Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada 2013–14

Notice to Reader

Please note, on June 12th, 2015, the following corrections were made to Table 1 of the Annual Report. Under the column titled "Women", the number and percentage of women for the following organizations should read: for the Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal of Canada, 4 and 44.4%; for the Registry of the Competition Tribunal, 3 and 50.0%; and for the RCMP External Review Committee, 1 and 25.0%.

ISSN: 1926-2485
Catalogue No. BT1-28/2014E-PDF

Table of Contents

President's Message

The Honourable Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board

I am pleased to present the 22nd Annual Report to Parliament on Employment Equity in the Public Service of Canada.

As a champion of modernizing the federal public service, I know a workforce that reflects the people it serves is better able to design and deliver programs and services to meet the needs of Canadians. The federal public service has contributed much to Canada's success, and I am proud of how far we have come in building a public service that reflects the diversity of our society.

This report demonstrates the progress that federal departments and agencies continue to make in developing inclusive organizations that reflect, respect, and value Canada's rich diversity. In particular, the report shows that all employment equity designated groups are fully represented within the core public administration in terms of their workforce availability.

These positive results are evidence of the Government's ongoing commitment to ensuring Canadians are served by a representative and inclusive public service that truly reflects today's society. I invite all Canadians to read this report to see the progress we are making in meeting the objectives of the Employment Equity Act.

Original signed by

The Honourable Tony Clement
President of the Treasury Board

Introduction

The Employment Equity Act requires the President of the Treasury Board to submit a report to Parliament on the state of employment equityin the core public administration (CPA) for each fiscal year. This report outlines results and progress with respect to the representation of employment equity designated groups for fiscal year 2013–14.

The Government of Canada remains committed to a diverse public service that reflects today’s society, a message which was reinforced when the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Government of Canada appeared before the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights in April 2013 and stated, “Our ultimate goal is to ensure that the workforce in the federal public service reflects the diversity of today’s society, and is innovative and responsive to address the needs of all Canadians.” The Clerk of the Privy Council also addressed this issue when he launched Blueprint 2020 in June 2013, a dialogue on a vision for a world-class public service “reflecting the diversity of Canadian society and drawing on a vast array of skills and expertise to meet the needs of Canadians and respond to the priorities of the Government.”

As at March 31, 2014, all four employment equity designated groups exceeded their workforce availability, as determined from 2006 Census data.Footnote 1 Aboriginal peoples continued to increase their representation, from 5.0 per cent to 5.1 per cent; members of a visible minority group increased their representation from 12.6 per cent to 13.2 per cent; the representation of persons with disabilities decreased marginally from 5.8 per cent to 5.7 per cent; and women’s representation decreased slightly from 54.2 per cent to 54.1 per cent.

Within the executive cadre, representation rates continued to exceed workforce availability for three of the four designated groups. Women increased their representation from 46.0 per cent to 46.1 per cent; persons with disabilities increased their representation from 5.3 per cent to 5.4 per cent; and members of a visible minority group increased their representation from 8.2 per cent to 8.5 per cent. The representation of Aboriginal peoples remained stable at 3.7 per cent, below their workforce availability for executives.

Appendix A provides statistical tables. Technical notes in Appendix B provide an explanation of the CPA workforceFootnote 2 information on the data for persons in the designated groups and definitions of terminology used throughout this report.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Activities

Collaboration

The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer (OCHRO) in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat works closely with the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) on employment equity issues. In addition to continuing collaboration on their common methodology for data collection and reporting, the two organizations, in collaboration with Employment and Social Development Canada and Shared Services Canada, participated in a pilot outreach workshop at Carleton University, Ottawa, in March 2014. The workshop provided information to students with disabilities on job opportunities, various employment programs open to students, and accommodation measures in the federal public service. There are plans to expand the initiative to include other universities and community colleges in the fall of 2014.

The following summarizes other activities undertaken by OCHRO, key stakeholders and bargaining agents in progressing toward the achievement of employment equity goals in the federal public service.

Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle

The three Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle (Visible Minorities Champions and Chairs Committee, Persons with Disabilities Champions and Chairs Committee, and Champions and Chairs Circle for Aboriginal Peoples) have successfully transitioned into an expanded role under the new governance model, implemented in the fall of 2011. The majority of departments and agencies have selected management champions and employee network chairs to participate in these committees. Each committee has established its priorities, is taking stock of progress against employment equity objectives, and is developing strategies and activities to address employment equity issues. Working groups have been set up to look at common areas of interest and areas of interdepartmental cooperation, such as career development, retention and advancement, and creating a healthy workplace. The focus is to collect and disseminate employment equity best practices and resources across the public service and within departments and to develop ideas and suggestions for consideration by departments.

Each employment equity deputy minister champion reported on the priorities, progress and emerging issues of their committees at a Public Service Management Advisory Committee meeting on April 26, 2013, and in a letter to the Clerk of the Privy Council. In addition, they met with the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights on April 29, 2013, to provide an update on the governance model and how their committees are functioning.

OCHRO consulted with the three Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle in May 2013 on the proposed changes to the 2014 Public Service Employee Survey (PSES). OCHRO’s PSES team members gathered the comments and feedback from committee members and adjusted the survey questions where appropriate. The objective of the consultation was to ensure that the 2014 PSES would address major people management themes and issues and that the questions would be clear and relevant to employees.

The employment equity deputy minister champions took advantage of their roles as community champions to promote dialogue around the Blueprint 2020 vision and to provide a summary report following discussions at each Employment Equity Committee and Circle. Promoting dialogue within the committees and circle helped ensure that the horizontal perspectives provided by each community were reflected in the Blueprint 2020 discussions and in the 2014 Destination 2020 report.

The use of GC 2.0 Tools continues to be promoted at Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees and Circle meetings as useful mechanisms for consultation, collaboration, and sharing of information and best practices among all three committees.

Joint Employment Equity Committee

The Joint Employment Equity Committee (JEEC), a National Joint Council committee, provides a forum for OCHRO, the PSC, departments and bargaining agents to consult and collaborate on the development, implementation and review of public service–wide policies and practices that affect employment equity designated groups.

During 2013–14, the JEEC received updates and presentations, and participated in consultations on the following topics:

  • The effect of the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s Human Rights Maturity Model and its impact on employment equity;
  • Disability management (with a focus on the Treasury Board Directive on Leave and Special Working Arrangements);
  • Priority population statistics, provided by the PSC;
  • Survey questions to be included in the 2014 PSES; and
  • The Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, Employment Equity in the Federal Public Service: Staying Vigilant for Equality.

In addition, the JEEC agreed to continue to receive the following updates on an ongoing basis: 

  • From Employment and Social Development Canada: the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, the survey previously known as the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, the recognition of foreign credentials of visible minorities, and the review of the Employment Equity Act;
  • From OCHRO: the impact of the Deficit Reduction Action Plan on employment equity groups, the status of relevant Treasury Board policies (Policy on the Duty to Accommodate Persons with Disabilities in the Federal Public Service, Employment Equity Policy and Telework Policy), parking for persons with disabilities, and the impact of the Disability Management Initiative on employment equity groups; and
  • From the PSC: accommodation during the assessment process.

Conclusion

The public service continues to make progress in achieving employment equity goals. The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, through OCHRO, will continue to collaborate with key stakeholders and provide support and guidance to departments on matters related to employment equity.

Appendix A: Statistical Tables

Table 1
Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group According to Department or Agency
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at March 31, 2014)
Department or Agency All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (All Employees) because employees may have voluntarily chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group and men are included in the total.

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note 1

Civilian staff only (data for members of the Canadian Forces are not included because the Treasury Board is not the employer).

Return to table 1 note 1 § referrer

Table 1 Note 2

Fisheries and Oceans Canada data include data for the Canadian Coast Guard.

Return to table 1 note 2 referrer

Table 1 Note 3

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada data include data for the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration.

Return to table 1 note 3 referrer

Table 1 Note 4

Information for small numbers is suppressed.

Return to table 1 note 4 * referrer

National Defence See note 1 table 1 § 22,112 8,628 39.0 686 3.1 1,350 6.1 1,592 7.2
Employment and Social Development Canada 19,802 13,825 69.8 916 4.6 1,303 6.6 3,378 17.1
Correctional Service Canada 17,834 8,515 47.8 1,757 9.9 1,012 5.7 1,666 9.3
Canada Border Services Agency 13,391 6,619 49.4 486 3.6 644 4.8 1,980 14.8
Public Works and Government Services Canada 11,352 6,610 58.2 364 3.2 671 5.9 1,401 12.3
Fisheries and Oceans Canada See note 2 table 1 9,097 3,249 35.7 422 4.6 527 5.8 515 5.7
Health Canada 8,761 5,777 65.9 714 8.2 546 6.2 1,766 20.2
Environment Canada 5,852 2,761 47.2 173 3.0 264 4.5 808 13.8
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Civilian Staff) 5,830 4,571 78.4 358 6.1 290 5.0 718 12.3
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada 5,607 3,077 54.9 143 2.6 203 3.6 784 14.0
Shared Services Canada 5,158 1,637 31.7 178 3.5 343 6.7 725 14.1
Citizenship and Immigration Canada 4,918 3,251 66.1 166 3.4 259 5.3 1,150 23.4
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada See note 3 table 1 4,572 2,215 48.5 145 3.2 207 4.5 547 12.0
Industry Canada 4,541 2,265 49.9 135 3.0 223 4.9 738 16.3
Transport Canada 4,500 2,019 44.9 161 3.6 230 5.1 629 14.0
Statistics Canada 4,433 2,255 50.9 101 2.3 274 6.2 880 19.9
Department of Justice Canada 4,410 3,000 68.0 156 3.5 288 6.5 751 17.0
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada 4,405 2,823 64.1 1,285 29.2 266 6.0 503 11.4
Natural Resources Canada 3,782 1,676 44.3 104 2.8 190 5.0 478 12.6
Veterans Affairs Canada 2,939 2,148 73.1 89 3.0 221 7.5 335 11.4
Public Health Agency of Canada 1,943 1,320 67.9 65 3.4 122 6.3 367 18.9
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat 1,648 1,027 62.3 45 2.7 113 6.9 262 15.9
Canadian Heritage 1,640 1,100 67.1 61 3.7 81 4.9 181 11.0
Public Safety Canada 962 585 60.8 50 5.2 60 6.2 111 11.5
Public Prosecution Service of Canada 952 642 67.4 53 5.6 59 6.2 121 12.7
Library and Archives Canada 889 538 60.5 62 7.0 57 6.4 89 10.0
Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada 798 517 64.8 30 3.8 57 7.1 254 31.8
Department of Finance Canada 719 348 48.4 16 2.2 22 3.1 107 14.9
Public Service Commission of Canada 713 462 64.8 31 4.4 59 8.3 107 15.0
Privy Council Office 665 370 55.6 28 4.2 37 5.6 85 12.8
Canadian Space Agency 587 245 41.7 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 19 3.2 80 13.6
Canada School of Public Service 565 375 66.4 24 4.3 33 5.8 82 14.5
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 555 364 65.6 16 2.9 31 5.6 23 4.1
Courts Administration Service 550 361 65.6 19 3.5 32 5.8 80 14.6
Office of the Chief Electoral Officer 434 208 47.9 19 4.4 34 7.8 68 15.7
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 402 229 57.0 14 3.5 22 5.5 53 13.2
Canadian Grain Commission 393 161 41.0 22 5.6 27 6.9 68 17.3
Parole Board of Canada 393 312 79.4 24 6.1 22 5.6 39 9.9
Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions 288 168 58.3 5 1.7 6 2.1 38 13.2
Western Economic Diversification Canada 286 179 62.6 18 6.3 19 6.6 59 20.6
Infrastructure Canada 271 167 61.6 8 3.0 12 4.4 41 15.1
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada 241 145 60.2 12 5.0 9 3.7 24 10.0
Canadian Transportation Agency 206 119 57.8 5 2.4 12 5.8 26 12.6
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario 201 126 62.7 7 3.5 15 7.5 50 24.9
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 199 138 69.4 11 5.5 8 4.0 20 10.1
Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada 196 116 59.2 7 3.6 14 7.1 10 5.1
Transportation Safety Board of Canada 192 61 31.8 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 7 3.7 16 8.3
Canadian Human Rights Commission 182 119 65.4 13 7.1 28 15.4 26 14.3
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages 157 107 68.2 5 3.2 11 7.0 16 10.2
Office of the Secretary to the Governor General 141 82 58.2 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 11 7.8 19 13.5
Status of Women Canada 83 73 88.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 7 8.4 9 10.8
Canada Industrial Relations Board 76 58 76.3 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 6 7.9 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Canadian International Trade Tribunal 61 39 63.9 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Commission for Public Complaints Against the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 56 39 69.6 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 8 14.3
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada 54 36 66.7 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 5 9.3 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board Canada 51 33 64.7 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 8 15.7
Canadian Dairy Commission 48 33 68.8 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * 6 12.5
Military Grievances External Review Committee 35 26 74.3 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada 27 20 74.1 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Public Service Staffing Tribunal 26 17 65.4 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
International Joint Commission 25 10 40.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada 25 11 44.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 21 10 47.6 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Human Rights Tribunal of Canada 17 11 64.7 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Farm Products Council of Canada 16 9 56.3 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission 13 7 53.9 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada 12 9 75.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Copyright Board Canada 12 5 41.7 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal of Canada 9 4 44.4 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada 8 6 75.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal Canada 7 6 85.7 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Registry of the Competition Tribunal 6 3 50.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
RCMP External Review Committee 4 1 25.0 See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 * See note 4 table 1 *
Total 181,356 98,078 54.1 9,239 5.1 10,390 5.7 23,919 13.2
Table 2
Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group and Region of Work
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at March 31, 2014)
Region of Work All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Note

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (All Employees) because employees may have voluntarily chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group and men are included in the total.

Table 2 Notes

Table 2 Note 1

NCR stands for National Capital Region.

Return to table 2 note 1 referrer

Table 2 Note 2

NCR includes NCR Quebec and NCR Ontario.

Return to table 2 note 2 referrer

Newfoundland and Labrador 2,784 1,177 42.3 173 6.2 153 5.5 52 1.9
Prince Edward Island 1,554 980 63.1 44 2.8 112 7.2 39 2.5
Nova Scotia 8,349 3,567 42.7 412 4.9 593 7.1 490 5.9
New Brunswick 6,387 3,572 55.9 233 3.6 334 5.2 154 2.4
Quebec (without the NCR) See note 1 table 2 20,427 10,669 52.2 420 2.1 672 3.3 1,999 9.8
NCR (Quebec) See note 1 table 2 24,333 13,927 57.2 1,276 5.2 1,310 5.4 3,162 13.0
NCR See note 2 table 2 80,358 45,146 56.2 3,094 3.9 4,619 5.7 11,660 14.5
Ontario (without the NCR) See note 1 table 2 23,340 12,795 54.8 1,213 5.2 1,604 6.9 4,074 17.5
NCR (Ontario) See note 1 table 2 56,025 31,219 55.7 1,818 3.2 3,309 5.9 8,498 15.2
Manitoba 6,442 3,629 56.3 942 14.6 423 6.6 596 9.3
Saskatchewan 4,464 2,564 57.4 747 16.7 261 5.8 279 6.3
Alberta 9,083 5,091 56.0 789 8.7 628 6.9 1,085 11.9
British Columbia 15,774 7,663 48.6 943 6.0 882 5.6 3,224 20.4
Yukon 290 183 63.1 48 16.6 25 8.6 19 6.6
Northwest Territories 384 232 60.4 80 20.8 23 6.0 25 6.5
Nunavut 231 128 55.4 79 34.2 11 4.8 19 8.2
Outside Canada 1,489 682 45.8 22 1.5 50 3.4 204 13.7
Total 181,356 98,078 54.1 9,239 5.1 10,390 5.7 23,919 13.2
Table 3
Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group According to Occupational Group
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at March 31, 2014)
Occupational Group All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (All Employees) because employees may have voluntarily chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group and men are included in the total.

Table 3 Notes

Table 3 Note 1

LCs have been included in the Executive Group since 2011–12.

Return to table 3 note 1 referrer

Executives 5,252 2,423 46.1 192 3.7 282 5.4 447 8.5
EX (Executive)
4,955 2,256 45.5 185 3.7 262 5.3 429 8.7
LC (Law Management) See note 2 table 3
297 167 56.2 7 2.4 20 6.7 18 6.1
Scientific and Professional 31,854 16,357 51.3 999 3.1 1,427 4.5 5,491 17.2
Administrative and Foreign Service 82,710 52,009 62.9 4,434 5.4 5,176 6.3 11,638 14.1
Technical 12,593 3,140 24.9 531 4.2 604 4.8 974 7.7
Administrative Support 19,891 15,647 78.7 1,300 6.5 1,528 7.7 2,882 14.5
Operational 28,971 8,453 29.2 1,779 6.1 1,364 4.7 2,477 8.5
Undetermined 85 49 57.6 4 4.7 9 10.6 10 11.8
Total 181,356 98,078 54.1 9,239 5.1 10,390 5.7 23,919 13.2
Table 4
Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group and Salary Range
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at March 31, 2014)
Salary Range
($)
All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number % of All Employees Number % of Salary Range % of EESee note 1 table 4 Group Number % of Salary Range % of EESee note 1 table 4 Group Number % of Salary Range % of EESee note 1 table 4 Group Number % of Salary Range % of EESee note 1 table 4 Group

Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (All Employees) because employees may have voluntarily chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group and men are included in the total.

Table 4 Notes

Table 4 Note 1

EE stands for Employment Equity.

Return to table 4 note 1 referrer

Table 4 Note 2

Information for small groups is suppressed.

Return to table 4 note 2 * referrer

Under 5,000 41 2.3 15 36.6 0.0 See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 *
5,000 to 9,999 141 0.1 35 24.8 0.0 See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * 7 5.0 0.1 8 5.7 0.0
10,000 to 14,999 67 0.0 35 52.2 0.0 See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 * See note 2 table 4 *
15,000 to 19,999 149 0.1 103 69.1 0.1 5 3.4 0.1 8 5.4 0.1 14 9.4 0.1
20,000 to 24,999 260 0.1 191 73.5 0.2 17 6.5 0.2 15 5.8 0.1 28 10.8 0.1
25,000 to 29,999 393 0.2 319 81.2 0.3 26 6.6 0.3 22 5.6 0.2 52 13.2 0.2
30,000 to 34,999 382 0.2 332 86.9 0.3 15 3.9 0.2 18 4.7 0.2 59 15.4 0.2
35,000 to 39,999 1,567 0.9 1,194 76.2 1.2 85 5.4 0.9 97 6.2 0.9 150 9.6 0.6
40,000 to 44,999 4,017 2.2 2,817 70.1 2.9 236 5.9 2.6 341 8.5 3.3 563 14.0 2.4
45,000 to 49,999 14,809 8.2 10,383 70.1 10.6 990 6.7 10.7 1,106 7.5 10.6 1,941 13.1 8.1
50,000 to 54,999 19,791 10.9 13,691 69.2 14.0 1,168 5.9 12.6 1,195 6.0 11.5 2,827 14.3 11.8
55,000 to 59,999 16,869 9.3 10,939 64.8 11.2 896 5.3 9.7 1,006 6.0 9.7 2,212 13.1 9.2
60,000 to 64,999 14,840 8.2 8,484 57.2 8.7 811 5.5 8.8 824 5.6 7.9 1,753 11.8 7.3
65,000 to 69,999 18,827 10.4 9,275 49.3 9.5 982 5.2 10.6 1,026 5.4 9.9 2,336 12.4 9.8
70,000 to 74,999 14,716 8.1 5,711 38.8 5.8 1,054 7.2 11.4 693 4.7 6.7 1,876 12.7 7.8
75,000 to 79,999 9,265 5.1 4,689 50.6 4.8 407 4.4 4.4 426 4.6 4.1 1,328 14.3 5.6
80,000 to 84,999 16,917 9.3 8,098 47.9 8.3 933 5.5 10.1 1,068 6.3 10.3 2,109 12.5 8.8
85,000 to 89,999 7,448 4.1 3,929 52.8 4.0 313 4.2 3.4 387 5.2 3.7 1,234 16.6 5.2
90,000 to 94,999 7,499 4.1 3,583 47.8 3.7 254 3.4 2.7 360 4.8 3.5 1,036 13.8 4.3
95,000 to 99,999 8,252 4.6 3,372 40.9 3.4 238 2.9 2.6 431 5.2 4.1 1,319 16.0 5.5
100,000 and over 25,106 13.8 10,883 43.3 11.1 806 3.2 8.7 1,354 5.4 13.0 3,069 12.2 12.8
Total 181,356 100.0 98,078 54.1 100.0 9,239 5.1 100.0 10,390 5.7 100.0 23,919 13.2 100.0
Table 5
Hirings, Promotions Into the Public Service of Canada by Designated Group and Separations From the Public Service of Canada by Designated Group

Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (April 1, 2013, to March 31, 2014)
Action Type All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number Number % Number % Number % Number %

Notes

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (All Employees) because employees may have voluntarily chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group and men are included in the total.

"Hirings" refers to employees who were added to the Public Service of Canada payroll between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014.

Data on "promotions" are obtained from the Public Service Commission of Canada and include information from departments and agencies that fall under both the Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV, and the Public Service Employment Act.

"Separations" refers to employees who left the Public Service of Canada payroll between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014.

The percentages represent that designated group's share of all actions of the given type.

See the definitions of "hirings," "promotions" and "separations" in Appendix B.

Hirings 7,146 3,948 55.2 327 4.6 238 3.3 1,140 16.0
Promotions 9,106 4,948 54.3 390 4.3 389 4.3 1,261 13.8
Separations 15,184 8,502 56.0 813 5.4 1,348 8.9 1,501 9.9
Table 6
Distribution of Public Service of Canada Employees by Designated Group and Age Range
Financial Administration Act, Schedules I and IV Indeterminates, Terms of Three Months or More, and Seasonal Employees (as at March 31, 2014)
Age Range All Employees Women Aboriginal Peoples Persons with Disabilities Members of a Visible Minority Group
Number % of All Employees Number % of Age Range % of EESee note 1 table 6 Group Number % of Age Range % of EESee note 1 table 6 Group Number % of Age Range % of EESee note 1 table 6 Group Number % of Age Range % of EESee note 1 table 6 Group

Note

The sum of designated groups does not equal the total (All Employees) because employees may have voluntarily chosen to self-identify in more than one designated group and men are included in the total.

Table 6 Notes

Table 6 Note 1

EE stands for Employment Equity.

Return to table 6 note 1 referrer

Under 35 33,830 18.7 18,755 55.4 19.1 1,515 4.5 16.4 871 2.6 8.4 5,599 16.6 23.4
35 to 39 26,338 14.5 14,740 56.0 15.0 1,359 5.2 14.7 1,009 3.8 9.7 4,221 16.0 17.6
40 to 44 27,032 14.9 15,030 55.6 15.3 1,638 6.1 17.7 1,317 4.9 12.7 3,957 14.6 16.5
45 to 49 28,931 16.0 15,971 55.2 16.3 1,742 6.0 18.9 1,758 6.1 16.9 3,695 12.8 15.4
50 to 54 32,710 18.0 17,723 54.2 18.1 1,556 4.8 16.8 2,476 7.6 23.8 3,065 9.4 12.8
55 and over 32,515 17.9 15,859 48.8 16.2 1,429 4.4 15.5 2,959 9.1 28.5 3,382 10.4 14.1
Total 181,356 100.0 98,078 54.1 100.0 9,239 5.1 100.0 10,390 5.7 100.0 23,919 13.2 100.0

Appendix B: Technical Notes

Core public administration

The Employment Equity Act prescribes that this report cover the portions of the public service of Canada set out in Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act. Seventy-three departments, agencies and commissions comprise the core public administration (CPA), for which the Treasury Board is the employer (see Table 1). The statistics in this report include only employees working for these organizations, which numbered 181,356 on March 31, 2014.

This report includes information on indeterminate employees, term employees of three months or more, and seasonal employees, with the exception of those seasonal employees who are on leave without pay at the end of March for each fiscal year. No information is reported on students or casual workers, except in cases where they were subsequently hired as indeterminate employees, for terms of three months or more, or as seasonal employees before the end of the fiscal year. Employees on leave without pay, such as those on care and nurturing leave and educational leave, are not included in these tables.

Statistics in this document also exclude Governor in Council appointees, ministerial staff, federal judges and deputy ministers, who are also on the public service payroll. As required under the Employment Equity Act, annual reports to Parliament present information for the fiscal year beginning April 1 and ending March 31.

The statistics of separate employers, covered under Schedule V of the Financial Administration Act, are not included in this report. Under the Employment Equity Act, separate employers that have more than 100 employees (e.g., the Canada Revenue Agency and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency) are required to provide their reports to the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer (OCHRO) of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat only for the purposes of tabling in Parliament at the same time as this report. To view their employment equity reports, readers should visit those organizations’ websites, or contact them directly.

Reports on employment equity in the Canadian Forces and with respect to members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are prepared by those organizations and are also tabled in Parliament at the same time as those of separate employers.

Data on persons in designated groups

To assure the consistency of data presented in this report, OCHRO uses the incumbent file, which contains information on all employees for whom the Treasury Board is the employer, in accordance with Schedules I and IV of the Financial Administration Act. Since 2011–12, the executive category includes data on the LC Group (Law Management Occupational Group) in its total workforce, which will need to be taken into consideration when comparing data historically.

All tabulations, other than those for women, contain data obtained through self-identification. This data is provided voluntarily by employees and maintained separately and confidentially in the Employment Equity Data Bank by OCHRO, and where applicable, through the self-declaration of individuals applying to the public service through the Public Service Commission of Canada’s (PSC’s) Public Service Resourcing System. A reconciliation process is carried out each year by OCHRO, the PSC and the departments of the CPA to ensure that information derived from the Public Service Resourcing System, the Employment Equity Data Bank, and incumbent file harmonizes with the information from departmental sources.

The completeness and accuracy of employment equity data for the CPA depend on the willingness of employees to self-identify and on departments providing opportunities for them to do so. Employees, including those engaged as students or casual workers, are given an opportunity to provide this information when they are hired and during departmental self-identification surveys or other campaigns. Furthermore, they may complete a self-identification form, available from their departmental employment equity coordinator, at any time.

Definitions

Aboriginal peoples:
Persons who are Indians, Inuit or Métis.
Casual workers:
People hired for a specified period of no more than 90 days by any one department or agency during the calendar year. Casual workers are not included in the representation figures.
Designated groups:
Women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and members of a visible minority group.
Hirings:
The number of persons added to the employee population in the past fiscal year. This includes indeterminate and seasonal employees, with the exception of those seasonal employees who are on leave without pay at the end of March; those with terms of three months or more; and students and casual workers whose employment status has changed to indeterminate, terms of three months or more, or seasonal. Hirings measure the flow of employees into the public service and may include more than one staffing action for term employees.
Indeterminate employees:
People appointed to the public service for an unspecified duration.
Members of a visible minority group:
Persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.
Persons with disabilities:

Persons who have a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment and who:

  • Consider themselves to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment; or
  • Believe that an employer or potential employer is likely to consider them to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment.

Included are persons whose functional limitations owing to their impairment have been accommodated in their current job or workplace.

Promotions:
The number of appointments to positions at higher maximum pay levels, either within the same occupational group or subgroup or in another group or subgroup.
Seasonal employees:
People hired to work cyclically for a season or portion of each year.
Self-declaration:
Voluntary information provided by applicants in appointment processes for statistical purposes related to appointments and, in the case of processes targeting employment equity groups, to determine eligibility.
Self-identification:

A collection of employment equity information, voluntarily provided by employees, for statistical purposes in analyzing and monitoring the progress of employment equity groups in the federal public service and for reporting workforce representation.

In 2012–13, OCHRO and the PSC worked together to address the long-standing issue of using different methodologies (self-identification and self-declaration) in the public service to report employment equity information to Parliament and Canadians. A common methodology was developed to address this issue, which has improved the quality and completeness of employment equity information as well as the efficiencies by which departments and agencies will obtain and report on employment equity data. This should be considered when comparing data historically.

Separations:
The number of employees (i.e., indeterminate, terms of three months or more, and seasonal) removed from the public service payroll, which may include more than one action for term employees. Separations include employees who retired or resigned, or employees whose specified employment period (term) ended.
Tenure:
The period of time for which a person is employed.
Women:
An employment equity designated group under the Employment Equity Act.
Workforce availability:
The distribution of people in the designated groups as a percentage of the total Canadian workforce. For federal public service purposes, workforce availability is based on Canadian citizens in those occupations in the Canadian workforce corresponding to the occupations in the public service and is derived from 2006 Census data. Estimates for persons with disabilities are derived from data, also collected by Statistics Canada, in the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey. Based on the 2006 data, workforce availability for women is 52.3 per cent, Aboriginal peoples is 3.0 per cent, persons with disabilities is 4.0 per cent, and members of a visible minority group is 12.4 per cent.

Note: Although 2011 Census data have been published for the private sector, 2011 workforce availability for the CPA is not yet available. The 2011 Census data will be reflected in next year’s annual report.

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