2014-15 Supplementary Information (Tables) - Report on Plans and Priorities

Table of Contents

  1. Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)
  2. Disclosure of TPPs under $5 million
  3. Up-Front Multi-Year Funding
  4. Greening Government Operations (GGO)
  5. Horizontal Initiatives
  6. Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years

Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Program: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Sub-Sub-Programs: Healthy Child Development, Mental Wellness, Healthy Living
Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection
Sub-Sub-Programs: Communicable Disease Control and Management, Environmental Public Health
Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Primary Care
Sub-Sub-Programs: Clinical and Client Care, Home and Community Care

Description: The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities. It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including surveillance, to prevent and /or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards; and primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services.

Expected results:

  • Ongoing access to health promotion/disease prevention programs and services.
  • Increased community capacity to deliver community-based health promotion and disease prevention programs and services.
  • Increased community capacity to manage and administer communicable disease control programs.
  • Increased program and community capacity to address and mitigate environmental public health risks.
  • Increasingly appropriate primary care services based on assessed need.
  • Improved coordinated and seamless responses to primary care needs.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 669.5 629.9 570.6 544.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 669.5 629.9 570.6 544.0
The decrease in Planned Spending 2014-15 and future years columns is due to the implementation of the "BC Tripartite Framework agreement on First Nations Health Governance: Transfer to the First Nations Health Authority". The sunset of the Federal Aboriginal Health Program in 2014-15 and the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement in 2015-16 also contribute to the decrease.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

  • Healthy Child Development : 2009-10
  • Mental Wellness : 2012-13
  • Healthy Living : 2011-12
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management : 2010-11
  • Environmental Health : 2011-12
  • Clinical and Client Care : 2013-14
  • Home and Community Care : 2013-14

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A):

  • Healthy Child Development : Continuation
  • Mental Wellness : Continuation
  • Healthy Living : Continuation
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management : Continuation
  • Environmental Health : Continuation
  • Clinical and Client Care : Continuation
  • Home and Community Care : Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation:

  • Healthy Child Development : 2014-15
  • Mental Wellness : 2015-16
  • Healthy Living : 2014-15
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management : 2014-15
  • Environmental Health : 2016-17
  • Clinical and Client Care: 2017-18
  • Home and Community Care : 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group:

First Nations in Canada (i.e., Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Aboriginal Organizations, non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan provides overall guidance on where efforts need to be focused in the short-, medium-, and long-term to improve First Nations and Inuit health outcomes over time. More specifically, the Strategic Goal 2: Working together will include better mechanisms for First Nations and Inuit to feed into the Branch's planning and decisions including contribution programs management and delivery. Goal 2 includes two key elements:

  • 2.1 Improve health outcomes by strengthening partnerships with First Nations, Inuit, provinces, territories and other government departments - finding new, better and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate, plan and work together; and
  • 2.2 Continue to support First Nations and Inuit in their aim to influence, manage and /or control health programs and services that affect them.

A priority for Health Canada is the advancement of collaborative efforts with provinces/territories and First Nations and Inuit to ensure quality service delivery. Through these collaborative relationships, Health Canada is also managing risks related to health systems transformation.

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with grants and contributions, the Branch will continue its efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint Grants and Contributions Information Management System project initiative between Health Canada-Public Health Agency of Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Program: Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit

Description: The Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program provides a specified range of medically necessary health-related goods and services to registered Indians (according to the Indian Act) and Inuit (recognized by one of the Inuit Land Claim Organizations) regardless of residency in Canada where not otherwise covered under a separate agreement (e.g. a self-government agreement) with federal, provincial or territorial governments. The benefits under the NIHB Program include the following, where not otherwise provided to eligible clients through other private or provincial/territorial programs: pharmacy benefits (prescription drugs and some over-the-counter medication), medical supplies and equipment, dental care, vision care, short-term crisis intervention mental health counselling, and medical transportation benefits to access medically required health services not available on reserve or in the community of residence.

Expected results:

  • Access to non-insured health benefits appropriate to the unique health needs of First Nations people and Inuit.
  • Efficient management of access to non-insured health benefits.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 191.8 186.8 178.6 176.5
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 191.8 186.8 178.6 176.5

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

Non-Insured Health Benefits: 2010-11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A):

Non-Insured Health Benefits: Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation:

Supplementary Health Benefits: 2015-16

General Targeted Recipient Group:

First Nations in Canada (i.e., Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Aboriginal Organizations, non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan provides overall guidance on where efforts need to be focused in the short-, medium-, and long-term to improve First Nations and Inuit health outcomes over time. More specifically, the Strategic Goal 2: Working together will include better mechanisms for First Nations and Inuit to feed into the Branch's planning and decisions including contribution programs management and delivery. Goal 2 includes two key elements:

  • 2.1 Improve health outcomes by strengthening partnerships with First Nations, Inuit, provinces, territories and other government departments - finding new, better and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate, plan and work together; and
  • 2.2 Continue to support First Nations and Inuit in their aim to influence, manage and /or control health programs and services that affect them.

A key initiative is to work collaboratively with stakeholders and regions to develop and implement a five-year management plan for the NIHB Program. As part of this initiative, some regional offices, such as Québec, will be consulting First Nations on a 5 year Operational Framework and Action Plan, as well as collaborating with headquarters in Ottawa on the development of an Inuit-specific engagement process on NIHB.

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with grants and contributions, the Branch will continue its efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint Grants and Contributions Information Management System project initiative between Health Canada-Public Health Agency of Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2013-14

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Program: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit
Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity
Sub-Sub-Programs: Health Planning and Quality Management, Health Human Resources, Health Facilities
Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Health System Transformation
Sub-Sub-Programs: Systems Integration, E-Health Infostructure
Sub-Program: Tripartite Health Governance

Description: The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services. It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit. The funds are used for: planning and management for the delivery of quality health services; construction and maintenance of health facilities; research activities; encouraging Aboriginal people to pursue health careers; investments in technologies to modernize health services; and integrating and realigning the governance of existing health services.

Expected results:

  • Improved quality in the delivery of programs and services.
  • Safe health facilities that support health program delivery.
  • Key stakeholders in Aboriginal health are engaged in the integration of health services.
  • Access to health information.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 473.7 577.9 587.8 617.2
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 473.7 577.9 587.8 617.2
The increase in Planned Spending 2014-15 and future years columns is due to the implementation of BC Tripartite Framework agreement on First Nations Health Governance: Transfer to the First Nations Health Authority.

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

  • Health Planning and Quality Management : 2011-12
  • Health Human Resources : 2013-14
  • Health Facilities : 2011-12
  • E-Health Infostructure : 2011-12
  • BC Tripartite contributions : 2012-13
  • Nursing Innovation Strategy : 2013-14

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A):

  • Health Planning and Quality Management : Continuation
  • Health Human Resources : N/A
  • Health Facilities : Continuation
  • E-Health Infostructure : Continuation
  • Nursing Innovation Strategy : N/A
  • BC Tripartite contributions : Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation:

  • Health Planning and Quality Management : 2016-17
  • Health Facilities : 2016-17
  • Systems Integration : 2015-16
  • E-Health Infostructure : 2016-17
  • BC Tripartite Initiative: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group:

First Nations in Canada (i.e., Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Aboriginal Organizations, non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan provides overall guidance on where efforts need to be focused in the short-, medium-, and long-term to improve First Nations and Inuit health outcomes over time. More specifically, the Strategic Goal 2: Working together will include better mechanisms for First Nations and Inuit to feed into the Branch's planning and decisions including contribution programs management and delivery. Goal 2 includes two key elements:

  • 2.1 Improve health outcomes by strengthening partnerships with First Nations, Inuit, provinces, territories and other government departments - finding new, better and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate, plan and work together; and
  • 2.2 Continue to support First Nations and Inuit in their aim to influence, manage and /or control health programs and services that affect them.

It is a priority of Health Canada to advance collaborative efforts with provinces/territories and First Nations and Inuit to ensure quality service delivery. Much of the ongoing work under this program activity involves engagement and coordination of health infrastructure initiatives with partners, particularly the Assembly of First Nations, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. Through collaboration efforts, partners explore and develop approaches in areas of mutual interest for advancing First Nations and Inuit health, guide health survey research and analysis, and seek to harmonize or improve the practices and systems that departments use to manage contribution agreements.

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with grants and contributions, the Branch will continue its efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint Grants and Contributions Information Management System project initiative between Health Canada-Public Health Agency of Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2004

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Substance Use and Abuse, Controlled Substances

Description: The Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) will contribute to reducing drug use among Canadians, particularly among vulnerable populations such as youth, by focusing on health promotion and prevention approaches to address illicit and prescription drug abuse before it happens. The objectives of the Fund are to facilitate the development of local, provincial, territorial, national and community-based solutions to drug use among youth and to promote public awareness of drug use among youth. The Program is delivered through Health Canada's national office, supported by two regional offices (BC and Québec).

Expected Results: DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit and prescription drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit and prescription drug abuse within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit and prescription drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit and prescription drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2006-07

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2014-15

General Targeted Recipient Group:

Canadian not-for-profit health organizations such as hospitals, regional health councils, public health units and community health organizations, Canadian not-for-profit organizations and registered not-for-profit charitable organizations (where there will be a preference for those that have historically dealt with problematic substance use), Canadian institutions including universities, boards of education and other centres of education in Canada, other levels of government including provinces, territories and municipalities, and their agencies, Métis, Inuit and off-reserve First Nations not-for-profit organizations; business sector associations, ad hoc groups or steering committees representing organizations that purposefully come together to address drug issues in their communities.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: DSCIF engages applicants and recipients by responding to inquiries and regular monitoring activities such as performance measurement and evaluation training and reporting, site visits and knowledge exchange meetings to share project strategies and lessons learned.

Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)

Start Dates: October 2007 - Services component; April 2008 - Systems component

End Dates: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Renewed in 2013-14

Strategic Outcome: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Substance Use and Abuse, Controlled Substances

Description: The Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) provides $13.2 M annually to provincial, territorial governments and national non-governmental organizations to: assist in strengthening treatment systems to facilitate the implementation of evidence-informed practices; increase capacity for planning and evaluating; and enhance opportunities for knowledge sharing.

Expected Results: DTFP plans to continue its efforts to strengthen substance abuse treatment systems. In particular, new projects will focus on assisting in strengthening treatment systems to facilitate the implementation of evidence-informed practices; increasing capacity for planning and evaluating; and enhancing opportunities for knowledge sharing.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 13.2 13.2 13.2 13.2
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 13.2 13.2 13.2 13.2

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Pending

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group:

Provincial and Territorial Governments, and National non-governmental organizations.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: DTFP has undertaken many initiatives to engage applicants including: national federal, provincial and territorial working group meetings and teleconferences to develop programs and prepare a performance measurement and evaluation strategy; national knowledge exchange meetings to share project strategies and lessons learned; and regular monitoring meetings.

Contribution to Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

Start Date: May 9, 2013

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Ts and Cs for this contribution program became effective April 1, 2013

Strategic Outcome: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Health Products, Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals

Description: To support basic, applied and clinical research on blood safety and blood product safety and effectiveness issues under the auspices of Canadian Blood Services.

Expected Results: A strong research and development program that supports safety, quality and supply of blood and blood products.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-profit organizations (e.g. charities, foundations, non-governmental organizations, universities and research institutions, health-related entities).

