2013-14 Supplementary Information (Tables) - Report on Plans and Priorities

Table of Contents

  1. Transfer Payment Programs
  2. Up-Front Multi-Year Funding
  3. Greening Government Operations (GGO)
  4. Horizontal Initiatives
  5. Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years
  6. Sources of Spendable and Non-Respendable Revenue
  7. Summary of Capital Spending by Program

Transfer Payments Programs

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted).

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Description: The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities. It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including surveillance, to prevent and /or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards; and primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services. 

Expected results: 

  • Ongoing access to health promotion/disease prevention programs and services
  • Increased community capacity to deliver community-based health promotion and disease prevention programs and services
  • Increased community capacity to manage and administer communicable disease control programs
  • Increased program and community capacity to address and mitigate environmental public health risks
  • Increasingly appropriate primary care services based on assessed need
  • Improved coordinated and seamless responses to primary care needs
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 706.6 719.0 719.6 652.7
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 706.6 719.0 719.6 652.7

Note: The net increase in Planned Spending 2013-14 is primarily due to refocusing funding for the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy to concentrate on more vulnerable populations such as First Nations and Inuit, whose communities have the highest smoking rates in Canada.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

  • Healthy Child Development : 2009-10
  • Mental Wellness : 2012-13
  • Healthy Living : 2011-12
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management : 2010-11
  • Environmental Health : 2011-12
  • Clinical and Client Care : 2012-13
  • Home and Community Care : 2009-10

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A):

  • Healthy Child Development : Continuation
  • Mental Wellness : Continuation
  • Healthy Living : Continuation
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management : Continuation
  • Environmental Health : Continuation
  • Clinical and Client Care : Continuation
  • Home and Community Care : Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation:

  • Healthy Child Development : 2014-15
  • Mental Wellness : 2015-16
  • Healthy Living : 2014-15
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management: 2014-15
  • Environmental Health : 2016-17
  • Clinical and Client Care: 2017-18
  • Home and Community Care : 2013-14

General Targeted Recipient Group:

First Nations in Canada (i.e., Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Aboriginal Organizations, Non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

The new Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan provides overall guidance on where efforts need to be focussed in the short-, medium-, and long term to improve First Nations and Inuit health outcomes over time. More specifically, the Strategic Goal 2: Collaborative Planning and Relationships will include better mechanisms for First Nations and Inuit to feed in Branch's planning and decision including contribution programs management and delivery. The Goal 2 includes two key elements:

2.1 Identify and advance shared priorities with First Nations, Inuit, other federal departments, provinces and territories, and other partners through culturally-appropriate collaborative planning and coordinated initiatives to improve health outcomes; and

2.2 Support First Nations and Inuit in their aim to influence, manage and /or control health programs and services that affect them.

As part of the Strategic Plan, Regional Transition Plans (initiated in 2012-13) will be implemented, which specifically set out how regions will organize themselves to better respond to local health needs/priorities. In addition, Regional Transition Plans will set out mechanisms to engage with local First Nations and Inuit and provincial and territorial partners (e. g., regional advisory bodies).

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with G&Cs, the Branch will continue efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint GCIMS project initiative between -Health Canada-Public Health Agency of Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted).

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program: Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit

Description: The NIHB Program provides a specified range of medically necessary health-related goods and services to registered Indians (according to the Indian Act) and Inuit (recognized by one of the Inuit Land Claim Organizations) regardless of residency in Canada where not otherwise covered under a separate agreement (e.g. a self-government agreement) with federal, provincial or territorial governments. The benefits under the NIHB Program include the following, where not otherwise provided to eligible clients through other private or provincial/territorial programs: pharmacy benefits (prescription drugs and some over-the-counter medication), medical supplies and equipment, dental care, vision care, short term crisis intervention mental health counselling, and medical transportation benefits to access medically required health services not available on reserve or in the community of residence. The Program also pays provincial health premiums on behalf of eligible clients in British Columbia.

Expected results:

  • Access to non-insured health benefits appropriate to the unique health needs of First Nations people and Inuit
  • Efficient management of access to non-insured health benefits
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 197.7 169.1 174.1 179.4
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 197.7 169.1 174.1 179.4

The decrease is primarily the result of the expiration of certain time-limited spending authorities for which a renewal may be sought.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

Non-Insured Health Benefits: 2010-11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A):

Non-Insured Health Benefits: Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation:

Supplementary Health Benefits: 2015-16

General Targeted Recipient Group:

First Nations in Canada (ie, Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Aboriginal Organizations, Non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

The new Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan provides overall guidance on where efforts need to be focussed in the short-, medium-, and long term to improve First Nations and Inuit health outcomes over time. More specifically, the Strategic Goal 2: Collaborative Planning and Relationships will include better mechanisms for First Nations and Inuit to feed in Branch's planning and decision including contribution programs management and delivery. The Goal 2 includes two key elements:

2.1 Identify and advance shared priorities with First Nations, Inuit, other federal departments, provinces and territories, and other partners through culturally-appropriate collaborative planning and coordinated initiatives to improve health outcomes; and

2.2 Support First Nations and Inuit in their aim to influence, manage and /or control health programs and services that affect them.

As part of the Strategic Plan, Regional Transition Plans (initiated in 2012-13) will be implemented, which specifically set out how regions will organize themselves to better respond to local health needs/priorities. In addition, Regional Transition Plans will set out mechanisms to engage with local First Nations and Inuit and provincial and territorial partners (e. g., regional advisory bodies).

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with G&Cs, the Branch will continue efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint GCIMS project initiative between Health Canada-Public Health Agency of Canada- and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted).

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11.

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit

Description: The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services. It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit. The funds are used for: planning and management for the delivery of quality health services; construction and maintenance of health facilities; research activities; encouraging Aboriginal people to pursue health careers; investments in technologies to modernize health services; and integrate and realign the governance of existing health services.

Expected results:

  • Improved quality in the delivery of programs and services
  • Safe health facilities that support health program delivery
  • Key stakeholders in Aboriginal health are engaged in the integration of health services
  • Access to health information
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 258.7 212.9 216.2 200.1
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 258.7 212.9 216.2 200.1

Note: The net decrease in Planned Spending 2013-14 is explained by decisions to focus contributions on direct service delivery. Reductions are limited to areas such as research, capacity building, partnership development and networking in order to preserve front-line service delivery.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

  • Health Planning and Quality Management : 2011-12
  • Health Human Resources : 2012-13
  • Health Facilities : 2011-12
  • Systems Integration : 2011-12
  • E-Health Infostructure : 2011-12
  • Nursing Innovation : 2012-13
  • BC Tripartite Initiative : 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A):

  • Health Planning and Quality Management : Continuation
  • Health Human Resources : Continuation
  • Health Facilities : Continuation
  • Systems Integration : Continuation
  • e-Health Infostructure : Continuation
  • Nursing Innovation : Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation:

  • Health Planning and Quality Management : 2016-17
  • Health Human Resources : 2017-18
  • Health Facilities : 2016-17
  • Systems Integration : 2015-16
  • E-Health Infostructure : 2016-17
  • Nursing Innovation : 2017-18
  • BC Tripartite Governance: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group:

First Nations in Canada (ie, Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Aboriginal Organizations, Non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

The new Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan provides overall guidance on where efforts need to be focussed in the short-, medium-, and long term to improve First Nations and Inuit health outcomes over time. More specifically, the Strategic Goal 2: Collaborative Planning and Relationships will include better mechanisms for First Nations and Inuit to feed in Branch's planning and decision including contribution programs management and delivery. The Goal 2 includes two key elements:

2.1 Identify and advance shared priorities with First Nations, Inuit, other federal departments, provinces and territories, and other partners through culturally-appropriate collaborative planning and coordinated initiatives to improve health outcomes; and

2.2 Support First Nations and Inuit in their aim to influence, manage and /or control health programs and services that affect them.

As part of the Strategic Plan, Regional Transition Plans (initiated in 2012-13) will be implemented, which specifically set out how regions will organize themselves to better respond to local health needs/priorities. In addition, Regional Transition Plans will set out mechanisms to engage with local First Nations and Inuit and provincial and territorial partners (e. g., regional advisory bodies).

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with G&Cs, the Branch will continue efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint GCIMS project initiative between Health Canada-Public Health Agency of Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Grant for Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative (THSSI)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant for Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative (THSSI)

Start date: April 1, 2012

End date: March 31, 2014

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2011-12

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: In 2011 the Government announced that the Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative funding is being further extended by $60m over a period of two years (2012-14). Funds being allocated for this period will support time-limited initiatives in key health system reform areas:

  • Developing mental health and chronic disease management strategies;
  • Addressing human resource gaps in the health field;
  • Strengthening system performance measurements, monitoring and reporting; and,
  • Implementing strategies to realize further efficiencies in medical transportation system.

The Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative is divided into the following three funds:

  • Territorial Health Access Fund intended to: reduce reliance over time on the health care system; strengthen community level services; and build self-reliant capacity to provide services in-territory. 
  • Operational Secretariat Fund intended to support the functioning of a Federal/Territorial Assistant Deputy Ministers Working Group to guide the implementation of the initiative; fund several Pan-Territorial projects; and provide Territorial governments with capacity to manage THSSI commitments.
  • Medical Travel Fund - to offset or help pay for expenses related to or incurred in the course of providing or paying for medical transportation.

Expected Results: The overriding goal of the two-year extended THSSI is to assist the three territories to consolidate progress made under the THSSI in reducing the reliance on outside health care systems and medical travel. For territories, consolidating projects that have achieved their goals and integrating projects with an ongoing mandate into territorial core business

Grant for Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative (THSSI)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 30.0 30.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 30.0 30.0 0.0 0.0

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: N/A

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: N/A

General Targeted Recipient Group: Territorial Governments

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: N/A. Eligible recipients involve Territorial Governments.

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

Start Date: April 2009

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Expected 2012-13

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program: Official Language Minority Community Development

Description: Builds on initiatives established under the previous Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities (2003-04 to 2008-09) and the Official Languages Health Contribution Program (2008-09 to 2012-13). The Program is managed by the Official Language Community Development Bureau.

Health Canada is in the process of renewing the Official Languages Health Contribution Program for the 2013-18 period. The current Program was approved for a five year period (2008-09 to 2012-13) with a total budget of $174.3 million, to support three mutually reinforcing components: 1) Health Networking ($22M); 2) Training and Retention of Health Professionals ($114.5M); and 3) Official Language Minority Community Health Projects ($33.5M); and to strengthen Health Canada's capacity to administer the Program ($4.3M).

The Health Networking component aims to: (i) maintain and enhance official language minority community health networks in line with provincial/territorial priorities; (ii) develop strategies to increase and improve OLMC health services; and (iii) provide leadership and coordination of activities that span all three components of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program.

The Training and Retention component is designed to: (i) provide post-secondary training of francophone health professionals in official language minority communities located outside Québec to respond to the health care provider needs of those communities; (ii) promote the recruitment of qualified students into francophone post-secondary health training programs and their re-integration into official language minority communities upon graduation; (iii) provide training and retention initiatives in Québec to ensure that health professionals have opportunities to improve their ability to work in both official languages, and to practice where they can meet the needs of official language minority communities; (iv) in communities outside Québec, provide cultural and French-language training to bilingual health professionals to improve their ability to provide health services to Francophone minority language communities; and (v) promote research and information-sharing on approaches to reducing barriers to health care access for official language minority communities.

The Official Language Minority Community Health Projects component of the Program provides short and medium term support for projects in six activity areas in response to community and provincial, territorial, or regional health priorities: (i) strategies to develop, retain and mobilize health human resources within French official language minority communities; (ii) development of sustained health information products and tools to facilitate access to health services within networks; (iii) provision of improved front-line health service expertise in the minority official language; (iv) support to regional and local health and social service agencies and community organizations in implementing new programs and best practices for access to health services in the minority official language; (v) development of volunteer health and social support services for official language minority communities within local networks, institutions and health

Expected results: The two main objectives of the Program are to improve access to health services in the minority official language and to increase the use of both official languages in the provision of health services. To achieve these objectives the Program has identified five expected outcomes:

  • increased number of health professionals to provide health services in official language minority communities;
  • increased coordination and integration of health services for official language minority communities within institutions and communities;
  • increased partnership/interaction of networks in provincial and territorial health systems;
  • increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing the health concerns of official language minority communities; and
  • increased dissemination and adoption of knowledge, strategies or best practices to address the health concerns of official language minority communities.
Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 38.3 23.0 23.0 23.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 38.3 23.0 23.0 23.0

The decrease is primarily the result of the expiration of certain time-limited spending authorities for which a renewal may be sought.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Pending

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Named or designated recipients (15) include 3 organizations mandated to improve the health and health services needs of official language minority communities, 11 post-secondary institutions (colleges and universities) that promote training and labour market integration for health professionals to respond to the needs of official language minority communities, and one provincial government program to promote health human resources initiatives for improving services to these communities.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada analysis and review of financial cash flows and outcomes for each recipient, accompanied by bilateral discussions on the nature of the outcomes and their pertinence to meeting program objectives for improving health and health services in both official languages.

