Departmental Results Report 2017 to 2018, supplementary tables: Department of Environment, chapter 2

Details on transfer payment programs

Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Voted

Start date

June 10, 2010

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010–11

Strategic outcome
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat and Sub-Program; Sub-Program 1.1.1 Biodiversity Policy and Priorities; Sub-Program 1.1.2 Species at Risk; Sub-Program 1.1.3 Migratory Birds; Sub-Program 1.1.4. Habitat Conservation Partnerships and Sub-Program 1.1.5 Protected Areas
Description
Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in conservation activities to maintain or restore wildlife populations, in particular migratory birds and species at risk, to target levels.
Results achieved 2017-18
  • In 2017–18, the HSP Prevention Stream awarded over $2.8 million to 46 new projects and 29 previously approved multi-year projects to maintain populations of wildlife species in order to prevent them from becoming a conservation concern.
  • Between its inception in 2004 and the end of March 2016, AFSAR Species at Risk Stream has invested more than $33.1 million into 851 local conservation projects, and has leveraged more than $23.5 million in matching funds from project partners. Funded projects benefited the habitat for more than 300 SARA-listed species and supported the improvement or restoration of close to 13,500 ha of land and 190 km of shoreline.
  • The department provided a contribution of $700,000 for one year to the Earth Rangers, the “Kids’ Conservation Organization,” to continue to expand its educational program for children and their families, particularly into Francophone and Indigenous communities, and to develop new programming focused on the links between biodiversity and climate change. Over the course of the year Earth Rangers delivered over 900 school assemblies across Canada, which included a feature on ECCC scientist Nancy Mahony. A new climate change section developed for Earth Rangers’ website was viewed 19,923 times by 15,693 unique visitors and a climate change resilience-themed mission encouraging kids to plant a tree to create new habitat was accepted by 9,397 members. Earth Rangers membership increased by 29,670 kids to over 190,000 members across Canada.

  • In 2017-18, The AFSAR Species at Risk Stream awarded $3.2 million to 39 new projects and 25 previously approved multi-year projects to support Aboriginal capacity development and engagement in the implementation of the Species at Risk Act to protect species at Risk and their habitat.
  • Between its inception in 2004 and the end of March 2017, AFSAR Species at Risk Stream has invested more than $36.5 million into 880 local conservation projects, and has leveraged more than $26.9 million in matching funds from project partners. Funded projects benefited, on average, 120 unique SARA-listed species annually. The program has also supported the legal protection of over 71,700 ha of land and the improvement or restoration of more than 13,500 ha of land and 370 km of shoreline.   
  • In 2017–18, The Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk (AFSAR) Prevention Stream awarded over $703,000 to 16 new projects and 4 previously approved multi-year projects to support Aboriginal participation in projects that prevent other species, beyond those listed on the Species at risk Act, from becoming a conservation concern.
  • Between its inception in 2014 and the end of March 2017, the AFSAR Prevention stream has invested over $2.8 million to support 70 local conservation projects and has partnered with more than 66 different Indigenous organizations and communities. Project partners have contributed more than $1.9 million to these projects. The program has also supported the improvement or restoration of more than 4,900 ha of land and 66 km of shoreline.

  • In 2017–18 the National Wetland Conservation Fund (NWCF) awarded over $9.6 million to 69 new projects and 60 previously approved multi-year projects involving 49 unique funding recipients to conserve wetlands. These projects leveraged additional funds that exceeded $13.1 million (cash and in-kind) and involved Indigenous organizations and communities, conservation authorities, individuals, municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, private corporations, provincial crown corporations, and provincial/territorial governments.
  • Between its inception in 2014 and the end of March 2017, the NWCF has invested close to $25.5 million to support 198 local conservation projects. This investment has led to the restoration of over 2,600 hectares of wetlands and associated uplands and the enhancement of over 340,000 hectares of wetlands and associated uplands.
  • Supported with funding of $2.3 million the North American Waterfowl Management Plan program delivery within the Habitat Joint Ventures through partner organizations. Partners leveraged this funding into much more substantive investment by other federal and non-federal partners (in both Canada and the United States) in habitat conservation efforts.

