Departmental Results Report 2017 to 2018, supplementary tables: Department of Environment, chapter 1

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Section 1: Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016–19 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

  • sets out the Government of Canada’s sustainable development priorities;
  • establishes goal and targets; and
  • identifies actions to achieve them, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act.

In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Environment and Climate Change Canada supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) or equivalent document through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

Section 2: Sustainable Development in Environment and Climate Change Canada

Environment and Climate Change’s DSDS for 2017-20 describes the department’s actions in support of achieving the following FSDS goals:

  • Low-carbon government
  • Effective action on climate change
  • Healthy coasts and oceans
  • Pristine lakes and rivers
  • Sustainably managed lands and forests
  • Healthy wildlife populations
  • Connecting Canadians with nature
  • Safe and healthy communities

This supplementary information table presents available results for 2017-18 for the departmental actions pertinent to these goals. Last year’s supplementary information table is posted on the department’s website.

This year, Environment and Climate Change Canada is also noting which UN Sustainable Development Goal target each departmental action contributes to achieving.

Section 3: Departmental Performance by FSDS Goal

 

  • Low-Carbon Government: The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

Responsible Minister: All ministers

FSDS targets

Reduce GHG emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings
  • Report annually on GHG emissions inventories using the Federal Greenhouse Gas Tracking Protocol – a common standard for federal operations and submit results to the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Centre for Greening Government.
  • Update departmental implementation plan to reduce GHG emission levels in absolute terms from 2005 levels and put them on a clear downward trend. Elements of the plan will address the scope of the departmental GHG inventory including “exclusions” to be applied, and the approach to GHG emissions reduction being taken for buildings and/or fleets.
  • Undertake actions integrating five elements under Real Property management to reduce GHG emissions: operational improvements; maintenance procedures; occupant engagement; life cycle management; and energy performance improvement.
  • Innovate sustainable workplace practices by updating and adopting policies and practices to improve the sustainability of departmental workplace operations to reduce their related environmental impact.

UN SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.2

Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Starting point:

GHG emissions from buildings from base year 2005–06

Performance indicators:

  • GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year) = 18.1 ktCO2e
  • GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2016–17 = 14.3 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2016–17 = -21%
GHG emissions from facilities were reduced by 22.9% from the 2005-06 baseline.
Modernize our fleet
  • Support the reduction of energy use in ECCC’s fleets and the deployment of electric vehicles as well as support access to workplace electric vehicle charging stations, where operationally feasible.
  • Manage the capital planning process to approve new fleet purchases based on essential operational needs and departmental targets, aimed at facilitating the sharing of fleet vehicles across the Department.

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Target 12.7

Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Starting point:

GHG emissions from baseline year 2005–06 

Performance indicators:

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year) = 4.7 ktCO2e
  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2016–17 = 3.2 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2016–17 = 32.0%
GHG emissions from fleet were reduced by 30.9% from the 2005-06 baseline.
Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement
  • Take a sustainable approach to purchasing goods and services that incorporate environmental considerations in procurement instruments.
  • Work with Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) on electricity contracts that will maximize carbon credits and the purchase of non-traditional energy sources, including renewable energy.
  • Ensure that employees with procurement and contracting responsibilities undergo compulsory green procurement training.
  • Ensure that procurement and contracting employees continue to adhere to the requirements and the spirit of the PSPC Policy on Green Procurement and related, relevant legislation.

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Target 12.7

Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Starting point:

As of 2016–17, 20 of 28 (71%) eligible specialists have completed the C215 course from the Canada School of Public Service. This includes procurement specialists and materiel management specialists.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of specialists in procurement and materiel management who have completed training on green procurement

93% (37 out of 40) of procurement and material management specialists have completed training on green procurement.

Starting point:

As of 2016–17, 3/3 (100%) of eligible specialists have environmental/green statements in their performance agreements. This includes procurement specialists and materiel management specialists.

Performance indicator: 

Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement in the current fiscal year

100% (7 out of 7) of procurement and material management specialists have support and contribution towards green procurement in their performance agreements.
Demonstrate innovative technologies
  • Increase operational efficiency by testing state-of-the-art innovations not yet available in the marketplace.
  • Lead by example as an early adopter of clean technology innovations.

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Target 9.4

By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

Starting point:

Reduce annual GHG emissions at King City Radar Station (Ontario) by up to 10% by 2020–21, from a baseline of 1.5 ktCo2e between 2012 and 2016

Performance indicator:

GHG emissions from buildings participating in the Build-in-Canada Innovation Program (King City Radar)

The technology that is being considered for adoption is a wireless temperature controller which will adjust heating and cooling in occupied building zones. Addressing occupied areas instead of the building as a whole can improve energy efficiency.

Results are expected later in the fall of 2018.
Promote sustainable travel practices
  • Revising departmental travel procedures to explore offsetting options to reduce the impact of employee government travel.

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Target 12.7

Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Starting point:

Messages issued and events held to promote sustainable travel: tele-conferencing / video conferencing; telework; green meetings; public transportation; commuter challenge; bicycle repair workshops, etc.

Performance indicators:

Sustainable travel guidance and communication plan developed in fiscal 2017–18

Sustainable travel guidance and communication plan was not developed in 2017–18. The development of the plan will be undertaken in 2018-19.
Understand climate change impacts and build resilience
  • Develop a departmental adaptation plan that identifies actions to address climate change risks.
  • Assess climate change risks to departmental assets, regulatory activities, services and policies.

