Tropical cyclone season summary: 2016

The 2016 tropical cyclone season in the Atlantic Basin was the deadliest since 2005. This was mainly a result of Hurricane Matthew's devastating landfall in southwestern Haiti where approximately 1600 deaths were attributed to the storm. Additionally, the 2016 season was the costliest since 2012 with total damage estimates exceeding $11.6 billion USD (Wikipedia). The 2016 season was unique in several ways. Hurricane Alex formed on January 12, this being the first Atlantic hurricane to form in January since Hurricane Alice in 1955. In addition, Hurricanes Matthew and Nicole represented the first time that two category 4 or stronger hurricanes occurred in October since record keeping began. Tropical Storm Colin's formation on June 5 marked the earliest third named storm on record in the Atlantic Basin. Colin exceeded the previous record for the earliest third named storm set in 1887 by seven days. Despite these rare characteristics of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, impact to Canadian territory was relatively minimal.

The first storm that the Canadian Hurricane Centre (CHC) tracked was Tropical Storm Colin. Messaging from the CHC started at 1800 UTC on June 6. There were no direct impacts to land associated with Colin. However, moisture from Colin likely enhanced rainfall over southern Newfoundland as the storm interacted with a trough of low pressure over Atlantic Canada. Offshore, gale-force winds and waves of 3 to 5 metres occurred over the southern Grand Banks.

On August 26, the CHC issued one preliminary bulletin on Hurricane Gaston to inform Canadians that this storm was unlikely to affect Canadian territory.

The next system generating a response from the CHC was Tropical Depression Eight. Messaging from the CHC on this system started at 1800 UTC on August 30. This system was expected to become a tropical storm and interact with another low pressure system and track south of Newfoundland. However, Tropical Depression Eight did not intensify to a tropical storm. Therefore Tropical Depression Eight gave little or no influence on Canadian weather.

On September 1 at 1700 UTC, the CHC began messaging on Tropical Storm Hermine. This storm produced gale-force winds over marine areas southwest of Nova Scotia as it stalled off the northeastern United States coast. In addition, swell waves of 2 to 3 metres occurred along the southwestern shore of Nova Scotia. Farther offshore, waves of up to 6 metres occurred.

The next tropical cyclone requiring response by the CHC was Hurricane Matthew. Messaging began at 1700 UTC on October 4. Although the storm became disorganized after landfall in South Carolina, considerable quantities of tropical moisture moved northeastward towards Atlantic Canada. This moisture contributed to the development of a very powerful fall storm in Atlantic Canada. This storm resulted in significant rainfall amounts throughout the region. Newfoundland and eastern Nova Scotia were severely impacted with heavy rain and very strong winds. The rain in these areas resulted in numerous reports of flooding, road washouts and infrastructure damage. In addition, these areas received damaging wind gusts resulting in fallen trees and structural damage.

The last storm tracked by the CHC for the 2016 hurricane season was Hurricane Nicole. Messaging on this storm began at 1200 UTC on October 12. Hurricane Nicole tracked well south of Atlantic Canada. Swell waves of 2 to 3 metres reached the southern coastlines of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Gale-force winds and waves of 4 to 6 metres high occurred offshore as Nicole passed by.

Figure 1 is a map showing the storms of tropical origin that generated attention for the CHC.

Figure 1: Storms of Tropical Origin attended to by the CHC
Map of storms of tropical origin affecting Canadian territory 2016
Long description

The 2016 hurricane season produced little impact to Canadian territory. However, 6 tropical cyclones were messaged on by the Canadian Hurricane Centre (CHC).

The first storm that the Canadian Hurricane Centre (CHC) tracked was Tropical Storm Colin. After becoming post-tropical, Colin gave enhanced rainfall over southern Newfoundland and gale-force winds and large waves to the extreme southern Grand banks.

The CHC issued one bulletin on Hurricane Gaston to inform Canadians that this storm was unlikely to affect Canadian territory.

The next system generating a response from the CHC was Tropical Depression (TD) Eight. The remnant low from TD eight gave gale-force winds and waves less than 4 metres to the extreme southern Grand Banks.