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Meetings with recipients; knowledge transfer activities; site visits; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring performance and results.

Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders

Start date: April 1, 2011 (actual funding received Supplementary Estimates C 2012)

End date: March 31, 2017

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2011-12 (No stand alone Ts & Cs were developed--Ts & Cs are included within the Agreement)

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: Funding of up to $100M over 6 years for Brain Canada to establish a Canada Brain Research Fund, which will support Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries in this field. Brain Canada will raise resources from the private sector to match the Government's contribution to the Fund.

Expected Results: An increase in the number of multidisciplinary, networked researchers and research projects in universities and teaching hospitals within Canada. This will lead to advanced knowledge of and new research on the brain.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: N/A

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: An independent evaluation will be conducted in 2015-16 (due to time-limited funding).

General Targeted Recipient Group: Other (university and research hospital-based neuroscientists from across Canada).

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: N/A

Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2017

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2008-09 to 2016-17

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: In Budget 2007, the federal government committed $130M over 10 years to establish the MHCC, an arm's length, not-for profit organization designed to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness.

Expected Results: Over the course of this grant, the Commission is expected to develop a national mental health strategy, a knowledge exchange centre, and undertake anti-stigma public awareness and educational initiatives.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants 14.6 14.3 14.3 14.3
Total Contributions - - - -
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 14.6 14.3 14.3 14.3

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010-11 (independent formative evaluation managed by the MHCC)

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: A synthesis evaluation is being conducted by the Health Portfolio in 2013-14. This will synthesize and supplement independent evaluations conducted by Pan-Canadian organizations over the past several years, including the MHCC's 2010-11 evaluation. A Health Portfolio approach to examine relevance/performance of mental health activities is also planned for 2015-16.

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: N/A

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)

Start date: May 1, 2012

End date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: A Treasury Board Submission to establish new Ts and Cs for the Health Information Initiative (HII) was approved by Treasury Board on March 29, 2012. These new Ts and Cs provide the Federal Minister of Health the authority to renew Funding Agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. There is no expiry date for the HII's Ts and Cs.

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (F/P/T) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its reports inform health policies, support the effective delivery of health services and raise awareness among Canadians about the factors that contribute to good health.

Since 1994, the Government of Canada has provided approximately $757 million in total to CIHI through a series of funding agreements. Under the current agreement, up to $238.7 million will be delivered to CIHI over 3 years (2012-13 to 2014-15). Presently, Health Canada funds 77% of CIHI's total budget, while the provincial and territorial governments contribute 15%. The remaining funds are generated through product sales.

This funding allows CIHI to provide quality, timely health information, and to continue important work to further enhance the coverage of health data systems to improve the information available to Canadians on their health care system, including information on wait times, and comparable health indicators. The funding also enables CIHI to respond effectively to emerging health data priorities.

Expected results:

The expected results are as follows:

Improve the comprehensiveness, quality and availability of data

  • Provide timely and accessible data connected across health sectors.
  • Support new and emerging sources of data, including electronic records.
  • Provide more complete data in priority areas.

Support population health and health system decision-making

  • Produce relevant, appropriate and actionable analysis.
  • Offer leading-edge performance management products, services and tools.
  • Respond to emerging needs while considering local context.

Deliver organizational excellence

  • Promote continuous learning and development.
  • Champion a culture of innovation.
  • Strengthen transparency and accountability.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 79.3 77.7 77.7 77.7
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 79.3 77.7 77.7 77.7

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2014-15

General Targeted Recipient Group: The HII was developed to support only CIHI; as such CIHI is the only recipient of HII funding. This caveat is noted in the Terms and Conditions for the HII, which stipulates that CIHI is, and only ever will be, the recipient of HII funding.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: None needed. CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding.

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2009

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Expected 2012-13

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Official Language Minority Community Development

Description: Builds on initiatives established under the previous Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities (2003-04 to 2008-09) and the Official Languages Health Contribution Program (2008-09 to 2012-13). The Program is managed by the Official Language Community Development Bureau of Health Canada.

The Official Languages Health Contribution Program was approved for a five-year period (2013-14 to 2017-18) with a total budget of $174.3 million, to support three mutually reinforcing components: 1) Integrating health professionals for official language minority communities ($106.5 million); 2) Strengthening local health networking capacity ($25 million); and 3) Health services access and retention projects ($38.5 million). Funding is also used to strengthen Health Canada's capacity to administer the Program ($4.3 million).

The "Integrating health professionals for official language minority communities" component funds French-language academic health programs in 11 colleges and universities outside of Québec to generate additional health professionals in French minority language communities. Funding supports student/teacher recruitment, French language training tools, teaching equipment purchases, and support to professors and students within each institution (e.g., bursaries and internships). Health Canada also supports a national secretariat for promoting and coordinating health professional training initiatives across French language post-secondary institutions outside Québec. The strategy in Québec is to provide funding to one coordinating organization for English and French language courses to health professionals and intake personnel (such as medical secretaries) who are already working in the health system in all administrative regions of Québec.

The "Strengthening local health networking capacity" component provides funding so that some 40 existing community-based health networks across Canada continue operating and making improvements in health and health services access for official language minority communities. The networks located in English and French linguistic minority communities are engaging local and regional health planning authorities to help ensure that they are responsive to the needs of official language minority communities and are integrating bilingual health professionals.

The "Health services access and retention projects" component provides funding for activities aimed at encouraging bilingual health professionals to practice in official language minority communities, engaging front-line health service providers in providing services in the second official language, supporting health human resource retention strategies, and addressing health needs specific to the demographics of official language minority communities.

Expected results:

Increased access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in official language minority communities.

Indicator: Number of health graduates working in official language minority communities (target year: 2016-17).

Increased offering of services in the minority language within health institutions and communities.

Indicator: Number of health institutions and communities where bilingual health services are available for official language minority communities (target year: 2016-17).

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 27.0 36.4 36.4 36.4
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 27.0 36.4 36.4 36.4

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012-13

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016-17

General Targeted Recipient Group: Named or designated recipients (15) include 3 organizations mandated to improve the health and health services needs of official language minority communities, 11 post-secondary institutions (colleges and universities) that promote training and labour market integration for health professionals to respond to the needs of official language minority communities, and 1 provincial government program to promote health human resources initiatives for improving services to these communities.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada analysis and review of financial cash flows and outcomes for each recipient, accompanied by bilateral discussions on the nature of the outcomes and their pertinence to meeting program objectives for improving health and health services in both official languages.

Regular meetings between Health Canada officials and recipient organizations, including management meetings, community-based events (conferences, consultations, research fora), face-to-face meetings, and site visits.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (The Partnership) (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: Not Applicable (Ts and Cs are embedded in the funding agreement)

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: The Partnership is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with more than 700 cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives: (1) to reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; (2) to enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and (3) to lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer. Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. The Partnership's initial five-year grant provided $250 million for 2007-12, and a named contribution agreement will provide an additional five years and $241 million for 2012-17.

Expected Results: The Partnership will become a leader in cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Aboriginal organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments. A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 48.5 47.5 47.5 47.5
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 48.5 47.5 47.5 47.5

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010-11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2015-16

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada works with the Partnership to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement. This also includes maintaining regular contact with the Partnership to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) (Voted)

Start Date: September 24, 2002

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010-11

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: The HCPCP uses contributions to fund non-profit, non-government organizations, including professional associations and educational institutions, and provincial, territorial and local governments.

The Program enables the federal government to respond to emerging health policy priorities, establish collaborative working arrangements with provincial/territorial governments to contribute to improvements in the health care system on a Pan-Canadian scale; and support organizations in achieving health care policy goals.

The Program fosters strategic and evidence based decision-making for quality health care, and promotes innovation through pilot projects, evaluation, policy research and analysis, and policy development on current and emerging priorities. Currently, the Program funds projects in priority health care policy areas such as access to health care; chronic and continuing care (including home and community care); health human resources, including assessment and integration of internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs); patient safety; and palliative/end-of-life care.

Expected Results: Projects supported by the Program have developed and implemented new educational and training approaches and built training capacity, for example the new training positions implemented through the Family Medicine Residencies Initiative. Projects supporting IEHPs have enabled these professionals to access assessments and training needed to join the health workforce. Numerous projects have developed tools and resources to enable health providers to maximize their roles in a range of settings, provided system managers and decision makers with data and decision making tools; and promoted the development of collaborative relationships to maximize health outcomes.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 34.1 26.4 25.7 25.7
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 34.1 26.4 25.7 25.7

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2013-14 (Sept 2013)

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit, Other Level of Government and Other-National.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: The Program engages recipients, potential recipients, and the public in various ways, for example, through stakeholder meetings and project site visits and by providing opportunities for stakeholder input in the development of program tools and templates.

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution Agreement to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) (Voted)

Start Date: May 17, 2013

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: In 2008, CADTH's funding was renewed as a Named Grant. As CADTH received funding via a Named Grant, there were no requirements to renew Terms and Conditions for this Grant. However, CADTH funding transitioned to a Contribution Agreement on April 1, 2013, upon expiration of the Named Grant on March 31, 2013.

Terms and Conditions were approved to cover the duration of future Contribution Agreements with CADTH. The fiscal year for those Terms and Conditions follows the traditional fiscal year calendar, from April 1 through March 31 of the following calendar year.

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: The CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Expected Results: The purpose of the current Contribution Agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review (CDR) and the Health Technology Management (HTM) activities comprised under Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Optimal Use (OU).

Expected results are: creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 16.4 16.1 16.1 16.1
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 16.4 16.1 16.1 16.1

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2007-08

An external evaluation of CADTH was conducted in 2012-13.

Health Canada is also conducting a synthesis evaluation involving this program that will be completed in 2013-14.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

  • Policy Forum.
  • Pharmaceutical Directors' Forum.
  • Health Technology Analysis Exchange.
  • CDR recommendations and Optimal Use working groups.
  • HTA analyses and rapid responses.

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) (Voted)

Start Date: May 15, 2013

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2012-13

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program:

Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Description: The contribution to the CPSI supports the federal government's interest (in a federal, provincial and territorial partnership context) in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. The first five-year grant funding agreement with CPSI ended on March 31, 2008, and was renewed for an additional five years, starting April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013. A new five-year contribution agreement began on April 1, 2013.

Expected Results: CPSI provides leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: education, with a focus on developing curriculum and training programs; interventions and programs, with a focus on coordinating and supporting evidence-informed clinical interventions and programs; research, to increase the scope and scale of patient safety research; and tools and resources, with a focus on creating tools and resources that can be applied by healthcare organizations. For 2013-18, CPSI will focus and align its activities with a new emphasis on the strategic goals that are most likely to drive further system-level transformation over the five-year period, and beyond.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants - - - -
Total Contributions 7.8 7.6 7.6 7.6
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - -
Total Transfer Payments 7.8 7.6 7.6 7.6

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation:

An external evaluation of CPSI was conducted in 2012-13.

