to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Canada’s species at risk are recovered

 

Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships Canada is a signatory to this convention and is thus bound by the requirements of the international convention, including the obligation to pay the assessed contribution. $190,000 2009–2010 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions) 2022-2023 (Evaluation of Species at Risk, including SAR components of Canada Nature Fund) CITES Secretariat
Assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (RAMSAR Convention) N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Canada’s wildlife and habitat are conserved and protected

Canada’s species at risk are recovered

Indigenous Peoples are engaged in conservation

Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships

Canada has been a Contracting Party to the Ramsar Convention since 1981.

Annual membership dues are an obligation of the Parties based on terms agreed to at the Convention of the Parties.

$206,140

2018-2019 (Evaluation of the National Wetland Conservation Fund)

2009–2010 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)

2022-2023 (Evaluation of Protected Areas, including Canada Nature Fund) RAMSAR Convention Secretariat
Assessed contribution to the Minamata Convention on Mercury N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Canadians have clean water

The Canadian environment is protected from harmful substances

Substances and Waste Management Canada is a Party to the Minamata Convention on Mercury (the Convention). The Convention is a multilateral treaty to protect human health and the environment from the adverse effects of mercury. The payment is made to the Convention’s Secretariat under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). $200,000 Not planned for evaluation Not planned for evaluation United Nations Environment Programme
Assessed Contribution to the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR) N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Canada contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing climate resilience globally International Climate Change Action and Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation The International Bamboo and Rattan Organisation (INBAR) is an intergovernmental organization dedicated to improving the social, economic, and environmental benefits for producers and users of bamboo and rattan, while maintaining a sustainable resource base by supporting innovative research and development. $38,000 Not planned for evaluation Not planned for evaluation International Network for Bamboo and Rattan
Grants for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer N/A G The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Canada contributes to reducing greenhouse as emissions and increasing climate resilience globally International Climate Change Action Under the rules of the Montreal Protocol, Canada has the option of directing up to 20% of its annual contribution to the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol (MFMP) towards support for bilateral or regional projects in developing countries, which helps them reduce their consumption or production of ozone-depleting substances (ODS). $2,800,000 2012-2013 (Evaluation of ECCC’s Activities in Support of the Montreal Protocol and Multilateral Fund) Not planned for evaluation Developing country governments, universities, training institutes that have signed the Montreal Protocol, and third‑party delivery agents

Grants – Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

N/A G The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Canadians use authoritative weather and related information to make decisions about their health and safety Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings The purpose is to encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities that enable Canadians to access, understand, and use information on changing weather, water, climate and air quality conditions. $44,000 2015-2016 (Evaluation of Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings) 2021-2022 (Evaluation of Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings) Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Indigenous organizations; domestic or international research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; provincial, territorial, municipal and local governments and provincial Crown corporations.
Contributions – Predicting Weather and Environmental Conditions Includes Treasury Board Submissions for MSC Renewal and Hydrological (both sunset in 2022-23); as well as on-going A-Base funding C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Canadians use authoritative weather and related information to make decisions about their health and safety Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings; Hydrological Services The purpose is to encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities that enable Canadians to access, understand, and use information on changing weather, water, climate and air quality conditions. $2,975,378 2015-2016 (Evaluation of Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings)

2021-2022 Evaluation of Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

2021-2022

(Evaluation of Hydrological Services)

Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Indigenous organizations; domestic or international research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; provincial, territorial, municipal and local governments and provincial Crown corporations.
Contributions in Support of the Impact Assessment and Regulatory System: Environment and Climate Change Canada Treasury Board Submission funding sunsets in 2022-23 C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Canada’s wildlife and habitat are conserved and protected

Canada’s species at risk are recovered

Indigenous Peoples are engaged in conservation

Species at Risk; Migratory Birds and other Wildlife; Environmental Assessment. The overall objective of these terms and conditions is to advance ECCC’s contribution to the “Cumulative Effects, Open Science and Evidence” approach. This includes the development of an open science and data platform; supporting regional assessments; conducting strategic assessments, including ones on climate change and biodiversity; and coordinating departmental, federal and inter-jurisdictional efforts to implement the proposed approach to addressing the cumulative effects of natural resource development. $3,060,400 Not planned for evaluation 2022-2023 (Horizontal Evaluation of the Impact Assessment and Regulatory Processes (IARP) Horizontal Initiative) Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations, such as charitable and volunteer organizations, professional associations, and non-governmental organizations; Domestic Indigenous organizations, governments, Individuals, boards, commissions, communities, associations and authorities including: Indigenous not-for-profit organizations; District councils, Chiefs councils and Tribal councils; Indigenous research, academic and educational institutions; and Indigenous for-profit organizations; Domestic research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian individuals; Domestic for-profit organizations, such as small businesses with less than 500 employees, companies, corporations, and industry associations; Local organizations such as community associations and groups, seniors’ and youth groups, and service clubs; and Provincial, territorial, municipal and local governments and their agencies (e.g. Crown corporations).
Contribution – Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (2019) N/A C The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Not applicable Community Eco-Action Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (2019) (formerly Science Horizons) is funded through the Career Focus stream of the Government of Canada’s Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (YESS), overseen by Employment and Social Development Canada. Programs under the Career Focus stream aim to demonstrate federal leadership by investing in the skills required to meet the needs of the knowledge economy, facilitate the transition of highly skilled young people to a rapidly changing labour market, and promote the benefits of advanced studies. $3,069,000 2019-2020 (Horizontal Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy - Career Focus Stream) 2024-2025 (Horizontal Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy - Career Focus Stream) The direct recipients of Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) funding are the Delivery Agents administering the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy. Indirectly, recipients of the wage subsidy are for-profit organizations, not-for-profit organizations, municipal governments, Indigenous organizations, and post-secondary educational institutions.
Grants - Innovation Solutions Canada (ISC) Treasury Board Submission for Ocean Agenda sunsets in 2021-22 G The program is appropriated annually through Estimates. Support Clean technology and Zero Plastic Waste Agenda Substance and Waste Management

Incentivize clean technology development and innovation to reduce plastic waste.

Includes grant funding from Oceans Agenda TB Submission, as well as internal re-allocation to fund pressure.

$1,700,000 Not planned for evaluation 2021-2022 (Evaluation of Federal Leadership Towards Zero Plastic Waste in Canada Horizontal Initiative) Canadian Small and Medium Size Enterprises

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Institutional GBA+ capacity

The Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) of the Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) is Environment and Climate Change Canada’s (ECCC) Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) Champion. The GBA+ Champion is responsible for the overall implementation and updating, as required, of the department’s GBA+ policy.

The department’s GBA+ Centre of Expertise resides with SPB and the Director General of Strategic Policy manages the day-to-day operation of the Centre of Expertise (CoE), which includes two dedicated FTEs of an analyst and a senior analyst who report to a Director. The CoE provides support to the department, including:

The GBA+ Branch Advisory Network aims to strengthen GBA+ capacity throughout the department by facilitating the sharing of information, best practices and resources. The network consists of approximately 25 members from across the department.

Additional specific activities for 2021-22 include the development of:

In addition, GBA+ activities feed into the department’s Working Group on Diversity and Inclusion, supported by two ADM Co-Champions.

These resources aim to advance the integration of GBA+ across all departmental activities to support evidence-based decision-making and to continue to build a culture of inclusiveness.

Highlights of GBA+ results by program

ECCC plays an important role in the protection of Canadians and their environment. The careful consideration of how different groups of people experience the environment and the differentiated impacts of environmental policies and programs helps inform good policymaking, science, program implementation and service delivery.

Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation

Climate change affects all Canadians; however, experiences differ according to geographic location, gender, income level, ethnicity and other socio-economic factors. For example, large urban centers experience amplified heat waves, whereas those in rural areas who depend on agriculture can experience loss of livelihood. Studies demonstrate that women, people with lower income, and Indigenous people tend to be more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. In Canada, northern and coastal regions are particularly vulnerable to climate change.

Policy responses to climate change can disproportionally affect some subgroups of the population. For example, low income households, which are more likely to be headed by sole female parents and disproportionately include individuals with disabilities or mental illness, recent immigrants and Indigenous persons, may be more vulnerable to pollution pricing as expenditures on carbon-intensive goods make up a larger share of their expenses. This initiative may also impact employment for many Canadians, with potential losses in the traditional energy sector, and gains in the environmental, clean technology, and renewable energy sector. As the initiative is implemented, efforts are taken to mitigate and avoid, as much as possible, impacts on vulnerable groups. Disaggregated data, such as data broken down by gender, age, race, ethnicity, and income will be collected to understand how certain groups may be disproportionately impacted, and to determine ways to mitigate impacts. This includes a Just Transition, which aims to ensure that the transition away from coal-fired electricity takes into consideration those who may be adversely impacted, such as coal workers and communities.

Overall, mitigating the effects of climate change in a balanced and inclusive manner will benefit all Canadians, and in particular, help alleviate the impacts that will be disproportionally felt by certain groups.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes

International Climate Change Action

Canada’s international engagement on climate change, including our climate finance pledge for developing countries, serves to reduce the impacts of climate change on those most vulnerable (women, Indigenous people, youth, etc.). The repercussion from droughts, floods, extreme weather events, and food and water insecurity have a greater and differentiated effect on these vulnerable groups, especially the poor. To address these issues, proposed programming will specifically target women, girls, and Indigenous people by integrating GBA+ considerations into climate change actions alongside developmental considerations, such as health.

In line with Canada’s Gender Results Framework Goals, GBA+ is considered during the negotiation and implementation of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) as well as in other bilateral and regional environmental cooperation agreements with strategic partners, including the United States and Europe. Multilateral and bilateral engagement is expected to increase throughout 2021-22. Canada’s international environmental cooperation has the potential to have positive impacts on individuals and groups outside of Canada by improving environmental conditions in the most vulnerable locations, including in Southeast Asia and Latin America. GBA+ considerations are also integrated through the development of bilateral environmental cooperation activities with international partners, in order to provide women and Indigenous peoples equitable access to and benefits from the opportunities created by FTAs in green goods and services.

Canada will continue supporting the implementation of the Gender Action Plan adopted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which aims to increase women’s participation and leadership in climate action and to better integrate gender considerations in national climate plans and policies. Applying a GBA+ lens to investment decisions will help create better social and economic opportunities for vulnerable groups in the face of climate change. In addition, such actions promote the engagement of women and vulnerable groups in the design, decision-making, and implementation of programs and projects while facilitating cooperative solutions and knowledge transfer.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes; Promoting gender equality to build a more peaceful, inclusive, rules-based and prosperous world; Equal and full participation in the economy; Equal opportunities and diversified paths in education and skills development

Climate Change Adaptation

Climate change can transform the economy and significantly affect the daily lives of Canadians. Climate change is influencing the frequency and intensity of extreme events, is altering ecosystems and habitats, has the potential to affect the economy across all sectors, and poses risks to human health and safety. Certain populations are more vulnerable to a changing climate depending on region of residence, sex, gender, age, income, employment status, family status, Indigenous status, visible minority status, and disability status. Prevailing social norms, attitudes and behavioural habits may also exacerbate the impacts and responses to climate change for certain populations.

Integrating considerations of gender, income, age, employment status, education, family status, region of residence, disability status and of Indigenous and visible minority communities helps ensure that adaptation policy and programs fulfill the specific needs of the most vulnerable, do not exacerbate inequalities and other vulnerabilities, and ensure the equal participation of diverse groups of people in the decision-making and implementation phases of these activities.

To address these issues and build on recent efforts to include diverse perspectives in adaptation policy, a GBA+ lens will be applied to the ongoing development of adaptation policy advice and in the work of the Canadian Centre for Climate Services. In addition, in 2021-22, ECCC will engage partners, including Indigenous peoples, to develop a shared national vision and goals to enhance climate resilience in Canada. While this work will benefit all Canadians, it is likely to have the greatest impact on populations who are disproportionately affected by climate change.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal and full participation in the economy, Eliminating gender-based violence and harassment, and promoting security of the person and access to justice; Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes

Air Quality

Certain populations are more vulnerable to air pollution depending on sex, gender, age, income, employment status, family status, previous health status and other factors. Detrimental health effects of air pollution can be compounded in individuals who have multiple risk factors. For example, a person could be disproportionately affected by air pollution if they are elderly, have chronic health conditions, and live in an area that has a higher degree of air pollution, compared to someone who has only one risk factor.

A GBA+ lens has been applied to the development of some policy recommendations, programs and measures to address air pollution and improve air quality. ECCC will build on this approach by exploring ways to ensure that vulnerable groups are considered in future air quality work, such as Indigenous communities in geographic areas located downwind of large industrial complexes and those affected by smoke during wildfires.

ECCC will also continue to work with provinces and territories to monitor air quality on a daily basis through the National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) Program to provide information for the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI), which is tailored to vulnerable groups and provides messaging on the health risks of air pollution and personal actions to reduce these risks.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes

Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships

In general, the Program is expected to affect Canadians positively by providing cleaner freshwater for drinking, fishing, swimming and other uses, and healthier freshwater ecosystems.

Certain elements of the Program will positively affect Indigenous peoples. Specific targeted activities under this Program seek to improve the technical capacity and engagement of Indigenous governments, organizations, individuals and communities. These activities aim to address Indigenous peoples’ particular concerns regarding freshwater ecosystems; to include Indigenous representation at key decision-making tables, where appropriate; and, to build capacity in understanding and addressing freshwater issues, especially those that have implications in Indigenous communities.

Ecosystem-specific targeted activities

Great Lakes

In 2021-22, through the Great Lakes Protection Initiative, projects that build capacity in understanding and addressing Great Lakes issues will be supported, including those that have implications for Indigenous communities. Direct support will be provided through the Indigenous Engagement program component of the Great Lakes Protection Initiative (i.e., six capacity-building projects in four Indigenous communities and two organizations). Through ongoing efforts related to lake-wide management and Areas of Concern, ECCC will continue to engage with First Nations and Métis communities across the Great Lakes basin in taking action and Great Lakes decision-making. Indigenous participation in Great Lakes governance will continue to be welcomed, including participation on the Great Lakes Executive Committee, pursuant to the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, and annual meetings between Canada-Ontario Agreement on the Great Lakes Executive Committee Co-Chairs and First Nations and Metis partners.

Lake Winnipeg

In 2021-22, ECCC’s Lake Winnipeg Basin Program will provide funding to support Indigenous governments and peoples in efforts to reduce nutrient loading in the Lake Winnipeg Basin through Indigenous-led projects such as community-based monitoring and projects that gather and utilize Traditional Knowledge to enhance the understanding of the ecosystem health of Lake Winnipeg and its basin.

St. Lawrence

In 2021-22, the St. Lawrence Action Plan will continue to support projects that foster education and raise awareness of best practices among Indigenous peoples and communities to preserve water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. For example, an ongoing project in the watershed will engage youth in the Mohawk community of Kanesatake through activities that recognize the traditional Kanien’kéhâ:ka knowledge and through scientific samplings of territorial rivers and scientific analysis of the aquatic ecosystem.

Atlantic Ecosystem Initiatives

In 2021-2022, through the Atlantic Ecosystem Initiatives, projects will be supported in the Saint John River Watershed that build capacity in understanding and addressing freshwater issues, including those that have implications in Indigenous communities. For example, Atlantic Ecosystem Initiatives will support a comprehensive examination of factors affecting water quality in the upper Saint John River basin, the results of which will be shared with Indigenous communities and local organizations to help inform future planning and initiatives to improve water quality.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes

The Water Quality and Ecosystem Partnerships, including Indigenous engagement efforts, align with the principles and spirit of GBA+, which considers many identity factors such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability, and how the interaction between these factors influences the way we might experience government policies and initiatives.

Community Eco-Action

The EcoAction Community Funding Program and the Environmental Damages Fund programs aim to affect Canadians and their communities positively by funding projects that benefit the environment. The Programs’ eligible funding recipients include environmental non-governmental organizations, community groups, youth and student groups, and Indigenous organizations.

The programs allocate funding using Calls for Proposals that are open to all eligible applicants. French and English information on how to apply for funding is available widely on program websites and social media. Staff are also available to answer inquiries and provide advice on proposal development to groups that are underrepresented or have less capacity or experience in applying for funding. Concrete actions will be taken to recognize various cultures and languages through the engagement of Indigenous communities to build awareness of funding opportunities, and with a linguistic lens when evaluating projects are involving Official Language Minority Communities. This includes: ensuring different subgroups of the population are eligible and aware of funding opportunities; using a linguistic lens when answering inquiries and evaluating proposals that involve Official Language Minority Communities; translating program material in both official languages and considering translation in Indigenous languages when appropriate; funding projects in communities negatively impacted by climate risks; directing funding to diverse communities as appropriate; and including members of diverse backgrounds, cultures, and regions in the review process. Both programs compile data on funding to Indigenous communities, some of which are located in remote regions.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal and full participation in the economy

Substances and Waste Management

Although the Substances and Waste Management Program benefits all Canadians, certain populations in Canada, such as expectant mothers, children, the elderly, the economically disadvantaged, and Indigenous communities are more vulnerable to harmful substances, and benefit most from sound risk management. The Chemicals Management Program uses scientific information to properly assess the risks posed for vulnerable groups from exposure to toxic chemicals and products that contain them. Scientific information is also used to inform decisions and risk management.

Alignment with Gender Results FrameworkGoal(s): Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes

Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution

Compliance promotion officers tailor compliance promotion material based on the target audience’s needs and known compliance barriers, including the cultural and linguistic profile of a regulated community. For example, compliance promotion fact sheets for the Tetrachloroethylene (Use in Dry Cleaning and Reporting Requirements) Regulations were made available in 6 languages (English, French, Korean, Chinese, Punjabi and Persian) to take into consideration the demographics and language profiles of the regulated community. In addition, compliance promotion officers will continue to work with various Indigenous communities and organizations to deliver compliance promotion activities that meet the needs of their communities, for example, through in-person visits or workshops.

Enforcement will continue to adapt its hiring practices to ensure its workforce is more representative. Additional training will be provided regarding Treaty rights and the unique legal status and rights of Indigenous peoples in Canada to facilitate better engagement initiatives. This will notably be performed with respect to a number of laws and regulations with significant impact on these communities such as the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations and the Storage Tank Systems for Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products Regulations. Enforcement officers will continue to adapt their engagement approaches when conducting enforcement activities with diverse communities through the use of translators, for instance.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal opportunities and diversified paths in education and skills development; Equal and full participation in the economy

Species at Risk

Preserving biodiversity is necessary for maintaining strong ecosystems, which in turn, deliver important and diverse ecosystem services to Canadians. The performance indicators considered in the Species at Risk Program reflect not only the ability to protect species at risk, but also examine how the Program might impact, either directly or indirectly, demographic groups who may be more vulnerable due to a combination of socio-economic factors. Other groups may also be impacted including private landowners, industry, other orders of government, non-governmental organizations, and Indigenous peoples.

ECCC expects that the Program will have more direct effects on Indigenous peoples, given that Indigenous reserves and lands often provide important refuge for species at risk. Canada’s Indigenous peoples are also the holders of Indigenous Traditional Knowledge (ITK) essential to achieving the protection and recovery goals for many species. Additionally, the Program consults with Indigenous peoples to ascertain impacts to Treaty rights. Therefore, expected negative Program effects may be related to consultation fatigue and the continuous, repeated gathering of ITK on species at risk. Efforts will be made to reduce these effects by focusing more on ecosystem-based and multi-species conservation approaches as well as improving coordination among federal departments and provincial/territorial governments.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making; Equal and full participation in the economy

Migratory Birds and Other Wildlife

ECCC is responsible for implementing the Migratory Birds and Other Wildlife Program and the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change provides advice to the Governor in Council with respect to migratory birds and other wildlife. Such advice is based on science, including Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, and consultations with affected parties for expected socio-economic impacts. Where socio-economic or cultural impacts are significant, the department collaborates with conservation stewards, stakeholders and other orders of government to incorporate, when possible, their concerns into the decision-making processes and implementation activities to avoid or mitigate disproportionate impacts on certain groups.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making

Habitat Conservation and Protection

The core outcome of this Program is the protection of important wildlife habitat through the regulation, purchase or donation of land and water for conservation purposes. Impacts and benefits would accrue to different demographics along the process of achieving this outcome. While the processes of land and water securement and protection tend to involve and favour specific groups of Canadians (landowners, governments, non-government organizations), the long-term ecosystem services, such as climate regulation, erosion control, tourism and recreation, education, knowledge systems, and cultural heritage, that are gained by conserving ecosystems and landscapes are most often to the benefit of lower-income, rural and Indigenous communities.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal and full participation in the economy; Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making; Equal opportunities and diversified paths in education and skills development

Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships

The Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships Program aims to engage with domestic and international governments, Indigenous organizations, non-government organizations, businesses, and Canadians to develop and meet Canada’s biodiversity commitments. The conservation and protection of biodiversity is necessary for maintaining strong ecosystems, which in turn, deliver important and diverse ecosystem services to all Canadians. For example, healthy ecosystems can filter toxic substances from air, water, and soil, protect us against flooding, storm surges, and erosion, sequester carbon, maintain the water cycle, and help stabilize local climates.

To increase capacity to conserve biodiversity in Canada, the Program will continue to develop, review, and share Canadian positions and policy frameworks, provide targeted funding, conduct research, and maintain and share data and information. Indicators will be assessed to gauge the level of engagement of the population and, in the case of Indigenous peoples, the level of satisfaction with those engagement activities. This information will be used to adjust engagement activities as needed in 2021-22.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal opportunities and diversified paths in education and skills development; Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making

Environmental Assessment

Resource development affects the environment and can have economic, social and health consequences that are felt more heavily by some demographic groups. ECCC provides expert advice and knowledge to decision-makers for subjects within its mandate, such as water quality and biodiversity. This engagement will help to determine potential impacts of development to Canadians, including vulnerable populations.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Reduced poverty and improved health outcomes

Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife

ECCC is aware that certain instruments under the Acts it is responsible for enforcing may present more challenges to compliance for specific groups, such as visible minorities, linguistic groups, and/or Indigenous peoples. The various compliance promotion strategies utilized need to respond to these challenges.

  • The Program will provide training and material to inform on elements that must be considered when engaging in compliance promotion and enforcement activities with regulatees that may be Indigenous or part of a visible minority or linguistic group.
  • Through a group of officers who meet regularly with Indigenous representatives such as in wildlife co-management committees, ECCC will continue to build and promote mutual understanding and partnership.
  • Imagining new ways of working together, the department successfully implemented a service agreement for a Quebec Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel (QC-CEGEP) to develop a collegial training program adapted to Indigenous students’ unique realities, culture and history. The Program will continue to address the special considerations required to meet GBA+ requirements through policy analysis and the development of service agreements with the affected groups.

As a result, enforcement officers take into account established precepts when determining a fair and appropriate enforcement response.

Furthermore, ECCC has developed guidelines for entry and engagement on Indigenous lands, which support staff by: raising awareness and respect for Aboriginal treaty rights; instilling a greater awareness for the unique cultural and legal context of regulatory enforcement on lands where Indigenous peoples manage or control access or where Indigenous peoples exercise Aboriginal or treaty rights; and providing contact information and resources to leverage existing branch and departmental knowledge.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making. ECCC has made strides in ensuring gender equality in leadership roles within the directorate with representation at the various levels of management.

Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

Canadians, and especially people living in northern and rural areas, are dependent on weather forecasts, warnings and expert advice to safely plan their daily activities. Canadians and other stakeholders rely on ECCC for authoritative information on weather, water, climate, marine, ice and air quality. Weather warnings provide information that can assist vulnerable Canadians, such as the elderly, children, or those with certain chronic illnesses or their caretakers, to make informed decisions in weather scenarios that may pose increased risks to these populations (e.g. extreme heat, extreme cold). This also applies to information that might be used to support other populations such as the homeless (i.e. extreme cold responses). An important aspect of these warnings is determining how best to communicate with all Canadians, especially those who are most vulnerable. Recognizing the different needs of Canadians, ECCC provides weather and environmental information through a wide range of platforms including the WeatherCAN application, weather radios, webinars, tailored weather products focusing on potential impacts of a weather situation, and stakeholder engagement. ECCC is also improving the accessibility and documentation of its weather and environmental data and services. Together, these strategies will help better communicate risk to a wide variety of Canadians and prepare them for potential impacts of hazardous weather.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal opportunities and diversified paths in education and skills development; Promoting gender equality to build a more peaceful, inclusive, rules-based and prosperous world

Hydrological Services

Disasters in Canada, including water-related disasters such as floods and droughts, have shown that major events such as these can have significant psycho-social impacts, especially on those citizens who lack sufficient social infrastructure or those who were vulnerable prior to the event. Hydrometric data can be used in combination with socio-economic data to identify potential impacts of water hazards on various groups and implement mitigation measures accordingly. For instance in the case of flooding, hydrometric data provide the core information to develop flood maps which, when combined with geo-referenced socio-economic data, such as household revenue, age and sex, can be used to generate detailed risk assessments to prioritize actions targeting the groups that are the most at risk, including optimizing the monitoring network to enhance coverage for Canadians.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Equal opportunities and diversified paths in education and skills development; Promoting gender equality to build a more peaceful, inclusive, rules-based and prosperous world

Internal Services

ECCC is committed to integrating GBA+ in evaluation. A GBA+ lens is applied in evaluation design and methodologies. Among other things, evaluations can consider how GBA+ has informed program design and delivery.

In its role as an enabler in the delivery of services by program Branches, ECCC’s Corporate Services and Finance Branch (CSFB) is applying a social procurement lens during procurement processes. This pilot initiative aims to consider impacts on gender, diversity and Indigenous groups, and aims to integrate GBA+ in all procurement activities.

Furthermore, a built-in GBA+ component as been integrated in the consideration of project investment in IM/IT. Digital tools, primarily remote work and the use of GCworkplace, have been deployed to enhance inclusion and meet the needs of all employees. CSFB has encouraged flexible work arrangements for employees to ensure that family situations and family roles are considered, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

To enhance inclusion, workplace solutions such as GCworkplace are considered and where feasible, implemented in new projects. The GCworkplace vision was formed and is oriented towards the following seven dimensions: flexible, digital, efficient, green, inclusive, collaborative, and healthy. Additionally, a single window approach for accommodation requests and a Return to Work application were both developed with a GBA+ lens in mind.

CSFB also benefits from a high representation of women throughout the senior management cadre, enabling decision-making that incorporates balanced and diverse perspectives.

On Human Resources, the Department will continue to support the overall implementation of the ECCC Diversity & Inclusion / Employment Equity action plan, and work through avenues such as the Leadership Council on Diversity & Inclusion and the Diversity & Inclusion Working Group to ensure that ECCC works towards addressing key employment equity areas of under-representation.

The Department will continue to contribute to a leadership culture that promotes and builds a healthy, harassment-free, accessible, respectful and supportive work environment.

ECCC will continue to use and develop tools and resources to support the mainstreaming of GBA+ in all ECCC activities and build a culture of inclusiveness.

Alignment with Gender Results Framework Goal(s): Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making; eliminating gender-based violence and harassment, and promoting security of the person and access to justice

Horizontal initiatives

Addressing Air Pollution

The Addressing Air Pollution Initiative Supplementary Table is undergoing final review and confirmation across implicated federal departments. The table will be published on this web page as soon as it is finalized. Please check here later for further updates, or reach out to the Addressing Air Pollution Initiative Secretariat (ec.secretariatinitiativeairsecretariatairinitiative.ec@canada.ca) for more information.

Clean Growth and Climate Change

The Clean Growth and Climate Change Horizontal Initiative Supplementary Table is undergoing final review and confirmation across implicated federal departments. The table will be published on this web page as soon as it is finalized. Please check here later for further updates, or reach out to Amy Goon (amy.goon@canada.ca) for more information.

Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan Initiative Supplementary Table is undergoing final review and confirmation across implicated federal departments. The table will be published on this web page as soon as it is finalized. Please check here later for further updates, or reach out to the FCSAP Secretariat (ec.pascf-fcsap.ec@canada.ca) for more information.

Federal Leadership Towards Zero Plastic Waste

The Federal Leadership Towards Zero Plastic Waste Initiative Supplementary Table is undergoing final review. The table will be published on this web page as soon as it is finalized. Please check here later for further updates, or reach out to Susan Young (susan.young5@canada.ca) for more information.

Nature Legacy for Canada

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Nature Legacy for Canada

Lead department(s)

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)

Federal partner organization(s)

Parks Canada (PCA); Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO); Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2018-19

End date of the horizontal initiative

2023-24

Description of the horizontal initiative

Natural spaces will be protected by establishing and expanding protected areas, managing them to high standards, and linking them onto a well-connected network of protected lands, inland water and coastal and marine areas. Species will be conserved by developing and implementing, in collaboration with partners, protection and recovery measures for priority species, in priority areas, and to address risks; and the rights and responsibilities of Indigenous peoples in conserving species and spaces will be respected and supported.

Governance structures

A senior management committee (Senior Oversight Committee), chaired by ECCC, was established at the ADM level with representation from ECCC, PCA, DFO and NRCan to guide the initiative, address any issues, and overcome any roadblocks that become apparent.

The Committee meets at least once a year to consider a status report on the implementation of the Nature Legacy for Canada.

Total federal funding allocated (from start to end date)(dollars)

$1,168,087,505 from June 2018 to March 2024

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$372,529,496

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$337,695,741

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

$46,500,000 (Offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC))

Total planned spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2023-24

Planning highlights

The Speech from the Throne committed Canada to conserve 25% of our country’s land and 25% of our country’s oceans by 2025 and work toward 30% of each by 2030. We will continue to develop an ambitious plan to achieve these targets. Recognizing that the loss of nature is a global issue requiring global action, Canada will also advocate that countries around the world set a “high ambition” 30% conservation goal for 2030, as advocated by the Prime Minister in September 2020.

The Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation in Canada (Pan-Canadian Approach) reflects a shift to more multi-species and ecosystem-based conservation, and more targeted and collaborative federal, provincial and territorial, and Indigenous partnership approach focussed on conservation planning and action on shared priority places, species, and sectors.

We will continue to implement the Pan-Canadian Approach by supporting the recovery and conservation of six identified shared priority species (Barren-ground Caribou (including the Dolphin and Union population), Boreal Caribou, Greater Sage-grouse, Peary Caribou, Southern Mountain Caribou, and Wood Bison) and other species of federal interest, through investments, including investments from partners and ongoing collaborative conservation planning arrangements.

We will continue to invest in projects to support partner and stakeholder engagement, integrated conservation planning and ongoing species at risk conservation in 11 federal-provincial-territorial priority places. We will continue to administer the Canada Nature Fund’s Community-Nominated Priority Places for Species at Risk—a $15.6 million, four-year funding initiative to support community-led projects that protect and conserve species at risk. We will also continue to work with a variety of partners and stakeholders in the agriculture, forest, and urban development sectors to develop conservation action plans to align sector policy and practice with positive outcomes for species at risk, and other wildlife such as migratory birds, and sector sustainability.

We will work with provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, key industry sectors, and private foundations and trusts to continue to expand and effectively manage a network of protected and conserved areas across Canada. For example, the federal and provincial governments will work with the ranching community to conserve prairie grasslands and manage pastures in southwestern Saskatchewan in an environmentally, economically, and socially responsible way in order to support wildlife habitat protection, livestock production, and local and Indigenous community interests. We will also continue to collaborate with partners to conserve ecosystems and landscapes in ways that benefit lower income, rural and Indigenous communities. Additionally, we will continue to administer the Target 1 Challenge program of the Canada Nature Fund – a up to $175 million, four-year funding initiative to support projects that will create new protected and conserved areas, including Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas, across Canada that will contribute to Canada’s Target 1.

We will continue to work with our three Indigenous governance bodies to co-deliver the Indigenous Guardians Pilot to support the more than 70 First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities’ Guardians initiatives in protecting sensitive and culturally important areas and species, monitoring ecological health, and maintaining Indigenous cultural sites. The Pilot will conclude in 2022, with the completion of an evaluation of the funded initiatives’ benefits and the Pilot’s effectiveness. Supporting Indigenous leadership in conservation is a central component of Canada’s effort to protect 25% of Canada lands and 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, and lay a foundation for achieving 30% of each by 2030. Work funded under the Canada Nature Fund will support the establishment of up to 30 Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs), across Canada through funding opportunities, such as the Target 1 Challenge program.

Contact information

Nature Legacy Secretariat
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
315 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau QC J8Y 3Z5
ec.secretariatdupatrimoinenaturel-naturelegacysecretariat.ec@canada.ca

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Shared outcomes: Canada’s species at risk are recovered and Canada’s ecosystems, landscape and biodiversity are protected
Name of theme Species at Risk Spaces (Protected Areas) Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Protection and recovery action for 230 species at risk is enhanced Canada’s network of protected areas, OECMs and IPCAs is expanded and strengthened Not applicable
Environment and Climate Change Canada $331,173,996

$452,632,353

(Including IS)

$22,194,340
Parks Canada

$58,667,050

(Including IS)

$162,010,390

(Including IS)

$15,129,515
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

$159,183,716 and $14,600,000 ongoing

(Including IS)

n/a $13,647,819
Natural Resources Canada $4,420,000 n/a n/a

2021-22 Planning information

Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2021-22 Planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Nature Legacy for Canada $1,168,087,505 $251,186,951 Canada’s species at risk are recovered Percentage of species at risk for which changes in populations are consistent with recovery and management objectives 60% May 2025
Canada’s ecosystems, landscape and biodiversity are protected Percentage of total i) terrestrial territory (land and inland water); and ii) coastal and marine areas that are conserved through networks of protected areas, other effective conservation measure (OECMs) and Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs)

i) 17% of total land is conserved

ii) 10% of total coastal and marine areas are conserved

2020

* This amount includes any additional funding received after the last renewal.

** Amounts include offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC) with new funding of $46.5M. Southern Mountain Caribou is inherently tied to Nature Legacy and its outcomes under Species and Spaces Themes.

Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2021-22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Species at risk $553,444,762 $133,165,635 Protection and recovery action for 230 species at risk is enhanced Percentage of 230 species at risk for which protection or recovery actions are being implemented through action for priority places, species, and threats 100% 2023

* This amount includes any additional funding received after the last renewal.

** Amounts include offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC) with new funding of $46.5M. Southern Mountain Caribou is inherently tied to Nature Legacy and its outcomes under Species and Spaces Themes.

Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2021–22 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
ECCC Species at risk Protection and recovery of species and their critical habitat through science, action planning, stewardship actions, regulations, enforcement, and reporting $117,444,701 $27,819,709 Protection and recovery action for species at risk is enhanced Percent of species whose critical habitat has been identified on federal land for which habitat, wholly or in part, is protected 100% 2025
Enabling the stewardship actions of partners with contributions funding through the Canada Nature Fund $167,475,500 $45,427,100 Collaboration with partners for species at risk is enhanced through the Canada Nature Fund Total land area (in hectares) that has been (i) secured; (ii) protected (new); or (iii) protected (renewed) for species at risk

3 year rolling average

(i) 7,000

(ii) 10,000

(iii) 100,000

2023
Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful 61% Ongoing
Renewing capacity for assessment, listing, and recovery planning $46,253,795 $9,250,759 Core capacity to implement the Species at Risk Act is renewed Percentage of legally listed species at risk with a recovery strategy or management plan available on the Species at Risk public registry where a recovery document is due. 75% 2023
PCA Heritage Places Conservation Program Protection and recovery of species and their critical habitat through science, implementation of on-the ground recovery actions, enforcement, and reporting $41,968,610 $9,221,440 Heritages places are managed responsibly Percentage of actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans that are implemented 50% 2023
Renewing capacity for assessment, listing, and recovery planning $16,698,440 $3,248,110 Number of species at risk action plans for Parks Canada places with 3 or more species at risk that are completed 24 2020
DFO Species at Risk Protection and recovery of species and their critical habitat through science, action planning, stewardship actions, regulation, enforcement, and reporting $58,831,716 $13,078,117 Protection and recovery action for species at risk is enhanced Percentage of listed aquatic species that, when reassessed, have trends consistent with the population and distribution objectives laid out in the recovery strategies or management plans 75% 2023
Enabling the stewardship actions of partners with contributions funding through the Canada Nature Fund $59,352,000 $15,870,400 Collaboration with partners for species at risk is enhanced through the Canada Nature Fund Number of stakeholder actively involved in species at risk protection and recovery activities 50 2023
Renewing capacity for assessment, listing, and recovery planning $41,000,000 $8,200,000 Core capacity to implement the Species at Risk Act is renewed Percentage of aquatic species/populations at risk listed under the Species at Risk Act for which a recovery strategy/management plan is completed 80% 2023
NRCan Cumulative Effects Protection and recovery of species and their critical habitat through science $4,420,000 $1,050,000 Protection and recovery action for species at risk is enhanced Trends in the use of tools, products and approaches by key decision makers to enhance information, decisions and responses regarding management of disturbance in ecosystems Minimum of 5 tools, products and approaches used by key decision makers 2023

* This amount includes any additional funding received after the last renewal.

** Amounts include offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC) with new funding of $46.5M. Southern Mountain Caribou is inherently tied to Nature Legacy and its outcomes under Species and Spaces Themes.

Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2021-22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Protected areas $614,642,743 $118,021,316 Canada’s network of protected areas, OECMs and IPCAs is expanded and strengthened Number of protected areas, OECMs and IPCAs with demonstrable progress toward establishment or expansion 15 protected areas by 2023 2023
20 Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs) by 2023 2023
10 Other Effective Area-Based Conservation Measures (OECMs) 2023
Percent of existing ECCC and PCA protected areas where overall ecological condition or management effectiveness is maintained or improved 78% 2023

* This amount includes any additional funding received after the last renewal.

** Amounts include offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC) with new funding of $46.5M. Southern Mountain Caribou is inherently tied to Nature Legacy and its outcomes under Species and Spaces Themes.

Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2021-22 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022-22 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
ECCC Habitat Conservation and Protection Protection of wildlife habitat as National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, and Conservation Areas through regulation, management, and evaluation $90,590,629 $24,913,680 ECCC network of protected areas is expanded Total area of habitat protected as ECCC National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, and Conservation Areas 136,816 km2 terrestrial 2022
ECCC network of protected areas is effectively managed Effective management of the ECCC protected areas network (average performance of all sites) 75% 2023
Supporting the actions of partners to create protected areas, other effective conservation measures, and Indigenous protected and conserved area with contribution funding from the Canada Nature Fund $323,768,488 $56,145,997 Collaboration with partners for protected areas, OECMs, and IPCAs is enhanced through the Canada Nature Fund Percentage of total terrestrial territory (land and inland water) conserved by partners, OECMs and IPCAs 6.2% 2020
Enabling the participation of Indigenous peoples in the establishment, management, and monitoring of protected areas, other effective conservation measures, and Indigenous conserved and protected areas with contribution funding $38,273,236 $7,368,740 Indigenous peoples are engaged in conservation Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful 61% Ongoing
PCA Heritage Places Establishment Program Complete negotiations to establish Protected Areas $7,000,000 $0
Indigenous peoples actively participate and contribute to the stewardship and establishment of heritage places Number of negotiated agreements signed (Nahanni) 1 or 2, still to be confirmed 2021
$32,373,564 $0
Number of agreements under negotiation 1

Completed.

2020

Heritage Places Conservation Program Effective Management of National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas $118,231,830 $29,592,899 Canada’s natural heritage is protected for future generations Percentage of National Park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved 92% 2023
National marine conservation areas are ecologically sustainable Percentage of ecological sustainability measures for which data is collected and assessed 65% 2021
Support new National Advisory Committee on Nature for planning, consensus-building, coordination, and Indigenous engagement $4,404,996 $0
Indigenous peoples actively participate in and contribute to the stewardship and conservation of heritage places Percentage of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge 35% 2021***

* This amount includes any additional funding received after the last renewal.

** Amounts include offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC) with new funding of $46.5M. Southern Mountain Caribou is inherently tied to Nature Legacy and its outcomes under Species and Spaces Themes.

*** The COVID-19 pandemic precluded consultations with indigenous collaborators to have the result in 2020, it is expected to be reported on in 2021.

Total spending, all themes
Theme Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2021-22 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 – Species at Risk $553,444,762  $133,165,635
Theme 2 – Protected Areas $614,642,743 $118,021,316
Total, all themes $1,168,087,505 $251,186,951

* This amount includes any additional funding received after the last renewal.

** Amounts include offcycle funding decision providing Southern Mountain Caribou (SMC) with new funding of $46.5M. Southern Mountain Caribou is inherently tied to Nature Legacy and its outcomes under Species and Spaces Themes.

Up-front multi-year funding

Clayoquot Biosphere Trust

Recipient information

Clayoquot Biosphere Trust (CBT)

For more information, please visit the CBT site at www.clayoquotbiosphere.org

Start date

February 2000

End date

In perpetuity

Link to departmental results

Canadians have clean water

Link to Program Inventory

Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships; Community Eco-Action

Purpose and objectives of the transfer payment program

Creation of an endowment fund for the CBT, which is the cornerstone of the Clayoquot Sound United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Biosphere Reserve. The CBT will use the income from the endowment fund to support local research, education and training in the Biosphere Reserve region.

Total funding approved

$12 million

Total funding received

$12 million (in 2000)

Planned funding in 2021-22

$0.0

Planned funding in 2022-23

$0.0

Planned funding in 2023-24

$0.0

Summary of annual plans of recipient

During 2021-22, the CBT will focus on the following objectives and deliverables:

  • Deliver a range of grants for regional initiatives in the areas of research and environment, arts and culture, community development, and youth and education. A seventh Biosphere Research Award will be offered for research that advances understanding of conservation challenges in the marine and/or terrestrial ecosystems and prioritizes conservation actions.
  • Publish a Vital Brief that presents data and stories to build understanding of the social, environmental, economic, and cultural impacts of tourism during COVID-19. The report will align with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDG) as a means of tracking progress towards national and global goals and showcase regenerative tourism innovations.
  • Proceed with the development of the Biosphere Centre through activities such as the re-zoning process and raising capital funds.
  • Complete the 2021 UNESCO Periodic Review. Produce a self-study report that compiles data and stories to showcase the evolution and impact of the UNESCO Biosphere designation and the CBT from 2010 - 2020 and host independent reviewers appointed by the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.
  • Build awareness and local action for the UN SDG targets by hosting an SDG bootcamp for local youth and develop SDG education programs creating curriculum based on local sustainability science and research.
  • Continue to co-ordinate the Sydney Inlet Acoustic Refugium Monitoring Project 2020-2023.

Green Municipal Fund

Name of recipient

Green Municipal Fund (GMF)

For more information, please visit the GMF site at www.fcm.ca/home/programs/green-municipal-fund.htm

Start date

February 2000

End date

No end date

Link to departmental result(s)

Canadian greenhouse gas and short-lived climate pollutant emissions are reduced

Canadian communities, economies, and ecosystems are more resilient

Link to Program Inventory

Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation

Description

Between 2000 and 2018, the Government of Canada endowed the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) with $50 million for grants and $625 million for endowment funding to administer a revolving fund for grants, loans and loan guarantees to encourage investment in municipal environmental projects. As per Budget 2019, the Government of Canada transferred an additional $950 million to the FCM for the GMF. Since its inception, the total amount transferred from the Government of Canada for the GMF amounts to $1.625 billion.

The GMF was established to have a positive impact on the health and the quality of life of Canadians by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and tackling the effects of climate change, improving local air, water and soil quality, and promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency by supporting environmental studies and projects within the municipal sector. Eligible projects may fall into one or more of the following categories: energy, water, waste, sustainable transportation, brownfields, or integrated community projects.

The amount of GMF financing available to municipalities is directly related to the environmental benefits and/or innovation of the projects undertaken, with grant/loan combinations of up to 80% of eligible costs available for capital projects with exceptional environmental benefits.

As stipulated in the GMF Funding Agreement between the FCM and the Government of Canada, the FCM has created two advisory bodies: the Green Municipal Fund Council (GMF Council) and the Peer Review Committee. The GMF Council’s role is to assist the FCM Board of Directors—the GMF decision-making body—in approving projects proposed by municipalities. The 18-member GMF Council includes six federal members: two from Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), two from Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), one from Infrastructure Canada (INFC), and one from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). All ECCC members are appointed by the FCM Board of Directors based on recommendations from the Minister of Environment and Climate Change.

The GMF Peer Review Committee comprises 75 members, of which 20 are Government of Canada representatives (10 from ECCC; 10 from NRCan). Environment and Climate Change Canada Peer Reviewers provide the GMF and federal Council members with scientific expert advice on proposals for plans, studies or capital projects.

Total funding approved

$337,500,000

Total funding received

$337,500,000

Funding in 2021-22

$0

Planned funding in 2022-23

$0

Planned funding in 2023-24

$0

Summary of annual plans of recipient

GMF’s 2021-2022 Annual Statement of Plans and Objectives (ASPO) is expected to be available in February 2021. The GMF’s 2020-2021 ASPO states the following:

The 2019 GMF Funding Agreement specifies that FCM commits:

  • $4.5–9.5M per year in grants for plans, studies and pilots;
  • $7.5–22.5M per year in grants for capital projects;
  • $50-150M per year in loans for capital projects; and
  • $30-90M per year in granting as it relates to the new project streams announced in federal Budget 2019;
    • Community Efficiency Financing (CEF) – empowering low-rise residential property owners to invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy upgrades;
    • Sustainable Affordable Housing (SAH) – enabling energy efficient retrofit programs and new builds in the affordable housing sector;
    • Low Carbon Cities Canada (LC3) – supports projects aimed at reducing cities’ carbon footprint in seven major Canadian cities.
GMF Funding Targets in millions (M) of dollars
Indicator Average net approved yearly funding since inception* Target
2020–21
Total grants approved for plans, studies and pilots $5.1M $6M
Total grants approved for capital projects $5.1M $11M

Total loans approved for capital projects (including

brownfields and new programs)

$36.3M $120M
Total grants approved for new programs N/A $55M

* Average approved funding since inception excludes data from fiscal year 2019–2020 as it is not yet available.

Key Result Areas (KRAs)

The GMF planned activities for 2020-21 include the following KRAs:

  • Empower innovation: focus on addressing the risks that municipalities and private-sector partners face when they try to adopt new and innovative solutions.
  • Accelerate the replication of proven sustainable solutions: enhance the replication rate and mobilization of promising new solutions emerging from GMF.
  • Create a roadmap of the municipal sector’s challenges and solution pathways: develop roadmaps to show municipalities how to achieve their overall sustainability objectives in each GMF focus subsector (i.e. energy, transportation, water, waste and land use and planning).
  • Establish the business case for and economic benefits of sustainable solutions: deliver appropriate analysis and knowledge tools to support municipalities in their decision-making and due diligence around sustainable solutions.
  • Be responsive to clients’ needs: establish a central advisory service system to optimize the benefits of GMF’s funding offers and the related processes, and help it respond to its clients’ needs.
  • Leverage and mobilize GMF’s knowledge, decision tools and capacity-building support for planning and executing sustainable projects: outline a holistic approach to capacity building that enables GMF to address gaps.
  • Collect and develop data to help direct the efforts of the municipal sector and its partners: FCM will collect data and make it available so that municipalities, GMF and its partners have the information they need to identify sustainability areas that easily address and have significant environmental and economic impact.
  • Attract capital and investments to the municipal sustainability sector (lever investments) and help municipalities access funds and identify new revenue streams: better position the municipal sector to receive additional investments and stretch their budgets further.
  • Ensure GMF’s sustainability and maximize its influence: ensure the endowment’s sound management in the long term while ensuring that it has the financial resources required to fulfill its mandate.
  • Inspire municipalities and their partners by defining, recognizing and communicating the successes, lessons learned and triple bottom line benefits of sustainable solutions: better position GMF to communicate the key ingredients in successes as well as lessons learned.
  • Maintain excellence in governance, due diligence, project funding and oversight while balancing risks with returns: development of a performance measurement system that will articulate GMF’s sector contributions and the progress it makes toward delivering on its mandate and ensuring optimal results from its operations.
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