UN SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.1

Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Starting point:

In 2014, ECCC undertook a process to understand climate risks to key programs and activities within the Department

Performance indicators:

  • Report assessing climate change risks to departmental assets, regulatory activities, services and policies and identifying recommended actions for adaptation completed by fall 2018
  • Departmental adaptation plan developed by fiscal 2018–19
Results are expected later in the fall of 2018.
  • Effective Action on Climate Change: A low carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degree Celsius and support efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; supported by a whole-of-government approach to implementation

FSDS targets

By 2030, reduce Canada's total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Use regulation to limit GHG emissions

Lead the overall implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Develop and implement regulations, tools, measures and mitigation actions, consistent with the Pan Canadian Framework, for key GHG emitters.  For example, ECCC will:

  • Strengthen regulations to limit GHG emissions from post-2018 heavy duty trucks.
  • Take action to accelerate phase out traditional coal-fired electricity units, and propose regulations to reduce methane emissions in the oil and gas sector.
  • Finalize regulations to phase down hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) consumption and to prohibit the import and export of products that contain or are designed to contain HFCs, thereby avoiding future HFC releases to the environment.
  • Implement Pan-Canadian pricing of carbon pollution, working with provinces and territories.

UN SDG 7: Affordable and clean energy

Target 7.2

By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

UN SDG 8: Decent work and economic growth

Target 8.4

Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, with developed countries taking the lead

UN SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.2

Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Starting point:

Percentage improvement in GHG emissions performance for manufacturer model year 2018–2020 reporting relative to the 2010 model year:

  • 13% - heavy-duty pick-up trucks and vans
  • 11% - Combination Tractors
  • 5% - Vocational vehicles

Performance indicator:

GHG emissions from heavy duty vehicles

Results are expected in 2020.

Starting point:

Target of phasing out 100% of the 36 units currently in use by end of their useful life (between 2019 and 2030), pending regulations that are still in development and not scheduled for publication in Canada Gazette II until late 2018.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of coal-fired electricity generation units meeting their regulated GHG emissions intensity performance requirement

Results are expected by June 2021.

Starting point:

10% reduction in consumption in 2019 from a calculated HFC consumption baseline in tonnes CO2e, towards an 85% reduction in 2036

Performance indicator:

HFC emissions

Results are expected in March 2020.

Starting point:

13 Provinces and Territories have in place carbon pricing that meets the benchmark in 2018 or federal backstop applies

Performance indicator:

Carbon pricing systems are in place in Canada

Progress was made to extend carbon pricing throughout Canada, including through the development of the federal carbon pricing backstop system, which will apply in jurisdictions that choose it or that do not have a system in place in 2018 aligned with the pan-Canadian benchmark.
Work with partners on climate change
  • Work with other partners, including international organizations, to address GHG emissions from the transportation sectors.
  • Engage partners, in particular the Canadian private sector, in projects that advance the role of clean technology in addressing emissions of air pollutants and/or GHGs.
  • Collaborate with provinces and territories to improve the consistency of emission data across Canadian jurisdictions. In addition, expand the collection of facility data for the national GHG inventory; the expanded program will better align with provincial and territorial data.

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Target 9.4

By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

Starting point:

21.1% improvement in performance for manufacturer model year 2017 reporting relative to 2011 model year

Performance indicator:

GHG emissions from light duty vehicles

10.2% improvement
(relative to the 2015 model year)

Starting point:

Annual decrease toward a 30 Mt CO2e reduction by 2030.

Performance indicator:

Emissions reductions are being achieved under the Clean Fuel Standard building on the Renewable Fuels Regulations

Results are not available at this time; timeline for results reporting will be determined during the regulatory development process.
Conduct climate policy research and analysis
  • Conduct or review upstream GHG assessments for all major energy projects undergoing review.
  • Ensure public access to information and research findings pertaining to sustainable development and environmental governance.
  • Provide key economic analysis to assess incremental impacts of regulatory proposals that:
    • Combat climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and
    • Meet national emissions-reductions targets.

UN SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production

Target 12.8:

By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature

Starting point:

Annual increase from a baseline. Baseline to be established when Canadian Centre for Climate Services (CCCS) portal has been functioning for one full year (launch expected in 2018-19; baseline established in 2019-20

Performance indicator:

Number of individuals businesses, and governments accessing climate services and using that information to inform decision-making

Results are expected after September/ October 2019.
Take a leading role in international agreements and initiatives on climate change
  • Lead Canada’s participation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change with the aim of negotiating ways to implement of the Paris Agreement.
  • Continue working with Global Affairs Canada to deliver on Canada’s $2.65B to support developing countries’ transition to low carbon and climate resilient economies.
  • Promote Canadian objectives in international fora such as the G7, G20, OECD, Francophonie, Commonwealth, the World Meteorological Organization and in other Ministerial meetings. 
  • Provide expertise, leadership and climate finance contributions, including for the reduction of Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (SLCPs), through key partnerships such as with the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the Arctic Council, the Global Methane Initiative, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, the World Bank, the International Maritime Organization and the Montreal Protocol.
  • Advance priorities and climate change-related commitments with the U.S and contribute expertise and advancing Canada’s environmental priorities through bilateral partnerships with Mexico, Chile, China and the European Union.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.A

Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible

Starting point:

Higher cumulative reductions from year to year, from the 2018-19 baseline, reaching minimum reduction of 200 Mt of GHGs

Performance indicator:

GHG reductions resulting from international initiatives funded by Canada

232,800-325,920 metric tons of GHG reductions expected from the Transformative Carbon Asset Facility. Results from other projects are expected later in the fall of 2018.