Health Canada is also conducting a synthesis evaluation involving this program that will be completed in 2013-14.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2017-18

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-Profit

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Health Canada works with CPSI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CPSI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Transfer Payment Programs under $5 million

Disclosure of TPPS under $5 million
Name of TPP Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program Main Objective End Date of TPP, if applicable Type of TP (G, C) Planned Spending for 2014-15 ($000) Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation General Targeted Recipient Group
McMaster University's implementation of the "Teams Advancing Patient Experience: Strengthening Quality" project Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities To evaluate ways to achieve better health outcomes for patients while also making the healthcare system more cost-effective through greater implementation of medical teams. March 31, 2016. C 2,416.5 N/A McMaster University is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions.
Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System Health Products, Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals To support the development of a national organ and tissue donation and transplantation system that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting the federal role and interest in organ and tissue donation and transplantation. On-going funding.  Current agreement ends March 31, 2014. C 3,580.0 2012-13 Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions.
Grant to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Substance Use and Abuse, Controlled Substances To provide objective, evidence-based information and advice to help reduce the health, social and economic harms associated with substance abuse and addictions On-going funding.  Current grant agreement ends March 31, 2016. G 3,562.5 2010-11 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse.
Mood Disorders Society of Canada Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities Provide funding to the Mood Disorders Society of Canada (MDSC) in the amount of $5.2 million to:
  1. Establish the Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network (CDRIN) ($5 million).
  2. Develop and implement a national Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Continuing Medical Education (CME) training program for family physicians and specialists ($200,000).
March 31, 2017. C 2,000.0 N/A Non-Profit.
Grant to the Health Council of Canada Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities Through monitoring and annual public reporting on the progress achieved in implementing commitments in the 2003 First Ministers' Accord and the 2004 Health Accord, the Council contributes to enhancing accountability and transparency in healthcare system reform. June 30, 2014 (Note: Further to the Government's decision to phase out funding for the Council, Corporate Members of the Health Council decided, at their June 2013 meeting, to wind up the Council effective June 30, 2014). G 4,000.0 2007-08 Health Council of Canada.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Conditional Grant to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Name of recipient: Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly known as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

Start date: 1996-97

End date: N/A

Description: At the time of its establishment (1996-97), CFHI (then known as CHSRF) received a $66.5 million endowment. In addition, it received additional federal grants for the following purposes:

1999: $25 million to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention, management, leadership and the issues emerging from health system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund or NRF).

1999: $35 million to support the CHSRF's participation in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

2003: $25 million to develop a program to equip health system managers and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use research to better manage the Canadian health care system (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA) over a thirteen-year period.

Building on this history, in 2012 CHSRF's mission and name were changed to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) to reflect the evolution of its work. CFHI remains an independent organization, now dedicated to accelerating healthcare improvement and transformation for Canadians. It collaborates with governments, policy makers, and health system leaders to convert evidence and innovative practices into actionable policies, programs, tools and leadership development.

Upfront Multi-Year Funding (millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2014-15
Planned Funding
2015-16
Planned Funding
2016-17
151.5 1996:  66.5
1999:  60
2003:  25
Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Summary of annual plans of recipient:

CFHI's programming is guided by its objective to accelerate healthcare improvement by creating ongoing interaction, collaboration and exchange of ideas and information between governments, policy-makers, health system leaders and providers, and to convert evidence and innovative practices into actionable policies, programs, tools and leadership development.

According to its 2014 Program of Work, CFHI will continue to work in collaboration with policy makers, health system leaders and decision-makers to:          

  • collaborate on healthcare improvement and transformation initiatives at the provincial/territorial, regional and federal levels.
  • enhance education and training programming through the EXTRA program, including on-line education and decision-support courses and tools.
  • synthesize existing evidence and research to inform work on healthcare improvement.
  • involve patients in decisions about care re-design and delivery and increase patients' capacity for engaging more meaningfully in decision-making.
  • bring evaluation and performance management knowledge and support to CFHI's work as well as its collaborations with others.
  • spread innovations and knowledge to facilitate further healthcare improvement and transformation.

With the launch in 2012 of refocused programming, CFHI will continue to focus on communicating its new programs and mission to CFHI's targeted audiences with the goals of: 1) creating recognition of the value of CFHI in accelerating healthcare improvement and transformation for Canadians; and 2) articulating how CFHI's programs are interconnected and convert evidence and innovative practices into actionable policies, programs, tools and leadership development.

 Link to recipient's site: http://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/Home.aspx

Conditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: Canadian Health System Policy, Health System Priorities

Name of recipient: Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Description: Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis. Its Corporate Members are the 14 federal, provincial and territorial Deputy Ministers of Health.

To date, the Government of Canada has committed the following funding allocations to Infoway:

  • $500 million in 2001 in support of the September 2000 First Ministers' Action Plan for Health System Renewal to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority.
  • $600 million in the First Ministers' Health Accord of February 2003, to accelerate implementation of the EHR and telehealth.
  • $100 million as part of Budget 2004 to support development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system.
  • $400 million as part of Budget 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait times reductions.

Also, as confirmed in Budget 2010, Canada's Economic Action Plan allocated an additional $500 million to Infoway to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of healthcare and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (millions)
Total Funding Prior Years' Funding Planned Funding
2014-15
Planned Funding
2015-16
Planned Funding
2016-17
$2,100.00 $1,816.97Conditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway Footnote 3 To be determinedConditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway Footnote 4 To be determinedConditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway Footnote 4 To be determinedConditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway Footnote 4

Summary of annual plans of recipient:

Through its Strategic Investor role and building on its strategic plan released in 2013 ("Opportunities for Action: A Pan-Canadian Digital Health Strategic Plan"), Infoway collaborates with provinces and territories and with health organizations to accelerate the development, adoption and effective use of digital health innovations across Canada, and contributes to the delivery of better quality and access to care and more efficient delivery of health services for patients and clinicians. Infoway investments support evidence-based care that will foster a more modern and sustainable health care system for all Canadians.

For 2014-15, Infoway plans to focus on three key objectives:

  1. Deploy EHRs for Canadians - by working with all jurisdictions and other stakeholders, continue to advance the availability, adoption and use of the six core systems of an EHR (i.e. client registries, provider registries, diagnostic imaging systems, drug information systems, laboratory information systems, clinical reports/immunization); and, accelerate the realization of their associated benefits to support health care innovation and transformation.

    In terms of availability of EHR systems, Infoway's work in 2014-15 will further advance the laboratory and drug domains.  This work will contribute to the goal of having 100 per cent of Canadians with an EHR available to their authorized healthcare professionals by 2016.
  2. Get information into the hands of clinicians - continue the current focus to increase advanced use of EMRs by physicians and nurse practitioners in ambulatory clinics and community-based practices across Canada.
  3. Improve the patient experience for Canadians, especially those with chronic conditions and their health care providers, through the use of remote patient monitoring and other emerging technologies such as consumer health solutions and mobile devices in health care.

 Link to recipient's site: https://www.infoway-inforoute.ca/

Greening Government Operations

Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce GHG emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Departmental target: 20% reduction by 2020-21

Scope and Context

GHG emissions sources include only on-road fleet operations.

The Fleet GHG Inventory Accounting Template provided by Public Works Government Services Canada (PWGSC) and the Automotive Resources International (ARI) database is used to monitor and manage fleet operations.

As of 2012-13, Health Canada had decreased its on-road fleet-related GHG emissions by 20%Greening Government Operations Footnote gg1 from the 2005-06 baseline year, surpassing the original commitment of an overall 10% reduction target by 2020-21.

Key activities include the replacement of old vehicles, adherence to Health Canada's Fleet Management Policy and Fleet Management Standard as well as timely communications to raise employee awareness.

Program: Internal Services
Sub-Program: Asset Management Services

Performance Measurement
Expected Result

Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2015. Yes [March 31, 2015]
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005-2006. 3.06 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in current fiscal year. 2.45 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-06 to the current fiscal year, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. -20%
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions (indicate if not applicable). N/A

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

7.1 Target: Real Property Environmental Performance

As of April 1 2014, and pursuant to departmental Real Property Sustainability Frameworks, an industry recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Scope and Context

Health Canada is custodian of nine buildings (seven laboratories, two support facilities) totalling 91,048 m2. These facilities and 169,000 m2 of leased space meet the needs of approximately 9,081employees in 79 locations In addition, Health Canada owns eight health facilities which provide First Nations and employees the space required to deliver health care services to First Nations communities.

In response to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy 2010-13, Health Canada developed a Green Buildings Strategic Framework. The Framework promotes green building and development practices using a suite of industry-recognized assessment tools to result in better environmental performance of real property projects. This Framework will be used as the basis for developing a Real Property Sustainability Framework for the Department.

Green building and development practices are applied to all temperature controlled office and laboratory spaces over 1000m2 where benchmark information is available.  Health Canada has completed assessments of the six custodial buildings subject to the requirements of the Green Buildings Strategic Framework.  In 2012-13, one building was certified to the industry-recognized assessment tool BOMA BEStGreening Government Operations Footnote gg2 Level 1 and another at Level 2.  Since facilities are reassessed on a six year cycle, no new assessments will be completed until the next assessment period in 2015-16.

Program: Internal Services
Sub-Program: Asset Management Services

Performance Measurement
Expected Result

An industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Real Property Sustainability Framework in place to improve the management of energy, waste and water in departmental real property assets by March 31, 2015. Yes [March 31, 2015]
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings (over 1000 m2) and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1000 m2) where the Crown is the major lessee, assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool, and associated floor space (m2) . 0 Crown-owned buildings
0 m2
0 New lease or lease renewal projects
0 m2
Planned assessment tool to be used:
BOMA BESt
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings, new construction, build-to-lease projects, major renovations projects, achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance, and associated floor space (m2). 0 Crown-owned buildings
0 m2
0 New construction projects
0 m2
0 Build-to-lease projects
0 m2
0 Major renovation projects
0 m2
Planned environmental performance level to be achieved: 
Number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance. 1 Fit-up and refit project
2788 m2
Planned environmental performance level to be achieved:
  • 3 Green Globes (projects $1M-$10M)
  • LEED (CI) Silver (projects $10M+)
 
Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Target
7.1.1.1. Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian's current commitment(s) to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tool(s). [Mandatory] Seeking to reach "Achieved" as defined by the guidelines for this target area.
7.1.1.4. Manage the collection, diversion and disposal of workplace waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner. Seeking to reach "Achieved" as defined by the guidelines for this target area.

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context

Health Canada will continue to focus on greening its procurement of office supplies, information technology (IT) hardware, and right-sized vehicles that are the most fuel efficient in their class available at the time of purchase:

  • For office supplies, the scope excludes purchases using acquisition cards. The percentage of office supplies identified as having environmental features was 53% in fiscal year 2012-13 which puts Health Canada on track to achieving the 80% target by March 2017.
  • For IT hardware purchases, the scope includes automatic data processing equipment (e.g. computers). Laboratory, field equipment and purchases using acquisition cards are excluded. The Department's objective will be to maintain and/or exceed a percentage rate of 92%, which was achieved in 2012-13, of environmentally friendly IT hardware purchases that include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the equipment.
  • For vehicles, 64% were right-sized and the most fuel efficient in their class available at the time of purchase, as per Health Canada's Fleet Standard. This puts Health Canada on track to achieve the 90% target by March 2017.
  • The number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year excludes vacant positions and employees on leave.
  • The number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement, in the given fiscal year excludes vacant positions and employees on leave.

Program: Internal Services
Sub-Program: Asset Management Services

Performance Measurement
Expected Result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place (as of April 1, 2014). Yes [March 31, 2014]
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year. 24
100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement, in the given fiscal year. 6
100%

Departmental Green Procurement Target:

By March 31, 2017, 92% of IT hardware purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the equipment.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Volume of IT hardware purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total volume of all purchases for IT hardware in the year in question. 92%

Departmental Green Procurement Target:

By March 31, 2017, 80% of office supply purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the supplies.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Volume of office supply purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total volume of all office supply purchases in the year in question. 60%

Departmental Green Procurement Target:

By March 31, 2017, 90% of vehicles purchased are right-sized for operational needs and are the most fuel efficient vehicle in their class available at the time of purchase and/or are an alternative vehicle.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Number of vehicle purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total number of vehicle purchases in the year in question. 75%
 
Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Target
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Seeking to reach "Achieved" as defined by the guidelines for this target area.

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Scope and Context

Health Canada has approximately 9,081 employees located in 79 locations across Canada. Employees may be located in major cities or in remote locations focusing on providing health services to First Nations communities.  Although some unique situations exist, the majority of Health Canada's workplaces are offices containing typical office equipment: computers, telephones, printers and photocopiers, boardrooms and cafeterias.

Since 2010, Health Canada has done the following to make its workplaces more sustainable:

  • Reduced the number of printers  by over 50%, reaching a ratio of 7.5 employees to each printer;
  • Ensured that programs are in place to divert surplus electronic and electrical equipment and batteries are from landfill;
  • Recycled laboratory plastics in the National Capital Region, in addition to a standard 3RsGreening Government Operations Footnote gg5 waste diversion program;
  • Reduced office paper purchases by 40% since 2010; and
  • Put into place a Green Meetings Guide.

Program: Internal Services
Sub-Program: Asset Management Services

Performance Measurement
Expected Result

Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by March 31, 2015. Yes [March 31, 2015]
 
Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Target
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e. printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings). Seeking to reach "Achieved" as defined by the guidelines for this target area.
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Seeking to reach "Achieved" as defined by the guidelines for this target area.

Goal 8: Water Management

Target 8.1: Water Management

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Scope and Context

Health Canada is custodian of nine buildings (seven laboratories, two support facilities) totalling 91,048 m2. These facilities and 169,000 m2 of leased space meet the needs of approximately 9,081 employees in 79 locations  In addition, Health Canada owns eight health facilities which provide First Nations and employees the space required to deliver health care services to First Nations communities.

Through the development of a Real Property Sustainability Framework, Health Canada will define its approach to sustainable water management within its real property portfolio.

Program: Internal Services
Sub-Program: Asset Management Services

Performance Measurement
Expected Result

Water is managed sustainably in Government of Canada real property operations.

Departmental Strategies for GGO Targets
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Approach to improving water management included in Real Property Sustainability Framework by March 31, 2015. Yes [March 31, 2015]

Horizontal Initiatives

Early Childhood Development Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children

Name of lead department: Health Canada

Lead department PAA program: First Nations and Inuit Health Primary Health Care

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component - October 2002
  • Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) component - December 2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component - ongoing
  • ELCC component - ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

  • ECD: $320 million (M) 2002-03 to 2006-07. $52.603 M per year thereafter and ongoing
  • ELCC: $45M 2005-06 to 2007-08. $13.047 M per year thereafter and ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The goal of the Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development (FSECD) for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children, announced in October 2002, is to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. This initiative allocated $320 M over the first five years which was shared by Health Canada, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

In December 2004, Cabinet approved an additional $45M over three years (beginning fiscal year 2005-06) and $13.047M ongoing for the ELCC component to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs: Aboriginal Head Start On-Reserve (AHSOR) for Health Canada and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI) for ESDC.

Shared outcome(s):

The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers Federal/Provincial/ Territorial ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

Governance structure(s): Each federal department is responsible for their specific program activities.

Planning Highlights:

In collaboration with partners and stakeholders, federal departments will continue to build on evidence to inform programming, and enhance linkages between programs and services to better support Aboriginal children and families.

Federal Partner #1: Health Canada

Electronic Links:

Federal Partner - Health Canada ($ million)
PAA Program Contributing activities/ programs Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2014-15
First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Aboriginal Head Start On-Reserve (AHSOR) 256.967 from 2002-03 to 2013-14,
18.997 ongoing

Committed in 2002
18.997
ELCC
68.52 from 2005-06 to 2013-14,
6.547 ongoing

Committed in 2005
6.547
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder-First Nations and Inuit Component 174.1 from 2002-03 to 2013-14,
13.166 ongoing

Committed in 2002
13.166
Capacity BuildingTable Federal Partner - Health Canada footnote i 10.878 from 2002-03 to 2012-13
0 beyond 2013-14

Committed in 2002
0
Total From start to 2014-15
ECD: 474.1
ELCC: 75.07
ECD: 32.163
ELCC: 6.547

Table Federal Partner - Health Canada footnotes

Table Federal Partner - Health Canada footnote i

As per the 2012 Economic Action Plan, and consistent with Health Canada's focus on front-line services, funding to National Aboriginal Organizations for Capacity Building has been redirected to other priorities.

Return to table Federal Partner - Health Canada footnote i referrer

2014-15 Expected results, including Targets:

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR):

  • Ongoing program support and enhancement.
  • Increase integration, coordination, access, and quality of programming.

Expected Result: First Nations and Inuit have access to quality healthy child development programs and services (Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) 2013).

Target: 9,000 First Nations children on-reserve access AHSOR (PMF 2013).

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC):

  • Ongoing support and implementation of program standards.
  • Development of best practices to increase access to earlier FASD diagnosis and early intervention.

Expected Results: Maintaining the number of First Nations and Inuit communities served by FASD Programming.

Target: 36 mentoring sites, 17 community coordinators, and program supports in over 400 First Nations communities.

Federal Partner #2: Public Health Agency of Canada

Electronic Link:  Public Health Agency of Canada

Federal Partner - Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) ($ millions)
PAA Program Contributing activities/programs Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2014-15 Planning SpendingTable Federal Partner - Public Health Agency of Canada footnote i
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities 62.880 (2002-03 through to 2006-07)
12.576/ year and ongoing

Committed in 2002.
10.7
Capacity Building 2.5 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 0.5/year) and ongoing

Committed in 2002
0.2
Total ECD: 10.9

Table Federal Partner - Public Health Agency of Canada footnotes

Table Federal Partner - Public Health Agency of Canada footnote i

PHAC's planned spending has been adjusted to reflect historical government-wide reductions to departmental operating budgets

Return to table Federal Partner - Public Health Agency of Canada footnote i referrer

2014-15 Expected Results, including targets:

Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC):

Continue to support program expansion by serving an additional 1,000 children to the program's original 2002 enrollment of 3,500, on an ongoing basis. The program is also enhanced on an ongoing basis through an increased number of special needs and parental outreach workers and special needs training.

Target: A total of 4,500 children reached. 

Capacity Building:

The program will continue to enhance coordination, engagement and information exchange with other federal departments, provincial/territorial governments, and key stakeholders in Aboriginal early childhood education to develop tools and resources to build capacity in Aboriginal communities.

Target: An Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities Performance Measurement Strategy is currently under development, which will include specific expected results, performance indicators and targets. Targets will be available at that time.

Federal Partner #3: Employment and Social Development Canada

Electronic Links:  N/A

Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) ($ millions)
PAA Program Contributing activities/ programs Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2014-15 Planned Spending
Skills and EmploymentTable Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote i First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative 45.7 (2002-03 through to 2006-079.14/year) and ongoing

Committed in 2002
9.14
ELCC
21 (2005-06 through to 2007-08 at 7/year)
6.5/year ongoing

Committed in 2005
6.5
Social DevelopmentTable Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote i Research and Knowledge 21.2 (2002-03 through to 2006-07) 4.24/year and ongoing

Committed in 2002
0.4Table Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote ii
Total ECD: 9.54
ELCC: 6.5

Table Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnotes

Table Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote i

Based on current ESDC Program Alignment Architecture (PAA).

Return to the first table Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote i referrer

Table Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote i

ESDC's planned spending has been adjusted to reflect historical government-wide reductions to departmental operating budgets.

Return to table Federal Partner - Employment and Social Development Canada footnote ii referrer

2014-15 Expected Results, including targets:

First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative: Approximately 8,500 child care spaces in over 450 First Nation and Inuit sites through 62 Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) Agreement Holders.

Labour Market - Aboriginal Skills Employment and Training Strategy: Program support and enhancement for parents participating in skills development and training.

Federal Partner: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada was a funding partner between 2002 to 2012, allocating $50.050M (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07; $1,010M/year) 2007-08 to 2011-12. Funding from this partner ended as of April 2012 in order to simplify and streamline operations in line with the Economic Action Plan.

Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2014-15
ECD: 320 (2002-03 to 2006-07)
60 in 2002-03 and 65/year hereafter (until 2006-2007)
52.603/year and ongoing
ECD: 52.603
ELCC: 45 (2005-06 to 2007-08)
14.5 in 2005-06
15.3 in 2006-07; 15.2 in 2007-08)
13.047/year and ongoing
ELCC: 13.047
Total from start to 2014-15 Total 65.65

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Halina Cyr, MHSc, RD
Director, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Interprofessional Advisory and Program Support Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
20th Floor, Jeanne Mance Building
Address Locator: 1920A, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa ON, K1A 0K9
Tel: 613-948-6412
E-mail: halina.cyr@hc-sc.gc.ca

Chemicals Management Plan

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Chemicals Management Plan

Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)/Environment Canada (EC)

Lead department PAA Program: Environmental Risks to Health (HC)/Substances and Waste Management (EC)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 (second phase)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (second phase)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $516 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

  • setting priorities and government-imposed timelines for risk assessment and risk management of chemicals of concern.
  • enhancing research, monitoring and surveillance.
  • increasing industry stewardship and responsibilities for substances.
  • collaborating internationally on chemicals assessment and management.
  • communicating to Canadians the potential risks of chemical substances.
  • engaging industry to inform risk assessment and risk management action while also enhancing trust in the program.

Jointly managed by HC and EC, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances.  It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (which replaced the Hazardous Products Act in June 2011), the Food and Drugs Act, and the Pest Control Products Act

Building on lessons learned in the first four years of the program, CMP priority setting was refined and, under the second phase of the CMP, the remaining substances were grouped to facilitate more efficient assessments, industry participation and risk management. Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, health, drug and other products.

The same core functions continue in phase two of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and policy and program management.

The following program areas are involved in CMP activities:

HC

  • Health Products and Food Branch:
    • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate.
    • Food Directorate.
    • Natural Health Products Directorate.
    • Policy, Planning and International Affairs Directorate.
    • Therapeutics Products Directorate.
    • Veterinary Drugs Directorate.
  • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Consumer Product Safety Directorate.
    • Safe Environments Directorate.
    • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate.
  • Regions and Programs Bureau.
  • Pest Management Regulatory Agency.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

  • Office of Border Health Services:
    • Travelling Public Program.

EC

  • Environmental Stewardship Branch:
    • Chemicals Sector Directorate.
    • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate.
    • Industrial Sectors Directorate.
    • Energy and Transportation Directorate.
    • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate.
  • Science and Technology Branch:
    • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate.
    • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate.
    • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate.
    • Water Science and Technology Directorate.
  • Enforcement Branch.
  • Strategic Policy Branch:
    • Economic Analysis Directorate.

For more information, see the  Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal at: http://chemicalsubstanceschimiques.gc.ca/index-eng.php

Shared outcome(s):

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Knowledge, information and data on substances of concern is used by HC and EC recipients to inform risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, research, risk assessment, and monitoring & surveillance activities.
  • Canadians and stakeholder groups understand information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern.
  • Targeted industry conforms or complies with requirements of risk management measures.
  • Targeted industry takes voluntary or enforced action to protect Canadians and the environment.
  • Targeted industry understands its obligations to take action to protect Canadians and the environment.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Canadians use information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern to avoid or minimize risks posed by these substances.
  • Risks associated with harmful substances in humans, the environment, food and consumer products are prevented, minimized or eliminated.

Final Outcome:

  • Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances.

Governance structure(s):

In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, EC and HC deliver their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures. CMP governance is assured through a joint Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee). The CMP ADM Committee is supported by the CEPA DGs which is comprised of representatives of the core program areas. This is supplemented by the Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC) which is the extended group of Directors General required for implementation of the CMP.

2014-15 Planning Highlights:

In 2014-15, the program will continue to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining high priority substances from the first phase of the CMP, including ongoing assessment of substances in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach, as well as the assessment of other substances deemed to be a priority. Screening Assessment Reports and Risk Management Strategies for high priorities will be completed and risk management measures will continue to be developed, implemented, tracked and monitored. Work with other jurisdictions bilaterally and in multinational fora to undertake regional and multilateral efforts to manage chemicals of concern will continue.

In 2014-15, HC and EC will continue assessment and management of the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,500 substances by 2016. Draft Screening Assessment Reports covering approximately 160 substances are planned to be published in 2014-15, including substances from the following initiatives, as well as 26 living organisms on the Domestic Substances List (DSL):

  • Petroleum Sector Stream Approach.
  • Aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substances grouping.
  • Selenium containing substances grouping.
  • Boron containing substances grouping.
  • Certain organic flame retardants grouping.
  • Substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs) grouping.

Final Assessment Reports covering approximately 500 substances are also planned to be published in 2014-15, including substances from the following initiatives, as well as 250 previously assessed substances from the DSL:

  • Petroleum Sector Stream Approach.
  • Aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substances grouping.
  • Cobalt-containing substances grouping.
  • Methylenediphenyl diisocyanates and diamines (MDI/MDA) grouping.
  • Substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs) grouping.
  • Certain internationally classified substances grouping.

Analysis of data will be undertaken for the second phase of the Domestic Substances List Inventory Update (DSL IU2) as well as for three Groupings of the Substance Groupings initiative for existing substances (Organic Flame Retardants, Phthalates, and Selenium). A lessons learned report for CMP information gathering is planned and will be used to inform the next phase of the CMP and future inventory updates. Data collection activities to inform the risk management of Aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substances, Organic Flame Retardants, and Phthalates will take place, as needed.

Risk management highlights for 2014-15 include the publication, in Part II of the Canada Gazette, of final regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), 1999.  This will include:  the Products Containing Mercury Regulations, the Regulations Amending the Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Regulations and the Regulations Amending 2-Butoxyethanol Regulations.

Proposed regulations will also be published in Part I of the Canada Gazette.  These are: Regulations Amending the Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances 2012 to add Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) (including Decabromodiphenyl Ether - decaBDE), Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS), Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Long-Chain Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids (PFCAs), and the Products Containing PBDEs Regulations. EC will also develop national targets for the Code of Practice to facilitate performance measurement for Environmental Management of Road Salts in Canada.

HC and EC will also continue to use the new substances program to identify and manage, as appropriate, the human health and environmental risks of new substances before import or manufacture in Canada.  The program will perform risk assessments on approximately 450 new substances, including products of biotechnology and nanomaterials, and will develop any needed risk management measures, while also continuing its prioritization of substances on the Revised In Commerce List (ICL).

The program will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address identified risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods and food packaging materials, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water. Highlights for 2014-15 include having the regulatory package ready for publication under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act in the Canada Gazette Part II for a high priority CMP substance - (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP); and compliance and enforcement activities related to heavy metals in toys. Approval of five guidelines/guidance documents will be sought from the provinces and territories, as part of the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality, for toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, tetrachloroethylene and boil water advisories.

Work will continue on substances/products regulated under the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), including the review, listing and prioritization for assessment of risk due to presence in the environment of substances in F&DA regulated products, as well as the development of Environmental Assessment Regulations and non-regulatory initiatives, and re-evaluation of food additives and food packaging materials.

HC and EC will continue to conduct research and monitoring programs to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Specific monitoring activities for 2014-15 include preparations for the release of the biomonitoring results from the third cycle of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and the continued data collection for the fourth cycle of the CHMS. Several substances will also be added to the Total Diet Study to fill in anticipated gaps for future CMP priorities. Environmental monitoring of chemicals of concern in air, water, sediments, aquatic biota, and wildlife will continue in 2014-15, in addition to sector monitoring through the wastewater monitoring program.

Research in support of current CMP themes and priorities will continue and opportunities for synergies with government organizations, universities and international partners will be continue to be explored.

Work will also continue on the re-evaluation of previously approved pesticides according to legislated timelines and requirements under the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), as well as on continuing to monitor health and environmental incidents related to pesticides, analyzing trends and sales data, and taking regulatory action, as needed.

The program will develop compliance strategies and compliance promotion and enforcement plans and will continue to deliver related activities, to promote regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and compliance with, regulatory requirements for some CMP substances. Focus will be on delivering compliance promotion activities for the highest priority instruments.

EC and HC will continue to reach out to stakeholders and the public in order to implement the CMP successfully and help achieve the overall goal of protecting health and the environment for all Canadians. An ongoing focus will be on increasing transparency and predictability, as well as expanding the reach of key stakeholder engagement activities to support involvement in the program. Outreach work with Canadians to raise awareness of the risks and safe use of substances will continue to be undertaken by Health Canada.

Federal Partner #1: HC ($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner PA Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation from Start to End Date, 2011-12 to 2015-16 Planned Spending for 2014-15
Health Canada 2.1 Health Products a. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 10.4 2.1
2.2 Food Safety and Nutrition a. Risk Assessment 5.8 1.2
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 5.3 1.1
c. Research 3.6 0.7
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 5.4 1.1
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 1.0 0.2
2.3 Environmental Risks to Health a. Risk Assessment 57.5 11.5
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and EnforcementTable Federal Partner #1: HC footnote i 63.2 11.4
c. ResearchTable Federal Partner #1: HC footnote ii 51.2 13.3
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 43.3 8.7
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 10.1 2.0
f. Policy and Program Management 12.1 2.3
2.4 Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety a. Risk Assessment 12.8 2.6
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 12.9 2.6
2.7 Pesticides a. Risk Assessment 20.9 4.2
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 4.4 0.9
c. Research 1.7 0.3
Internal Services 36.9 7.3
Total Health Canada 358.5 73.5
Please note that the 13% Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) Accommodations funding is included in the above table. Totals may vary slightly due to rounding of figures.

Table Federal Partner #1: HC footnotes

Table Federal Partner #1: HC footnote i

$9.5M ($3.2M/yr) from 2013-14 to 2015-16 was transferred to PHAC as a result of Budget 2012.

Return to table Federal Partner #1: HC footnote i referrer

Table Federal Partner #1: HC footnote ii

$9M from 2012-13 to 2014-15 included for the Banting Retrofit.

Return to table Federal Partner #1: HC footnote ii referrer

2014-15 Expected Results: HC

  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances informs risk assessment and risk management processes, as well as monitoring and surveillance activities.
  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • Data on use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern to inform risk assessment, risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders.
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCPSA and F&DA.
  • Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures.
  • Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions.
Federal Partner #2: PHAC ($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner PAA Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation from Start to End Date, 2011-12 to 2015-16 Planned Spending for 2014-15
PHAC 1.3.2 Border Health b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 9.5 3.2
Total PHAC 9.5 3.2
Please note that the 13% PWGSC Accommodations funding is included in the above table.

2014-15 Expected Results: PHAC

Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCPSA and F&DA.

Federal Partner #3: EC ($ million)
Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2011-12 to 2015-16) 15. Planned Spending for
2014-15
3.1 Substances and Waste Management a. Risk Assessment 17.4 3.5
b. Risk Management 68.4 13.7
c. Research 9.0 1.8
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 24.6 4.9
3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution a. Compliance Promotion 4.3 0.9
b. Enforcement 11.3 2.3
Internal Services 12.4 2.5
Total 147.5 29.5
Totals may differ within tables due to rounding of figures.

Expected Results: EC

  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances informs risk assessment and risk management processes, as well as monitoring and surveillance activities.
  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • Data on use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern to inform risk assessment, risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders.
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCPSA and F&DA.
  • Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures.
  • Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions.
Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
TotalTable Federal Partners - Total Program Spending footnote i Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date): ($ millions) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2014-15: ($ millions)
516.0 106.20
Please note that 13% PWGSC Accommodations funding is included in the above table.
Totals may differ within tables due to rounding of figures.

Table Federal Partners - Total Program Spending footnotes

Table Federal Partners - Total Program Spending footnote i

$9M from 2012-13 to 2014-15 included for the Banting Retrofit.

Return to table Federal Partners - Total Program Spending footnote i referrer

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):  N/A

Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen, Director
Chemicals Policy Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
5th Floor, 269 Laurier Street, West
Address Locator: 4905B
Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
Telephone number: (613) 941-8071
E-mail address: suzanne.leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca

Stewart Lindale, Director
Legislative and Regulatory Affairs
Environmental Stewardship Branch
Environment Canada
351, boul. Saint Joseph
Gatineau, Québec K1A 0H3
Telephone number: (819) 934-2358
E-mail address: Steward.Lindale@ec.gc.ca

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP)

Name of lead department(s): The lead is shared between Health Canada (HC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Lead department PAA program:

  • HC: Health Products, Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety, Pesticides and Food Safety and Nutrition
  • CFIA: Food Safety Program
  • PHAC: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and Public Health Infrastructure
  • CIHR: Health and Health Services Advances

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-09

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing started in FY 2013-14

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $488.6M for 2008-09 to 2012-13 and $125.0M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is to assess that the food, health and consumer products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The FCSAP was originally a 5 year horizontal initiative, but is now an on-going initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, food borne illness outbreaks, and the global withdrawal of some prescription medicines, prompted the need for government action in 2007.

The FCSAP includes efforts to modernize Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe food, health and consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The FCSAP bolsters Canada's regulatory system by committing to amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative and regulatory regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. The FCSAP helps to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The FCSAP established an integrated, risk-based plan that includes a series of initiatives premised on three key areas of action: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight provides for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed, we work to enhance health and safety risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

A number of the initiatives established under the FCSAP are being furthered through the Healthy and Safe Food for Canadians Framework.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring).
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements.
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards.
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food.
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents.
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food.
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards.
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products.
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements.

Governance structure(s):

The Minister of Health has responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the FCSAP.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) has primary responsibility for implementing FCSAP activities related to health products along with the Regions and Programs Bureau (RAPB) with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and CIHR on one initiative (increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness).

Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with RAPB and PHAC, work together to implement FCSAP activities related to consumer products.

CFIA, HPFB and the PHAC work together to implement FCSAP activities related to food.

The Communications and Public Affairs Branch (CPAB) of Health Canada provides communications support for all of the above activities and coordinates or leads many of the horizontal Departmental activities.

Planning Highlights:

The FCSAP reflects the need to modernize and sharpen the focus of Government action to protect Canadians and responds to the economic realities and new technologies of the 21st century, such as globalization and the introduction of more complex products. The FCSAP is an integrated, risk-based plan with the streams of initiatives (premised on the three key areas of action: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response) aligned to meet these needs.

Federal Partner #1: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions, including Internal Services)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2014-15Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote 1
Health Products Active Prevention 56.8 10.0
Targeted Oversight 34.6 10.2
Rapid Response Existing resources Existing resources
Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety Active Prevention 41.0 13.7
Targeted Oversight 15.7 4.9
Rapid Response 17.9 4.4
Pesticides Active Prevention 6.9 1.6
Rapid Response 8.0 2.1
Food Safety and Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 7.5
Rapid Response 1.3 0.4
Total 211.8 54.8
Expected results by program (HC):
Health Products

Active Prevention

In 2014-15, the Health Products program will continue to engage stakeholders in the modernization of Canada's regulatory system. HPFB is taking a phased approach to implementation as described in the Regulatory Roadmap.

In an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficacy of health products, Health Canada will continue to focus on enhancing the integrity of the health product supply chain in Canada by educating stakeholders and improving the oversight of the ingredients found in health products as per the new Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) regulations which came into force on November 8, 2013. Health Canada will continue to implement the new regulations with the full implementation of the API licensing and inspection programs.

Health Canada is committed to enhancing the transparency of regulatory decision-making related to pharmaceutical and biological products and medical devices. The Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) project provides information about Health Canada's decision to authorise applicable products for sale in Canada. Phase II of the project was launched in 2012, where SBD documents were redesigned into a question and answer format that is more easily navigable and user-friendly. Information on post-authorisation activities is now included, allowing Canadians to get up-to-date information on products which have SBDs. The SBDs will continue to include regulatory, safety and effectiveness considerations with an increased focus on Health Canada's risk/benefit analysis. In 2014-15, Health Canada will undertake an evaluation of Phase II of the SBD project.

Health Canada also reviews Product Monographs (PM) produced by Market Authorization Holders (MAHs) that are factual, scientific documents on a drug product that describes the properties, claims, indications and conditions as well as information that may be required for the optimal, safe and effective use of the drug. The PM consists of three sections: Part I - Health Professional Information; Part II - Scientific Information; and Part III - Consumer Information. Health Canada has drafted plain language labelling improvements to PM Part III (now called Consumer Medication Information) which are targeted to be implemented early in 2014-15. Plans are also underway to make plain language labelling improvements to Parts I and II and consultations on these proposed improvements will take place in 2014.

As part of the lifecycle approach, Health Canada will continue reviewing Risk Management Plans (RMP) for therapeutic products. The RMPs provide information related to both identified and potential risks, strategies to characterize the risks in question, and a risk minimization plan. RMPs are submitted on a voluntary basis. Health Canada will also be exploring ways to enhance its active surveillance activities to ensure a risk-based efficient and effective approach.

To increase awareness and compliance with regulatory requirements, Health Canada will continue to engage in pre-submission meetings with industry to ensure higher quality submissions and to provide valuable scientific and regulatory guidance to stakeholders. These meetings provide the opportunity to monitor and evaluate the exchange of information as well as obtain feedback regarding areas of concern prior to filing a submission.

With the age of blockbuster drugs coming to an end, Health Canada will experience a paradigm shift towards niche market drugs of high complexity such as combination products, orphan drugs, personalized medicines and cancer drugs. Pre-submissions meetings with industry will be of even more importance to ensure appropriate guidance to different sets of regulations are provided to the sponsor. As well, since Health Canada's mandate is the review and authorization of drug products, increased collaboration with the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) may be needed to ensure speedier access to these niche drug products.

The Government of Canada has made a number of commitments to involve the public in its decision-making processes. Health Canada is putting these commitments into effect through a variety of public involvement opportunities. External advisory bodies are one mechanism that Health Canada is using to receive public input and advice on scientific, technical, policy, and program matters. Currently, an initiative to incorporate observers in advisory body meetings has been undertaken in order to increase openness and transparency.

Expected Results: Increased industry awareness and knowledge of regulatory requirements; enhancement of knowledge of post-market health products safety risks to inform decisions; increased oversight of the risk management and risk mitigation strategies for health products; increased safety of APIs through industry compliance with the Food and Drug Act (FDA) and its regulations; improved timeliness of pre-market reviews; and increased awareness and understanding of the safe use of health products by consumers and health care professionals.

Target / Performance Indicator: Number of engagement opportunities with industry, international collaborations; number of guidance/educational tools developed; number of standards, frameworks and policies developed or modified; number of consultations/ engagement activities with Canadians and target populations; improved timeliness of pre-market reviews; number risk management and mitigation plans received, reviewed and implemented; and percent of API firms in compliance as determined through the inspection program (once established)Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote #hfnb2.

Targeted Oversight

Through the National Border Integrity Program, Health Canada's ability to make and support admissibility decisions at the border as they relate to health products will be strengthened. The program will continue to advance its ability to monitor and control the importation of health products by addressing challenges involved in reducing the health and safety risk for products entering Canada through the following initiatives: a national standardized process for the handling of health products at the border; establishment of service standards between Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Health Canada to improve the ability to respond when safety incidents occur; and, undertaking public education activities to inform Canadians of risk associated with the importation of non-compliant health products. The program intends to further expand its work on the Single Window Initiative (SWI).

In addition, Health Canada will continue to review Periodic Safety Update Reports (PSURs) which are documents that summarize the worldwide safety experience of a health product at pre-established post-authorization times. The department will also continue to review Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report (PBRER), introduced in 2013. PBRERs expand the scope of the review to put an emphasis on the benefits of medicinal products, especially when risk estimates have changed the benefit-risk balance of a product. Furthermore, Health Canada will continue to seek opportunities to expand and enhance the Good Pharmacovigilance Practices (GVP) inspection program, such as through a review of international best practices and the incorporation of additional elements to its inspections.

Health Canada continues to enhance the quality and reporting of adverse reaction reports. This includes ongoing work to increase the number of reports that are submitted electronically.

Finally, on December 6, 2013, the Government introduced legislation that requires mandatory reporting of adverse drug reactions to Health Canada by healthcare institutions. The Department is working with provinces and territories to design and implement this new requirement

In partnership with CIHR, Health Canada has implemented the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN): a pan-Canadian network of centres of excellence in post-market pharmaceutical research. The evidence generated by DSEN-funded studies is intended to inform decision-making across the health care system. The CIHR and Health Canada will work collaboratively to streamline the DSEN processes and procedures (e.g., the framework to prioritize DSEN research queries, query submission, etc.) to make these tools as responsive as possible to the needs of the federal regulator, federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) drug plans and organizations mandated to support F/P/T decision-making.

Expected Results: Enhanced capacity of Health Canada and the pharmaceutical and biotech industriesFood and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote #hfnb3 to identify and respond to risk issues; increased capacity to identify safety issues with health products on the market; increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increased capacity to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness; and improved ability to monitor and control importation of health products.

Target / Performance Indicators: Year-over-year increase in PSUR submitted by industry; number of new safety signals generated through PSUR reviews per year; percentage of safety issues identified by Market Authorization Holders (MAH) resulting in product monograph changes or regulatory action to mitigate risk; percentage of adverse reactions addressed within service standards; and number of import alerts resulting in detecting/stopping non-compliant products at the border; number/% of health product admissibility determinations that recommend refusal of entry into Canada.Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote #hfnb4

Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety

Active Prevention

The Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) and the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) and its Cosmetics Regulations provide the authorities for the Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety program to support industry's responsibility for the safety of their products and consumers' responsibility to make informed decisions about product purchases and use.

The Program will work with industry, standard setting bodies and international counterparts to develop standards and guidelines and share best practices as appropriate. The Program will also promote consumer awareness of the safe use of consumer products and cosmetics to support informed decision-making.

Highlights for 2014-15 include: continuing to promote consumer awareness of the safe use of consumer products and cosmetics by advancing a new risk communications approach; continued compliance promotion efforts to ensure that industry, especially Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), are aware of their obligations; and continuing to reduce risks associated with radiation emitting devices and increase Canadian's awareness and understanding of the safe use of these devices by developing and/or amending guidelines, regulations, safety codes and Healthy Canadians web content.

Expected Results: Industry is informed / aware of regulatory requirements related to consumer products and cosmetics.

Performance Indicator: % of Canadian industries informed/aware of regulatory requirements.

Target: 95%

Targeted Oversight

Through Targeted Oversight, the Program undertakes regular cycles of compliance and enforcement in selected product categories as part of the Cyclical Enforcement Plan (CEP) and responds to issues identified through mandatory incident reporting, market surveys, lab results and other means. Under the CCPSA, the Program has enhanced authorities to ensure investigative actions are being taken to determine the safety profile of products and to verify that preventative measures are being implemented.

Highlights for 2014-15 will include: the continued application of a risk-based approach to assessing incident reports, notifications, and complaints, as well as the identification of emerging trends for assessment, the Cyclical Enforcement Plan and other enforcement activities. This approach includes consideration of product hazards to identify the level and nature of the risk which informs risk management activities. Internationally, there will be a renewed effort to collaborate on consumer product safety in North America through a Cooperative Engagement Framework (CEF) with the United States and Mexico. In supporting continued cooperation on cosmetics regulation, Canada will be hosting the 8th International Cooperation for Cosmetics Regulation (ICCR 8) in 2014-15 with representation from the United States, Japan, and the European Union. In addition the program will strengthen its surveillance and monitoring systems to maintain and improve the programs capacity to detect unsafe products in the marketplace.

Expected Results: Early detection of potentially unsafe consumer products and cosmetics.

Performance Indicator: % of incident reports received and triaged within service standard.

Target: 90%

Rapid Response

The Government is equipped to respond rapidly to remove unsafe consumer products from shelves, preventing them from reaching consumers. While the Department continues to operate with a step-wise approach to compliance and enforcement by pursuing voluntary compliance by industry where appropriate, the CCPSA includes new measures to enforce compliance to protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products. Under Rapid Response, when an unacceptable risk from consumer products and cosmetics is identified, the program can act quickly to protect the public and take appropriate enforcement actions, including issuing consumer advisories, negotiating recalls or other corrective measures with industry.

Highlights for 2014-15 include: in support of the Government of Canada's Regulatory Modernization Initiatives, Health Canada will be reviewing its suite of regulations to verify if the approach taken is in-line with current legislative objectives, regulatory practices or government objectives. The Program will also continue implementation of the Cyclical Enforcement Plan (CEP) and pursue subsequent risk management actions for non-compliant products identified through the plan or as a result of incident reporting and monitoring.

Expected result: Risks associated with consumer products and cosmetics in the Canadian marketplace are appropriately managed.

Performance Indicator: % of non-compliant products identified through the CEP and incident reporting, for which risk management action is taken in accordance with established operating procedures and timelines.

Target: 85%

Pesticides

Active Prevention

The Pesticidesprogram encourages and facilitates industry development and adoption of quality assurance and stewardship programs for the safe manufacture and subsequent selection and use of pesticides and other consumer products containing pesticides. Retailers of pest control products often rely on their importers and distributors for validation of access to registered products. Work under this strategy fosters an increased knowledge of the requirements under the Pest Controls Products Act (PCPA) and Regulations (e.g. requirement to sell only registered and properly labelled pest control products); an awareness of the tools available to validate the status of the pest control products and their label information; and consumer awareness of safe use practices of pest control products.

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) will continue to provide information to consumers through outreach and educational activities related to the responsible use of pesticides. This includes development and dissemination of material through face-to-face meetings, booths, the web, and PMRA's Information Service, which every year responds to a wide range of queries from the public on the safe and proper use of pesticides. The compliance strategies under active prevention aim to engage stakeholders in order to test assumptions about the ability and will to comply in a timely and effective manner with enforcement actions.

Expected Results: Increased industry (manufacturers, distributors, retailers and vendors) and user awareness of risks and related regulatory requirements.

Performance Indicators: % of active prevention activities (e.g. booths, visits, presentations, surveys, workshops) conducted.

Target: 90%

Rapid Response

Under rapid response, the Pesticides program will enhance compliance monitoring of pest control products both at the retail level and the borders to ensure compliance with the PCPA and also for early detection of any pesticide safety issues.

Expected results: Improved monitoring of pest control products using a risk-based management approach.

Performance Indicators: % of planned targeted inspections conducted (marketplace, manufacturers, retailers, distributors and vendors of consumer pesticides); number and type of enforcement responses initiated in situations of non-compliance.

Target: 90%

Food Safety and Nutrition

Active Prevention

Health Canada's Food Safety and Nutrition program will continue to enhance risk management measures for priority food safety hazards in foods, to gather food allergy incident information in order to develop prevention measures, to consult with industry and stakeholders on key files, and engage with international standards bodies while collecting research-based scientific data and scientific advice to support development of policies, guidelines, standards, regulations (better understanding of food safety risks) and processes.

Expected Results: Increased effective assessment and mitigation strategies of food safety and nutritional risks.

Target / Performance Indicators: Number of risk modelling activities conducted, number and type of involvement with international standard setting initiatives, number of risk profiles and risk assessments developed, number of guidelines/policies developed to minimize food safety risks, number of studies related to data collection to identify safety concerns at an early stage, number of detection methods developed or enhanced, and number and type of guidance documents developed and disseminated to increase industry awareness of standards and regulatory requirements, as well as the considerations of consumer and stakeholder feedback documented in decision-making.

Targeted Oversight

The Food Safety & Nutrition program has no targeted oversight funding under this stream.

Rapid Response

Under the rapid response pillar, the Food Safety and Nutrition program will continue its participation in the Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education with the goal of promoting the "Be Food Safe" campaign and will continue to develop new education materials for consumers to promote food safety in an effort to reduce foodborne disease outbreaks in Canada.

Expected Results: Consumers make informed decisions about food.

Target / Performance Indicators: Number of safe food handling web pages that were viewed (Healthy Canadians web site and Health Canada web site).

Internal Services - Communications Services

Active Prevention

Health Canada's Communications and Public Affairs Branch (CPAB) will continue to focus on increasing industry and consumer awareness of food, health and consumer product safety.

As technology advances and consumption habits change, Canadians will increasingly expect information to be when and where they need it. Health Canada will continue to offer information in a variety of new and traditional ways to meet this need.  In 2014-15, CPAB will continue to focus on ensuring that Canadians have easy access to health and safety information in order to make informed health and safety decisions. In collaboration with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS), Health Canada is leading the development of the Health theme on Canada.ca. The Health theme will be a user-centric website populated by information and services most used by Canadians. With the launch of the expanded Healthy Canadians social media channels in 2013-14, Health Canada will increase the reach of food, consumer and health product messaging, including risk communications. In 2014-15, Health Canada will expand the content delivered on these platforms and explore additional channels to reach Canadians and update innovative tools such as the Recalls and Safety Alerts web and mobile applications. Additionally, food, consumer and health product web content will be developed to provide consumers friendly information to Canadians and to raise awareness of food, consumer and health product responsibilities among industry.

As outlined in recent TB policy directives, Health Canada will move towards producing electronic formats first and ensure value when producing printed publications. CPAB will ensure that Canadian consumers continue to receive accurate and reliable information related to food, health and consumer product safety by streamlining the distribution process, focusing on inventory management and reducing storage costs by moving towards "just in time" delivery of print products.

CPAB continues to manage the Service Level Agreement (SLA) put into place in May 2012 with Service Canada. This SLA will increase efficiencies with telephone inquiries providing extended hours of service to Canadians, fielding a larger volume of calls and responding more efficiently to email inquiries. This streamlined approach will also provide a more consistent response to consumer-related inquiries.

Expected Results: Increased consumer awareness and understanding of the safe use of health, food and consumer products. Increased industry awareness and knowledge of regulatory requirements.

Target / Performance Indicators: Increase in the number of followers on Healthy Canadians social media properties; increase in the number of web visits and engagement levels.

Federal Partner #2: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Canadian Food Inspection Agency ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2014-15Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote 1
Food Safety Program and Internal Services Active Prevention 114.2 27.4
Targeted Oversight 77.0 18.8
Rapid Response 32.2 8.7
Total 223.4 54.9
Expected results by program: Food Safety Program and Internal Services

Active Prevention

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) food safety initiatives continue to ensure active prevention including measures to enable government to better understand and identify food safety risks and to work with industry to implement effective food safety risk mitigation strategies. The CFIA, along with its federal partners, will continue to strengthen food safety standards and regulations and will engage Canadians in making decisions with respect to food safety.

In 2014-15, the CFIA will continue the redesign of its food regulatory framework to support the implementation of the Safe Food for Canadians Act, and will move forward with its Imported Food Sector Product Regulations regulatory proposal under the Canada Agricultural Products Act. In light of these regulatory changes, the CFIA will continue to revise its food safety programming for verification of industry food safety systems in high-risk sectors and complete the administrative infrastructure for importer licensing, including the Information Management / Information Technology component.

The CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada on data collection and risk mapping towards identification and characterization of areas of concern, including imported food ingredients, fresh produce, mycotoxins in cereals and undeclared allergens. Risk mapping will identify additional gaps in standard-setting and policy development and will assist in focusing operational efforts on areas of greatest risk. Data collected through baseline surveillance will serve to fill information gaps.

The CFIA will continue engagement with counterparts in foreign countries to enhance food safety information exchange and identify best practices to inform risk management approaches.

As well, the CFIA will also continue to inform consumers and industry on the use of Product of Canada and Made in Canada claims on food products.

Expected results: Better identification, assessment and prioritization of potential food safety hazards through risk mapping, information gathering, and sampling and testing of foods on the Canadian marketplace including informing the relevant Agency stakeholders on relative risk in order to influence decisions and priorities for different food/hazard combinations; improved industry compliance; industry implementation of preventive food safety systems; and provision of data to Health Canada to be used in the establishment of standards, regulations, and policies that contribute to the prevention of food safety issues through the product lifecycle.

Target / Performance indicators: Performance indicators for on-going Action Plan activities are presently undergoing revision to be incorporated into the CFIA's regulatory systems performance model, and will be reported in the 2014-15 Departmental Performance Report (DPR).

Targeted Oversight

Targeted oversight initiatives include enhanced inspection of identified high-risk food sectors and targeted import control measures. In 2013-14, the CFIA will continue to adapt its food safety inspection practices for high-risk sectors, including the implementation of an importer licensing regime, and provide training to inspection staff on revised procedures. Evaluation and verification of industry's food safety control systems in both fresh fruit and vegetable and non-federally registered sectors will take place with a focus on imported products. Method development and testing in targeted areas will continue. Enhanced tracking of imported food products will continue and border blitzes will be conducted.

Expected results: Improved industry compliance with food safety standards; modern tools and new risk-based approaches contribute to improved safety of imported foods.

Target / Performance indicators: Performance indicators for on-going Action Plan activities are presently undergoing revision to be incorporated into the CFIA's regulatory systems performance model, and will be reported in the 2014-15 DPR.

Rapid Response

Towards ensuring rapid response to food safety issues and emergencies, enhanced recall capacity will enable the Government of Canada to effectively respond to and conduct investigations for an anticipated increased number of food recalls resulting from targeted oversight activities. Targeted consumer risk communication activities and products will also provide Canadians with more information to help consumers better protect themselves and their families.

In 2014-15, the CFIA will continue to implement and to improve recall policies and procedures to support effective and efficient food safety recall and investigation methodologies. This will include development and delivery of training to Agency staff and providing awareness sessions to industry.

Expected results: Timely and efficient recall capacity in the face of increased identification of potential risks through targeted testing and other information; better public understanding of food safety risks; increased consumer use of various food safety alert systems; and increased public trust and confidence in the food safety system.

Target / Performance indicators: Performance indicators for on-going Action Plan activities are presently undergoing revision to be incorporated into the CFIA's regulatory systems performance model, and will be reported in the 2014-15 DPR.

Federal Partner #3: Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2014-15Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote 1
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Active Prevention 1.0 1.6
Targeted Oversight 8.0 2.3
Public Health Infrastructure Active Prevention 17.3 2.3
Total 26.3 6.2
Expected results by program: Public Health Agency of Canada:

Active Prevention

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will modernize and strengthen Canada's food safety systems by use of innovative laboratory tests (molecular typing), by expanding integrated surveillance systems (Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) and FoodNet Canada), use of decision-making models in priority areas and dissemination of outbreak investigation results to provincial and territorial partners through the web-based Outbreak Summaries system.

Expected results: Increased understanding of food-borne illness risks by HC, CFIA and PHAC.

Target / Performance indicators: % of reports tracked, # of peer-reviewed publications, # of issue papers provided to departmental colleagues and stakeholders, and # of provinces/territories using the Outbreak Summaries system.

Targeted Oversight

Through ongoing and expanded data collection, analysis and reporting on the rates, patterns and circumstances of unintentional injury of Canadians, PHAC will contribute to the evidence base supporting injury prevention and control.

Expected results: Data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products; engagement of injury prevention stakeholders.

Federal Partner #4: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Canadian Institutes of Health Research ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Planned Spending for 2014-15Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote 1
Health and Health Services Advances Targeted Oversight 27.1 9.0
Total 27.1 9.0
Expected results by program: Health and Health Services Advances

Targeted Oversight

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will make investments and focus efforts in advancing the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN) to increase the evidence on drug safety and effectiveness available to regulators, policy-makers, health care providers and patients and to increase capacity within Canada to undertake high-quality post-market research in this area.

Work will continue on refining the DSEN Query management process, engaging decision makers, delivering on peer-reviewed funding opportunities for the initiative and responding to strategic direction received from the DSEN Steering Committee.

Expected results: Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increased capacity in Canada to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness.