Tropical Storm Hermine produced gale-force winds over marine areas southwest of Nova Scotia as it stalled off the northeastern United States coast. In addition, swell waves of 2 to 3 metres occurred along the southwestern shore of Nova Scotia. Farther offshore, waves of up to 6 metres occurred.

Hurricane Matthew became disorganized east of Cape Hatteras and was therefore no longer tracked. However, moisture from the storm moved north and energized a low south of Nova Scotia resulting in a powerful wind and rain storm for much of Atlantic Canada.

Hurricane Nicole gave swell waves of 2 to 3 metres to the southern coastlines of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Gale-force winds and waves of 4 to 6 metres high occurred over extreme southern sections of Laurentian fan and the southern Grand Banks.

Legend Details

Tropical depresssion symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Depression

Tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Storm

Hurricane symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Hurricane

Post-tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Post-Tropical Storm

A summary of bulletins issued by the CHC is shown below, including bulletins from previous years. In terms of the number of information statements issued, 2016 was one of the less active years for the CHC.

Bulletin summaries 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006
Unique hurricane information statements (WOCN3X/4X CWHX) 44 23 82 32 64 99 79 37 90 48
Number of storms represented by these bulletins 6 4 4 2 4 8 4 2 6 4

The following is a summary of the six events of tropical origin that were tracked by the CHC that impacted Canadian territory in 2016.

Colin

Figure 2: Track Map of Tropical Storm Colin
Figure 2: Track Map of Tropical Storm Colin
Long description

Colin originated from a disturbance known as a tropical wave that moved off the west coast of Africa on May 27. The tropical wave moved westward and moved into the Caribbean Sea on June 1. The wave then moved northwestward through the Caribbean Sea. By morning on June 5, the system acquired a closed circulation resulting in the formation of a tropical depression while located near the north coast of the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. By afternoon on June 5 while moving into the southern Gulf of Mexico, the system strengthened into Tropical Storm Colin.

Colin then moved northeastward across the Gulf of Mexico towards the Florida coast. Colin reached its maximum intensity of 45 knots on the morning of June 6 over the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Colin made landfall in Florida near Keaton Beach late evening on June 6.

By the morning of June 7, Colin became post-tropical near the coast of the Carolinas with maximum winds near 50 knots. Post-tropical storm Colin then accelerated northeastward and interacted with a trough of low pressure near Atlantic Canada on June 8.

Track readings issued by the Canadian Hurricane Centre:

Tropical Storm Colin #3

June 6. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 85 km/h (27.7 N/86.5 W).
Status: Tropical Storm as shown by a tropical storm symbol on a blue track line.

June 6. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 85 km/h (29.3 N/84.7 W).
Status: Tropical Storm as shown by a tropical storm symbol on a blue track line.

June 7. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 85 km/h (30.2 N/82.6 W).
Status: Tropical Storm as shown by a tropical storm symbol on a blue track line.

June 7. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 85 km/h (33.6 N/77.8 W).
Status: Tropical Storm as shown by a tropical storm symbol on a blue track line.

June 7. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 95 km/h (35.3 N/74.7 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

June 7. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 95 km/h (36.9 N/70.8 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

June 8. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 95 km/h (39.1 N/65.8 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

June 8. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 75 km/h (40.8 N/61.0 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

June 8. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 75 km/h (42.8 N/54.8 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

Legend Details

Tropical depresssion symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Depression

Tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Storm

Hurricane symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Hurricane

Post-tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Post-Tropical Storm

Figure 3: Visible Satellite Image Of Colin off the Coast of Florida

Figure 3: Visible Satellite Image Of Colin off the Coast of Florida

Storm and Synoptic History

Colin originated from a disturbance known as a tropical wave that moved off the west coast of Africa on May 27. Over the next few days the tropical wave moved westward and moved into the Caribbean Sea on June 1. The wave then moved northwestward through the Caribbean Sea. On June 4, there was an increase in organization of the system and thunderstorm activity increased. By 1200 UTC on June 5, the system acquired a closed circulation resulting in the formation of a tropical depression while located near the north coast of the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. By 1800 UTC on June 5 while moving into the southern Gulf of Mexico, the system strengthened into Tropical Storm Colin.

Colin then moved northeastward across the Gulf of Mexico towards the Florida coast. Colin reached its maximum intensity of 45 knots at 1200 UTC on June 6 over the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Tropical Storm Colin maintained its intensity of 45 knots despite strong shear and made landfall in Florida near Keaton Beach at 0200 UTC on June 7.

Colin then underwent extratropical transition as it moved across northern Florida and southeastern Georgia emerging in the Atlantic later on June 7. By 1200 UTC on June 7, Colin became post-tropical near the coast of the Carolinas with maximum winds near 50 knots.

Post-tropical storm Colin then accelerated northeastward and interacted with a trough of low pressure near Atlantic Canada on June 8. Very cold cloud tops over the Avalon Peninsula shown on infrared satellite imagery indicated that some of Colin's moisture contributed to enhanced rainfall over the Avalon on June 8. A cluster of lightning was also seen on the Canadian Lightning Detection Network over the Avalon Peninsula on June 8. The remnant low from Colin tracked across the Grand Banks giving gale force winds to the extreme southern Grand Banks and waves of 3 to 5 metres.

Conditions and Impacts

Impacts were minimal. Enhancement of rainfall over the Avalon Peninsula was a result of moisture from Colin being absorbed by a trough of low pressure to its north. Gale-force winds and 3 to 5 metre waves occurred over the extreme southern Grand Banks. Swell waves of 2 to 3 metres reached the south and east coasts of Newfoundland as Colin tracked to the south.

Warnings & Information Statements

No public warnings were issued as a result of Colin. Gale warnings were in effect over the Grand Banks as a result of Colin's passage.

Coordination and Communications Efforts

Coordination of potential rainfall impacts over the Avalon Peninsula as well as wind and waves over the Grand Banks occurred between the CHC and the Newfoundland and Labrador Weather Office (NLWO).

Tropical Depression Eight

Figure 4: Track Map of Tropical Depression Eight
Figure 4: Track Map of Tropical Depression Eight
Long description

Tropical Depression (TD) Eight formed on August 25 along the southern end of a cold front that stalled over the western Atlantic. As the front dissipated a broad area of low pressure formed. The area of low pressure gradually became better defined on August 27, about 100 nautical miles (185 km) south of Bermuda. On the morning of August 28, TD Eight formed while located about 350 nautical miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, NC. The system tracked west-northwestward towards Cape Hatteras, then turned northward and then northeastward while located 60 nautical miles (111 km) south-southeast of Cape Hatteras.

TD Eight then accelerated northeastward in the Atlantic. Impacts on the North Carolina coast were minimal. The circulation then became elongated and the depression dissipated late in the evening of August 31 about 250 nautical miles (460 km) east of Virginia Beach. The remnant low of TD Eight became very difficult to identify on September 1.

Track readings issued by the Canadian Hurricane Centre:

Tropical Depression 8

Aug. 30. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 55 km/h (34.2 N/75.3 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Aug. 30. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 55 km/h (34.7 N/75.0 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Aug. 31. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 55 km/h (34.9 N/74.1 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Aug. 31. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 55 km/h (35.0 N/74.0 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Aug. 31. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 55 km/h (34.2 N/75.3 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Aug. 31. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 45 km/h (35.9 N/72.7 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Sept. 1. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 45 km/h (37.2 N/69.1 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Sept. 1. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 45 km/h (38.8 N/66.1 W).
Status: Tropical Depression as shown by a tropical depression symbol on a green track line.

Legend Details

Tropical depresssion symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Depression

Tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Storm

Hurricane symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Hurricane

Post-tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Post-Tropical Storm

Figure 5: Satellite Image of Tropical Depression Eight Southeast of Cape Hatteras

Figure 5: Satellite Image of Tropical Depression Eight Southeast of Cape Hatteras

Storm and Synoptic History

Tropical Depression (TD) Eight formed on August 25 along the southern end of a cold front that stalled over the western Atlantic. As the front dissipated a broad area of low pressure formed. The area of low pressure gradually became better defined on August 27, about 100 nautical miles (185 km) south of Bermuda. By 1200 UTC on August 28, TD Eight formed while located about 350 nautical miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, NC. The system tracked west-northwestward towards Cape Hatteras, then turned northward and then northeastward while located 60 nautical miles (111 km) south-southeast of Cape Hatteras.

TD Eight then accelerated northeastward in the Atlantic. Impacts on the North Carolina coast were minimal. The circulation then became elongated and the depression dissipated shortly after 0000 UTC on September 1 while located about 250 nautical miles (460 km) east of Virginia Beach. The remnant low of TD Eight became very difficult to identify later on September 1. Therefore the CHC sent out its final message on TD Eight shortly after 11 UTC on September 1.

Conditions

Gale-force winds occurred over extreme southern Grand Banks. Waves were 4 metres or less.

Impacts

There were no impacts on land from TD Eight. Marine impacts were confined to the extreme southern Grand Banks.

Warnings & Information Statements

The CHC issued ten unique information statements for this event. There were no tropical storm watches or warnings required. Gale warnings were issued for southern portions of the Grand Banks.

Coordination and Communications Efforts

The CHC coordinated the messaging on TD Eight with the NLWO before discontinuing messaging. Marine issues over the Grand Banks were discussed.

Gaston

The CHC issued one bulletin on Hurricane Gaston to inform Canadians that the storm would not likely have any impact to Canadian territory. Gaston formed from a strong tropical disturbance that left the coast of Africa on August 20. The disturbance moved west-northwestward and became a hurricane on August 24. Hurricane Gaston then continued moving generally northwestward until August 30 when it turned northward and then took a sharp turn east-northeastward. This turn kept Gaston far out in the Atlantic. The storm therefore had no impact to Canada.

Hermine

Figure 6: Track Map of Hurricane Hermine
Figure 6: Track Map of Hurricane Hermine
Long description

Tropical Storm Hermine formed in the Gulf of Mexico late on August 31 from a tropical disturbance that had moved north of Puerto Rico and across the southern Bahamas during the last week of August. Hermine was located about 346 nautical miles (640 km) southwest of Apalachicola, Florida when the storm reached tropical storm strength. Hermine then accelerated to the northeast and intensified. During the afternoon of September 1, Hermine became a hurricane and that evening reached its maximum intensity with sustained winds of 70 knots (130 km/h). Hermine made landfall early on September 2 just east of St. Marks, Florida.

The storm then quickly weakened below hurricane status it moved across Florida and southern Georgia. Hermine transitioned into a post-tropical storm on September 3 as it moved into the Atlantic from the outer banks of North Carolina. Post-Tropical Storm Hermine remained a strong storm with maximum sustained winds of 60 knots (111 km/h) as it moved to lie 138 nautical miles (253 km) south-southeast of Nantucket, Massachusetts on the afternoon of September 5. On September 6, Hermine moved slowly westward and became disorganized as it was absorbed by an upper level trough. The CHC stopped messaging on Hermine at that time.

Track readings issued by the Canadian Hurricane Centre:

Post-Tropical Storm Hermine

Sept. 5. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 110 km/h (37.9 N/68.1 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

Sept.5. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 110 km/h (39.1 N/69.1 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

Sept. 5. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 110 km/h (39.3 N/70.3 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

Sept.6. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 100 km/h (39.6 N/71.3 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

Sept.6. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 100 km/h (39.6 N/71.8 W).
Status: Post-Tropical Storm as shown by a post-tropical storm symbol on a black track line.

Legend Details

Tropical depresssion symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Depression

Tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Storm

Hurricane symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Hurricane

Post-tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Post-Tropical Storm

Figure 7: Satellite Image of Hermine near Florida

Figure 7: Satellite Image of Hermine near Florida

Storm and Synoptic History

Tropical Storm Hermine formed in the Gulf of Mexico late on August 31 from a tropical disturbance that had moved north of Puerto Rico and across the southern Bahamas during the last week of August. Hermine was located about 346 nautical miles (640 km) southwest of Apalachicola, Florida when the storm reached tropical storm strength. Hermine then accelerated to the northeast due to influence from a mid-level trough of low pressure over the southern United States. During this time, Hermine was moving over 30 degree Celsius water and wind shear lessened. At 1855 UTC on September 1, the NHC upgraded Hermine to a hurricane after a hurricane hunter aircraft observed winds of 65 knots (120 km/h). By 0000 UTC on September 2, Hermine reached its maximum intensity with sustained winds of 70 knots (130 km/h). Hermine made landfall with the same intensity at 0530 UTC on September 2 just east of St. Marks, Florida.

Hermine then quickly weakened below hurricane status as the storm moved across Florida and southern Georgia. Hermine transitioned into a post-tropical storm on September 3 as it moved into the Atlantic from the outer banks of North Carolina. Post-Tropical Storm Hermine remained a strong storm with maximum sustained winds of 60 knots (111 km/h) as it moved to lie 138 nautical miles (253 km) south-southeast of Nantucket, Massachusetts at 1800 UTC on September 5. On September 6, Hermine moved slowly westward and became disorganized as it was absorbed by an upper level trough. The CHC and NHC stopped messaging on Hermine at that time.

Conditions

Swell waves of 2 to 3 metres occurred along the South Shore of Nova Scotia as a result of Hermine. Over extreme southwestern marine areas, gale force winds and waves of up to 6 metres occurred.

Impacts

Impacts from Hermine were minimal and confined to southwestern waters. Swell waves along the South Shore of Nova Scotia may have given rip currents at the beaches.

Warnings & Information Statements

Gale warnings were issued for the extreme southwestern marine areas of the Maritimes. The CHC issued 8 information statements on Hermine.

Coordination and Communications Efforts

The CHC coordinated messaging and gale warnings with ASPC throughout the event.

Matthew

Figure 8: Track Map of Hurricane Matthew
Figure 8: Track Map of Hurricane Matthew
Long description

Hurricane Matthew originated from a tropical disturbance that moved off the coast of Africa on September 22. Matthew became a named storm on September 28 about 30 nautical miles (56 km) southeast of St. Lucia. Tropical Storm Matthew then underwent rapid intensification. Matthew became a hurricane on September 29 and a category 5 storm on September 30. Matthew then turned northward and made landfall in southwestern Haiti as a strong category 4 storm on October 4. Matthew then continued northward making landfall on Guantanamo Province, Cuba during the evening of October 4. Matthew weakened briefly to category 3 after landfall in Cuba but quickly regained strength back to category 4 as it approached the Bahamas. Matthew then made a third landfall on Grand Bahama Island on October 6 as a category 4 storm.

Hurricane Matthew tracked near the coast of Florida and then made landfall for a fourth time 48 nautical miles (89 km) southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina at category 1 strength on the morning of October 8. Matthew then moved offshore again shortly afterward. Matthew then became a post-tropical storm on October 9 as it moved eastward away from Cape Hatteras then stalled. Much of the moisture sheared off to the north and energized another low pressure system that formed south of Nova Scotia. During the early morning hours of October 10, a new low formed over Georges Bank. This low then tracked northeastward south of Nova Scotia to lie near Cape Race, Newfoundland early in the morning of October 11. Later that day, the low moved east of Newfoundland.

Legend Details

Tropical depresssion symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Depression

Tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Storm

Hurricane symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Hurricane

Post-tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Post-Tropical Storm

Figure 9: Satellite Image of Hurricane Matthew Southwest of Haiti

Figure 9: Satellite Image of Hurricane Matthew Southwest of Haiti

Storm and Synoptic History

Hurricane Matthew originated from a tropical disturbance that moved off the coast of Africa on September 22. Matthew became a named storm on September 28 about 30 nautical miles (56 km) southeast of St. Lucia. Tropical Storm Matthew then underwent rapid intensification. Matthew became a hurricane on September 29 and a category 5 storm on September 30. Hurricane Matthew became the lowest latitude category 5 storm ever recorded in the Atlantic Basin while located at 13.3 degrees north. Matthew then turned northward and made landfall in southwestern Haiti as a strong category 4 storm on October 4. Matthew then continued northward making landfall on Guantanamo Province, Cuba during the evening of October 4. Matthew weakened briefly to category 3 after landfall in Cuba but quickly regained strength back to category 4 as it approached the Bahamas. Matthew then made a third landfall on Grand Bahama Island on October 6 as a category 4 storm. Hurricane Matthew caused extensive damage and loss of life in Haiti, parts of Cuba and the Bahamas.

Hurricane Matthew tracked near the coast of Florida and then made landfall for a fourth time 48 nautical miles (89 km) southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina at category 1 strength on the morning of October 8. Matthew then moved offshore again shortly afterward. Matthew then became a post-tropical storm on October 9 as it moved eastward away from Cape Hatteras then stalled.

Although the circulation of Post-Tropical Storm Matthew remained well to the south, east of Cape Hatteras, much of the moisture sheared off to the north and energized another low pressure system that formed south of Nova Scotia. At 0600 UTC on October 10, a new low formed over Georges Bank. This low then tracked northeastward south of Nova Scotia to lie near Cape Race, Newfoundland early in the morning of October 11. Later that day, the low moved east of Newfoundland.

Conditions

The low pressure system that formed south of Nova Scotia tapped into moisture that streamed north from Matthew's remnants. As a result, this low became very intense and produced strong winds and heavy rain in Atlantic Canada. Cape Breton and Newfoundland were particularly affected.

Here are observations of rain and wind from Atlantic Canada:

New Brunswick

Station Rainfall in millimetres
Mechanic Settlement 56.0
Moncton 48.0
Bouctouche 45.3
Saint John 43.2
Grand Manan 41.4
Fredericton 26.8
Station Wind gusts (km/h)
Mechanic Settlement 67
Moncton 72
Bouctouche 63
Saint John 80
Miscou Island 70

Nova Scotia

Station Rainfall in millimetres
Sydney 228.2
Eskasoni 199.6
Sydney Airport 139.6
Port Hawkesbury 137.4
Ingonish Beach 123.7
Tracadie 116.7
Cheticamp 114.5
Halifax Stanfield International Airport 103.0
Shearwater Jetty 93.6
Kentville 82.7
Upper Stewiacke 80.2
Greenwood 64.4
Kejimkujik 62.8
Yarmouth 49.2
Station Wind gusts (km/h)
Sydney Airport 117
Grand Etang 111
Tracadie 95
Caribou Point 91
Port Hawkesbury 87
Halifax Stanfield International Airport 83
Greenwood 78

Prince Edward Island

Station Rainfall in millimetres
Charlottetown Airport 79.8
East Point 73.6
Maple Plains 51.4
Harrington 63.0
North Rustico 48.5
Summerside 38.1
North Cape 31.1
Station Wind gusts (km/h)
East Point 106
Charlottetown Airport 93
St. Peters 91
Summerside 91
Maple Plains 72

Newfoundland

Station Rainfall in millimetres
Burgeo 263.3
Grand Falls-Windsor 181.3
Gander International Airport 163.8
Badger 155.0
Lewisport 147.1
Millertown 142.0
Corner Brook 139.0
Glovertown 130.6
Twillingate 100.6
Clarenville 96.0
Port aux Basques 93.5
Station Wind gusts (km/h)
Green Island-Fortune Bay 130
Port aux Basques 128
Sagona Island 122
Burgeo 119
Bell Island Lighthouse 109
Twillingate 106
Argentia 98

Impacts

There were no direct impacts to Canada from Matthew. However, the indirect impacts were substantial. The wind and rain from the energized low pressure system toppled trees, damaged homes, flooded roads and residences and caused some roads to be washed out. The hardest hit areas were Cape Breton and Newfoundland.

Warnings & Information Statements

There were two information statements sent by the CHC on Matthew. It became clear while Matthew was located off the Coast of the Carolinas that there would be no direct impacts to Canadian territory.

Coordination and Communications Efforts

ASPC and NLWO coordinated marine winds. ASPC discussed the public warnings with Weather Preparedness Meteorologist.

Nicole

Figure 10: Track Map of Hurricane Nicole
Figure 10: Track Map of Hurricane Nicole
Long description

A tropical disturbance moving northwestward in the central Atlantic became Tropical Storm Nicole while located about 455 nautical miles (845 km) northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico near noon on October 4. Nicole gradually became better organized over the next two days despite strong wind shear while moving northwestward. During the afternoon of October 6, Nicole was upgraded to a hurricane. Early on October 7, Nicole strengthened to category 2 storm. However, strong wind shear produced by the more powerful Hurricane Matthew to the northwest caused Nicole to weaken to a tropical storm late on October 7. Despite the strong wind shear, Nicole began to strengthen again slightly on October 8 over very warm sea surface temperatures. However, the storm didn’t regain hurricane strength until October 11. Nicole moved very little between October 8 and 11 due to an area of high pressure to its north. However, on October 11, the high moved off to the east and Nicole began to move northward and intensify. Nicole became a category 4 storm on October 12 as it approached Bermuda. Nicole then weakened slightly before making a direct hit on Bermuda near noon on October 13. Nicole then weakened steadily due to wind shear to a category 1 storm. Nicole was then declared post-tropical near noon on October 17 while located southeast of the Grand Banks.

Track readings issued by the Canadian Hurricane Centre:

Hurricane Nicole

Oct. 12. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 155 km/h (28.2 N/67.0 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 12. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 155 km/h (29.0 N/66.9 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 12. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 215 km/h (30.6 N/66.1 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 13. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 215km/h (30.6 N/66.1 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 13. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 205 km/h (31.7 N/65.1 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 13. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 185 km/h (32.9 N/64.1 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 13. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 175 km/h (33.8 N/62.3 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 14. 2016, 3 AM ADT, wind speed 155 km/h (34.9 N/60.0 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 14. 2016, 9 AM ADT, wind speed 140 km/h (35.8 N/58.4 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 14. 2016, 3 PM ADT, wind speed 130 km/h (36.4 N/57.0 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Oct. 14. 2016, 9 PM ADT, wind speed 120 km/h (36.8 N/55.0 W).
Status: Hurricane as shown by a hurricane symbol on a red track line.

Legend Details

Tropical depresssion symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Depression

Tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Tropical Storm

Hurricane symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Hurricane

Post-tropical storm symbolIndicates Point on the track of a Post-Tropical Storm

Figure 11: Satellite Image of Hurricane Nicole South of Bermuda on October 12

Figure 11: Satellite Image of Hurricane Nicole South of Bermuda on October 12

Storm and Synoptic History

A tropical disturbance moving northwestward in the central Atlantic became Tropical Storm Nicole while located about 455 nautical miles (845 km) northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico at 1500 UTC on October 4. Nicole gradually became better organized over the next two days despite strong wind shear while moving northwestward. At 1800 UTC on October 6, Nicole was upgraded to a hurricane. Early on October 7, Nicole strengthened to category 2 storm. However, strong wind shear produced by the more powerful Hurricane Matthew to the northwest caused Nicole to weaken to a tropical storm late on October 7. Despite the strong wind shear, Nicole began to strengthen again slightly on October 8 over very warm sea surface temperatures. However, the storm didn't regain hurricane strength until 1800 UTC on October 11. Nicole moved very little between October 8 and 11 due to an area of high pressure to its north. However, on October 11, the high moved off to the east and Nicole began to move northward and intensify. Nicole became a category 4 storm on October 12 as it approached Bermuda. Nicole then weakened slightly before making a direct hit on Bermuda at 1500 UTC on October 13. Nicole then weakened steadily due to wind shear to a category 1 storm. Nicole was then declared post-tropical at 0300 UTC on October 17 while located southeast of the Grand Banks.

Conditions

Gale-force winds occurred over the extreme southern sections of Laurentian Fan and the southern Grand Banks. Swell waves of 2 to 3 metres affected the southern coastlines of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.

Impacts

There were no impacts to land areas on Canada except for an extended period of swell waves along south facing shorelines. Mariners had to be prepared for gale-force winds over extreme southeastern waters.

Warnings & Information Statements

There were eleven information statements sent by the CHC on Nicole. Gale warnings were issued for Laurentian Fan and the southern Grand Banks.

Coordination and Communications Efforts

CHC and NLWO coordinated marine winds and gale warnings.

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