Starting point:

Higher cumulative number of people in each consecutive year, reaching at least 10M people by 2030

Performance indicator:

Number of people in developing countries who benefited from Canada’s adaptation funds

63,565 people expected from the National Adaptation Plans Global Network project. Results from other projects are expected later in the fall of 2018.
Develop a solid base of scientific research and analysis on climate change
  • Conduct targeted scientific and engineering studies to measure GHG emissions by technology, equipment type, fuel, and operating conditions.
  • Maintain comprehensive GHG emission and air pollutant inventories that are up-to-date, informative, and relevant to all Canadian jurisdictions.
  • Collaborate with organizations to gather new knowledge and data to support improved air quality and/or reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Conduct climate research and analysis to develop climate data and scenarios, which will inform mitigation actions and effective adaptation planning and support active participation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

UN SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.1

Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Target 13.3

Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Starting point:

100% every year from 2018 and ongoing;  Baseline to be established after the first year of reporting (2018-19)

Performance indicator:

% of requested products delivered to senior management and decision-makers.

This is a new indicator; results are expected by March 2019.
Support voluntary action to reduce GHG emissions and adapt to climate change
  • Develop the Canadian Centre for Climate Services (CCCS) which will work with provincial, territorial, Indigenous and other partners to make it easier for governments, communities, decision-makers, businesses and organizations to access data and information on climate science.

UN SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.1

Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Target 13.3

Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Starting point:

Annual increase from a baseline. Baseline to be established when the Canadian Centre for Climate Services (CCCS) portal has been functioning for one full year (launch expected in 2018-19; baseline established in 2019-20)

Performance indicator:

Number of individuals, businesses and governments accessing climate services and using that information to inform decision-making

Results are expected after September/ October 2019.
  • Healthy Coasts and Oceans: Coasts and Oceans support health, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

FSDS targets

By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

By 2020, all fish and invertebrate stocks and aquatic plants are managed and harvested sustainably, legally and applying ecosystem-based approaches starting at 96% in 2015

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Use legislation and regulation to protect coasts and oceans
  • Assess and deliver permits for disposal at sea and Antarctic expeditions. These permits are delivered in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act and their regulations. Decisions will be based on the latest scientific and technical information and public and indigenous consultations when required.
  • Improve guidance for permit applicants for the Disposal at Sea program and the Antarctic program, including the development of a revised set of internal monitoring guidance, strategies, policies and site management plans.
  • Advance the regulatory proposal to designate the Scott Islands as a marine National Wildlife Area in 2017.
  • Meet Canada’s international obligations under the London Convention and Protocol to prevent marine pollution.

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

Target 14.1

By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution

Starting point:

100% of monitored ocean disposal sites show no evidence of marine pollution from disposal activities

Performance indicator:

Percentage of monitored ocean disposal sites with no evidence of marine pollution from disposal activities

Results are expected later in the fall of 2018.
Work with partners to protect and restore coastal ecosystems
  • Implement ECCC’s initiatives contributing to Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan, such as risk-based response planning, enhanced marine weather forecasting and alternative response measures, to strengthen the prevention of and responses to marine incidents.

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

Target 14.2

By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

 

Starting point:

By 2022, a reduction in the number of small oil spills and marine incidents relative to the number of vessel trips, compared with the average of the previous five years (specific target to be determined by April 2020 following establishment of baseline).

Performance indicator:

The number of marine safety incidents and spills from vessels in Canada’s waters.1

Results for this indicator are reported by Transport Canada.

Starting point:

100 by May 2018, from baseline of 30 in 2015–16

Performance indicator:

Number of partners or organizations participating in ECCC supported projects that address program priorities in targeted ecosystems

Results for this indicator are related to projects that support freshwater, hence not applicable to this FSDS target of Healthy Coasts and Oceans.  Next year’s DSDS will be updated accordingly.
1 This indicator reflects the collective results of activities of the contributing departments to the Oceans Protection Plan (OPP). Horizontal results reporting for the OPP is led by Transport Canada.
  • Pristine Lakes and Rivers: Clean and healthy lakes and rivers support economic prosperity and the well-being of Canadians

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

FSDS targets

Reduce nutrient pollution to lakes and rivers

By 2025, reduce phosphorus loading into Lake Erie by 40% to achieve the binational (Canada-US) phosphorus targets from a 2008 baseline

Reduce an additional estimated 2000 kilograms of phosphorus per year to Lake Simcoe in support of Ontario’s target to reduce phosphorus inputs into Lake Simcoe to 44,000 kilograms of phosphorus per year by 2045

Restore lake and river ecosystems

By 2019, 85% of the indicators of the Overview of the State of the St. Lawrence, including phosphorus and nitrogen, achieve a result considered intermediate or better to improve water quality, conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable use of the river

By 2019, restore beneficial uses that will assist in the delisting five Canadian Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs). In the remaining AOCs, increase the number of beneficial use impairment re-designations from 18 in 2014 to 30 in 2019

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Work with partners on water quality and ecosystem health
  • Work to protect Canada’s freshwater and priority ecosystems, including the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River, Lake Winnipeg, and other major river basins in Atlantic, Western, and Northern ecosystems, through sound science and regulatory tools and in collaboration with Indigenous and other partners across Canada.
  • Collaborate with partners to conserve and enhance the St. Lawrence ecosystem and to maintain and recover its uses through the Canada-Quebec Agreement 2011–2026.
  • Build partnerships and work in collaboration with partners to address program priorities for the Atlantic Ecosystems Initiatives and the Gulf of Maine Initiative in order to support the long-term sustainability of freshwater and coastal ecosystems in these targeted ecosystems.
  • Provide information, data and expertise for domestic and international water boards to support Canada’s collaboration with the provinces, by way of agreements and with the U.S through the international Joint Commission, in efforts to regulate lakes and river basins such as Lake Ontario, Lake Superior, the Mackenzie River Basin, and the Pacific Drainage Basin. This includes participating in targeted studies focus on improving inter-jurisdictional water management.