Regular meetings between Health Canada officials and recipient organizations, including their management meetings, community-based events (conferences, consultations, research fora), face-to-face meetings, and site visits.

Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness Research and Development (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness Research and Development (Voted)

Start Date: April 2000

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Not applicable (no Ts and Cs for this grant)

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program: Health Products

Description: To support basic, applied and clinical research on blood safety and blood product safety and effectiveness issues under the auspices of Canadian Blood Services.

Expected Results: Improved blood safety and blood system governance

Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness Research and Development (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Pending

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-profit organizations (e.g. Charities, foundations, NGOs, universities and research institutions, health-related entities)

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Meetings with recipient; knowledge transfer activities; site visits; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; monitoring performance and results.

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)

Start Date: April, 2004

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program: Substance use and abuse

Description: The Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund will contribute to reducing drug use among Canadians, particularly among vulnerable populations such as youth, by focusing on health promotion and prevention approaches to address drug abuse before it happens. The objectives of the Fund are to facilitate the development of local, provincial, territorial, national and community-based solutions to drug use among youth and to promote public awareness of illicit drug use among youth. The Program is delivered through Health Canada's regional and national offices and the Northern region.

Expected Results: DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2006-07

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2013-14

General Targeted Recipient Group:

  • Canadian not-for-profit health organizations such as hospitals, regional health councils, public health units and community health organizations;
  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations and registered not-for-profit charitable organizations (where there will be a preference for those that have historically dealt with problematic substance use);
  • Canadian institutions including universities, boards of education and other centres of education in Canada;
  • other levels of government including provinces, territories and municipalities, and their agencies;
  • Métis, Inuit and off-reserve First Nations not-for-profit organizations;
  • business sector associations; and
  • ad hoc groups or steering committees representing organizations that purposefully come together to address drug issues in their communities.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: DSCIF engage applicants and recipients by responding to inquiries and regular monitoring activities such as performance measurement and evaluation training and reporting, site visits and knowledge exchange meetings to share project strategies and lessons learned.

Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)

Start Dates: October 2007 - Services component; April 2008 - Systems component

End Dates: Services component - March 31, 2013; Systems component - ongoing funding

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2007-08 to 2012-13. Terms and Conditions expire March 31, 2013 and are in the process of being renewed.

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program: Substance use and abuse

Description: The aim of the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) will be to provide the incentive (seed funding) for provinces, territories and key stakeholders to initiate projects that will lay the foundation for systemic change leading to sustainable improvement in the quality and organization of substance abuse treatment systems. At the same time that provincial and territorial governments are working to achieve these system-level efficiencies, five-year time limited funding (new funds) will be available for the delivery of treatment services to meet the critical illicit drug treatment needs of at-risk youth in high needs areas.

Expected Results: DTFP plans to increase availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The Program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available by end of FY and will be measured by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need.

DTFP will also seek to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians. The Program's success and progress in this plan will be measured by the extent to which treatment system improvements have been made; perceptions of stakeholders; and, the extent to which uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred.

Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 27.6 13.2 13.2 13.2
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 27.6 13.2 13.2 13.2

The decrease is primarily the result of the expiration of certain time-limited spending authorities for which a renewal may be sought.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Pending

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016-17

General Targeted Recipient Group:

  • Provinces and Territories Governments
  • Canadian Non-Government Organizations
  • Canadian academic institutions

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: DTFP has undertaken many initiatives to engage applicants including: national F/P/T working group meetings and teleconferences to develop program and prepare a performance measurement and evaluation strategy; national knowledge exchange meetings to share project strategies and lessons learned; bi-lateral meetings and site visits for regular monitoring.

Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders

Start date: March 2012

End date: March 31, 2017

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2011-12 (No stand alone Ts & Cs were developed--Ts & Cs are included within the Agreement)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: Funding of up to $100M over 6 years for Brain Canada to establish a Canada Brain Research Fund, which will support Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries in this field. Brain Canada will raise resources from the private sector to match the Government's contribution to the Fund.

Expected Results: An increase in the number of multidisciplinary, networked researchers and research projects in universities and teaching hospitals within Canada. This will lead to advanced knowledge and new research of the brain.

Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders(Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 10.0 20.0 20.0 20.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 10.0 20.0 20.0 20.0

As per funding agreement.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: N/A

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: Independent evaluation will be conducted in 2015-16 (due to time-limited funding)

General Targeted Recipient Group: Other (university and research hospital-based neuroscientists from across Canada).

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: N/A

Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: In 2008 CADTH's funding was renewed as a Named Grant. As CADTH received funding via a Named Grant, there were no requirements to renew Terms and Conditions for this Grant. However, CADTH funding is expected to transition to a Contribution Agreement upon expiration of the Named Grant on March 31, 2013. Terms and Conditions will be proposed and approved to cover the duration of future Contribution Agreements with CADTH.

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Expected Results: The purpose of the current Named Grant is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review (CDR), Health Technology Assessment (HTA), and the Canadian Optimal Medication Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS). Expected results are: creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost.

Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 16.9 16.4 16.1 16.1
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 16.9 16.4 16.1 16.1

* The funding had increased in 2010-11 and 2011-12 due to the Funding Agreement amendment of increased funding for two years in support of the Optimizing Health System Efficiency Initiative. The amount was up to one million dollars ($1,000,000) in the Fiscal Year 2010-11 and up to two million dollars ($2,000,000) in the Fiscal Year 2011-12

Funding for pan-Canadian Health Organizations has been reduced modestly in line with expected savings through administrative efficiencies and reductions in overhead.

Note: CADTH funding is expected to transition to a Contribution Agreement upon expiration of the Named Grant on March 31, 2013.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2007-08

An external evaluation of CADTH was conducted in 2012-13.

HC is also conducting a synthesis evaluation involving this program that will be completed in 2013-14.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Not for profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

  • Policy Forum
  • Health Technology Analysis Exchange
  • CDR recommendations and Optimal Use working groups
  • HTA analyses and rapid responses

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2012

End date: ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: A Treasury Board Submission to establish new Ts and Cs for the HII was approved by Treasury Board on March 29, 2012. These new Ts and Cs provide the Federal Minister of Health the authority to renew Funding Agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. There is no expiry date for the HII's Ts and Cs.

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its reports inform health policies, support the effective delivery of health services and raise awareness among Canadians about the factors that contribute to good health.

Since 1994, the GoC has provided approximately $757 million in total to CIHI through a series of Funding Agreements. Under the current agreement, up to $238.7 million will be delivered to CIHI over 3 years (2012-13 to 2014-15) and phases in a 5% reduction in annual funding to CIHI compared to the previous agreement as part of the federal deficit reduction action plan. Presently, Health Canada funds 78% of CIHI total budget, while the Provincial and Territorial governments contribute 20%. The remaining funds are generated through product sales.

This funding allows CIHI to provide quality, timely health information, and to continue important work to further enhance the coverage of health data systems to improve the information available to Canadians on their health care system, including information on wait times, and comparable health indicators. The funding also enables CIHI to respond effectively to emerging health data priorities.

Expected results: As required by the Health Canada-CIHI Funding Agreement, Health Canada received CIHI's 2012-13 final Operational Plan and Budget in March, 2012. The document was submitted to the Federal Minister of Health for information. In CIHI's 2011-12 Annual Report they indicated that they will remain focused on their strategic priorities as follows:

Improve the comprehensiveness, quality and availability of data

  • Provide timely and accessible data connected across health sectors
  • Support new and emerging sources of data, including electronic records
  • Provide more complete data in priority areas

Support population health and health system decision-making

  • Produce relevant, appropriate and actionable analysis
  • Offer leading-edge performance management products, services and tools
  • Respond to emerging needs while considering local context

Deliver organizational excellence

  • Promote continuous learning and development
  • Champion a culture of innovation
  • Strengthen transparency and accountability
Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 81.7 79.3 77.7 77.7
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 81.7 79.3 77.7 77.7

Funding for pan-Canadian Health Organizations has been reduced modestly in line with expected savings through administrative efficiencies and reductions in overhead.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2014-15

General Targeted Recipient Group: The HII was developed to support only CIHI, as such CIHI is the only recipient of Health Information Initiative (HII) funding. This caveat is noted in the Terms and Conditions for the HII, which stipulates that CIHI is, and only ever will be, the recipient of HII funding.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: None needed. CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding. See answer above.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Not Applicable (Ts and Cs are embedded in the funding agreement)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer Corporation (the Partnership) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with more than 700 cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives: (1) to reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; (2) to enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and (3) to lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer. Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. The Partnership's initial five-year grant provided $250 million for 2007-12, and a named contribution agreement will provide an additional five years and $241 million for 2012-17.

Expected Results: The Partnership will become a leader in cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Aboriginal organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments. A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 50.0 48.5 47.5 47.5
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 50.0 48.5 47.5 47.5

Funding for pan-Canadian Health Organizations has been reduced modestly in line with expected savings through administrative efficiencies and reductions in overhead.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010-11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2015-16

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada works with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

Start Date: December 10, 2003

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2008-09 (new Ts & Cs expected to be approved 2012-13)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: The grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) supports the federal government's interest (in an F/P/T partnership context) in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. The first five-year funding agreement with CPSI ended on March 31, 2008, and was renewed for an additional five years, starting April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013. A new five-year agreement is expected to begin on April 1, 2013, with funding delivered under a contribution agreement.

Expected Results: CPSI provides leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: education, with a focus on developing curriculum and training programs; interventions and programs, with a focus on coordinating and supporting evidence-informed clinical interventions and programs; research, to increase the scope and scale of patient safety research; and tools and resources, with a focus on creating tools and resources that can be applied by health care organizations.

Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.6
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.6

Funding for pan-Canadian Health Organizations has been reduced modestly in line with expected savings through administrative efficiencies and reductions in overhead.

Note: A new five-year agreement is expected to begin on April 1, 2013, with funding delivered under a contribution agreement.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2007-08

An external evaluation of CPSI was conducted in 2012-13.

HC is also conducting a synthesis evaluation involving this program that will be completed in 2013-14.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada works with CPSI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CPSI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Grant to the Health Council of Canada (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Health Council of Canada (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2004

End Date: Ongoing (Note: Current Funding Agreement expires on March 31, 2015)

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: The Health Council of Canada (the Council) was established out of the 2003 First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal to monitor and report on progress against commitments in the 2003 Accord. In the 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care, First Ministers expanded the mandate of the Council to include reporting on the health status of Canadians and health outcomes. The Health Council is governed by its Corporate Members, who are participating F/P/T Ministers of Health (excluding Québec). Sequence of Funding Agreements: Interim grant funding was provided from April 1, 2004-August 31, 2004; followed by a Funding Agreement for the period of September 1, 2004-March 31, 2008, which was extended to March 31, 2009, with a subsequent extension to March 31, 2010; and, the current agreement started on April, 2010 and is valid until March 31, 2015.

Expected Results: Through monitoring and annual public reporting on the progress achieved in implementing commitments in the 2003 First Ministers' Accord and the 2004 Health Accord, the Council contributes to enhancing accountability and transparency in health care system reform.

Grant to the Health Council of Canada (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 8.0 8.0 7.5 7.5
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 8.0 8.0 7.5 7.5

Funding for pan-Canadian Health Organizations has been reduced modestly in line with expected savings through administrative efficiencies and reductions in overhead.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2007-08

An external evaluation of the Health Council of Canada was conducted in 2012-13.

HC is also conducting a synthesis evaluation involving this program that will be completed in 2013-14.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada consults with the Council when finalizing new funding agreements. The department also reviews and consults with the Council on a yearly basis in reference to the annual Work Plan and Budget. In addition, Health Canada maintains regular contact with the Council to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

Start Date: September 2002

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: The Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) uses contributions to fund non-profit, non-governmental organizations, professional associations, educational institutions, and provincial, territorial and local government.

The Program enables the Federal government to respond to emerging health policy priorities, establish collaborative working arrangements with provincial/territorial governments to affect change on a Pan-Canadian scale; and support organizations in achieving health policy goals.

The Program fosters strategic and evidence based decision-making for quality health care, and promotes innovation through pilot projects, evaluation, policy research and analysis, and policy development on current and emerging priorities. Currently, the Program funds projects in priority health care policy areas such as access to health care; chronic and continuing care (including home and community care); health human resources, including assessment and integration of internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs); patient safety; and palliative/end-of-life care.

Expected Results: Projects supported by the Program have developed and implemented new educational and training approaches and built training capacity, for example the new training positions implemented through the Family Medicine Residencies Initiative. Projects supporting IEHPs have enabled these professionals to access assessments and training needed to join the health workforce. Numerous projects have developed tools and resources to enable health providers to maximize their roles in a range of settings, provided system managers and decision makers with data and decision making tools; and promoted the development of collaborative relationships to maximize health outcomes.