Target / Performance Indicators: Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners from 2008-09 to 2012-13 ($ millions)
Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2008-09 to 2012-13) Total Planned Spending for 2014-15Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan Footnote 1
Health Canada 211.8 54.8
Canadian Food and Inspection Agency 223.4 54.9
Public Health Agency of Canada 26.3 6.2
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 27.1 9.0
Total 488.6 124.9

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Diana Dowthwaite
Director General
Resource Management and Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Health Canada
7th Floor, Graham Spry Building
Address Locator: 2007D
250 Lanark Ave., Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
Telephone number: (613) 957-6690
E-mail address: diana.dowthwaite@hc-sc.gc.ca

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

Lead department PAA program: Substance Use and Abuse

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 2012

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2017

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $228.2M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) was initiated in 2001. In 2012, the Strategy was renewed for five years to provide a focused federal presence to preserve the gains of the past decade and continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence. The renewed Strategy focuses on the core areas of federal responsibility and invests in new priorities including populations with higher smoking rates. The objective of the Strategy is to reduce the use of tobacco and the potential for tobacco-related death and disease in Canada.

Shared outcome(s): To preserve the gains made over the past decade, and to continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence.

Governance structure(s): Health Canada remains the lead department with responsibility for the coordination and implementation of the FTCS. As part of the Health Portfolio, the Public Health Agency of Canada will deliver a contribution program.

Federal partners manage the control of tobacco products through monitoring and assessing the illicit and licit tobacco markets:

  • Public Safety Canada (PSC) - monitors contraband tobacco activity and related crime.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) - works with federal partners to identify and investigate criminal activities and to coordinate information on national and international contraband tobacco issues.
  • The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) - increases knowledge of contraband domestically and internationally by liaising with tobacco authorities at all levels and by monitoring and providing regular reports on both national and global contraband tobacco. The CBSA provides reports, information and guidance to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure of tobacco.
  • The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) - administers the Excise Act 2001, which governs federal taxation of tobacco products and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada.
  • Public Prosecutions Service Canada - monitors federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences in order to enforce and recover outstanding fines.

Planning Highlights: April 1, 2014 - March 31, 2015

FTCS priorities in 2014-15 include:

  • Pan-Canadian Quitline - Helping more Canadians quit smoking by providing provinces and territories with funding to support increased utilization of quitline services as a result of the pan-Canadian quitline and web address appearing on cigarette and little cigar packages.
  • On-reserve First Nations and Inuit initiatives - Providing support to First Nations and Inuit communities to implement and strengthen tobacco control measures.
  • Marketing awareness and outreach - Encouraging young adults aged 20 to 24 to quit smoking and stay smoke-free.  The Break It Off tobacco cessation campaign is a collaboration between Health Canada and the Canadian Cancer Society.
  • Chronic disease risk factors - Providing funding for tobacco-related interventions that aim to reduce tobacco use as a chronic disease risk factor by aligning with broader disease prevention strategies.
  • Contraband - Advancing efforts to combat the trafficking and cross-border smuggling of contraband tobacco, including a new Criminal Code offence with mandatory penalties of imprisonment for repeat offenders.

Federal Partner: Health Portfolio

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2014-15
Health Canada (Substance Use and Abuse) FTCS 181.3 35.2
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Public Health Infrastructure 1.0 0.2
PHAC Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 10.4 2.2
Total 191.7 37.6
PHAC funding includes a re-profile of $1.2M from 2012-13 over the subsequent four years.

Expected results by program:

The Health Portfolio will achieve results in the following areas:

  • Regulations and Compliance - Conducting compliance monitoring activities and undertake enforcement measures with respect to the Tobacco Act and its regulations.
  • Research - Conducting research and surveillance to support decision making and the development of anti-tobacco policies and programs.
  • Policy - Leading the development of policies supporting the renewal of the FTCS in 2017 and facilitating stakeholder engagement. This includes coordinating and supporting policies associated with Canada's membership in the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), as well as collaborating with provinces and territories in tobacco control activities.
  • Litigation - Providing base funding for tobacco litigation and for the defense of the Tobacco Act and its regulations.
  • Community interventions - Funding will be used to leverage existing networks and seek innovative partnerships that contribute to an integrated approach to chronic disease prevention; to support interventions and programming that aim to reduce tobacco use, particularly among young adults, First Nations on-reserve and Inuit in recognized Inuit communities; and to work with partners from the public and private sectors to promote healthy living and prevent chronic diseases caused by risk factors such as tobacco use.

Federal Partner: Public Safety Portfolio

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2014-15
PSC FTCS 3.0 0.6
RCMP FTCS 8.5 1.7
CBSA FTCS 18.4 3.7
Total 29.9 6.0

Expected results by program:

PSC:

  • Enhanced partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police through the administration of contribution funding for monitoring activities in connection with determining levels of contraband activity.
  • Interdepartmentally led efforts to explore the implementation of the Protocol to Eliminate the Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products under the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.
  • Provision of policy leadership and development of strategies to support law enforcements efforts to combat organized crime in the trade of contraband tobacco.

RCMP:

  • RCMP Police Operations (Tech Ops): Improved border security through the use of sophisticated technology which permits detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions, resulting in intelligence that supports criminal investigations. Investigators use this technology in the fight against organized crime networks that move illicit tobacco products across shared borders.
  • RCMP Criminal Intelligence: Regular reports on the illicit tobacco situation provided to the Department of Finance Canada and Health Canada, including data on seizures, organized crime involvement and trends. Reports and presentations provided to other partners and key Ministerial entities upon request, such as the Senior Revenue Officials Conference and the Interprovincial Investigations Conference. Participation in information sharing sessions with American Law Enforcement partners. Delivery of presentations at law enforcement courses/workshops in Canada and the U.S. on the subject of contraband tobacco.

CBSA:

  • Provision of advice to Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco.
  • Monitoring and reporting on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada.
  • Expanded cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  • Collection of tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians.

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2014-15
CRA FTCS 4.5 0.9
Total 4.5 0.9

Expected results by program:

  • Verification of export activity.
  • Ensuring compliance with legislative requirements imposed on the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada.
  • Working with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco.
  • Supporting RCMP/CBSA enforcement activities.
  • Maintaining accounts and providing services related to transactions (including refunds) and producing reports of tobacco-related activities.

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP)

Funding for this activity has ended
Federal Partner Program Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2014-15
ODPP FTCS 2.0 nil
Total 2.0 nil
Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2014-15
228.2 44.5

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Robert Ianiro
Director General
Controlled Substances & Tobacco Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
1st Floor, Main Stats Building, Address Locator:  0301A
Tunney's Pasture Driveway, Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
Telephone number: (613) 941-1977
E-mail address: Robert.ianiro@hc-sc.gc.ca

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years

All upcoming Internal Audits over the next three fiscal years
Name of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
2014-15
Audit of Cost Recovery of Health Products Program Planned 2014-15
Audit of Natural Health Products Program Planned 2014-15
Audit of Pesticide Management Program Planned 2014-15
Audit of Home and Community Care G & C Planned 2014-15
Audit of Key Financial Controls, 2014-2015 Internal Service Planned 2014-15
Audit of Physical Security Internal Service Planned 2014-15
Audit of IT Business Continuity Planning
for Mission Critical Systems
Internal Service Planned 2014-15
Audit of Shared Accountability
in Back Office Consolidations
Internal Service Planned 2014-15
2015-16
Audit of Agreements with Pan-Canadian Health Organizations G & C Planned 2015-16
Audit of the Consumer Product Safety Program Program Planned 2015-16
Audit of First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention G & C Planned 2015-16
Audit of Regional Laboratories Activities Program Planned 2015-16
Audit of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) Organizational Restructuring Program Planned 2015-16
Audit of Key Financial Controls, 2015-2016 Internal Service Planned 2015-16
Audit of the Management of Service with Shared Services Canada Internal Service Planned 2015-16
Audit on Information Management Internal Service Planned 2015-16
Audit of Workplace Relations and Wellness Programs Internal Service Planned 2015-16
2016-17
Audit of Biologics and  Radiopharmaceuticals Program Planned 2016-17
Audit of the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Program Program Planned 2016-17
Audit of First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity G & C Planned 2016-17
Audit BC Tripartite Agreement and NIHB Service Model G & C / Program Planned 2016-17
Audit of FNIHB Capital Program Program Planned 2016-17
Audit of Key Financial Controls, 2016-17 Internal Service Planned 2016-17
Audit of Grants and Contributions Information Management System Internal Service Planned 2016-17
Audit of Departmental Financial System Internal Service Planned 2016-17
 
B. All upcoming Evaluations over the next three fiscal years
Performance Alignment Architecture Name of Evaluation Expected Start Date Expected Completion Date
2014-15
1.1.1 Health System Priorities Health Information Initiative - Evaluation January 2014 December 2014
1.2 Specialized Health Services Employee Assistance Services - Evaluation December 2013 September 2014
2.3.1 Climate Change and Health Canada's Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Clean Air Regulatory Agenda - Component Evaluation February 2014 December 2014
2.4.1 Consumer Product Safety Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan - Evaluation October 2013 June 2014
2.5.2 Controlled Substances Drug Strategy Community Initiation Fund - Evaluation September 2013 June 2014
2.7 Pesticides Pesticides Program - Evaluation January 2014 March 2015
3.1.1.1 Healthy Child Development
3.1.1.3 Healthy Living
First Nations and Inuit Healthy Living and Healthy Child Development - Evaluation May 2013 September 2014
3.1.2.1 Communicable Disease Control and Management First Nations and Inuit Communicable Disease Control and Management - Evaluation November 2013 March 2015
2015-16
1.1.1 Health Systems Priorities Canadian Partnership Against Cancer - Evaluation April 2015 March 2016
1.1.1 Health Systems Priorities Mental Health Commission of Canada and the Mood Disorder Society of Canada - Evaluation August 2014 December 2015
2.2.2 Nutrition Policy and Promotion Nutrition Policy and Promotion Program - Evaluation January 2014 June 2015
2.3.1 Climate Change and Health Canada`s Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Climate Change - Component Evaluation March 2014 June 2015
2.3.2 Air Quality
2.3.3 Water Quality
2.3.4 Health Impacts of Chemicals
2.7 Pesticides
Chemicals Management Plan (including water quality) - Evaluation January 2014 September 2015
2.5.2 Controlled Substances Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Named Grant - Evaluation March 2015 March 2016
2.6 Radiation Protection Radiation Protection - Evaluation June 2015 March 2016
3.1.1.2 Mental Wellness First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness - Evaluation March 2014 December 2015
3.2 Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Non-Insured Health Benefits) - Evaluation December 2013 March 2016
3.3.2.1 Systems Integration First Nations and Inuit Systems Integration - Evaluation March 2014 March 2016
2016-17
1.3 Official Language Minority Community Development The Official Languages Health Contribution Program - Evaluation April 2016 March 2017
2.1.1 Pharmaceutical Drugs Human Drugs Program - Evaluation August 2015 September 2016
2.1.4 Natural Health Products Natural Health Products Program - Evaluation February 2016 March 2017
2.5.1 Tobacco Tobacco Program - Evaluation November 2015 December 2016
3.1.2.2 Environmental Public Health First Nations and Inuit Environmental Health - Evaluation January 2015 September 2016
3.3.1.1 Health Planning and Quality Management First Nations and Inuit Health Planning and Quality Management - Evaluation March 2015 September 2016
3.3.1.3 Health Facilities First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities - Evaluation June 2015 December 2016
3.3.2.2 e-Health Infostructure First Nations and Inuit e-Health Infostructure - Evaluation September 2015 March 2017
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