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

Target 6.6

By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes

Starting point:

Target: 10 by 2022;   Baseline: N/A

Performance indicator:

Number of Indigenous organizations/communities participating in Great Lakes decision-making processes and projects that restore and protect Great Lakes water quality.

Approximately 35 indigenous organizations/communities participated in Great Lakes decision-making processes and projects that restore and protect Great Lakes water quality.

Starting point:

Target: 10 by 2022;   Baseline: N/A

Performance indicator:

Number of Indigenous governments, organizations and communities engaged in efforts that restore and protect Lake Winnipeg water quality

Two Indigenous governments, organizations and communities were engaged in efforts that restore and protect Lake Winnipeg water quality.

Starting point:

Target:  4 by 2021;   Baseline: N/A

Performance indicator:

Average number of non-federal partnerships established during the implementation of the SLAP activities and projects

On average, 4.98 non-federal partnerships were established during the implementation of the SLAP activities and projects.
Provide in-kind support and funding for projects
  • Fund projects through the Atlantic Ecosystems Initiatives to improve water quality, to conserve biodiversity, and to improve capacity to adapt to climate change. A broad ecosystem approach will be taken to support departmental priorities. Other projects will include targeted outreach to solicit more proposals that address impacts of climate change, and consultation with Indigenous governments and communities.
  • Allocate 2017–18 grants and contributions funding through the Gulf of Maine Initiative. Four collaborative and science-based projects will continue into 2017–18, along with ongoing collaborative initiatives between ECCC and other key partners.
  • Through its application-based Eco-Action program, the Department will match 50% funding support to not-for-profit and non-government organizations to undertake local projects that address departmental priorities (clean growth and climate change, nature, clean air and water).
  • Apply payments received by the Environmental Damages Fund to address environmental damage and to undertake research that increases the Government of Canada’s ability to restore damaged environments.

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

Target 6.B

Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management

Starting point:

Target: $2 by March 31st, 2022

Baseline: N/A

Performance indicator:

Value of resources contributed by partners per dollar contributed by ECCC through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Program, Great Lakes Protection Initiative, and St. Lawrence Action Plan, and other regional initiatives

ECCC’s partners contributed $1.30 per dollar contributed by ECCC through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Program, Great Lakes Protection Initiative, and St. Lawrence Action Plan, and other regional initiatives.
Better understand lake and river ecosystems
  • Provide analysis, guidance and economic advice and develop and provide economic models to enable environmental effects to be factored into decisions.
  • Conduct targeted research studies and national water quality monitoring programs for chemicals to inform decision-making for the preservation and protection of Canadian freshwater quality.
  • Provide scientific data related to water quality, sediments and biological resources as part of the work related to the State of the St. Lawrence Monitoring Program.
  • Focus scientific efforts to proactively understand, track and provide water quality and quantity information relating to Canada’s freshwater resources.
  • Monitor the physical, chemical and biological/ecosystem characteristics of waters under federal jurisdiction, including Canada’s boundary waters.
  • Provide quality assured water quantity information (river flow and level) to various stakeholders to assist them in water management, planning and related decision-making.

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

Target 6.5

By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate

Starting point:

Decrease to 70 by December 2019, from 97 in March 2016

Performance indicator:

Number of beneficial uses whose status is listed as "impaired" or "requires further assessment" for Canada’s 17 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes

89 beneficial uses whose status was listed as "impaired" (70) or "requiring further assessment" (19).

Starting point:

100%, measured triennially from a baseline of 22% in 2016

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Great Lakes indicators that have been assessed as "good" through the State of the Great Lakes assessment (9 indicators in total).

Starting point:

Target: 100% by 2026, measured every 5 years;  Baseline:  NA

Performance indicator:

Percentage of indicators (21) in the State of the St. Lawrence River report which show a trend of being stable or improving

Starting point:

Target:  “Improving” by 2022, measured every 5 years;  Baseline:  NA

Performance indicator:

Overall status of ecosystem health of Lake Winnipeg is stable or improving as presented in the State of Lake Winnipeg Report

Results are expected in December 2018.
Results are expected by March 2020.
Results are expected by December 2018.
Use legislation and regulation to protect lake and river ecosystems
  • Administer, promote compliance with and enforce:
    • the Fisheries Act pollution prevention provisions and associated regulations, including the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER), the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations (PPER), and the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER);
    • the Environment Effects Monitoring (EEM) requirements under the PPER and MMER; and
    • the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) regulations.

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

Target 6.3

By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally

Starting point:

Percentage increase in order to reach 100% by 2040, compared to a baseline of 77% in 2015

Performance indicator:

Percentage of wastewater systems where effluent quality standards are achieved

77% of the wastewater systems that have reported achieved the effluent quality standards of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations.
  • Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

FSDS targets

By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Better understand lands and forest
  • Develop an inventory of conserved lands to support a multi-species approach to conservation and to deliver on the “Fully Accounting for Canada’s Conservation Lands” initiative.
  • Maintain and improve the Conservation Areas Reporting and Tracking System in cooperation with the Canadian Council on Ecological Areas and ECCC’s Private Conservation Lands database; enable tracking gains made towards Canada’s 2020 Biodiversity Target and FSDS goals.
  • Maintain and improve the integrated Canadian Wildlife Service Geospatial Knowledge Management Initiative database, to ensure availability of geo-referenced information for conservation planning and implementation.
  • Develop the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Initiative (CESI) Wetlands Extent Indicator, including methodology for indicators of the rate and intensity of change in wetlands. ECCC will provide accurate and relevant wetlands statistical data analysis and geospatial datasets.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.2

By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally  

Starting point:

13,603,600 ha before March 31st, 2020 from a baseline of 12,449,000 ha in 2014-15

Performance indicator:

Total area (in hectares) that is protected as marine and terrestrial National Wildlife Areas and as Migratory Bird Sanctuaries

12,447,826 hectares across Canada was protected as marine and terrestrial National Wildlife Areas and as Migratory Bird Sanctuaries
Build capacity and provide support
  • Develop management plans for its National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries in Nunavut as part of the renewed seven-year Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement (IIBA), signed in April 2016.
  • Consult with Indigenous peoples and the Government of the Northwest Territories with respect to the long-term conservation of additional sites.
  • Make progress on officially replacing existing names of northern protected areas with Indigenous names.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.2

By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

Starting point:

Target will be identified once the 2018–19 baseline is established.

Performance indicator:  

Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful

Results are expected after target is established. Baseline for target will be established in 2018-19.

Starting point:

Expected actions associated with the renewed IIBA to be identified during annual planning meeting

Performance indicator:

Annual percentage of ECCC IIBA obligations achieved out of the number forecasted during annual planning with the Inuit parties to the Agreement

This indicator has been retired and is no longer being monitored. IIBA implementation is now being monitored through a series of other indicators of the Habitat Conservation and Protection Program.
Conserve natural spaces
  • Develop and advance the Ecological Gifts Program with a focus on increasing the amount of ecologically sensitive land or rights in land donated by Canadians.
  • Manage and expand ECCC’s protected areas network. Advance the proposal for the designation Scott Islands Marine National Wildlife Area in 2017. Edéhzhíe National Wildlife Area (NWA) is proposed for designation before 2020. Progress will be made on conserving grassland habitat in Saskatchewan in 2017–18.
  • Implement the terms of the renewed IIBA for ECCC’s conservation areas in the Nunavut Settlement Area with Inuit parties to the agreement.
  • Support on-the-ground wetland restoration and enhancement projects in Canada through the National Wetland Conservation Fund.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.5

Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

Target 15.1

By 2020, ensure the conservations, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements

Starting point:

189,780 ha by March 31st, 2018 from a baseline of 164,891 ha in 2013-14

Performance indicator:

Total area of ecologically sensitive land secured (in ha) through the Ecological Gifts Program

190,393 hectares of ecologically sensitive land was secured through the Ecological Gifts Program.

Starting point:

13,603,600 ha before March 31st, 2020 from a baseline: 12,449,000 ha in 2014-15  

Performance indicator:

Total area (in hectares) that is protected as marine and terrestrial National Wildlife Areas and as Migratory Bird Sanctuaries

12,447,826 hectares across Canada was protected as marine and terrestrial National Wildlife Areas and as Migratory Bird Sanctuaries.
Work with domestic and international partners
  • Maintain strong collaborative partnerships with international, federal, provincial, Indigenous and non-governmental organizations and individuals through the Habitat Stewardship Program to protect, improve and/or restore habitat to enhance the survival of migratory birds and species at risk.
  • Work with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to deliver government priorities through the Natural Areas Conservation Program.
  • Work with Parks Canada, Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP), Canadian Parks Council, and other municipal/ provincial/territorial, Indigenous and stakeholder groups to develop a national blueprint for conserved and protected areas as well as a pathway to achieve Canada’s Biodiversity Target 1 (conserving at least 17% of Canada’s terrestrial areas and inland waters by 2020).
  • With regard to the Pathway to Canada’s Target 1, finalize preparations to present National Advisory Panel recommendation to Ministers in March 2018; participate in the implementation of Ministerial actions to reach Target 1 by 2020.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.1

By 2020, ensure the conservations, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements

Target 15.5

Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

Starting point:

Target will be identified once the 2018–19 baseline is established.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful

Results are expected after target is established. Baseline for target will be established in 2018-19.
  • Healthy Wildlife Populations: All species have healthy and viable populations

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

FSDS targets

By 2020, species that are secure remain secure, and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans

By 2025, 59% of managed migratory bird species have population sizes within an acceptable range

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Use legislation and regulations to protect species at risk and migratory birds
  • Provide key economic analysis in support of the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations.
  • Collaborate with partners at home and internationally to protect endangered species which are in trade to meet our obligations under the Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and implement the Wild Animal and Plant Protection Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act.
  • Collaborate with partners at home and internationally to conserve migratory birds and their habitats and implement the Migratory Birds Convention Act. The Department will continue to monitor the status of and conduct research on migratory birds and their habitats.
  • Conserve biodiversity and implement the Species at Risk Act and the Migratory Bird Convention Act in Canada through cooperative, collaborative and adaptive conservation planning and action with best placed partners and supporting the use of non-regulatory stewardship tools where appropriate.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.1

By 2020, ensure the conservations, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements

Target 15.5

Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

Starting point:

60% by May 2025 from a baseline of 43% (2017)

Performance indicator:

Percentage of species at risk for which changes in populations are consistent with recovery objectives

43% of species at risk had population trends that were consistent with recovery objectives.

Starting point:

60% by 2020, from a baseline of 57% in 2014

Performance indicator:

Percentage of migratory bird species that are within target population ranges

Results are expected in 2019.  

Starting point:

Targeted regulatees are penalized when non-compliant with wildlife laws and regulations administered by ECCC.