  • Through the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD): supported implementation of the CBD’s Gender Plan of Action, scientific assessments and communications to support implementation of the CBD’s strategic Plan and Aichi Biodiversity Targets, collaboration with sub-national governments, communication, education and public awareness, and supported the participation of the least developed countries in CBD meetings ($100,000). Support was also provided to the Secretariat of the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) to support core Secretariat functions and ensure collaboration with international organizations and Arctic states’ research and policy communities for the implementation of the CAFF work plan ($38,000). Additional support was provided to key CAFF projects such as the Arctic Migratory Bird Initiative, the report on the State of Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity, and scoping for resilience of Arctic wetlands ($30,000).

  • Concluded a $200,000 5-year contribution with the United Nations - Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services that provide independent scientific review of the status and trends of biodiversity and the associated consequences for provision of ecosystem services.

  • Concluded 3-year contributions with the Universities of Alberta ($330,000) and Manitoba ($240,000) for Polar Bears - Assessing impacts of changing climatic and ice regimes on polar bears across their Canadian range / Assessing impacts of climate and increasing industrial development on polar bears and their prey (ringed seals) in Baffin Bay.

  • Concluded a 5-year $768,500 contribution with Simon Fraser University for priority coastal, riparian and grassland ecosystem research in British Columbia.

  • $50,000 Contribution with University of British Columbia for dry interior and alpine ecosystem research in British Columbia.

  • $45,000 Contribution with the Wildlife Conservation Society Canada to support delivery of the North American Caribou Workshop, October 28-November 2, 2018.

  • $200,000 Contribution to Carleton University for research on landuse impacts on conservation and biodiversity, impacts of climate change in northern Canada, and earth observation approaches and tools for ecosystem monitoring and assessment.

  • $75,000 Contribution to University of Ottawa to increase citizen engagement in finding solutions for priority environmental issues through the expansion of NatureWatch citizen science data collection.

  • $50,000 Contribution to L’Institut national de la recherche scientifique to develop toxicogenomic methods for assessments of wildlife health and ecosystem resilience.

  • $25,000 Contribution to IOCongress2018 Organizing Society to support planning of the International Ornithological Congress, August 2018.

  • Compliance with the requirements of the Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards was supported by annual contributions of $230,826 made to the Fur Institute of Canada.
Comment on variances
Variance is mostly related to funds being reallocated to the Biodiversity Wildlife Habitat Program from the Habitat Stewardship Program – Species at Risk Stream to address other departmental priorities
Audits completed or planned
A department-wide Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions Programs is underway and scheduled to be completed by December 31, 2018
Evaluation completed or planned

An evaluation of the National Wetland Conservation Fund (NWCF) is underway and will be completed by the fall of 2018.

The Horizontal Evaluation of the Species at Risk Program is scheduled to be posted in fall 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements; and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results.

The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and useable manner: publicity in news media, information provided on the departmental website, letter-writing activities and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16 Actual spending 2016-17 Actual spending 20117-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $30,310,084 $32,223,112 $30,537,353 $30,905,600 $30,905,600 $368,247
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total transfer payments $30,310,084 $32,223,112 $30,537,353 $30,905,600 $30,905,600 $368,247

Contributions to support Climate Change and Clean Air

Voted

Start date

June 10, 2010

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010–11

Strategic Outcome

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air; Sub-Program 3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program; Sub-Program 3.2.2 International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships; and Sub-Program 3.2.3 Environmental Technology

Description

The purpose and overall objective of contributions made under these terms and conditions are to encourage and support international organizations and foreign states engaged in activities that advance international action, improve Canadian air quality, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and promote change towards sustainable environmental development and policies.

Results achieved 2017-18
  • New knowledge and data produced by collaborating organizations contributed to improved air quality and/or reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Verification of environmental claims of Canadian technologies was carried out.
  • International organizations that promote the reduction of emissions of air pollutants and/or greenhouse gases were engaged and supported.
  • Partners, in particular the Canadian private sector, were engaged in projects that advance the role of clean technology in addressing emissions of air pollutants and/or greenhouse gases.
  • Canada's environmental interests and priorities were addressed by international institutions.
  • New information and analysis supported the development of policy on sustainable development and the effective governance of environmental issues in Canada and internationally.
  • The public had increased access to information and research findings pertaining to sustainable development and environmental governance.
Comment on variances

As a result of prudent financial management, additional Grants and Contributions (G&C) funds from other programs had become available for reallocation within G&C vote for other priorities. These additional funds were reallocated to the Sub-Program (3.2.2) to pay a portion of 2016–17 United Nations Environment Programme membership.

Audits completed or planned

An audit of grants and contributions was completed in 2012–13.

Evaluation completed or planned

An evaluation of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s umbrella terms and conditions was completed in 2016–17 and the final report was released in July 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements; and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16 Actual spending 2016-17 Actual spending 20117-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $8,684,618 $18,043,165 $22,519,229 $25,485,710 $24,920,210 $2,400,981
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total transfer payments $8,684,618 $18,043,165 $22,519,229 $25,485,710 $24,920,210 $2,400,981

Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk

Voted

Start date

August 20, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2009–10

Strategic Outcome

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat and Sub-Program 1.1.2 Species at Risk

Description

The purpose of the HSP is to contribute to the recovery of endangered, threatened, and other species at risk and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern, by engaging Canadians in conservation actions to benefit wildlife. The HSP fosters partnerships among organizations interested in the recovery and protection of species at risk. It provides funding for on-the-ground activities that conserve or restore habitats for species at risk and other priority species that are not at risk, as well as for other practical actions for the recovery of such species. The HSP enables non-governmental organizations, landowners, the private sector, Indigenous organizations, educational institutions, community groups, and other levels of government to plan, manage and complete projects that will achieve the program goal.

Results achieved 2017-18

In 2017–18, the HSP Species at Risk (SAR) Stream awarded over $13.6 million in funding to 143 new projects and 87 previously approved multi-year projects to support the recovery of species at risk and the protection of their habitat.

Between its inception in 2000 and the end of March 2017, the HSP SAR Stream has invested over $176.9 million in 2,600 projects, leveraging more than $431 million in matching funds from project partners. These projects have legally protected over 193,000 ha of land and 3,200 km of shoreline, and benefitted the habitat on average annually for more than 440 species at risk.

Comment on variances

The majority of the variance is a result of the Species at Risk Director Generals committee evaluation of overall SARA priorities and subsequent reallocations. $437,244 was reallocated from the HSP SAR Stream to support other SARA priorities, namely, the negotiation of Species at Risk Act Section 11 agreements. Additionally, in 2017–18, $500,000 was reallocated from HSP SAR Stream for priorities related to avoiding emergency orders under SARA, $150,000 was reallocated for protected areas initiatives, $350,000 for Indigenous engagement priorities and $172,949 was reallocated to the Minister's innovation fund)

Normal program operational slippage and the withdrawal or cancellation of some projects in the fourth quarter accounts for remaining variance.

Audits completed or planned

A department-wide Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions Program is underway and scheduled to be completed by December 31, 2018

Evaluation completed or planned

The Horizontal Evaluation of the Species at Risk Program is scheduled to be posted in Fall 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Annually, the Department, in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada, issues a call for proposals.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16 Actual spending 2016-17 Actual spending 20117-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $12,151,876 $13,187,733 $14,584,584 $12,932,164 $12,841,337 -$1,743,247
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total transfer payments $12,151,876 $13,187,733 $14,584,584 $12,932,164 $12,841,337 -$1,743,247

Science Horizons Youth Internship Program (Science Horizons)

Start date
1997
End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2016-17
Strategic Outcome
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
1.3.3.3 - Environmental Youth Employment
Description

Science Horizons is funded through the Career Focus stream of the Government of Canada’s Youth Employment Strategy (YES), overseen by Employment and Social Development Canada. Programs under the Career Focus stream aim to demonstrate federal leadership by investing in the skills required to meet the needs of the knowledge economy, facilitate the transition of highly skilled young people to a rapidly changing labour market, and promote the benefits of advanced studies.