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Contributions 34.3 34.5 26.4 25.7
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 34.3 34.5 26.4 25.7

Funding has been reduced and targeted in key and emerging issues. Reductions are aimed at non-service delivery programs.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit, Other Level of Government and Other-National

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: The Program engages recipients, potential recipients, and the public in various ways, for example, through stakeholder meetings and project site visits; by providing opportunities for stakeholder input in the development of program tools and templates; and through dissemination of program information on the Departmental web site.

Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2017

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2008-09 to 2016-17

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program: Canadian Health System

Description: In Budget 2007, the federal government committed $130M over 10 years to establish the national Mental Health Commission of Canada, an arm's length, not-for profit organization designed to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness.

Expected Results: Over the course of this grant, the Commission is expected to develop a national mental health strategy, a knowledge exchange centre, and undertake anti-stigma public awareness and educational initiatives.

Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Total Grants 15.0 14.6 14.3 14.3
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Transfer Payments 15.0 14.6 14.3 14.3

Funding for pan-Canadian Health Organizations has been reduced modestly in line with expected savings through administrative efficiencies and reductions in overhead.

Note: A contribution agreement was established 2007-08 to provide one year of funding. A named grant was signed in April 2008 to allocated funding until 2017.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010-11 (formative)

HC is also conducting a synthesis evaluation involving this program that will be completed in 2013-14.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016-17

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: N/A

Transfer Payment Programs under $5 million

Transfer Payment Programs
Name of TPP Main Objective End Date of TPP, if applicable Type of TP (G, C) Planned Spending for 2013-14 (thousands of dollars) Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation General Targeted Recipient Group
Women's Health Contribution Program To improve the health status of women in Canada by enhancing the health system's understanding of, and responsiveness to, women's health issues through knowledge generation, networking, communications, information analysis and policy advice. March 31, 2014 C 2,850.0 2008-09 Municipalities and local organizations, Persons, Non-profit organizations, Provinces and territories
Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System To support the development of a national organ and tissue donation and transplantation system that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting the federal role and interest in organ and tissue donation and transplantation. On-going funding. Current agreement / terms and conditions end March 31, 2013. C 3,580.0 2012-13 Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient under the Ts and Cs
Grant to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse To provide objective, evidence-based information and advice to help reduce the health, social and economic harms associated with substance abuse and addictions On-going funding. Current grant agreement ends March 31, 2016. G 3,562.5 2010-11 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse
Mood Disorders Society of Canada

Provide funding to the Mood Disorders Society of Canada (MDSC) in the amount of $5.2 million to

  1. Establish the Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network (CDRIN) ($5 million); and
  2. Develop and implement a national PTSD Continuing Medical Education (CME) training program for family physicians and specialists ($200,000)
March 31, 2017 C 1,951.8 N/A Non-profit

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Conditional Grant to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI)

1. Strategic outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

2. Program: Canadian Health System

3. Name of recipient: Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly known as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

4. Start date: 1996-97

5. End date: N/A

6. Description: At the time of its establishment (1996-97), CFHI (then known as CHSRF) received a $66.5 million endowment. In addition, it received additional federal grants for the following purposes:

1999: $25 million to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention, management, leadership and the issues emerging from health system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund or NRF)

1999: $35 million to support the CHSRF's participation in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

2003: $25 million to develop a program to equip health system managers and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use research to better manage the Canadian health care system (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA) over a thirteen-year period.

Building on this history, in 2012 CHSRF's mission and name were changed to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) to reflect the evolution of its work. CFHI remains an independent organization, now dedicated to accelerating healthcare improvement and transformation for Canadians. It collaborates with governments, policy makers, and health system leaders to convert evidence and innovative practices into actionable policies, programs, tools and leadership development.

Funding ($ millions)
7. Total Funding 8. Prior Years' Funding 9. Planned Funding
2013-14
10. Planned Funding
2014-15
11. Planned Funding
2015-16
151.5 1996 - 66.5
1999 - 60
2003 - 25
Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

12. Summary of annual plans of recipient:

CFHI's programming is guided by its objective to accelerate healthcare improvement by creating ongoing interaction, collaboration and exchange of ideas and information between governments, policy-makers, health system leaders and providers, and to convert evidence and innovative practices into actionable policies, programs, tools and leadership development.

According to its 2013 Program of Work, CFHI will continue to work in collaboration with policy makers, health system leaders and decision-makers to:

  • collaborate on healthcare improvement and transformation initiatives at the provincial/territorial, regional and federal levels;
  • enhance education and training programming through changes to the EXTRA program and the development of on-line education and decision-support courses and tools;
  • synthesize existing evidence and research, and generate new analyses and policy knowledge to inform work on healthcare improvement;
  • bring evaluation and performance management knowledge and support to CFHI's work as well as its collaborations with others; and
  • spread innovations and knowledge to facilitate healthcare improvement and transformation.

With the launch in 2012 of refocused programming, CFHI will continue to focus on communicating its new programs and mission to CFHI's targeted audiences with the goals of: 1) creating recognition of the value of CFHI in accelerating healthcare improvement and transformation for Canadians; and 2) articulating how CFHI's programs are interconnected and convert evidence and innovative practices into actionable policies, programs, tools and leadership development.

13. Link recipient's site:  Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

 

Conditional Grant to Canadian Health Infoway (Infoway)

1. Strategic outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

2. Program: Canadian Health System

3. Name of recipient: Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

4. Start date: March 31, 2001(a)

(a) Infoway's original allocation (2001) was governed by a Memorandum of Understanding. Infoway is presently accountable for the provisions of four active funding agreements, signed in: March 2003 (encompasses 2001 and 2003 allocations), March 2004, March 2007, and March 2010.

5. End date: March 31, 2015(b)

(b) As per the 2010 funding agreement, the duration of the agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Up-Front Multi-Year Funding provided has been expended, or March 31, 2015. The duration of the 2007 funding agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Grant Funding provided has been expended, or March 31, 2012.

6. Description: Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis. Its Corporate Members are the 14 federal, provincial and territorial Deputy Ministers of Health.

To date, the Government of Canada has committed the following funding allocations to Infoway: $500 million in 2001 in support of the September 2000 First Ministers' Action Plan for Health System Renewal to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority; $600 million in the First Ministers' Health Accord of February 2003, to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100 million as part of Budget 2004 to support development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; and $400 million as part of Budget 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait times reductions. Also, as confirmed in Budget 2010, Canada's Economic Action Plan allocated an additional $500 million to Infoway, to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Funding ($ millions)
7. Total Funding 8. Prior Years' Funding 9. Planned Funding
2013-14
10. Planned Funding
2014-15
11. Planned Funding
2015-16
$2,100.00 $1,695.30Table 2 footnote (c) To be determinedTable 2 footnote (d) To be determinedTable 2 footnote (d) To be determinedTable 2 footnote (d)

Table 2 footnotes

Table 2 footnote 1

This figure represents funds disbursed to Infoway since its creation in 2001 up to November 2012, including the immediate lump sum disbursements in 2001, 2003 and 2004 totalling $1.2 B, as well as funds disbursed through cash flow requests under the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements. This figure does not reflect additional cash flow requests that Infoway may submit between December 2012 and March 2013.

Return to table 1 footnote (c) referrer

Table 1 footnote 2

As per both the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements, funds are to be disbursed according to the annual cash flow requirements identified by Infoway. These requirements are to be submitted to the Department no later than March 30, in advance of the upcoming fiscal year to which that cash flow statement applies. Also, Infoway can submit additional cash flow requests within a fiscal year, should the need for additional funding arise. Infoway has not provided an advance estimate of its 2013-14 to 2015-16 requirements.

Return to table 1 footnote (d) referrer

12. Summary of annual plans of recipient:

Infoway's overarching goal is as follows:
By 2010, every province and territory and the populations they serve will benefit from new health information systems that will help transform their health care delivery system. Further, by 2010, the electronic health records of 50 per cent of Canadians and by 2016, those of 100 per cent of Canadians, will be available to their authorized health care professional.

As of March 31, 2012, 52% of Canadians have an EHR available to their health care professionals, and electronic health tools are in place in every province and territory. Infoway is continuing to work with provincial and territorial partners towards full availability of EHRs.

For 2013-14, Infoway plans to focus on four key objectives, building on those pursued in 2012-13:

  • continue to collaborate with all jurisdictions and stakeholders to advance the availability, adoption and use of electronic health information systems to support health care innovation and transformation;
  • continue the current focus to increase the of advanced use of EMRs by physicians and nurse practitioners across Canada to support patient centred care;
  • advance innovative solutions for Canadians, especially those with chronic conditions, and their health care providers; and
  • based on key stakeholder input and direction, start to re-position the digital health agenda to support emerging priorities and identified opportunities for action.

13. Link recipient's site:  Canada Health Infoway

 

Mental Health Commission of Canada - Conditional Grant to support Research Demonstration Projects in Mental Health and Homelessness

1. Strategic outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

2. Program: Canadian Health System

3. Name of recipient: Mental Health Commission of Canada -- Conditional Grant to support Research Demonstration Projects in Mental Health and Homelessness

4. Start date: March 31, 2008

5. End date: March 31, 2013Footnote 1

6. Description: As part of Budget 2008, the federal government provided $110 million in funding to the MHCC to support five research demonstration projects in mental health and homelessness over five years (2008 - 2013). Research is taking place in five urban centres: Moncton, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. The overall goal of this initiative is to provide evidence about what services and systems could best help people who are living with a mental illness and are homeless.

Expected outcomes:

  • the development of best practices and lessons learned that are applicable to future efforts with respect to mental health and homelessness across Canada, including innovative methodologies for providing targeted interventions to specific subpopulations;
  • data that reflects the impact and prevalence of mental health issues and substance abuse challenges.
Funding ($ millions)
7. Total Funding 8. Prior Years' Funding 9. Planned Funding
2013-14
10. Planned Funding
2014-15
11. Planned Funding
2015-16
$110 M $110 M 0 Not applicable Not applicable
Total funding of $110 M for this project was provided to the MHCC in 2008. The MHCC provides project forecast expenditures for each fiscal year in its annual business plan in accordance with the terms and conditions of its funding agreement.

12. Summary of annual plans of recipient:

The focus of the Commission's activities will be on the transition of project participants and the completion of its Final Report, which will: provide the overall findings of the project, both on a regional and sub-population level; identify best practices related to integrating housing supports and health services to support better health outcomes; identify program and policy gaps; produce comparative data on populations and services; and, provide overall conclusions about the effectiveness of the Housing First approach. The final report is expected in December 2013.

13. Link recipient's site:  Mental Health Commission of Canada

Greening Government Operations (GGO)

Green Building Targets

8.1 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new construction and build-to-lease projects, and major renovation projects, will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance Footnote 2.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework.  0  
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework. 0  
Existence of strategic framework.  Completed
2011-12
 

Strategies/Comments

  1. Types of buildings included: All new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects for heated office and laboratory space where a benchmark is available.
  2. Physical locations: Urban and non-urban centres were certification is deemed feasible.
  3. Conditions for inclusion:  Project floor space greater or equal to 1000m².  Major renovation - project budget equals or exceeds 50% of the replacement cost of the subject building and significantly affects the building envelope and heating ventilation and air conditioning systems.
  4. Exclusion: Projects in facilities where custodial ownership is uncertain in the short to medium term.
  5. Industry-recognized tool to be used and achievement performance level:  New construction and build-to-lease projects - LEED Gold. Major renovation projects - LEED (CS or CI) Silver.
  6. Adjustments to the tool: Rural, northern, isolated locations and unknown building types will aspire to Green Globes Design, placing emphasis on energy and greenhouse gas emissions reductions.
  7. Rationale for adjustments: Security, feasibility, applicability, consistency and cost.
  8. Timeline: As of April 1, 2012, Health Canada will obtain a minimum of 3 Green Globes or LEED Silver on new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects as per the Health Canada Green Buildings Strategic Framework.
8.2 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, existing crown buildings over 1000m² will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool Footnote 3.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of buildings over 1000m², as per departmental strategic framework. 6
Percentage of buildings over 1000m² that have been assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool, as per departmental strategic framework. 2011-12 57%
2012-13 100%
2013-14 N/A
Existence of strategic framework.  Completed
2011-12

Strategies/Comments

  1. Types of buildings included:  All heated facilities where Health Canada has full access and control over utilities monitoring and usage.
  2. Physical locations: Urban and non-urban centres where certification is deemed feasible.
  3. Conditions for inclusion: All buildings with floor space greater than 1000 m².
  4. Exclusion: Projects in facilities where custodial ownership is uncertain in the short to medium term.
  5. Minimum Industry-recognized tool to be used: BOMA BESti Environmental Performance Assessment Tool for office and laboratory facilities.
  6. Adjustments to the tool: Rural, northern, isolated locations and unknown building types will aspire to meet the best practices of the BOMA BESt certification program. Emphasis will be placed on energy, water and waste reduction activities.
  7. Rationale for adjustments: Security, feasibility, applicability, consistency and cost.
  8. Timeline: As of March 31, 2013, Health Canada plans to complete assessments of each of its existing facilities for environmental performance. Facilities will be reassessed on a six year cycle.
8.3 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new lease or lease renewal projects over 1000m², where the Crown is the major lessee, will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool Footnote 4.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000m² in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework.  N/A
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000m² that were assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework.  N/A
Existence of strategic framework.  Completed
2011-12

Strategies/Comments

  1. This target is not directly applicable as Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) negotiates leases on behalf of Health Canada. As the client, Health Canada will request inclusion of this target in its lease requirements.
8.4 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, fit-up and refit projects will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance Footnote 5.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework. 3
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework.  3
Existence of strategic framework.  Completed
2011-12

Strategies/Comments

  1. Types of buildings included:  All heated facilities where Health Canada has full access and control over utilities monitoring and usage.
  2. Physical Location: Urban and non-urban centres where certification is deemed feasible.
  3. Conditions for inclusion: Fit-up and refit projects over $1 million and project floor space greater or equal to than 1000 m².
  4. Minimum Industry-recognized tool to be used:  3 Green Globes or LEED (CI) Silver.
  5. Adjustments to the tool: Rural, northern, isolated locations and unknown building types will aspire to Green Globes. Emphasis will be placed on reducing energy and greenhouse gas emissions.
  6. Rationale for adjustments: Security, feasibility, applicability, consistency and cost.
  7. Timeline: As of April 1, 2012, Health Canada will begin processes necessary to obtain a minimum of 3 Green Globes or equivalent on new fit-up and refit projects as per the Health Canada Green Buildings Strategic Framework.
 