Target: 95% by April 2018

Baseline: 95% in 2015-16

Performance indicator:

Percentage of prosecutions that result in convictions

99% of prosecutions resulted in convictions.
Work with partners to protect species and their habitats
  • Work with partners to finalize a Species at Risk Act Management Plan for the polar bear. In addition, work with international partners to implement a Circumpolar Action Plan for polar bear in accordance with the 1973 Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears.
  • Seek to enable the implementation of Bird Conservation Regions (BCR) Strategies. This will involve finding mechanisms and developing partnerships in order to disseminate the information available in BCR Strategies.
  • Support the implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan in Canada through the collaborative Habitat Joint Venture partnerships. These focus on retention and restoration of wetlands and associated uplands in priority landscapes for migratory waterfowl.
  • Collaborate with stakeholders and Indigenous partners at home via various Species at Risk Act (SARA) mandated and SARA-enabled advisory bodies including but not limited to the Species at Risk Advisory Committee, the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk and the First Nation Advisory Committee on Species at Risk to protect species and their habitats.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.5

Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

Target 15.1

By 2020, ensure the conservations, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements

Starting point:

7.1 ha million ha by March 31st from a baseline of 5.2 ha in 2013-14

Performance indicator:

Total priority waterfowl habitat managed and/or enhanced by  partners in support of North American Waterfowl Management Plan objectives (In million ha)

Results are expected later in the fall of 2018.

Starting point:

Target will be identified once the 2018–19 baseline is established.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful

Results are expected after target is established. Baseline for target will be established in 2018-19.
Build capacity and promote education
  • Provide analysis, guidance and economic advice and develop and provide economic models.
  • Provide funding through the Habitat Stewardship Program to contribute to the recovery of endangered, threatened and other species at risk, and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern. This will include engaging Canadians from all walks of life in conservation actions to benefit wildlife.
  • Provide funding through the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk to support Indigenous capacity to participate actively in the recovery of endangered, threatened and other species at risk, and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.5

Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

 

Starting point:

30% by 2021

Baseline: will be identified in 2018 (first reporting year for this indicator)

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Canadian households in which one or more people engaged without pay in activities aimed at conservation or protection of the environment or wildlife

Results are expected in late 2018.
Uphold international commitment related to wildlife
  • Undertake international actions for the conservation of migratory birds (under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation), and deliver projects for seabird conservation in Chile (under the Canada-Chile Agreement on Environmental Cooperation) and for shorebird monitoring in Panama (under the Canada-Panama Environment Agreement).
  • Coordinate Canada’s participation with the U.S. and Mexico in the Trilateral Committee for Wildlife and Ecosystem Conservation and Management, and support trilateral working group to ensure the conservation of the Monarch butterfly migration, as per the 2016 North American Leaders Summit commitment.
  • Track and coordinate actions in support of the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy, and initiatives to advance the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada, including by implementing the actions agreed to by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for conservation, wildlife and biodiversity, and through actively participating in and leading Canadian delegations at international meetings in support of biodiversity.
  • Participate with national and international partners in the implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance to contribute to wetland conservation in Canada.
  • Implement the Ramsar Convention in Canada to promote the wise use of wetlands and support partners in the nomination of any new proposed Ramsar Sites.

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

Target 15.1

By 2020, ensure the conservations, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreement

Target 15.5

Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

Starting point:

Increase toward achievement of 17% from a baseline of 10.6% in 2015 (Terrestrial lands & inland waters)

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Canadian areas conserved as protected areas and other effective areas-based conservation measures

10.5% of Canadian areas were conserved as protected areas and by other effective areas-based conservation measures

Starting point:

8.8 ha by March 31st, 2018 from a baseline of 7.5 ha in 2013-14

Performance indicator:

Total priority waterfowl habitat retained by partners in support of North American Waterfowl Management Plan objectives (In million ha)

Results are expected later in the fall of 2018.
  • Connecting Canadian with Nature: Canadians are informed about the value of nature, experiencing nature first hand, and actively engaged in its stewardship

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

FSDS targets

By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature—for example, by visiting parks and green spaces—and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Build capacity for conservation activities
  • Work with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to deliver Government priorities, including to accelerate the rate of private land conservation and protect important natural habitat in communities across southern Canada.
  • Fund the Natural Areas Conservation Program to:
    • assist and support the securement of ecologically significant areas across Canada;
    • protect habitat for species at risk (both COSEWIC-assessed and SARA-listed) and migratory birds; and
    • enhance connections and corridors between protected areas.

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

Target 11.4

Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage

Starting point:

110,000 by March 31st, 2019.

Baseline to be determined in 2018-19

Performance indicator:

Number of Canadians engaged in individual and collective actions funded by the EcoAction Program

78,535 Canadians were engaged in individual and collective actions funded by the EcoAction Program
Promote public participation
  • Implement the “Connecting Canadians to Nature” Initiative in ten National Wildlife Areas by constructing new trails, bridges and exhibits, and promoting a national geocaching program (an outdoor educational game that uses GPS-enabled devices).
  • Facilitate Canadians’ access to nature in National Wildlife Areas close to urban centres. For example, free access to the Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area in 2017 is provided as part of the 150th anniversary of Confederation celebrations.  

UN SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities

Target 11.7

By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities

Starting point:

25% by 2020 (280,062 visitors from a baseline of 224,050 in 2015)

Performance indicator:

Percentage increase in annual visitation to the ten National Wildlife Areas that are part of the Connecting Canadians to Nature Initiative since launch

Results are expected by March 2019.
  • Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

FSDS targets

Implement the Air Quality Management System to: Decrease the three-year average of particulate matter, nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compound emissions from regulated and/or previous three-year average; Increase the percentage of the Canadian population living in areas where measured outdoor concentrations are below the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for fine particulate matter and ozone compared to the year 2000

By 2020, address the 4,300 substances identified as priorities for action under the Chemicals Management Plan.

FSDS contributing actions Corresponding departmental actions Support for UN sustainable development goal target Starting points targets and performance indicators for departmental actions Results achieved
Better understand air pollutants and harmful substances

Better understand air pollutants by:

  • Providing air quality monitoring data, expertise, maps and analysis to guide implementation of the Air Quality Management System (AQMS) and to track benefits of the Canada–U.S. Air Quality Agreement.

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

Target 3.9;

By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

Target 11.6

By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

Starting point:

Continued downward trend in rolling three year average emissions from 2006-2008 from a baseline of the previous year's  result

Performance indicator:

Emissions of air pollutants from industrial and transportation sources in tonnes for fine particulate matter (PM2.5); sulphur oxides (SOx); nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

In the 2014 to 2016 period, emissions of air pollutants from industrial and transportation sources in tonnes were:

SOx: 1,096,306 t

NOx: 1,758,856 t

VOC: 1,126,665 t

PM2.5: 106,576.5267 t

The results represent a downward trend from the 2013 to 2015 period with lower SOx, NOx, and VOCs emissions reported this year. PM2.5 was not reported on in the previous period.

Better understand harmful substances by:

  • Conducting scientific assessment to determine the risks to the environment from substances that are already in commerce (existing substances) and substances proposed for use in Canada (new substances). The assessment provides the evidence needed to determine whether a substance is toxic, and ultimately, whether risk management is required.

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

Target 3.9;

By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination.

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

Target 11.6

By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

Starting point:

Target of 100% by March 2018

Performance indicator:

Percentage of substances that are found to be toxic to the environment that have controls in place within legislated timelines

This is a new indicator. First results are expected by March 31, 2019.
Provide information to inform action and decision making

Provide information to inform action and decision-making on air quality by:

  • Collecting and publishing National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) data for the 2016, 2017 and 2018 reporting years. NPRI includes data on releases (to air, water and land), disposals and recycling of over 300 air pollutants and other harmful substances, from industrial and other facilities across Canada.
  • Implementing the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) to provide Canadians with greater access to local air quality information and forecasts to help make informed decision about their health.
  • Finalizing and publishing a strategy to address short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs). The SLCP Strategy was published in July 2017.
  • Preparing and publishing a national report on black carbon and methane every two years in line with Arctic Council commitments.
  • Contributing to the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI), which track Canada’s performance on key sustainability issues related to air pollutant emissions and air quality and ensures that national, regional, local and international data are publicly accessible and transparent.

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

Target 3.9;

By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

Target 3.D

Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks

UN SDG 13: Climate Action

Target 13.3

Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Starting point:

15-20% from a most recent measure of 15% in 2011

Performance indicator:

Percentage of the general population within selected regions receiving AQHI who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information

14% of the general population within selected regions reported that they recalled seeing or hearing AQHI information

(results do not include data from Quebec due to limited availability of AQHI data in the province).

Use legislation and regulation to address outdoor air pollutant emissions and harmful substances

Use legislation and regulation to address outdoor air pollutant emissions by:

  • Undertaking modelling, analysis and research to support informed federal decision-making on policy approaches and regulatory development to reduce air pollution.
  • Developing, and/or finalizing and implementing industrial emissions requirements for various equipment types and sectors, using regulatory and non-regulatory instruments such as the Multi-Sector Air Pollutants Regulations (MSAPR), NOx guidelines for new stationary combustion turbines and Performance Agreements for the aluminum and the iron ore pellets sectors.
  • Developing, implementing, administering and enforcing regulations to reduce air pollutant emissions, specifically from the transportation and oil and gas sectors. This activity will include the finalization of regulation for off-road small spark ignition engines, implementation of amendments to regulation of on-road vehicles for 2017–2025, and proposed regulation of petroleum and refinery air pollutant emissions.
  • Implementing measures to reduce black carbon emissions from wood-burning appliances and new stationary diesel engines.
  • Use legislation and regulation to address harmful substances by:
  • Undertaking modelling, analysis and research, and by developing regulatory impact analysis statements to support informed federal decision-making on policy approaches to reduce air and water pollution. Key economic analysis will include the assessments of regulations such as the off-road small spark ignition engines. The analysis will also support the development of air quality standards and the phase-out of subsidies for the fossil fuel industry over the medium-term, with an aim to provide incentives for clean investments.
  • Developing, implementing and administering regulatory and voluntary instruments to manage risks from harmful substances, waste and effluents and to improve administration of the Fisheries Act.
  • Taking domestic regulatory action to phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) consumption and prohibit the import and manufacture of products that contain HFCs.
  • Developing, finalizing, administering, and enforcing regulatory instruments to manage and reduce risks from harmful substances, such as the Prohibition of Certain Substances Regulations, 2012 and the new Asbestos Regulations under CEPA 1999.

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

Target 3.9

Target 3.9 – substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination.

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Target 12.4

By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment

Starting point:

Multi-sector Air Pollutants Regulations was registered and published in June 2016 to address air pollutant emissions from boilers and heaters, engines, and the cement sector. Initial reporting requirements begin in 2017 for boilers, heaters, and stationary spark-ignition.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of regulatees that are in compliance with federal air pollution measures

Results are expected in June 2019.

Starting point:

10.5 Kt reduction by 2025 (Equivalent to 25% decrease from a baseline of national emissions of 42 Kt in 2013)

Performance indicator:

Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada’s Black Carbon Emissions Inventory

Results are expected in summer 2019.

Starting point:

10% reduction in consumption in 2019 from a calculated HFC consumption baseline in tonnes CO2e, towards an 85% reduction in 2036

Performance indicator:

HFC Emissions

Results are expected in March 2020. 
Work with partners on outdoor air quality and chemical manage-ment

Work with partners on outdoor air quality by:

  • Continuing to implement the AQMS, a comprehensive framework to address air pollution in Canada and improve the health of Canadians and the environment; in collaboration with provinces, territories, and with the engagement of stakeholders.
  • Publishing CAAQS for sulphur dioxide (SO2), which were announced by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in October 2016, in the Canada Gazette.
  • Developing new CAAQS for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and reviewing the CAAQS for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone; in collaboration with Health Canada, provinces, territories, and in consultation with stakeholders through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment.
  • Working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to reduce the transboundary flow of air pollutants and implement the Vehicles and Engines Action Plan under the Canada- U.S. Air Quality Agreement.
  • Work with partners on chemical management by:
  • Participating in international chemicals- and waste-related fora and continuing to engage and consult with relevant national and international stakeholders.

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

Target 3.9

Substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination.

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

Target 11.6

By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

Starting point:

100% of CAAQS will be reviewed on a five-year cycle from date of initial publication and, where necessary, will be made more stringent to encourage continuous improvement in air quality

Performance indicator:

% CAAQS reviewed and updated

100% of Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) were reviewed and updated

Starting point:

85% of Canadians live in areas that meet the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) in 2030, from a baseline of 60% in  2005-2007

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Canadians living in areas where air quality standards are achieved

During the period of 2013-15 (most recent data available), 70% of Canadians were living in areas where air quality standards were achieved.
Take a leading role in international agreements and collaboration on chemicals management and trans-boundary air pollution

Take a leading role in international agreements and collaboration on chemicals management by:

  • Implementing the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, including its Kigali Amendment on HFCs. Continue to advance the sound management of chemicals and waste through active participation in committees and subsidiary bodies to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, supported by domestic action under the Chemicals Management Plan.
  • Advancing domestic actions on mercury to allow Canada to ratify the Minamata Convention and contribute to international activities to prepare for entry into force of the Convention. Canada continues to advance the sound management of chemicals and waste through active participation in committees and subsidiary bodies to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, as well as through domestic implementation actions, including strengthening of domestic regulations. Canada advances domestic actions on mercury to facilitate ratification of the Minamata Convention and contributed to international activities to prepare for entry into force of the Convention.

Take a leading role in international agreements and collaboration on transboundary air pollution by:

  • Ratifying the 1999 Gothenburg Protocol (of the UNECE Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution).
  • Engaging in efforts to take action on short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) and other contaminants under the Arctic Council.
  • Continuing to work with the U.S. through the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement to reduce transboundary air pollution.

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

Target 3.9 – substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination.

Target 3. D

Stregthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks.

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Target 12.4

By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment

Starting point:

10% reduction in consumption in 2019 from a calculated HFC consumption baseline in tonnes CO2e, towards an 85% reduction in 2036 as per the Kigali Amendment

Performance indicator:

HFC Emissions

Results are expected in March 2020.  

Starting point:

Canada signed the Gothenburg Protocol December 1, 1999; ratify the Gothenburg Protocol

Performance indicator:

Achievement of indicative 2020 Canadian emissions reduction commitments (in Canada’s commitments under the Gothenburg Protocol)

Date to achieve target is 2020. Reporting of results to follow in 2021.
Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites
  • Assess and remediate sites for which ECCC is responsible.
  • Provide expert advice to help federal custodians assess and remediate their contaminated sites to ensure that the highest-priority sites are remediated under Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) and to reduce the ecological risks they pose.
  • Provide program oversight for the ongoing delivery of the FCSAP, in partnership with other federal departments and agencies and consolidated Crown corporations
  • Prepare a public progress report on the results of the FCSAP.

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Target 12.4

By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment

Starting point:

From zero sites assessed as of April 1, 2016, the beginning of Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) to 560 sites assessed by March 31, 2020

Performance indicator:

Number of funded sites where assessment activities have been conducted during Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

434 sites were assessed in 2017-18.

In total, 654 s sites have been assessed in the first two years of Phase III (2016-17 and 2017-18).

Starting point:

From zero sites where risk reduction activities have been conducted as of April 1, 2016, the beginning of Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) to 970 sites with risk reduction activities conducted by March 31, 2020

Performance indicator:

Number of funded sites where risk reduction activities have been conducted during Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

Risk reduction activities were conducted in 762 sites in 2017-18. 

In total, there have been 996  sites where risk reduction activities were conducted in the first two years of Phase III (2016-17 and 2017-18).  

Section 4: Report on Integrating Sustainable Development

Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) is a process that supports environmentally sustainable decision making. It helps ensure that the environment is considered when developing policy, plan and program proposals. The guidelines for this process are in the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.

During the 2017–18 reporting cycle, ECCC considered the environmental effects of 37 proposals subject to the Directive, as part of its decision-making processes. Of these, 36 proposals were found to have positive effects on progress toward achieving the 2016-19 FSDS goals and targets. One proposal was administrative and thus did not have any linkages to the FSDS goals and targets.

The Directive requires that SEA results be reported through a public statement of environmental effect that includes impacts on the FSDS. ECCC posts the findings of its SEAs on ECCC’s public statement web page. For example, the SEA public statement on funding the Federation of Canadian Municipalities for the Green Municipal Fund identified that the initiative would have positive environmental effects on three of the 2016-19 FSDS goals: Effective action on climate change, Clean growth, and Safe and healthy communities.

Additional information on the results of the SEAs is available on the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency’s SEA web page.

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