 

Science Horizons is designed to increase youth employment in the environmental field across Canada. Science Horizons provides a wage subsidy of up to $15,000 to eligible employers to hire a recent Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (STEM) graduate. Science Horizons is delivered through contributions to Delivery Agents (five (5) in 2017-18), who administer the program, including all activities related to matching eligible employers and interns.

Results achieved 2017-18
At this time, the total number of jobs created was 1,059.
Comment on variances

With Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) having a higher target (and greater funds) than the previous year and delays in approvals for Science Horizons funding – resulting in the loss of the spring season for job matching – they were required to match more internships in less time than initially planned. Therefore, CICan did not use $230,816 of their funding.

This is not expected to recur in Year-2 of the agreement for 2018-19 because CICan will have the entire year, including the critical spring period, to create internships for Science Horizons.

Savings between Science Horizons and other YES programs managed by Environmental Careers Organization (ECO) Canada allowed for significant savings in administration and staffing costs. This allowed them to make an even greater investment in promoting the program and in funding more green jobs which resulted in ECO Canada surpassing their job creation target. Due to this, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) was able to meet its overall job target.

Evaluation completed or planned
The Horizontal Evaluation of the Species at Risk Program is scheduled to be posted in Fall 2018.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluation completed or planned

Evaluation completed in 2014-15 (Summative Evaluation of the Horizontal Youth Employment Strategy for 2012-15).

Next evaluation is scheduled for 2019-20

Engagement of applicants and recipients

For 2017-18, ECCC held a more open call for organizations to apply to become Delivery Agents, resulting in a total of five (5) recipients identified to enter into a Contribution Agreement with ECCC to receive Science Horizons funding. Each Delivery Agent targets a specific market segment and uses its own network of organizations and educational institutions to promote Science Horizons. This includes sending informational emails to their networks, attending career or job fairs at colleges and universities, and participating in conferences and networking events with organizations in the environmental and clean technology industry.

In addition, ECCC uses social media and the Departmental internet site to promote success stories on employers and interns who have benefitted from the program and other information about Science Horizons.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16 Actual spending 2016-17 Actual spending 20117-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $3,295,663 $10,419,000 $14,059,000 $14,059,000 $13,828,184 -$230,816
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total transfer payments $3,295,663 $10,419,000 $14,059,000 $14,059,000 $13,828,184 -$230,816

Contributions to Support Sustainable Ecosystems

Voted

Start date
June 10, 2010
End date

Ongoing – Evaluation to be completed by March 31, 2015

 

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2010–11
Strategic Outcome
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Program 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems; Sub-Program 1.3.1 Sustainability Reporting and Indicators; Sub-Program 1.3.2 Ecosystems and Environmental Assessments; Sub-Program 1.3.4 Great Lakes; Sub-Program 1.3.5 St. Lawrence; Sub-Program; Sub-Program 1.3.7 Lake Winnipeg and Sub-Program 1.3.8 Ecosystems Partnerships
Description
Contributions under the Sustainable Ecosystems Program encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to manage ecosystem resources in a manner consistent with ecosystem sustainability.
Results achieved 2017-18

Projects under Sustainable Ecosystems addressed one or more of the elements of an ecosystem approach:

  1. integrated planning and decision making
  2. action to improve the environment; and
  3. knowledge generation and assessment for decision making

In 2017–18, Environment and Climate Change Canada worked with a wide range of recipients to carry out this work:

  • The St. Lawrence Action Plan 2011–2026 (SLAP) is an agreement between the Governments of Canada and Québec, intended to strengthen collective efforts in the integrated management of the St. Lawrence basin, and to carry out joint actions to conserve and to enhance its ecosystem. These efforts are based on three priorities: biodiversity conservation, improved water quality, and sustainable use.
  • Appendix G of the SLAP sets out the terms and conditions under which Canada provides an annual contribution of $450,000 to Québec through the Province’s Ministère du Développement durable, de l’Environnement et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques. Thirty-seven (37) projects were carried out as part of the Joint Action Plan where $322,151 of the available funding contribution supported 16 of these projects and activities. These projects primarily focused on research activities, field work, and the development of tools to support decision making.
  • The Governments of Canada and Québec also implemented the Community Interaction Program (CIP), which provides funding to non-governmental organizations for projects that aim to conserve and to enhance the ecosystem of the St. Lawrence. Environment and Climate Change Canada distributed $491,863 in funding for 15 projects
  • The Areas of Prime Concern Program (Zones d’intervention prioritaire, ZIP) supports Stratégies Saint-Laurent and its 13 committees in their cohesive actions to engage and support local stakeholders working to improve the quality of the surrounding environment. Environment and Climate Change Canada provided $1.1 million in funding under this program.

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Program (LWBP) is part of a broader investment through Budget 2017 to protect Canada’s freshwater resources. Budget 2017 committed $25.7M over five-years (2017–2022) to build on previous Lake Winnipeg Basin investments of $35.6M since 2007.

In 2017–18, the Lake Winnipeg Basin Program provided $362,500 in financial support to targeted nutrient reduction actions, and increased Indigenous engagement and stakeholder collaboration to protect Lake Winnipeg and its basin. The funding also included support to the Lake Winnipeg Research Consortium’s operation of the only lake-based science platform on Lake Winnipeg (i.e, MV Namao) and the ongoing development and expansion of the Canadian Watershed Information Network, CanWIN, the University of Manitoba’s web based open access data and information network which enables data sharing and analysis.

Work continued with existing water governance bodies to explore options and opportunities to work collaboratively towards the development and implementation of a basin-wide nutrient strategy, including the development of  transboundary nutrient objectives.This includes working with the Province of Manitoba to continue implementation of the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg, which provides for a long-term collaborative and coordinated approach between the two governments to support the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin.

In 2017–18, ECCC implemented the Lake Winnipeg Science Plan which includes 16 research and monitoring projects in Lake Winnipeg and its basin, The plan’s research findings will improve the understanding of Lake Winnipeg’s response to nutrient reduction actions in the basin, the impact of climate variability on nutrient loading to Lake Winnipeg and the impact of zebra mussels on nutrient cycling and the food web. It will aslo provide sound science to inform policy and nutrient management action.


Continued to fund the co-ordination of Remedial Action Plan (RAP) implementation activities in Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs). These activities included assessment and reporting on success of remedial actions and determining remaining actions required to remediate Canadian AOCs through the Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP). For example assessments of the staus of three beneficial use impairments (Degradation of Fish and Wildlife Populations, Degradation of Fish and Wildlife habitat and Degradation of Benthos) in the Bay of Quinte Area of Concern concluded that restoration targets have been achieved and the results were reviewed by government agencies, stakeholders and the public. GLAP resources were also used to fund multi-stakeholder projects to restore beneficial uses of the ecosystem in Great Lakes AOCs via the Great Lakes Sustainability Fund (GLSF).  In partnership with local and provincial stakeholders, GLSF funds were used to support projects in three key areas:  (1) improving point and non-point source water quality; (2) rehabilitating and protecting fish habitat and wildlife habitat; and (3) characterizing contaminated sediment and developing contaminated sediment management plans in AOCs.


The Atlantic Ecosystems Initiatives provides $1.2 million annually in funding for projects that improve the health, productivity, and long-term sustainability of ecosystems in Atlantic Canada. In 2016–17, the program supported 18 ecosystem-based projects that brought together a diverse group of partners, including academic institutions, various levels of government (Canada and United States), and Indigenous organizations to address water quality, habitat and biodiversity, and the impacts of climate change.


The Gulf of Maine Initiative provided $260,000 in funding for four projects aimed at maintaining a healthy ecosystem that supports long-term sustainability and economic growth. These projects build upon previously funded work; and involved collaboration from academic institutions, various levels of government (Canada and the United States), non-government organizations, and industry stakeholders. These projects provide science and information that will lead to action on habitat conservation, responsible development, and sustainable ecosystem health.


The Ecosystem Partnerships Program committed $115,000 to 4 projects with Indigenous and other groups focusing on strengthening water governance in the Fraser and Mackenzie river basins, and across BC. These projects i) shared knowledge across partners to increase understanding of threats to and opportunities for watershed sustainability, ii) formalized terms of reference for a collaborative technical and research committee, iii) convened partners to explore collaborative land use planning and watershed management across levels of government, and iv) held a roundtable workshop and published a guidance document for Indiginous engagement in watershed planning and governance in BC.


The Saint John River Watershed in New Brunswick was identified as a priority for ECCC in the Freshwater Action Plan under ‘Other Major Basins’ in 2017–18.

In 2017, a Statement of Cooperation was signed by ECCC, DFO, Maliseet First Nation/Tribal Leaders, and US Federal agencies. This serves as an aspirational nation-to-nation document which facilitates cooperation in restoring the watershed and ecosystem, and recognizing the rights of the Maliseet and the Saint John River (Wəlastəkw). Several committees, including a Steering Committee and Technical Committee, have been formed to discuss governance, goals/objectives and information sharing under the Statement.

ECCC is focusing efforts towards a coordinated and integrated management approach for the Saint John River. This includes working with federal, provincial, Indigenous, and NGO partners to identify watershed priorities, goals and objectives. ECCC facilitated meetings in 2017–18 to identify common areas for coordination and collaboration, including water quality monitoring, data management and access, freshwater assessment, and funding arrangement.

Comment on variances
In addition, some funds were reallocated from other initiatives to support additional projects under the Sustainable Ecosystems Program.
Evaluation completed or planned
The Horizontal Evaluation of the Species at Risk Program is scheduled to be posted in Fall 2018.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluation completed or planned

An evaluation of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s umbrella terms and conditions was released in July 2017.

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative Program Evaluation was completed in 2016–17 and the final report was released in July 2017.

The Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean Up Fund Program Evaluation was completed in 2017–18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Environment and Climate Change Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements, and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results.

The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable, and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16 Actual spending 2016-17 Actual spending 20117-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $17,841,669 $16,210,500 $9,163,493 $9,163,493 $8,785,205 -$378,288
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total transfer payments $17,841,669 $16,210,500 $9,163,493 $9,163,493 $8,785,205 -$378,288

Grants in support of The Natural Areas Conservation Program

Voted

Start date
September 11, 2014
End date
March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment
Grant
Type of appropriation

The program is appropriated annually through Estimates.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2014–15
Strategic Outcome
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat and Sub-Program 1.1.4 Habitat Conservation Partnerships
Description
Funding ($100 million total investment starting in 2014–15, for 5 years) enables the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) to implement the Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP). The NCC works to ensure the long-term protection of biodiversity by working with private landowners to secure and steward ecologically significant lands that have been identified as priorities for conservation. The NCC and other conservation –based organizations/ land trusts acquire and preserve private land primarily through land purchase, land donations, conservation agreements, relinquishment of rights, and stewardship actions. The aim of the program is to secure over 130,000 ha of ecologically sensitive land and undertake stewardship implementation actions, such as property management plan actions on an estimated 120,000 ha and monitor compliance of conservation agreements on an estimated 100,000 ha of land secured under the NACP.
Results achieved in 2017-18
Between April 1, 2017, and March 31, 2018, the NCC and its partners, secured more than 16,000 ha of land under the NACP. In addition, the NCC and its partners conducted stewardship implementation actions under the NACP on more than 200,000 ha of land. The full program details for the 2017-18 fiscal year will be reported to the Department by the NCC through the submission of its annual report, in line with the funding agreement.
Comments on variances
Not applicable
Audits completed or planned
Not applicable
Evaluations completed or planned

The NCC finalized an independent evaluation in 2017–18 which is available on NCC’s website.

The program was also included as part of a broader internal evaluation on the Habitat Conservation Partnerships Program, completed in 2017–18 by ECCC Audit and Evaluation Branch. The evaluation report will be made public in the near future.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The NCC issues an annual call for proposals for the Other Qualified Organizations component of the program.

The Department will approve annual work plans and annual reports for the Program. In collaboration with the NCC, the Department will participate in public announcements for the Program, on an ongoing basis.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015-16 Actual spending 2016-17 Actual spending 20117-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $0
Total contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total transfer payments $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $22,500,000 $0
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