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target

8.5 The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17% below 2005 by 2020.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Health Canada commits to a reduction in on-road fleet-related GHG emissions (relative to fiscal year 2005-06 baseline) by 2020-21. 10%
Departmental GHG emissions in fiscal year 2005-06 in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. 3.06
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. FY 2011-12 3.03
FY 2012-13 3.00
FY 2013-14 2.97
FY 2014-15 2.94
FY 2015-16 2.91
FY 2016-17 2.88
FY 2017-18 2.85
FY 2018-19 2.82
FY 2019-20 2.79
FY 2020-21 2.76
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-06 to the end of the given fiscal year. FY 2011-12 -1%
FY 2012-13 -1%
FY 2013-14 -1%
FY 2014-15 -1%
FY 2015-16 -1%
FY 2016-17 -1%
FY 2017-18 -1%
FY 2018-19 -1%
FY 2019-20 -1%
FY 2020-21 -1%
Existence of an implementation plan to reduce GHG emissions Completed
2010-11

Strategies/Comments

  1. Interim target: Health Canada's annual interim target is 1% absolute reduction in GHG emissions annually (until 2020-21), relative to baseline fiscal year of 2005-06. This represents 30% of Health Canada's overall GHG reduction target by 2014. Therefore, by the end of the 2011-14 Health Canada Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy under the first Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, Health Canada should have achieved a 3% reduction of GHG emissions.
  2. Scope: Only on-road fleet operations are included within this target, no incremental funding is being made available.
  3. Roles and Responsibilities: Director of Materiel and Asset Management Directorate (MAMD) is overseeing this target, with input and support from the Fleet Managers and Cost Centre Managers in Health Canada.
  4. Key Activities: Replacement of old vehicles, policy adherence, awareness and communications.
  5. Reporting Requirements: Annual GHG emissions will be assessed with the Federal Greenhouse Gas Tracking Protocol - A Common Standard for Federal Operations, which is provided by PWGSC. Health Canada uses the ARI database to monitor and manage fleet operations.
  6. Tools and Resources: Federal Greenhouse Gas Tracking Protocol - A Common Standard for Federal Operations, Automotive Resources International database which manages fleet operations and the Fleet GHG Inventory Accounting Template provided by PWGSC.
  7. An action plan has been developed to encourage conformity to Health Canada's fleet standards, which includes "greening" the fleet.
  8. Health Canada will also:
    • Provide stronger direction, guidance and a challenge function to fleet operators.
    • Use best practices already established from the more successful Regions/Programs.
    • Investigate practices from other departments with similar fleet challenges.
    • Ramp up communications (Health Canada Broadcast News, National Materiel and Assets Advisory Committee meetings, etc.)
  9. Health Canada will investigate opportunities to support a modernization strategy which will include use of rental vehicles and/or pooling where applicable.
 

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally-generated EEE. Completed
2011-12
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year. FY 2011-12 11%
FY 2012-13 77%
FY 2013-14 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. By the end of the fiscal year 2011-12, Health Canada had developed an implementation plan to reuse or recycling of all its surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
  2. Furthermore, Health Canada fully implemented its plan in the National Capital Region (NCR) by the end of fiscal year 2011-12. While representing only one region (out of nine), the NCR is, by virtue of its employee population, responsible for the majority of EEE waste generated by the Department.
  3. Health Canada has defined location as a region, of which there are nine (9); NCR, Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Colombia and the Northern region. By March 31, 2014 all regions will be included in this program.
 

Printing Unit Reduction Target

8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in fiscal year 2010-11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. (Optional) N/A
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. FY 2011-12 4:1
FY 2012-13 8:1
FY 2013-14 8:1

Strategies/Comments

  1. Health Canada is defining printing units as all desktop printers, networked printers and multi-functional devices.
  2. Health Canada has decided to include all employees, not only office employees. However, the following employees will be excluded: employees who frequently deal with confidential or secret documents, those working in a space with a maximum of 15 employees or less, and employees requiring personal printers due to a disability.
  3. The number of network printing units has been determined utilizing OpenView; a network discovery service. Personal printing units are accounted for through a method of floor walk-through and analysis of asset management databases and tools.
  4. Health Canada used a combination of Human Resources statistics and the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Population Affiliation Report for determining the number of employees.
  5. Health Canada used a combination of Human Resources statistics and the TBS Population Affiliation Report for determining the number of employees. The number of employees subject to this target is 11,392.
 

Paper Consumption Target

8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-06 and 2011-12, and applicable scope.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the baseline year selected, as per departmental scope.  7823
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected. FY 2011-12 N/A
FY 2012-13 10%
FY 2013-14 20%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Health Canada used 2010-11 fiscal year as the baseline year to measure internal paper consumption per office employee. The 2010-11 Health Canada baseline is based upon paper purchased through PWGSC mandatory standing offers.
  2. Health Canada is working to establish a concrete strategy to meet the 20% target based on the 2010-11 baseline year.
  3. Health Canada used a combination of Human Resources statistics and the TBS Population Affiliation Report to determine the number of employees. The number of employees subject to this target is 11,392.
 

Green Meetings Target

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Presence of a green meeting guide. Completed
2011-12

Strategies/Comments

  1. Health Canada has completed and adopted a guide for green meetings.
  2. Adoption of this guide is defined as obtaining approval from senior management, making the guide available to all Health Canada employees and ensuring effective communication of the guide's principles through awareness campaigns.
 

Green Procurement Targets

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

8.10 Target 1: By March 31, 2014, 60% of IT hardware purchases will be identified as environmentally preferred models up from 29% in 2009-10.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Percentage of IT hardware purchases that meet the target relative to total of all purchases for IT hardware up from 29% in 2009-10.
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 52%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Scope:
    • N7010 ADP equipment
    • N7020 ADP CPU
    • N7021 ADP CPU
    • N7022 ADP CPU
    • N7025 ADP Input-Output
    • N7035 ADP support equipment
    • N7042 Mini and micro computer control devices
    • Exclusions: Laboratory or field equipment and purchases using acquisition cards
  2. Departmental policy mandates use of PWGSC standing offers (which include IT hardware purchases).
  3. IT hardware purchases represent approximately 50% of assets
  4. Other: Volume/percentage of "unknown" responses from the baseline year (34.7%)
  5. Other: Health Canada will utilize its green procurement field in SAP to assess the environmental friendliness of IT Hardware. To decrease confusion on what is "green", SAP users have been given six specific options to choose from and extensive documentation on each:
    • Unknown (Included to increase data reliability and assess the level of user awareness)
    • Environmental Attributes of Supplier
    • Uncertified Environmental Attribute
    • Certified Environmental Attribute(s)
    • Recycled Content
    • No Environmental Attribute
  6. A communication strategy was developed to encourage procurement officers and/or Cost-Centre Managers to comply in purchasing "green" IT hardware and utilize the SAP system to identify the greenness of procured items.
  7. Investigate whether IT hardware providers (standing offers) can be limited to offering environmental preferred products only.
8.10 Target 2: By March 31, 2014, 60% of specified purchases of office supplies will be identified as having environmental features up from 30% in 2009-10.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Increased percentage of office supply purchases identified as environmentally friendly frombaseline of 30% in 2009-10.
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 50%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Scope:
    • N7045 ADP supplies
    • N7510 Office supplies
    • N7520 Office devices and accessories
    • N7530 Stationary
    • N7540 Standard forms
    • N7035 ADP support equipment
    • N7042 Mini and micro computer control devices
    • Exclusions: Purchases using acquisition cards
  2. Other: Health Canada will utilize its green procurement field in SAP to identify "office supplies" with environmental features. To decrease confusion on what is "green", SAP users have been given six specific options to choose from and extensive documentation on each:
    • Unknown (Included to increase data reliability and assess the level of user awareness)
    • Environmental Attributes of Supplier
    • Uncertified Environmental Attribute
    • Certified Environmental Attribute(s)
    • Recycled Content
    • No Environmental Attribute
  3. A communication strategy will be developed to encourage procurement officers and/or Cost-Centre Managers to comply with purchasing "green" office supplies and use the SAP system to identify the greenness of procured items.
  4. Investigate whether office supply providers (standing offers) can be limited to offering environmental preferred products only.
8.10 Target 3: By March 31, 2014, 90% of vehicles purchased annually are right sized for operational needs and are the most fuel efficient vehicle in its class, as per Health Canada Fleet Standard and/or are an alternative fuel vehicle.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Percentage of vehicles purchased that conformto the directives of Health Canada Fleet Standard.
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year. 50%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Semi-annual reports will be obtained through SAP and/or ARI to identify new fleet acquisitions. These will be individually assessed against the existing fleet standard matrices to determine compliance. 
  2. The Health Canada Fleet Standard was developed in 2008 and will be updated annually.
  3. A communication strategy was developed to encourage compliance with the standard.

As a result, a baseline of 45% of vehicles purchased annually are right sized for operational needs; are the most fuel efficient vehicle in their class (as per the Health Canada Fleet Standard), and/or are an alternative fuel vehicle has been determined.

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.

8.11 Target 1: Training for Select Employees

As of March 31, 2014, 100% of materiel management staff (including director/manager and staff levels identified as having procurement functions and responsibilities in their respective work plans), will receive green procurement training through Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) course C215 or in-house equivalent.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Percentage of procurement and materiel management staff with formal green procurement training relative to total number of procurement and materiel management staff identified with such responsibilities
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year. 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Green Procurement policy supports all designated employees (PG group) to take green procurement training.
  2. An annual human resources report identifying PG group employees will be compared to MAMD's listing of participants having taken thegreen procurement training through CSPS course C215 or in-house equivalent.
  3. Because of constant changes in the total number of PG positions at Health Canada, a percentage will be used to report every year on the number of procurement and materiel management staff with formal green procurement training versus the total number of procurement and materiel management staff identified with such responsibilities in any given year.
  4. PGs that have not taken the course(s) will be followed up with accordingly to encourage compliance.
8.11 Target 2: As of March 31, 2014, 100% of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management will have greening of government operations included in their employee performance evaluations
Phase 1a : As of April 1, 2011, employee performance evaluations for PG Group directors and managers as it relates to greening of government operations (including adherence to greening initiatives /directions / frameworks and standards by subordinates) will be incorporated into their employee performance evaluations
Phase 1b : As of April 1, 2012 employee performance evaluations related to greening of government operations will be included as part of the Corporate Commitments for Executives.
Phase 2 : By April 1 2013, employee performance evaluations for program and regional managers with procurement responsibilities/authorities related to greening of government operations (including adherence to greening initiatives/directions/frameworks and standards by subordinates) will be included as part of their performance evaluations.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Phase 1a: Number/percentage of performance evaluations of identified positions of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management within MAMD that have environmental consideration clauses relative to the total of identified positions.
Exclusions may include positions that are vacant.
2/11
18%
Phase 1b: Percentage of performance evaluations of identified executive group (EX) positions that have environmental consideration clauses relative to the total of identified EX positions.
Exclusions may include positions that are vacant.
100%
Completed
Phase 2: Percentage of performance evaluations of identified positions (regional directors and PG program managers) that have environmental consideration clauses relative to the total of identified positions.
Exclusions may include positions that are vacant.
100%
Completed

Strategies/Comments

  • Phase 1a - By April 1, 2011, all Health Canada materiel and asset management managers and functional heads within the MAMD (1 director, 3 PG-6 senior managers and 7 PG-5 managers) had Greening of Government Operations (GGO) clauses embedded into their Employee Performance Evaluations.
  • Phase 1b - By April 1, 2012, Health Canada had developed strategies to have GGO embedded into the Corporate Commitments for Executives; including identifying applicable EX positions and matching them to appropriate clauses. More specifically, a performance measure under the Leadership Results Commitments was included in the final version.
  • Phase 2 - Health Canada has completed the assessment of the scope of program and regional managers [Regional Senior Financial Officers (RSFOs) and fleet managers] with procurement responsibilities/authorities related to greening of government operations during 2011-12. Development and implementation strategies to incorporate environmental clauses into their employee performance evaluations will be completed by the end of the fiscal year.
8.11 Target 3: Management processes and controls

By 2014, Health Canada will ensure that 100% of management processes and controls accommodate green procurement, as appropriate.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status
Percentage of procurement related tools with a "greening" process
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year. 70%

Strategies/Comments

  1. During 2011-12 an internal assessment of the management processes and controls that pertain to procurement decision-making at Health Canada was conducted. Governance, policies, processes, procedures, tools and templates, management information systems, risk management, results and performance, change management and information and communication were all examined.
  2. Fiscal year 2011-12 was spent analyzing possible actions against impact on behaviour, planning and reporting. Similarly, management processes and controls were assessed for their potential to impact on procurement objectives.
  3. Based on the above analysis, the baseline type and number of processes and controls that accommodate green procurement has been narrowed down to the following:
    Policies, Processes and Procedures:
    • 1-Contract and Requisition Control Committee (CRCC) Communiqué for National Capital Region
    • 2-CRCC Communiqué for Regions
    • 3-Fleet Management Policy
    • 4-Fleet Management Standard
  4. Based on the above analysis, there are 13 procurement processes and controls in total, of which nine still require a "greening" process:
    • 1- Health Canada Assets Management Policy
    • 2- Assets Management Standard
    • 3- 2010-11 A contracting Guide for Cost Centre Managers and Administrators
    • 4- Assets Inventory Instruction Guide
    • 5- Health Canada Materiel Management Policy
    • 6- Procurement Planning Summary
    • 7- Risk Management Policy
    • 8- Annual Fleet report
    • 9- Systems: SAP
  5. The methodology for designating those management processes and controls that should include green procurement is based on version 2.0 of Setting Green Procurement Management Framework Targets.
  6. A phased approach focusing on a subset of processes and controls in each fiscal year will be established. This represents a continuous improvement best practice.
  7. A schedule for revising five identified management processes and controls each fiscal year has been established.

Horizontal Initiatives

Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children.

Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)

Lead department program: First Nations and Inuit Health Primary Health Care

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component- October 2002.
  • Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) component- December 2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component - ongoing.
  • ELCC component - ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

  • ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter). Ongoing: $65 million per year.
  • ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08). Ongoing: $14 million per year.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The goal of the Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children, announced in October 2002, is to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. This initiative allocated $320 million over first five years which was shared by Health Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

In December 2004, Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years (beginning fiscal year 2005-06) and $14 million ongoing for the ELCC component to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs: Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (AHSOR- Health Canada) and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI- Human Resources and Skills Development Canada).

Shared outcome(s):

The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

Governance structure(s): Each federal department is responsible for their specific program activities.

Planning Highlights:

In collaboration with partners and stakeholders, federal departments will continue to build on evidence to inform programming, and enhance linkages between programs and services to better support Aboriginal children and families.

Federal Partner #1: Health Canada (HC)

Electronic Link:

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Health Canada
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
First Nations and Inuit Health Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) $107.595M (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $21.519M/year). $21.519M/year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$21.519M
ELCC
$24.000M (2005-06 through to 2007-08,
$7.500M in 2005-06, $8.300M in 2006-07;
$8.200M in 2007-08).
$7.500M in 2008-09 and ongoing

Committed in 2005.
$7.500M
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC) $70.000M (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$10.000M in 2002-03 and $15.000M thereafter). $15.000M/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$15.000M
Capacity Building $5.075M
(2002-03 through to 2006-07; $1.015M/year).
2007-08 to 2011-12 $1.015M/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$0.00MTable 4.1.1 footnote 1
Total From start to 2013-14  
ECD: $ 445.408M
ELCC: $69.000M
ECD: $36.519M
ELCC: $7.500M

Table 4.1.1 footnotes

Table 4.1.1 footnote 1

Per the 2012 Economic Action Plan, and consistent with Health Canada's focus on front-line services, funding to National Aboriginal Organizations for Capacity Building has been redirected to other priorities.

Return to table 4.1.1 footnote 1 referrer

The budget for the AHSOR program in 2013-14 will be $59 million which includes $25 million historical funding, $21.5 million in enhanced funding under the Early Childhood Development (ECD) Federal Strategy, $7.5 million in Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) funds and $5 million under upstream investments (FMM).

Expected results by program :

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR):

  • Ongoing program support and enhancement
  • Increase integration, coordination, access, and quality of programming (i.e., identify core competencies of workers/staff)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC):

  • Strengthening program standards for the FASD Mentoring Projects
  • Improving data collection to better support First Nations and Inuit communities in achieving stronger health outcomes

Federal Partner #2: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Electronic Link:  Public Health Agency of Canada

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Public Health Agency of Canada
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) $62.880M (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$12.576M/ year and ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$12.576M
Capacity Building $2.500M (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $0.500M/year) and ongoing

Committed in 2002
$0.500M
Total ECD: $156.912M ECD: $13.076M

Expected results by program as per Names of Programs for Federal Partners :

Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) :

  • Continue to support program expansion by serving 4,600 children on an ongoing basis. The program is enhanced also on an ongoing basis through an increased number of special needs and parental outreach workers and special needs training

Capacity Building:

  • The program will continue to enhance coordination, collaboration and information exchange with other federal departments, provincial/territorial governments, national Aboriginal organizations and key stakeholders in Aboriginal early childhood education and to build further capacity in Aboriginal communities.

Federal Partner #3: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
Skills and EmploymentTable 4.1.3 footnote 1 First Nations and Inuit child Care Initiative (FNICCI) $45.700M (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $9.140M/year) and ongoing.

Committed in 2002
$9.140M
ELCC
$21.000M (2005-06 through to 2007-08; $7.000M/year). $6.500M/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2005
$6.500M
Social DevelopmentTable 4.1.3 footnote 1 Research and Knowledge $21.200M
(2002-03 through to 2006-07); $4.240M/year and ongoing.

Committed in 2002
$0.450M
Total ECD: ongoing
ELCC: ongoing
ECD: $9.590M
ELCC: $6.500M

Table 4.3.1 footnotes

Table 4.3.1 footnote 1

Based on current HRSDC Program Alignment Architecture

Return to table 4.3.1 footnote 1 referrer

Expected results by program as per Names of Programs for Federal Partners:

First Nations and Inuit child Care Initiative (FNICCI):

  • Labour Market (Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy)
  • Program support for parents participating in skills development and training

Research and Knowledge:

  • Information on the well-being of Aboriginal children.
  • Align collection of Aboriginal children information with Federal strategy on Aboriginal data.

Federal Partner #4: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
The People - Social Development Capacity building $5.050M (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07; $1.010M/year) 2007-08 to 2011-12

Committed in 2002.
$0.000M
Total ECD: $10.101M ECD: $0.000M

Expected results by program as per Names of Programs for Federal Partners:

Since 2002, AANDC coordinated horizontal work with ECD partners and funded research and capacity building. Effective April 1, 2012, AANDC's ECD funding was reduced through Budget 2012 thereby ending AANDC's coordination role. Federal ECD partners continue to collaborate as needed to support policy and program development.

Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013-14

ECD (2002-03 to 2006-07): $320.000M

($60.000M in 2002-03 and $65.000M/year hereafter); $65.000M/year ongoing.

ECD: $59.185M

Total from start to 2013-14: $775.000M

ELCC (2005-06 to 2007-08): $45.000M

($14.500M in 2005-06; $15.300M in 2006-07; $15.200M in 2007-08); and $14.000M/year ongoing.

ELCC: $14.000M

Total from start to 2013-14: $129.000M Total: $73.185M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Halina Cyr, MHSc, RD
Director, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Interprofessional Advisory and Program Support Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
20th Floor, Jeanne Mance Building, Room A2013
A.L.1920A, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa ON K1A 0K9

Tel: 613-948-6412
 

Chemicals Management Plan

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Chemicals Management Plan

Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)/Environment Canada (EC)

Lead department Program: Environmental Risks to Health (HC)/Substances and Waste Management (EC)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 (second phase)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (second phase)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $516 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

  • setting priorities and government-imposed timelines for risk assessment and risk management of chemicals of concern;
  • enhancing research, monitoring and surveillance;
  • increasing industry stewardship and responsibilities for substances;
  • collaborating internationally on chemicals assessment and management;
  • communicating to Canadians the potential risks of chemical substances;
  • engaging industry to inform risk assessment and risk management action while also enhancing trust in the program.

Jointly managed by HC and EC, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (which replaced the Hazardous Products Act in June 2011), the Food and Drugs Act, and the Pest Control Products Act.

Building on lessons learned in the first four years of the program, CMP priority setting was refined and, under the second phase of the CMP, the remaining substances were grouped to facilitate more efficient assessments, industry participation and risk management. Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, health, drug and other products.

The same core functions continue in phase two of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and policy and program management.

The following program areas are involved in CMP activities:

In Health Canada:

  • Health Products and Food Branch:
    • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate
    • Food Directorate
    • Natural Health Products Directorate
    • Policy, Planning and International Affairs Directorate
    • Therapeutics Products Directorate
    • Veterinary Drugs Directorate
  • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Consumer Product Safety Directorate
    • Safe Environments Directorate
    • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate
  • Regions and Programs Bureau
  • Pest Management Regulatory Agency

In Environment Canada:

  • Environmental Stewardship Branch
    • Chemicals Sector Directorate
    • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate
    • Public and Resources Sectors Directorate
    • Energy and Transportation Directorate
    • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate
  • Science and Technology Branch
    • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
    • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate
    • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate
    • Water Science and Technology Directorate
  • Enforcement Branch
  • Strategic Policy Branch
    • Economic Analysis Directorate

For more information, see the Government of Canada's  Chemical Substances Portal.

Shared outcome(s):

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Knowledge, information and data on substances of concern is used by HC and EC recipients to inform risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, research, risk assessment, and monitoring & surveillance activities
  • Canadians and stakeholder groups understand information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern
  • Targeted industry conforms or complies with requirements of risk management measures
  • Targeted industry takes voluntary or enforced action to protect Canadians and the environment
  • Targeted industry understands its obligations to take action to protect Canadians and the Environment

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Canadians use information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern to avoid or minimize risks posed by these substances
  • Risks associated with harmful substances in humans, the environment, food and consumer products are prevented, minimized or eliminated

Final Outcome:

  • Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances

Governance structure(s):

In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, EC and HC deliver their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures. CMP governance is assured through a joint Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) and an Interdepartmental Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC). These Committees were established to maximize the coordination of efforts, while minimizing duplication between the two departments.

The CMP ADM Committee provides strategic direction, coordination and a challenge function for the implementation and review of results and resource utilization of the CMP. The CMEC is the management committee at the Director General level to support the development of joint Health Canada/Environment Canada strategic directions. It is also a formal body for cooperation to ensure timely and concerted actions in implementing the CMP activities in an integrated fashion. The CMEC reports to the ADM Committee, providing recommendations on program implementation, results and resource utilization.

2013-14 Planning Highlights:

In 2013-14, HC and EC will continue to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining high priority substances from the first phase of the CMP, including ongoing assessment of substances the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach, as well as the assessment of other substances deemed to be a priority. Screening Assessment Reports and Risk Management Strategies for high priorities will be completed and risk management measures will continue to be developed, implemented, tracked and monitored. Work with other jurisdictions bilaterally and in multinational fora to undertake regional and multilateral efforts to manage chemicals of concerns will continue.

In 2013-14, HC and EC will continue assessment and management of the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1500 substances by 2016 through the substance groupings initiative, rapid screening, and other approaches.

During 2013-14, draft Screening Assessment Reports, and associated risk management scope documents, will be completed for the following groups of substances:

  • Aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substances;
  • Certain internationally-classified substances with potential for exposure to individuals in Canada;
  • Cobalt-containing substances;
  • Methylenediphenyl diisocyanates and diamines (MDI/MDA); and
  • Substituted diphenylamines.

During 2013-14, data collection activities will also take place for the final three Groupings of the Substance Groupings initiative for existing substances (Phthalates, Boron-containing substances and Selenium).

Development of proposed risk management actions for toxic substances in Batch 11 and 12 as well as non-Challenge substances, will take place in 2013-14, along with finalizing risk management actions for toxic substances from Batches 6-9.

HC and EC will also continue to use the new substances program to identify and manage as appropriate human health and environmental risks of substances before import or manufacture in Canada.

HC will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address identified risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods and food packaging materials, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water. Highlights for 2013-14 include the publication of final regulations under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act in Canada Gazette Part II for two CMP substances - (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethanol (DEGME), as well as the approval of updated Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality for ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, 1,2-dichloroethane and selenium. Health Canada will also continue its review, listing and prioritization for assessment of risk due to presence in the environment of substances in Food and Drugs Act regulated products.

HC and EC will continue to conduct research and monitoring programs to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Specific monitoring activities for 2013-14 include the release of the biomonitoring results from the second cycle of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and the completion of the data collection for the third cycle of the CHMS. Several substances will also be added to the Total Diet Study to fill in anticipated gaps for CMP2 and CMP3 priorities.

Research in support of current CMP themes and priorities will continue and opportunities for synergies with government organizations and universities will be explored. Information on approximately 2,700 substances will be received and analyzed as part of the second phase of the DSL inventory update. This information will provide updates on current commercial status of substances in Canada and will inform Rapid Screening, the Polymer Approach, and priority setting for the next phase of the CMP.

Work will continue on substances/products regulated under the Food and Drugs Act, including the development of Environmental Assessment Regulations and non-regulatory initiatives, re-evaluation of food additives and food packaging materials and assessment of food contaminants as indicated by CMP screening assessments and new scientific knowledge.

Work will also continue on the re-evaluation of previously approved pesticides according to legislated timelines and requirements under the Pest Control Products Act, as well as on continuing to monitor health and environmental incidents related to pesticides, analyzing trends and sales data, and taking regulatory action as needed.

EC will continue to develop compliance strategies and enforcement plans and will continue to deliver related activities, to promote regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and compliance, with regulatory requirements for CMP substances. Focus will be on delivering compliance promotion activities for the highest priority instruments as determined by the compliance priority setting process.

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
Health Canada Health Products Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 10.4 2.1
Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment 5.8 1.2
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 5.3 1.1
Research 3.6 0.7
Monitoring and Surveillance 5.4 1.1
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 1.0 0.2
Environmental Risks to Health Risk Assessment 57.5 11.5
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 72.7 14.5
ResearchTable 4.2.1 footnote 1 42.2 7.3
Monitoring and Surveillance 43.3 8.7
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 10.1 2.0
Policy and Program Management 12.1 2.3
Consumer Product and Workplace Safety Risk Assessment 12.8 2.6
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 12.9 2.6
Consumer Product and Workplace Safety Risk Assessment 12.8 2.6
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 12.9 2.6
Pesticides Risk Assessment 20.9 4.2
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 4.4 0.9
Research 1.7 0.3
Internal Services   36.9 7.3
Total 359.2 70.6

Table 4.2.1 footnotes

Table 4.2.1 Footnote 1

$9.3M ($3.1M/year) from 2012-13 to 2014-15 not included for the Banting Retrofit. Funds earmarked in fiscal framework and the department will seek access to these funds moving forward.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Totals may differ within tables due to rounding of figures.

Expect Results 2013-14 Health Canada :

  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances informs risk assessment and risk management processes, as well as monitoring and surveillance activities
  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities
  • Data on use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern to inform risk assessment, risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCSPA and F&DA
  • Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures
  • Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions
Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
Environment Canada Substances and Waste Management Risk Assessment 17.4 3.5
Risk Management 68.4 13.7
Research 9.7 1.8
Monitoring and Surveillance 24.6 4.9
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution Compliance Promotion 4.3 0.9
Enforcement 11.3 2.3
Internal Services   11.8 2.4
Total 147.5  29.5

Totals may differ within tables due to rounding of figures.

Program funding includes amounts appropriated to PWGSC for provision of accommodations ($8.4 million from start to end date and $1.7 million in 2013-14).

Expect Results 2013-14 Environment Canada :

  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances informs risk assessment and risk management processes, as well as monitoring and surveillance activities
  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities
  • Data on use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern to inform risk assessment, risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCSPA and F&DA
  • Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures
  • Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions
Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
TotalTable 4.2.2 footnote 1 Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date): (Millions) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13: (Millions)
$ 506.7 $ 100.1

Table 4.2.1 footnotes

Table 4.2.1 footnote 1

$9.3M ($3.1M/year) from 2012-13 to 2014-15 not included for the Banting Retrofit. Funds earmarked in fiscal framework and the department will seek access to these funds moving forward.

Return to table 4.2.1 footnote 1 referrer

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen, Director
Chemicals Policy Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
Ph: (613) 941-8071
suzanne.leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca

Stewart Lindale, Director
Legislative and Regulatory Affairs
Environmental Stewardship Branch
Environment Canada
Ph: (819) 934-2358
Steward.Lindale@ec.gc.ca

 

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP)

Name of lead department(s): The lead is shared between Health Canada (HC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Lead department program:

  • HC: Health Products, Consumer Products Safety, Pesticide Safety and Food Safety and Nutrition;
  • CFIA: Food Safety Program;
  • PHAC: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and Public Health Infrastructure;
  • CIHR: Health and Health Services Advances.

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2008-09.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing starting FY 2013-14.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $488.6M for 2008-09 to 2012-13 and $125.2M ongoing.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is to assess that the food, health and consumer products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The FCSAP is a horizontal initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, food borne illness outbreaks, and the global withdrawal of some prescription medicines, have underscored the need for government action.

The FCSAP includes efforts to modernize Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe food, health and consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The FCSAP bolsters Canada's regulatory system by committing to amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative and regulatory regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. The FCSAP helps to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The FCSAP is an integrated, risk-based plan and includes a series of initiatives that are premised on three key areas of action: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight provides for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed, we work to enhance health and safety risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring);
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements;
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards;
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food;
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents;
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food;
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards;
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products; and
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements.

Governance structure(s):

The Minister of Health and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have joint responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the FCSAP.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) has primary responsibility for implementing FCSAP activities related to health products with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and the CIHR on one initiative (increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness).

Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with the Regions and Programs Bureau (RAPB) and PHAC, work together to implement FCSAP activities related to consumer products.

CFIA, Health Canada’s HPFB and the PHAC work together to implement FCSAP activities related to food.

The Communications and Public Affairs Branch (CPAB) of Health Canada provides communications support for all of the above activities and coordinates or leads many of the horizontal Departmental activities under the Consumer Information Strategy.

Planning Highlights:

The FCSAP reflects the need to modernize and sharpen the focus of Government action to protect Canadians and responds to the economic realities and new technologies of the 21st century, such as globalization and the introduction of more complex products. The FCSAP is an integrated, risk-based plan with the streams of initiatives (premised on the three key areas of action) aligned to meet these needs.

Federal Partner #1: Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions, including Internal Services)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2013-14Table 4.3.1 footnote 1
Health Products Active Prevention 56.8 10.2
Targeted Oversight 34.6 10.2
Rapid Response Existing resources Existing resources
Consumer Products Safety Active Prevention 41.0 13.7
Targeted Oversight 15.7 4.9
Rapid Response 17.9 4.4
Pesticide Safety Active Prevention 6.9 1.6
Rapid Response 8.0 2.1
Food Safety and Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 7.6
Rapid Response 1.3 0.3
Total 211.8 55.0

Table 4.31 footnotes

Table 4.3.1 footnote 1

Funding ongoing starting 2013-14.

Return to table 4.3.1 footnote 1 referrer

Expected results by program (HC):

Health Products Safety

Active Prevention

In 2013-14, the Health Products program will continue to engage stakeholders in the modernization of Canada's regulatory system. Health Products and Food Branch is taking a phased approach to implementation as described in the Regulatory Roadmap.

In an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficacy of health products, the Health Products program will implement regulatory change to include regulatory oversight of the manufacturing of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API). An API Inspection Program is dependent on the final publication and coming into force of the proposed API regulations. As such, API inspections are not possible at this time and targets cannot be set until the regulatory amendments come into force. Planning and implementation work on inspection training, compliance and promotion, as well as on quality system documents continue while these regulations are pending.

Health Canada is committed to enhancing the transparency of regulatory decision making related to pharmaceutical and biological products and medical devices. The Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) project provides information about Health Canada's decision to authorise applicable products for sale in Canada. SBD documents have now been redesigned into a question and answer format that is more easily navigable and user-friendly. Information on post-authorisation activities will also be included, allowing Canadians to get up to date information on products which have SBDs. The SBDs will continue to include regulatory, safety and effectiveness considerations with an increased focus on Health Canada's risk/benefit analysis.

Health Canada also reviews Product Monographs (PM) produced by Market Authorization Holders (MAHs) that are factual, scientific documents on a drug product that describes the properties, claims, indications and conditions as well as information that may be required for the optimal, safe and effective use of the drug. The PM consists of three sections: Part 1 - Health Professional Information; Part 2 - Scientific Information; and Part 3 - Consumer Information. Health Canada has drafted plain language labelling improvements to PM Part III which are targeted to be released in 2013-14. Plans are also underway to make plain language labelling improvements to Parts 1 and 2 and consultations on these proposed improvements will take place in 2013.

As part of the lifecycle approach, Health Canada will continue reviewing Risk Management Plans (RMP) for therapeutic products. The RMPs provide information related to identified and potential risks, strategies to characterize the risks in question, and a risk minimization plan. RMPs are submitted on a voluntary basis.

To increase awareness and compliance with regulatory requirements, Health Canada will continue to engage in pre-submission meetings with industry to ensure higher quality submissions and to provide valuable scientific and regulatory guidance to stakeholders. These meetings provide the opportunity to monitor and evaluate the exchange of information as well as obtain feedback regarding areas of concern prior to filing a submission.

The Government of Canada has made a number of commitments to involve the public in its decision-making processes. Health Canada is putting these commitments into effect through a variety of public involvement opportunities. External advisory bodies are one mechanism that Health Canada is using to receive public input and advice on scientific, technical, policy, and program matters. Currently, an initiative to incorporate observers in advisory body meetings has been undertaken in order to increase openness and transparency.

To improve and augment patient and consumer participation in consultations, Health Canada is piloting a Patient and Consumer Participation Pool (www.health.gc.ca/participationpool). This approach will increase access to a wider variety of patients and consumers who are able to make meaningful contributions to consultations, through tools and information designed to enhance their understanding of the regulatory process. The Pool was launched in 2012-13 and 87 pool participants were successfully recruited.

As technology adapts and Canadians look for their information in different ways, Health Canada continues to strive to offer information in a variety of new and traditional ways. CAPB will continue to focus on ensuring that Canadians have easy access to health and safety information so that they can make informed health and safety decisions.

Expected Results:

Increase industry awareness and knowledge of regulatory requirements; enhance knowledge of post-market health products safety risks to inform decisions; increase oversight of the risk management and risk mitigation strategies for health products; increase safety of APIs through industry compliance with the Food and Drug Act (FDA) and its regulations; improve timeliness of pre-market reviews; increase awareness and understanding of the safe use of health products by consumers and health care professionals.

Performance Indicator:

Number of engagement opportunities with industry, international collaborations; number of guidance/educational tools developed; number of standards, frameworks and policies developed or modified; and number of consultations/ engagement activities with Canadians and target populations; improved timeliness of pre-market reviews; number risk management and mitigation plans received, reviewed and implemented; percent of API firms in compliance as determined through the inspection program (once established)Footnote 6.

Targeted Oversight

Through the National Border Integrity Program, Health Canada's ability to make and support admissibility decisions at the border as they relate to health products will be strengthened. The program will continue to advance its ability to monitor and control the importation of health products by addressing challenges involved in reducing the health and safety risk for products entering Canada through the following initiatives: a national standardized process for the handling of health products at the border; establishment of service standards between Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Health Canada to improve the ability to respond when safety incidents occur; and, undertaking public education activities to inform Canadians of risk associated with the importation of non-compliant health products. The program intends to further expand its work on the Single Window Initiative (SWI).

In addition, Health Canada will continue to enhance the post-market surveillance elements of the program through increased efforts focused on review of Periodic Safety Update Reports (PSURs) which are documents that summarize the worldwide safety experience of a health product at pre-established post-authorization times. In 2013, a new reporting format, the Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report (PBRER), will expand the scope of the review to put an emphasis on the benefits of medicinal products, especially when risk estimates have changed the benefit-risk balance of a product. Furthermore, Health Canada will continue to seek opportunities to expand and enhance the Post Market Reporting Compliance (PMRC) inspection program, such as through a review of international best practices and the incorporation of additional elements to its inspections.

Health Canada will be exploring new ways to enhance the quality and reporting of adverse reaction reports. With this in mind, the Canada Vigilance eHealth Project will determine the feasibility of developing an eHealth-based adverse reaction reporting system to leverage the eHealth tools used by healthcare professionals, including electronic medical records (EMRs), electronic health records (EHRs) and related data repositories such as provincial Drug Information Systems (DIS), for adverse reaction reporting to Health Canada.

The Department has worked with Accreditation Canada to develop adverse reaction reporting and monitoring standards as part of their accreditation program for hospitals. These standards will complement the Department's many efforts to encourage and facilitate adverse reaction reporting. Health Canada also promotes adverse reaction reporting through the Canada Vigilance Regional Offices, by way of outreach and promotional activities, as a way to increase health professional and consumer awareness of, and participation in, the Canada Vigilance Program.

In partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Health Canada has implemented the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN): a pan-Canadian network of centres of excellence in post-market pharmaceutical research. The evidence generated by DSEN funded studies is intended to inform pharmaceutical decision-making across the health care system.The CIHR and Health Canada will work collaboratively to streamline the DSEN processes and procedures (e.g., the framework to prioritize DSEN research queries, query submission, etc.) to make these tools as responsive as possible to the needs of the Federal Regulator, F/P/T drug plans and organizations mandated to support F/P/T decision making.

Expected Results:

Enhance capacity of Health Canada and the pharmaceutical/biotech industriesFootnote 7 to identify and respond to risk issues; increase capacity to identify safety issues with health products on the market; increase knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increase capacity to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness; improve ability to monitor and control importation of health products.

Performance Indicators:

Year-over-year increase in PSUR submitted by industry; number new safety signals generated through PSUR reviews per year; percent of safety issues identified by Market Authorization Holders (MAH) resulting in product monograph changes or regulatory action to mitigate risk; percent of ARs addressed within service standards; number of import alerts resulting in detecting/stopping non-compliant products at the border; number/% of health product admissibility determinations that recommend refusal of entry into CanadaFootnote 8.

Consumer Products Safety

Active Prevention

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) and the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA) and its Cosmetics Regulations provide the authorities for the Consumer Product Safety Program to support industry's responsibility for the safety of their products and consumers' responsibility to make informed decisions about product purchases and use.

The Program will work with industry, standard setting bodies and international counterparts to develop standards and guidelines and share best practices as appropriate. The Program will also promote consumer awareness of the safe use of consumer products and cosmetics to support informed decision-making.

Expected Results: Industry is informed / aware of regulatory requirements related to consumer products and cosmetics.

Performance Indicator: % of Canadian industries informed/aware of regulatory requirements.

Targeted Oversight

Through Targeted Oversight, the Program undertakes regular cycles of compliance and enforcement in selected product categories as part of the Cyclical Enforcement Plan and responds to issues identified through mandatory incident reporting, market surveys, lab results and other means. Under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, the Program has improved authorities to ensure investigative actions are being taken to determine the safety profile of products and to verify that preventative measures are being implemented.

Expected Results: Early detection of potentially unsafe consumer products and cosmetics.

Performance Indicator: % of incident reports received and triaged within service standard

Rapid Response

The Government is equipped to respond rapidly to remove unsafe consumer products from shelves, preventing them from reaching consumers. While the Department continues to operate with a step-wise approach to compliance and enforcement by working with industry to voluntarily take corrective actions, the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act includes measures to protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products. Under Rapid Response, when an unacceptable risk from consumer products and cosmetics is identified, the program can act quickly to protect the public and take appropriate enforcement actions - including issuing consumer advisories, working with industry to negotiate recalls or other corrective measures.

Expected result: Risks associated with consumer products and cosmetics in the Canadian marketplace are appropriately managed

Performance Indicator: % of non-compliant products identified through the Cyclical Enforcement Plan and incident reporting, for which risk management action is taken in accordance with established operating procedures and timelines.

Pesticide Safety

Active Prevention

The Pesticide Safety Program encourages and facilitates industry development and adoption of quality assurance and stewardship programs for the safe manufacture and subsequent selection and use of pesticides and other consumer products containing pesticides. Retailers of pest control products often rely on their distributors for validation of access to registered products. Work under this strategy fosters an increased knowledge of the requirements under the Pest Controls Products Act (PCPA) and Regulations and an awareness of the tools available to validate the status of the pest control products and their label information.

PMRA will continue to provide information to consumers through outreach programs related to the responsible use of pesticides. This includes dissemination of material through media, booths, the web, and PMRA's Information Service, which every year responds to a wide range of queries from the public on the safe and proper use of pesticides. The compliance strategies under active prevention aim to engage stakeholders in order to test assumptions about the ability and will to comply in a timely and effective manner with enforcement actions.

Expected Results: Increased industry (manufacturers, distributors, retailers and vendors) awareness of risks and related regulatory requirements

Performance Indicators: Number of active prevention activities (e.g. booths, visits, presentations, surveys, workshops) conducted;

Rapid Response

Under rapid response, the pesticide safety program will enhance compliance monitoring of pest control products at the retail or marketplace level as a strategy for early detection of any pesticide safety issues.

Expected results: Improved monitoring of pest control products using a risk-based management approach.

Performance Indicators: Number of targeted inspections conducted (marketplace, manufacturers, retailers, distributors and vendors of consumer pesticides; number and type of enforcement responses initiated in situations of non-compliance.

Food Safety and Nutrition

Active Prevention

Health Canada's Food Safety and Nutrition program will continue to enhance risk management measures for priority food safety hazards in foods, implement Food Allergy Incident Prevention Measures, consult with industry and stakeholders on key files, and engage with international standards bodies while developing standards, policies, regulations and processes.

Expected Results: Increased effective assessment and mitigation strategies of food safety risks.

Performance Indicators: Number of risk modelling activities conducted, number and type of involvement in International initiatives that support industry, number and type of involvement with international standard setting initiatives, percent and range of new submissions addressed within time standards, research in policy and RIAS, as well as the considerations of consumer and stakeholder feedback documented in decision-making.

Targeted Oversight

The Food Safety & Nutrition program has no targeted oversight funding under this stream.

Rapid Response

Under the rapid response pillar the Food Safety and Nutrition program will continue its participation in the Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education with the goal of promoting the "Be Food Safe" campaign and will continue to develop new education materials for consumers to promote food safety in an effort to reduce foodborne disease outbreaks in Canada.

Expected Results: Consumers make informed decisions about food.

Performance Indicators: % of consumers aware and knowledgeable of their role in food safety, and how this is used in decision-making.

Federal Partner #2: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2013-14Table 4.3.2 footnote 1
Food Safety Program and Internal Services Active Prevention 114.2 27.2
Targeted Oversight 77.0 20.4
Rapid Response 32.2 7.3
Total 223.4 54.9

Table 4.3.2 footnotes

Table 4.3.2 footnote 1

Funding ongoing starting 2013-14.

Return to table 4.3.2 footnote 1 referrer

Expected results by program (CFIA):

Active Prevention

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) food safety initiatives aimed at ensuring active prevention include measures to enable government to better understand and identify food safety risks and to work with industry to implement effective food safety risk mitigation strategies. The CFIA, along with its federal partners, will strive to strengthen food safety standards and regulations and will engage Canadians in making decisions with respect to food safety.

In 2013-14, the CFIA will work towards the implementation of the Safe Food for Canadians Act through the redesign of its food regulatory framework, and will move forward with its Imported Food Sector Product Regulations regulatory proposal under the Canada Agricultural Products Act. In light of these regulatory changes, the CFIA will continue to revise its food safety programming for verification of industry food safety systems in high-risk sectors and conclude establishment of the administrative infrastructure for importer licensing, including the implementation of an IMIT business solution.

The CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada on data collection and risk mapping towards identification and characterization of areas of concern, including imported food ingredients, fresh produce, mycotoxins in cereals and undeclared allergens. Risk mapping will identify gaps in standard-setting and policy development and will assist in focusing operational efforts on areas of greatest risk. Data collected through baseline surveillance will serve to fill information gaps.

The CFIA will continue engagement with counterparts in foreign countries to enhance food safety information exchange and identify best practices to inform risk management approaches.

As well, the CFIA will also continue to inform consumers and industry on the Canadian Food Labelling Initiative and the use of Product of Canada and Made in Canada claims on food products.

Expected results: To better identify, assess, and prioritize potential food safety hazards through risk mapping, information gathering, and sampling and testing of foods on the Canadian marketplace and to inform the relevant Agency stakeholders on relative risk in order to influence decisions and priorities for different food/hazard combinations; improved industry compliance; industry implementation of preventive food safety systems; establishment of standards, regulations, and policies that contribute to the prevention of food safety issues through the product lifecycle.

Performance indicators: % completion of regulatory approval process; number of planned and percent completed commodity / hazard targeted surveys to address information gaps; number of risk profiles completed; number and percent of high risk / priority areas for which CFIA has the requisite tools and processes to identify, assess and prioritize potential food safety risks, percent completion of revised approaches to food safety system verification; number of industry awareness sessions delivered versus planned, ability to report on the number and nature of inquiries regarding the Product of Canada guidelines; percent completion of the supporting IM/IT infrastructure and tool for importer licensing management; evidence of new/ongoing engagement on food safety with international regulatory counterparts.

Targeted Oversight

Targeted oversight initiatives include enhanced inspection of identified high-risk food sectors and targeted import control measures. In 2013-14, the CFIA will continue to adapt its food safety inspection practices for high-risk sectors, including the implementation of an importer licensing regime, and provide training to inspection staff on revised procedures. Evaluation and verification of industry's food safety control systems in both fresh fruit and vegetable and non-federally registered sectors will take place with a focus on imported products. Method development and testing in targeted areas will continue. Enhanced tracking of imported food products will continue and border blitzes will be conducted.

Expected results: Improved industry compliance with food safety standards; modern tools and new risk-based approaches contribute to improved safety of imported foods.

Performance indicators: Number and percent of total required inspectors trained on revised procedures, number and percent of planned high-risk food safety inspections and verifications completed; number of border blitzes conducted versus planned; number and percent of new testing methodologies developed and implemented.

Rapid Response

Towards ensuring rapid response to food safety issues and emergencies, enhanced recall capacity will enable the Government of Canada to effectively respond to and conduct investigations for an anticipated increased number of food recalls resulting from targeted oversight activities. Targeted consumer risk communication activities and products will also improve Canadian's awareness of food safety issues and recalls and will help consumers better protect their health.

In 2013-14, the CFIA will continue to enhance food safety recall and investigation methodology.

Expected results: Timely and efficient recall capacity in the face of increased identification of potential risks through targeted testing and other information; better public understanding of food safety risks; increased consumer use of various food safety alert systems; and increased public trust and confidence in the food safety system.

Performance indicators: number of personnel trained and available to support recall activities; number of recalls and percent conducted in accordance with CFIA standards; number of and percent of required investigations conducted in accordance with CFIA standards; number of communications initiatives aimed at increasing consumer awareness of food safety issues and recall; percent of consumers aware of food safety issues.

Federal Partner #3: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Public Health Agency of Canada ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2013-14Table 4.3.3 footnote 1
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Active Prevention 1.0 0.2
Targeted Oversight 8.0 2.3
Public Health Infrastructure Active Prevention 17.3 3.8
Total 26.3 6.3

Table 4.3.3 footnotes

Table 4.3.3 footnote 1

Funding ongoing starting 2013-14.

Return to table 4.3.3 footnote 1 referrer

Expected results by program (Public Health Agency of Canada):

Active Prevention

The Public Health Agency of Canada will modernize and strengthen Canada's food safety systems by use of innovative laboratory tests (molecular typing), by expanding integrated surveillance systems (Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) and C-EnterNet), use of decision making models in priority areas and dissemination of outbreak investigation results to provincial and territorial partners through the web-based Outbreak Summaries system.


Expected results: Increased understanding of food-borne illness risks by HC, CFIA and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Performance indicators: % of reports tracked, # of peer-reviewed publications, # of issue papers provided to departmental colleagues and stakeholders, and # of provinces/territories using the Outbreak Summaries system.

Targeted Oversight
Through ongoing and expanded data collection, analysis and the Public Health Agency of Canada will contribute to the evidence base for policies, practices and programs for injury prevention focussing on vulnerable populations including children and seniors.

Expected results:

  1. More and better data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products.
  2. Engagement of risk assessment stakeholders.

Federal Partner #4: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2013-14Table 4.3.4 footnote 1
Health and Health Services Advances Targeted Oversight 27.1 9.0
Total 27.1 9.0

Table 4.3.4 footnotes

Table 4.3.4 footnote 1

Funding ongoing starting 2013-14.

Return to table 4.3.4 footnote 1 referrer

Expected results by program CIHR:

Targeted Oversight

CIHR will make investments and focus efforts in advancing the DSEN to increase the evidence on drug safety and effectiveness available to regulators, policy-makers, health care providers and patients and to increase capacity within Canada to undertake high-quality post-market research in this area.

Work will continue on refining the DSEN Query management process, engaging decision makers, delivering on peer reviewed funding opportunities for the initiative and responding to strategic direction received from the DSEN Steering Committee.

Expected results: Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increased capacity in Canada to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness.

Performance Indicators: Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners from 2008-09 to 2012-13 ($ millions):
Federal Partners Total Planned Spending for 2013-14 Total Planned Spending for 2013-14Table 4.3.5 footnote 1
Health Canada 211.8 55.0
Canadian Food and Inspection Agency 223.4 54.9
Public Health Agency of Canada 26.3 6.3
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 27.1 9.0
Total 488.6 125.2

Table 4.3.5 footnotes

Table 4.3.5 footnote 1

Funding ongoing starting 2013-14.

Return to table 4.3.5 footnote 1 referrer

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable.

Contact information: N/A

 

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

Name of Horizontal Initiative:
Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

Lead department program: Substance Use and Abuse

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 2012

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2017

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $230.3M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy was initiated in 2001. In 2012, the Strategy was renewed for five years to provide a focused federal presence to preserve the gains of the past decade and continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence. The renewed strategy focuses on the core areas of federal responsibility and invests in new priorities including populations with higher smoking rates. The objective of the Strategy is to reduce the use of tobacco and the potential for tobacco-related death and disease in Canada.

Shared outcome(s): To preserve the gains made over the past decade, and to continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence.

Governance structure(s): Health Canada remains the lead department with responsibility for the coordination and implementation of the FTCS. As part of the Health Portfolio, the Public Health Agency of Canada will deliver a contribution program.

Federal partners manage the control of tobacco products through monitoring and assessing the illicit and licit tobacco markets.

  • Public Safety Canada - monitors contraband tobacco activity and related crime;
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) - works with federal partners to identify and investigate criminal activities and to coordinate information on national and international contraband tobacco issues;
  • The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) - increases knowledge of contraband domestically and internationally by liaising with tobacco authorities at all levels and by monitoring and providing regular reports on both national and global contraband tobacco. The CBSA provides reports, information and guidance to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure of tobacco;
  • The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) - administers the Excise Act 2001, which governs federal taxation of tobacco products and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada; and
  • Public Prosecutions Service Canada (PPSC) - monitors federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences in order to enforce and recover outstanding fines.

Planning Highlights: April 1, 2013 - March 31, 2014 :

Along with ongoing activities, the FTCS will highlight the following new priorities:

  • Quitline - Helping more Canadians quit smoking by providing provinces and territories funding to support increased utilization of quitlines as a result of the pan-Canadian Quitline and web address appearing on cigarette and little cigar packages;
  • On-Reserve First Nations and Inuit Initiatives - Support for a targeted number of on-reserve First Nations and Inuit communities to implement evidence-based tobacco control strategies;
  • Marketing, awareness and outreach campaign - Implement a sustained marketing, awareness, and outreach campaign focused on encouraging cessation behaviour; and,
  • Chronic Disease Risk Factors - Funding for tobacco-related interventions that aim to reduce tobacco use as a chronic disease risk factor by aligning with broader disease prevention strategies.

Federal Partner #1: Health Portfolio

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Health Portfolio
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
Health Canada (Substance Use and Abuse) FTCS $183.9 $36.3
Public Health Agency   $10.0 $2.4
Total $193.9M $38.7M

Health Canada figures include: corporate PWGSC accommodation costs, $3M per year dedicated to Tobacco Litigation, and $250K International grant (this function will rest with PHAC). PHAC includes a reprofile of $1.2M from 2012-13 over the following four years.

Expected results by program as per Names of Programs for Federal Partners:

The Health Portfolio will achieve results in the following areas:

  • Regulations and Compliance - Conducting compliance monitoring activities and undertake enforcement measures with respect to the Tobacco Act and its regulations.
  • Research - Conducting research and surveillance to support decision making and the development of anti-tobacco policies and programs.
  • Policy - Leading the development of policies supporting the renewal of the FTCS in 2017 and facilitating stakeholder engagement. This includes coordinating and supporting policies associated with Canada's membership in the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC).
  • Litigation - Providing base funding for ongoing or any new tobacco litigation and for the defense of the Tobacco Act and its regulations.
  • Community interventions - Supporting interventions and programming that aim to reduce tobacco use, and supporting on-reserve First nations and Inuit communities to implement evidence-based tobacco control strategies.

Federal Partner #2: Public Safety Portfolio

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
PS FTCS $3.0 $0.6
RCMP FTCS Table 4.4.1 footnote 1$8.5 $1.7
CBSA FTCS $18.4 $3.7
Total $29.9M $6.0M

Table 4.4.1 footnotes

Table 4.4.1 footnote 1

Total RCMP Allocation for the period 2012-13 to 2016-17 is $8.5M.

Return to table 4.4.1 footnote 1 referrer

Expected results by program as per FTCS:

Public Safety

  • Enhanced partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police through the administration of contribution funding for monitoring activities in connection with determining levels of contraband activity.
  • Leading interdepartmental efforts to explore the implementation of the Protocol to Eliminate the Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products under the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.
  • Provide policy leadership and development of strategies to support law enforcements efforts to combat organized crime in the trade of contraband tobacco.

RCMP

  • RCMP Police Operations (Tech Ops): Improve border security through the use of sophisticated technology which permits detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions, resulting in vital intelligence in support of criminal investigations. Investigators rely heavily on this technology in the fight against well-orchestrated organized crime networks that target the shear vastness of the shared border to move illicit tobacco products.
  • RCMP Criminal Intelligence: Provide regular reports on the illicit tobacco situation to Finance and Health Canada, including data on seizures, organized crime involvement and trends. Provide side bar reports and presentations to other partners and key Ministerial entities upon request, such as the Senior Revenue Officials Conference and the Interprovincial Investigations Conference. Attend regular meetings to brief the Department of Finance and other agencies on the illicit tobacco market. Participate in information sharing sessions with American Law Enforcement partners. Give presentations at law enforcement courses/workshops in Canada and the U.S. on the subject of contraband tobacco. Support criminal investigations.

CBSA

  • Provide advice to Department of Finance on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco.
  • Monitor and report on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada.
  • Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  • Collection of the tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians.

Federal Partner #3: Canada Revenue Agency

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Canada Revenue Agency
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
CRA FTCS $4.5 $0.9
Total $4.5M $0.9M

Expected results by program as per FTCS :

Legislative and Policy and Regulatory Affairs Branch

  • Verify Export Activity.
  • Ensure compliance with legislative requirements imposed on the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada.
  • Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco.
  • Support RCMP/CBSA enforcement activities.

Assessment and Benefit Services Branch

  • Maintaining accounts provide services relative to account transactions (including refunds) and produce reports of tobacco-related activities.

Federal Partner #4: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions) - Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2013-14
ODPP FTCS $2.0 $0.0
Total $2.0M $0.0M
Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013-14
$230.3M $45.6M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Robert Ianiro
Director General
Controlled Substances & Tobacco Directorate
Health Canada
Tel: (613) 941-1977

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years (2013-14 - 2015-16)

A. All Upcoming Internal Audits over the Next Three Fiscal Years
Name of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
Fiscal Year -
Audit of Regional Operations Internal Services In progress FY 2013-14
Audit of Performance Reporting Internal Services In progress FY 2013-14
Audit of Financial Statement Readiness Financial In progress FY 2013-14
Audit of the Implementation of the Chemical Management Plan Program In progress FY 2013-14
Audit of Non-Insured Health Benefits – Vision Care, Medical Supplies, Mental Health Program Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of Transfer Payments for First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection G&Cs Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of Budgeting, Expenditure Monitoring and Forecasting/Horizontal Audit of Financial Forecasting Financial Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of Project Management Internal Services Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of the Economic Action Plan – Governance, Planning, Project Management and Implementation Activities Initiative Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of Information Technology Planning IT Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of PeopleSoft HR, IT Planned FY 2013-14
Audit of Key Financial Controls – Year 3 Financial Planned FY 2013-14
Horizontal Audit of Efficiency in Procurement and Contracting Practices Financial Planned FY 2013-14
Fiscal Year -
Audit of the Transfer Payments to First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention G&Cs Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of the Transfer Payments for Home and Community Care G&Cs Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of the Transfer Payments for First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity G&Cs Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of the Implementation of the Consumer Product Safety Act Program Planned FY 2014-15
Follow-Up Audit – Pharmaceutical Drugs Program Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals Program Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of the Grants and Contributions Centre of Expertise G&Cs Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of User Fees for Health Products Program Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement Activities Program Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of the Economic Action Plan –Implementation Activities Initiative Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of the Departmental Evaluation Function Internal Services Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of Key Financial Controls – Year 4 Financial Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of IT Business Continuity Planning for Mission Critical Systems March 2014 IT Planned FY 2014-15
Audit of Outsourced Information Technology Services IT Planned FY 2014-15
The information for 2014-15 is for planning purposes only and is subject to change.
B. All Upcoming Health Canada Evaluations over the Next Three Fiscal Years (2013-14 – 2015-16)
Name of Evaluation Performance Alignment Architecture Status Expected Completion Date
Fiscal Year -
Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP) – Horizontal Evaluation 1.1 Canada Health System Policy
2.1 Health Products
2.2 Food Safety and Nutrition
2.4 Consumer Product and Workplace Safety
2.6 Radiation Protection
2.7 Pesticides
Planned March 2014
Health Systems Priorities – Synthesis Evaluation 1.1.1 Health System Priorities Ongoing November 2013
Veterinary Drugs - Evaluation 2.1.1 Pharmaceutical Drugs
2.2.1 Food and Nutrition Safety
Ongoing June 2013
Human Drugs Program –Evaluation 2.1.1 Pharmaceutical Drugs Ongoing September 2013
Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals Program – Evaluation 2.1.2 Biologics & Radiopharmaceuticals Ongoing September 2013
Medical Devices Program – Evaluation 2.1.3 Medical Devices Ongoing September 2013
Food Safety and Nutrition Quality Program – Evaluation 2.2.1 Food and Nutrition Safety Planned March 2014
Implementation of an Action Plan to Protect Human Health from environmental contaminants – Horizontal Evaluation 2.3 1 Climate Change and Health
2.3.2 Air Quality
2.3.4 Health Impacts of Chemicals
3.1.2.2 First Nations and Inuit Environmental Health
Ongoing December 2013
Drug Treatment Funding Program of the National Anti-Drug Strategy – Evaluation 2.5.2  Controlled Substances Planned June 2013
Drug Strategy Community Initiative Fund (DSCIF) – Evaluation 2.5.2  Controlled Substances Planned March 2014
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care –Evaluation 3.1.3.2 First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Ongoing September 2013
Fiscal Year -
Health Information Initiative – Evaluation 1.1.1 Health System Priorities Planned March 2015
Genomics Research and Development Initiative – Evaluation 1.1.1 Health System Priorities Planned December 2014
Employee Assistance Services – Evaluation 1.2.2 Employee Assistance Services Planned March 2015
First Nations and Inuit Healthy Child Development –Evaluation 3.1.1.1 First Nations and Inuit Healthy Child Development Planned June 2014
First Nations and Inuit Healthy Living – Evaluation 3.1.1.3 First Nations and Inuit Healthy Living Planned June 2014
First Nations and Inuit Communicable Disease Control and Management – Evaluation 3.1.2.1  First Nations and Inuit Communicable Disease Control and Management Planned December 2014
Fiscal Year -
Chemicals Management Plan – Horizontal Evaluation 2.2  Food Safety and Nutrition
2.3.3  Water Quality
2.3.4 Health Impacts of Chemicals
2.7 Pesticides
Planned March 2015
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) Named Grant – Evaluation 2.5.2  Controlled Substances Planned March 2016
Pesticide Management - Evaluation 2.7 Planned March 2016
First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness – Cluster Evaluation 3.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness Planned March 2016
First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits – Evaluation 3.2 Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit Planned December 2015
First Nations and Inuit Systems Integration – Evaluation 3.3.2.1 First Nations and Inuit Systems Integration Planned March 2016
The information for 2014-15 and 2015-16 is for planning purposes only and is subject to change.

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

A. Respendable Revenue
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Revenue
2012-13
Planned Revenue
2013-14
Planned Revenue
2014-15
Planned Revenue
2015-16
Specialized Health Services 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.3
Health Products 94.2 96.0 97.9 99.8
Environmental Risks to Health 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
Radiation Protection 5.9 5.9 5.9 5.9
Pesticides 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.0
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5
Internal Services 8.7 8.9 9.1 9.3
Total Respendable Revenue 131.2 133.2 135.3 137.4
B. Non-Respendable Revenue
Program ($ millions)
Forecast Revenue
2012-13
Planned Revenue
2013-14
Planned Revenue
2014-15
Planned Revenue
2015-16
Specialized Health Services 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9
Health Products 13.2 13.5 13.8 14.0
Environmental Risks to Health 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Radiation Protection 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6
Pesticides 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3
Internal Services 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8
Total Non-respendable Revenue 19.0 19.3 19.6 19.8
Total Respendable and Non-respendable Revenue 150.2 152.5 154.9 157.2
Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding.

Summary of Capital Spending by Program

Summary of Capital Spending by Program (millions of dollars)
Program Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Specialized Health Services 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.1
Food Safety and Nutrition 4.2 3.1 3.1 3.1
Environmental Risks to Health 4.5 4.4 4.4 3.9
Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7
Substance Use and Abuse 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Radiation Protection 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.1
Pesticides 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 1.2 2.4 2.5 2.5
Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit 0.5 1.8 1.8 1.9
Internal Services 24.6 14.5 14.5 14.5
Total 37.4 28.6 28.8 28.2
Note: Details may not add to totals due to rounding.

All Electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-14 Reports on Plans and Priorities can be found on Health Canada's website.
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: