2019–2020 Departmental Plan: Departmental Plan

From: Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P. Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister Responsible for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, 2019.

This publication may be reproduced for personal or internal use without permission, provided the source is fully acknowledged. However, multiple copy reproduction of this publication in whole or in part for purposes of redistribution requires the prior written permission from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3, or ceaa.information.acee@canada.ca.

Catalogue No.: En104-15E-PDF

ISSN: 2371-6355

This document has been issued in French under the title: Agence canadienne d’évaluation environnementale: Plan ministériel 2019–2020.

Alternative formats may be requested by contacting: ceaa.information.acee@canada.ca

Table of contents

Minister’s message

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister Responsible for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

I am pleased to provide you with the 2019–20 Departmental Plan for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.

This plan informs Canadians and parliamentarians about what we do, and about the results we want to achieve in the coming year.

In 2019–20, the Agency will continue to actively support the Government of Canada’s commitment to protect the environment and grow the economy.

In February 2018, the government introduced legislation (Bill C-69) that proposes to put in place better rules to protect our environment, rebuild public trust in how decisions about resource development are made and ensure that Canada remains competitive in the global marketplace. The Bill broadens the factors to be considered in project reviews to include both positive and negative impacts, including all facets of a project: economic, environment, social and health aspects. It also envisions the creation of a new Agency: the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada.

Bill C-69 reflects this government’s belief that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand-in-hand and establishes a transparent and fair process that better positions Canada to create jobs and economic opportunities. We will do this by building resource projects in Canada in a responsible, transparent and timely fashion while also ensuring a sustainable future for generations to come. These better rules reflect values that are important to Canadians — including early, inclusive and meaningful public engagement; engagement that emphasizes nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government partnerships with Indigenous Peoples and timely decisions based on the best available science and Indigenous knowledge. Until the proposed legislative and program changes come into effect, existing laws and processes, including the Interim Approach and Principles announced in January 2016, continue to apply to major projects undergoing an environmental assessment.

I invite Canadians and my colleagues to read this plan and learn more about the Agency’s priorities and objectives for 2019–20, and how we plan to achieve them.

_____________________________________
The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change
and Minister Responsible for the Canadian
Environmental Assessment Agency

Institutional Head’s message

Ron Hallman, President, Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

I am pleased to submit this Departmental Plan, outlining how the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency plans to meet its key objectives in the 2019-20 reporting period.

The Agency is committed to delivering evidence-based environmental assessments (EAs) that protect the environment, foster economic growth and jobs, and serve the public interest. The Agency supports the Minister of Environment and Climate Change in carrying out her responsibilities by conducting EAs for major projects that are based on science, and that include meaningful feedback and expertise received from the public, Indigenous groups, and stakeholders.

In 2019–20, the Agency will continue to support the Minister, as the government continues to advance its proposed legislation regarding the future of environmental assessment. A transition team is in place at the Agency to ensure the identification and implementation of activities required to support the proposed legislative changes such as developing regulations and guidance documents, in order to ensure a smooth transition to the new regime. Internally, we have strengthened capacity to deliver effective and timely professional support in the delivery of the Agency’s key priorities, including the work required to successfully transform into the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada.

In addition to supporting the Minister through the legislative process, the Agency will continue its important day-to-day work in conducting federal environmental assessments. Our team continues to fulfill the Agency’s mandate of conducting high-quality environmental assessments to support decision-making.

I encourage you to read this plan for more details on the Agency’s priorities in the coming year.

_____________________________________
Ron Hallman
President
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Plans at a glance and operating context

Plans

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency is a federal body reporting to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change that provides high-quality environmental assessments (EAs) to inform government decision making, in support of sustainable development. The Agency is the responsible authority for most federal environmental assessments.

EA is a planning and decision-making tool that has been established to minimize or avoid adverse environmental effects before they occur and incorporate environmental factors into decision making.

In 2019–20, the Agency will concentrate on the following key priorities:

  • Deliver high-quality EAs of major projects;
  • Build effective relationships with Indigenous Peoples;
  • Engage Canadians, including the public, Indigenous Peoples and stakeholders, in the EA of major projects;
  • Develop a modern, interactive and user-focused public registry that provides Canadians with greater insight into impact assessments and the review of projects across their lifecycle;
  • Support the Minister in the next steps of the legislative process for Bill C-69 and in enacting related regulatory and policy changes as required;
  • Develop strategies and plans required to ensure a smooth organizational transition in support of the proposed new regime; and
  • Strengthen internal capacity to deliver effective and timely professional support in the delivery of the Agency’s key priorities.

This report outlines planned results and supporting activities to meet the Agency’s Core Responsibility and supporting Internal Services.

To achieve these results, the Agency will continue to emphasize openness and transparency and meaningful participation for all interested parties. In particular, the Agency will continue to build more effective relationships with Indigenous Peoples to support the goals of high-quality EA and reconciliation. The Agency will continue to work with provincial and territorial representatives to harmonize EA processes whereever possible, in support of the objective of one project, one assessment.

The Agency’s work will continue to support the Minister in delivering on her mandate letter Endnote i commitments to protect the environment, and to introduce new, fair processes to regain public trust and help get resources to market.

As the government moves forward with proposed changes to environmental and regulatory processes, the Agency is well-positioned to continue to support the Minister in delivering on legislative, regulatory or policy changes, while continuing to undertake high-quality environmental assessments.

Operating context

The Agency operates in a continuously changing environment impacted by external factors such as markets and the socio-economic climate affecting the type, timing, volume and distribution of projects requiring assessment.

Protecting the environment, while supporting economic growth and improving the quality of life of Canadians, is a priority of the Government of Canada. EA supports this priority by providing decision-makers with information that demonstrates how potential adverse impacts on the environment (within federal jurisdiction) can be eliminated, reduced or controlled through the application of mitigation measures.

The Agency ensures that opportunities are provided for meaningful public participation. For example, the Agency administers a Participant Funding Program, which supports individuals, non-profit organizations and Indigenous groups interested in participating in federal EAs. Public participation in federal EA ensures an open, balanced process and strengthens the quality and credibility of project reviews.

As environmental management is an area of shared responsibility between the federal and provincial governments, some projects may require both a federal and a provincial EA. EAs may be coordinated so that a single EA meets the legal requirements of both jurisdictions. A responsible authority may delegate the conduct of an EA, in whole or in part, to another jurisdiction.

The federal Crown has a legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate Indigenous groups when it contemplates conduct that may adversely affect potential or established Aboriginal or treaty rights. Indigenous consultation considerations are integrated into all EAs conducted by the Agency and by review panels. The EA process established under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012) coexists with other impact assessment requirements established under some land claims agreements, such as the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, the Northeastern Quebec Agreement, the Nisga’a Final Agreement, Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement, Tsawwassen First Nation Final Agreement and the Inuvialuit Final Agreement. Close collaboration is required to ensure efficient coordination of these processes.

The Agency carries out Gender Based Analysis plus (GBA+) on projects that require a Governor-in-Council decision as to whether the significant adverse environmental effects are justified in the circumstances. GBA+ analysis allows for a better understanding of the impact of projects on communities and different groups of individuals. It is an important tool in fulfilling the government’s commitment to gender equality and to ensure inclusive outcomes for Canadians.

The Agency’s organizational structure has remained relatively stable over the preceding years, but may evolve as a result of possible legislative changes stemming from Bill C-69. For more information on the Agency’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibilities

Environmental Assessment

Description

The Agency provides high-quality assessments of environmental effects to support government decision making. Environmental assessments ensure that adverse environmental effects are considered in a precautionary manner to maintain a healthy environment and to promote sustainable development.

Planning highlights

In 2019–20, the Agency will continue to support the Minister as Bill C-69 proceeds through the legislative process and will develop the regulatory and policy changes to support the implementation of the proposed legislation as required.

Until new legislation is enacted, the interim approach and principles announced in January 2016 will continue to apply to the assessment of major projects undergoing an EA. The approach and principles call for decision making that is informed by science and Indigenous knowledge, the views of the public and affected communities, meaningful consultation with Indigenous Peoples and an assessment of a project’s direct and upstream greenhouse gas emissions.

Departmental Result: Science, evidence and fact-based environmental assessments resulting in mitigation measures that minimize significant adverse environmental effects.

In order to deliver high-quality, evidence-based EAs, and in support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitments, the Agency will:

  • Continue to support the Minister as Bill C-69 proceeds through the legislative process and in the implementation of new legislation, as appropriate;
  • Carry out EAs that are informed by the best available information and knowledge, including community and Indigenous knowledge, based on validated methods and models, and which lead to proponent designs, plans and actions that incorporate the best available, economically and technologically feasible mitigation measures;
  • Assess a project’s direct and upstream greenhouse gas emissions as part of an EA conducted under CEAA 2012 and factor that assessment into the project’s decision statement, as appropriate;
  • Act as the Crown Consultation Coordinator for federal EAs conducted by the Agency or by a review panel, working with federal authorities to apply a whole-of-government approach to consultation with Indigenous groups potentially affected by a project;
  • Plan and carry out Regional Assessments to inform the conduct of project EAs and/or to better understand and manage cumulative environmental effects, in cooperation with other relevant jurisdictions and organizations; and,
  • Effectively and efficiently implement the EA process in areas where CEAA 2012 and other impact assessment requirements established under land claims agreements coexist (e.g., James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, Nisga'a Final Agreement, Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement, Tsawwassen First Nation Final Agreement, Inuvialuit Final Agreement).

In support of high-quality EA delivery, the Agency develops and promotes legislative and policy frameworks, tools and best-practices, as well as seeks opportunities for cooperation and coordinated action between the federal government and other jurisdictions. In 2019–20, the Agency will:

  • Develop operational policies, procedures, service standards, and guidance and training to support the implementation and transition to the new impact assessment process as proposed in Bill C-69;
  • Support and conduct research and provide advice that facilitates the shift towards Impact Assessment, including the proposed expanded scope of effects and factors to consider in an impact assessment;
  • Work with other jurisdictions to identify the most efficient and effective means of supporting the objective of “one project, one assessment”;
  • Support the development of Regulations Designating Physical Activities and Information Requirements and Time Management Regulations necessary for the implementation of the proposed Impact Assessment Act;
  • Manage committees to support implementation of the proposed Impact Assessment legislation including;
    • The Indigenous Advisory Committee that will provide expert advice and participate in the development of policy and guidance for the proposed new impact assessment system.
    • The Technical Advisory Committee on Science and Knowledge that will provide expert advice on topics related to impact assessments, as well as regional and strategic assessments.
    • The Minister’s Advisory Council that will provide advice to both the Minister and the Agency, and is comprised of representatives from industry, environmental groups, Indigenous organizations, and provincial and territorial governments, and advises on regulatory and policy issues.
    • Pending the establishment of the Minister’s Advisory Council, continuing to work with the Minister’s Multi-Interest Advisory Committee, comprised of representatives from industry, environmental groups, Indigenous organizations, and provincial and territorial governments, which advises on regulatory and policy issues. This committee will disband following coming into force of the new legislation.
  • Continue to work with other federal government departments that provide expertise during the conduct of EAs to ensure that the most robust science and advice is brought to bear;
  • Deliver research and advice that supports the shift towards impact assessment; and,
  • Lead interdepartmental committees to facilitate the exchange of information and best practices, develop and implement strategies to improve consistency and timeliness in federal EAs and for projects on federal lands and outside of Canada.
Departmental Result: Environmental assessment that considers input from Indigenous Peoples, the public and stakeholders.

In support of open and transparent government and meaningful participation by all parties with an interest in the EA process, the Agency will:

  • Enhance opportunities and mechanisms that support meaningful public, stakeholder and Indigenous Peoples participation throughout the EA process;
  • Facilitate public and Indigenous involvement in EAs through the delivery of the Participant Funding Program and continue expanding the program in order to better support participation, including Indigenous Peoples' participation, in both the EA process and activities such as policy dialogue and research initiatives;
  • Provide information and training to those engaged in the EA process, including practitioners, stakeholders, Indigenous Peoples, and the public; and,
  • Implement a new Canadian Impact Assessment Registry (the Registry) to enhance transparency of project assessments and support meaningful opportunities for public engagement throughout the life cycle of a project's review. The Registry will allow greater access to scientific and impact assessment information and provide greater transparency in the decision-making process.

The Agency seeks to build effective relationships with Indigenous Peoples in support of high-quality EA and advance the Government of Canada’s on-going commitment to support reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. In addition to the above-mentioned activities, the Agency will:

  • Enhance opportunities for Indigenous Peoples to participate in the EA process in meaningful ways and tailor activities to support Indigenous participation to specific projects as appropriate;
  • Provide opportunities for greater collaboration with Indigenous Peoples in the development of guidance documents, policies and regulations;
  • Implement new collaborative approaches and partnerships with Indigenous communities, such as the methodology which was co-developed with the Mikisew Cree for assessing potential impacts on the exercise of Aboriginal and Treaty rights; and,
  • Provide advice to Indigenous Services Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada for the negotiation of EA provisions in agreements with Indigenous Peoples.
Departmental Result: Environmental Assessment Decision Statements are complied with.

The Agency is responsible for the administration of CEAA 2012 including promoting, monitoring and facilitating compliance with CEAA 2012 for the projects for which it is the responsible authority. Proponents of designated projects must meet the requirements set out in CEAA 2012 and any decision statement issued by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change. Compliance with CEAA 2012, its regulations and decision statements is mandatory.

The EA process leads to the issuance of clear, measurable, and enforceable conditions through the Minister's decision statements for projects. These are based on mitigation measures as well as measures to verify the accuracy of the EA and determine the effectiveness of the mitigation measures and follow-up requirements to mitigate adverse environmental effects. Strong decision statements, combined with compliance promotion, compliance verification and enforcement activities help protect the environment and human health. Compliance with conditions is a principal requirement of CEAA 2012.

As part of its consistent and transparent approach to compliance with, and enforcement of decision statements issued by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, the Agency will:

  • Develop potential conditions in the decision statement for each project that is allowed to proceed;
  • Provide proponents, Indigenous groups, stakeholders and the general public with an opportunity to comment on potential conditions, and integrate comments received to the extent possible prior to submission of recommended conditions to the Minister for potential incorporation in the decision statement;
  • Promote, monitor and facilitate compliance by offering education and training opportunities, doing outreach, providing information, and consulting and engaging stakeholders and proponents whose designated projects are subject to CEAA 2012;
  • Conduct inspections to verify non-compliance;
  • Undertake enforcement actions in cases of non-compliance so that corrective actions are taken to restore compliance and avoid adverse environmental effects; and,
  • Make public information related to compliance and enforcement activities through the Canadian Environmental Assessment Registry Internet site, including enforcement actions taken, inspection summaries and information submitted by proponents (e.g. implementation schedules, annual reports and plans).
Planned results

Departmental Results

Departmental Result Indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2015 –16 Actual results

2016 –17 Actual results

2017 –18 Actual results

Note: Indicator results are not available for past years as these indicators are new and developed as part of the Departmental Results Framework.

Science, evidence and fact based environmental assessments resulting in mitigation measures that minimize significant adverse environmental effects

Percentage of projects in which mitigation measures have proven to be effective

90 %

2019 -20

Not available

Not available

Not available

Environmental assessments that consider input from Indigenous Peoples, the public and stakeholders

Percentage of environmental assessments in which Indigenous Peoples have participated

100 %

2019 -20

Not available

Not available

Not available

Environmental assessments that consider input from Indigenous Peoples, the public and stakeholders

Percentage of environmental assessments in which the public and stakeholders have participated

100 %

2019 -20

Not available

Not available

Not available

Environmental Assessment Decision Statements are complied with

Percentage of projects that are in compliance with environmental decision statement conditions

90 %

2019 -20

Not available

Not available

Not available

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20 Main Estimates

2019–20 Planned spending

2020–21 Planned spending

2021–22 Planned spending

63,191,842

63,191,842

63,999,604

65,559,386

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents

2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents

371

373

367

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Agency’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Endnote ii

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20 Main Estimates

2019–20 Planned spending

2020–21 Planned spending

2021–22 Planned spending

10,983,171

10,983,171

11,742,575

12,028,763

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents

2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents

75

74

73

Planning highlights

Internal Services will deliver effective and timely professional support to the Agency. In particular, it will:

  • Establish a strategy to foster a healthy, respectful, diverse, accessible and inclusive workplace;
  • Support a Joint Committee on Mental Health comprised of Agency employees and employee association representatives;
  • Build and sustain the desired workforce to deliver high-quality assessments;
  • Refine the implementation plan for the Agency’s new policy on scientific integrity. The Policy, a result of an agreement between the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, has as an objective fostering a culture that supports and promotes scientific integrity in the design, conduct, management, review and communication of research, science, and related activities;
  • Continue to enhance the Agency’s capacity to support the government’s priority to integrate GBA+ considerations across its programs and policies;
  • Ensure appropriate accommodation for an expanding Agency;
  • Ensure the stewardship of current and incremental financial resources;
  • Work with other government departments to implement measures to stabilize the administration of pay services for Agency employees;
  • Provide support for the evolution and launch of the proposed Impact Assessment Agency of Canada (e.g. web site; guidance documents, agency publications);
  • Lead the Horizontal Initiative Framework (HIF) to deliver the new impact assessment system in partnership with the eight other partner federal departments and agencies to ensure performance information is available to support evidence-informed decision making as well as transparent reporting to parliamentarians and the public. This HIF outlines the activities that each department will be responsible for when implementing the new impact assessment process; and,
  • Provide support for ongoing EAs (current and former Acts).

Furthermore, in support of the Government of Canada transparency and openness agenda, Internal Services provides information management, access to information and technology expertise, to advance the Agency’s vision for an enhanced and interactive public access portal for EAs and regulatory information.

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph
Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services

2016–17 Expenditures

2017–18 Expenditures

2018–19 Forecast spending

2019–20 Main Estimates

2019–20 Planned spending

2020–21 Planned spending

2021–22 Planned spending

Environmental Assessment

32,218,373

33,101,049

46,081,366

63,191,842

63,191,842

63,999,604

65,559,386

Subtotal

32,218,373

33,101,049

46,081,366

63,191,842

63,191,842

63,999,604

65,559,386

Internal Services

6,469,627

6,721,111

9,741,004

10,983,171

10,983,171

11,742,575

12,028,763

Total

38,688,000

39,822,160

55,822,370

74,175,013

74,175,013

75,742,179

77,588,149

The planned spending figures for the Core Responsibility: The above table does not include cost-recoverable expenditures. The Agency has the authority to recover up to $8.0 million in costs annually, which is netted against the voted authority.

The increase in funding from 2017–18 levels is for the transition to new impact assessment and regulatory processes. Funding for 2018–19 includes funds approved through Supplementary Estimates.

The Agency’s planned spending for 2019–20 is $74.2 million and is a direct result of anticipated legislative changes. Future funding decisions were announced as part of Budget 2018.

The level of demand to fund public participation in EAs depends on the number of major projects under assessment and on the timing of requests for reimbursement of expenditures by participants. Participants may be approved for funding in a given fiscal year, but may not ultimately be reimbursed until a subsequent fiscal year depending on the pace at which an EA proceeds. Such circumstances may result in a lapse of funds and the establishment of a liability in a subsequent fiscal year. As of March 31, 2018, the Agency's total potential liability related to the Participant Funding Program amounts to $12.9 million.

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services

2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents

2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents

2018–19 Forecast full-time equivalents

2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents

2021–22 Planned full - time equivalents

Environmental Assessment

223

226

280

371

373

367

Subtotal

223

226

280

371

373

367

Internal Services

42

45

53

75

74

73

Total

265

271

333

446

447

440

A full-time equivalent is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

The increase in 2018–19 and future years is a result of the transition to the new impact assessment and regulatory processes as described above. The Agency plans to use 446 FTEs in 2019–20, an increase of 175 over 2017–18 levels. The Agency’s staffing level remains relatively stable into future years.

Estimates by vote

Information on the Agency’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2019–20 Main Estimates. Endnote iii

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the Agency’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. The forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, as a result, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Agency’s website.Endnote iv

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ending March 31, 2020 (dollars)

Financial information

2018–19 Forecast results

2019–20 Planned results

Difference (2019–20 Planned results minus 2018–19 Forecast results)

Total expenses

61,774,590

80,317,889

18,543,299

Total revenues

1,626,936

2,000,000

373,064

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

60,147,654

78,317,889

18,170,235

Total Agency operational expenses are currently expected to increase by $18.5 million, or 30 percent based on the Agency’s authorities. The $2.0 million in planned revenues is the result of forecasted cost-recoverable panel reviews.

Additional information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Institutional head: Ron Hallman, President

Ministerial portfolio: Environment

Enabling instrument(s): Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 Endnote v

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1994

Other: The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 is supported by three regulations: the Regulations Designating Physical Activities, the Prescribed Information for the Description of a Designated Project Regulations, and the Cost Recovery Regulations. The Agency supports its President who is also the Federal Administrator under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the Agency’s website.Endnote vi

Reporting framework

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

Reporting framework

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Agency’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Endnote vii

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Agency’s website Endnote viii:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more
  • Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million
  • Gender-based analysis plus
  • Horizontal initiatives

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Endnote ix This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
Place Bell Canada, 160 Elgin Street, 22nd Floor
Ottawa ON K1A 0H3
Canada
Telephone: 613-957-0700
Fax: 613-957-0862
E-mail: ceaa.information.acee@canada.ca
Website: https://www.canada.ca/ceaa

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full - time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non - budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, Program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance Information Profile (profil de l’information sur le rendement)
The document that identifies the performance information for each Program from the Program Inventory.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s Core Responsibilities and Results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, Program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, Program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, Program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: