2015-16 Supplementary Information Table - Horizontal Initiatives

Chemicals Management Plan

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Chemicals Management Plan

Name of lead departments

Health Canada / Environment Canada

Federal partner organizations

Health Canada

  • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Safe Environments Directorate;
    • Consumer Product Safety Directorate; and
    • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate.
  • Health Products and Food Branch:
    • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate;
    • Food Directorate;
    • Natural Health Products Directorate;
    • Policy, Planning and International Affairs Directorate;
    • Therapeutics Products Directorate; and
    • Veterinary Drugs Directorate.
  • Pest Management Regulatory Agency
  • Regions and Programs Bureau

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • Office of Border Health Services:
    • Travelling Public Program.

Environment Canada

  • Environmental Stewardship Branch:
    • Chemicals Sector Directorate;
    • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate;
    • Industrial Sectors Directorate;
    • Energy and Transportation Directorate; and
    • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate.
  • Science and Technology Branch:
    • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate;
    • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate;
    • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate; and
    • Water Science and Technology Directorate.
  • Enforcement Branch
  • Strategic Policy Branch:
    • Economic Analysis Directorate.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2011-12 (second phase)

End date of the horizontal initiative

2015-16 (second phase)

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

$515,692,950

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partner

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

  • setting priorities and government-imposed timelines for risk assessment and risk management of chemicals and other substances of concern;
  • enhancing research, monitoring and surveillance;
  • increasing industry stewardship and responsibilities for substances;
  • collaborating internationally on chemicals assessment and management;
  • communicating to Canadians the potential risks of chemical and other substances; and
  • engaging industry to inform risk assessment and risk management action while also enhancing trust in the program.

Jointly managed by Health Canada and Environment Canada, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) - which replaced the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) in June 2011, the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA) and the Forestry Act.

Building on lessons learned in the first four years of the program, CMP priority setting was refined and, under the second phase of the CMP, the remaining substances were grouped to facilitate more efficient assessments, industry participation and risk management. Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, health, drug and other products.

The same core functions continue in phase two of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and, policy and program management.

Shared outcomes

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Research knowledge on substances of concern is made available to Health Canada and Environment Canada recipients to inform risk assessment, risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, monitoring & surveillance, and international activities;
  • Information on the risks of substances is used by Health Canada and Environment Canada recipients to inform risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, monitoring and surveillance, and research activities;
  • Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products is used by Health Canada and Environment Canada recipients or other stakeholders;
  • Canadians and stakeholder groups understand information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern;
  • Targeted industry conforms or complies with requirements of risk management measures; and
  • Targeted industry understands its obligations to take action to protect Canadians and the environment.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Canadians use information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern to avoid or minimize risks posed by these substances;
  • Risks associated with harmful substances in humans, the environment, food, pesticides, and consumer products are prevented, minimized or eliminated;
  • Targeted industry takes voluntary or enforced action to protect Canadians and the environment; and
  • Improved program decision-making and program performance.

Final Outcome:

  • Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances.

Governance structures

In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, Health Canada and Environment Canada deliver their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures. CMP governance is assured through a joint CMP Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee). The CMP ADM Committee is supported by the CEPA Directors General (DGs) Committee, which is comprised of representatives of the core program areas. This is supplemented by the Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC) which is the extended group of Directors General required for implementation of the CMP.

Planning highlights

In 2015-16, the program will continue to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining high priority substances from the first phase of the CMP, including ongoing assessment of substances in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach, as well as the assessment of other substances deemed to be a priority. Screening Assessment Reports and Risk Management Strategies for high priorities will be completed and risk management measures will continue to be developed, implemented, tracked and monitored. Work with other jurisdictions bilaterally and in multinational fora to undertake regional and multilateral efforts to manage chemicals of concern will continue.

In 2015-16, Health Canada and Environment Canada will continue the assessment and management of the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,500 substances included in the second phase of the CMP by 2016. Draft Screening Assessment Reports covering approximately 190 substances are planned to be published in 2015-16, including substances from the following initiatives:

  • Petroleum Sector Stream Approach;
  • Selenium containing substances grouping;
  • Boron containing substances grouping;
  • Certain organic flame retardants grouping;
  • Substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs) grouping;
  • Phthalates Grouping (State of the Science Report); and
  • Domestic Substances List (DSL) Micro-organisms.

Final Assessment Reports covering approximately 1,400 substances are also planned to be published in 2015-16, including substances from the following initiatives:

  • Petroleum Sector Stream Approach;
  • Aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substances grouping;
  • Cobalt-containing substances grouping;
  • Methylenediphenyl diisocyanates and diamines (MDI/MDA) grouping;
  • Substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs) grouping;
  • Rapid Screening III and Pesticides Initiatives;
  • Polymers Rapid Screening Initiative; and
  • Living organisms on the DSL.

Analysis of data will be completed for the second phase of the Domestic Substances List Inventory Update (DSL IU2) and will be used to inform the next phase of the CMP and future inventory updates. The program will undertake new data collection activities as needed. Information gathering activities for the next phase of the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach and the next phase of the Polymer Approach are being planned. Data collection activities to inform the risk management of Organic Flame Retardants, and Phthalates will also take place, if needed, following the outcomes of the risk assessments for these groupings.

Recommendations from the internal lessons learned report for CMP information gathering will be implemented for information gathering activities in the next phase of the CMP and future inventory updates.

In 2015-16, risk management scope and approach documents will be developed, as required, for substances included in the CMP Substance Groupings Initiative, Challenge to Industry, and the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach.

Proposed RM Instruments will also be published in Part I of the Canada Gazette. These are: Petroleum Stream 1 Petroleum and Refinery Gas (PRGs) Proposed RM Instrument, and Petroleum Stream 2 PRGs Proposed RM Instrument. Final RM Instruments will be published in Part II of the Canada Gazette. These are: Batch 10 Hydrazine Final RM Instrument (Pollution Prevention Plan); Hexabromcyclododecane (HBCD) Final RM Instrument; Quinoline Final RM Instrument; and, Mitotane Proposed RM Instrument.

Health Canada and Environment Canada will also continue to use the new substances program to identify and manage, as appropriate, the human health and environmental risks of new substances before import or manufacture in Canada. The program will perform risk assessments on approximately 500 new substances, including products of biotechnology and nanomaterials, and will develop any needed risk management measures, while also continuing its prioritization of substances on the Revised In Commerce List (ICL).

The program will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address identified risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods and food packaging materials, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water. Highlights for 2015-16 include having the regulatory packages developed under the authority of the CCPSA ready for publication in Canada Gazette Part I for Lead (Contact with Mouth) and Children's Jewellery; and compliance and enforcement activities related to (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) and Phthalates, among others. Approval of four guidelines/ guidance documents will be sought from the provinces and territories, as part of the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality for pH, benzo[a]pyrene, bromate and chromium. Proposed RM strategies for ethyl carbamate will also be published on the Health Canada website.

Work will continue on substances/products regulated under the F&DA, including the review, listing and prioritization for assessment of risk due to the presence in the environment of substances in F&DA regulated products; development of environmental assessment regulations for new substances in products regulated under the F&DA; research and consultations on non-regulatory initiatives aimed at reducing the release of F&DA products and substances into the environment; and re-evaluation of food additives, food contaminants and food packaging materials. The program will also work towards the development of environmental assessment regulations for medicinal ingredients in drugs that require a new Drug Identification Number.

Health Canada and Environment Canada will continue to conduct research and monitoring and surveillance activities to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Specific monitoring activities for 2015-16 include the release of national biomonitoring results from the third cycle of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), completion of data collection for cycle four, and initiation of data collection for cycle five. Several substances will also be added to the Total Diet Study, or other targeted studies, to fill in anticipated gaps for future CMP priorities. Environmental monitoring of chemicals of concern in air, water, sediments, aquatic biota, and wildlife will continue in 2015-16, as well as municipal wastewater monitoring.

Research in support of current CMP themes and priorities will continue and opportunities for synergies with government organizations, universities and international partners will continue to be explored. The Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study will implement its data analysis and publications strategy on the first wave of biomonitoring and health effects results.

Work will also continue on the re-evaluation of previously approved pesticides according to legislated timelines and requirements under the PCPA, as well as on continuing to monitor health and environmental incidents related to pesticides, analyzing trends and sales data, and taking regulatory action, as needed.

The program will develop compliance strategies and compliance promotion and enforcement plans and will continue to deliver related activities, to promote regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and compliance with, regulatory requirements for some CMP substances. Focus will be on delivering compliance promotion activities for the highest priority instruments.

Health Canada and Environment Canada will continue to reach out to stakeholders and the public in order to implement the CMP successfully and help achieve the overall goal of protecting health and the environment for all Canadians. An ongoing focus will be on increasing transparency and predictability, as well as expanding the reach of key stakeholder engagement activities to support involvement in the program. Health Canada will continue to increase proactive communications to the public to raise awareness of the risks and safe use of substances, including greater use of partnerships to expand the reach of messaging.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Suzanne Leppinen, Director
Chemicals Policy Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
269 Laurier Avenue West
PL: 4905B
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9

Telephone number: (613) 941-8071
E-mail address: suzanne.leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca

Greg Carreau, Executive Director
Program Development and Engagement
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
Environment Canada
200, boul. Sacré-Coeur
Office 8-873
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
Telephone number: (819) 953-6072
E-mail address: greg.carreau@ec.gc.ca

Planning Information

Planning Information
Federal organization Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015-16 Planned spending 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Targets
Health Canada 2.1 Health Products a. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 10,388,591 2,077,718 ER 1.1 Not applicable
2.2 Food Safety and Nutrition a. Risk Assessment 5,847,961 1,169,591
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 5,261,930 1,052,386
c. Research 3,617,680 723,536
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 5,418,614 1,083,724
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 1,024,405 204,881
2.3 Environmental Risks to Health a. Risk Assessment 57,469,134 11,493,827
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 63,158,441 11,358,550
c. Research 51,248,090 9,849,618
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 43,316,924 8,663,385
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 10,137,982 2,027,596
f. Policy and Program Management 12,118,469 2,822,035
2.4 Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety a. Risk Assessment 12,780,412 2,556,082
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 12,928,576 2,585,715
2.7 Pesticides a. Risk Assessment 20,903,463 4,180,693
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 4,411,229 882,246
c. Research 1,734,562 346,912
Internal Services 36,877,934 7,438,654 Not applicable
Public Health Agency of Canada 1.3.2 Border Health b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 9,548,553 3,182,851 ER 2.1 Not applicable
Environment Canada 3.1 Substances and Waste Management a. Risk Assessment 17,419,056 3,483,811 ER 3.1
b. Risk Management 68,446,359 13,689,272
c. Research 9,652,435 1,797,487
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 24,584,760 4,916,952
3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement: Pollution a. Compliance Promotion 4,337,745 867,549
b. Enforcement 11,282,295 2,249,448
Internal Services 11,777,350 2,495,481 Not applicable
Total for all Federal Organizations 515,692,950 103,200,000 Not applicable

ER 1.1 - Expected Results: Health Canada

  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities (Risk Assessment);
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCPSA and F&DA (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement);
  • Drinking water quality guideline technical documents/guidance documents (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement);
  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans (Research);
  • Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products (Monitoring and Surveillance); and
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders (Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications).

ER 2.1 - Expected Results: Public Health Agency of Canada

  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCPSA and F&DA (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement).

ER 3.1 - Expected Results: Environment Canada

  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities (Risk Assessment);
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, HPA/CCPSA and F&DA (Risk Management);
  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans (Research);
  • Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products (Monitoring and Surveillance);
  • Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures (Compliance Promotion); and
  • Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions (Enforcement).

Early Childhood Development Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children

As of 2015-16, the Early Childhood Development Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children and the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan initiatives will no longer be reported as horizontal initiatives. These initiatives have reported as horizontal initiatives since their launch in 2002 and 2008, respectively. As the initiatives are now part of the ongoing program funding base of the implicated departments, they are being included in section II of the Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) of each individual department. Past horizontal reports on these initiatives can be found in Supplementary Information Tables of RPPs and DPRs.

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

Name of lead department(s)

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Health Canada

  • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate.
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Branch;
  • Communications and Public Affairs Branch; and
  • Regions and Programs Bureau.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • Public Health Infrastructure; and
  • Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

Public Safety Canada

  • Akwesasne; and
  • Policy Development.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • Police Operations.

Canada Border Services Agency

  • Risk Assessment; and
  • Admissibility Determination.

Canada Revenue Agency

  • Taxpayer and Business Assistance.

Public Prosecutions Service Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 2012

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2017

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

$225,239,801

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy was initiated in 2001. In 2012, the Strategy was renewed for five years to provide a focused federal presence to preserve the gains of the past decade and continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence. The renewed strategy focuses on the core areas of federal responsibility and invests in new priorities including populations with higher smoking rates. The objective of the Strategy is to reduce the use of tobacco and the potential for tobacco-related death and disease in Canada.

Shared outcome(s)

To preserve the gains made over the past decade, and to continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence.

Governance structures

Health Canada remains the lead department for the federal government with responsibility for the coordination and implementation of the FTCS.

Federal partners manage the control of tobacco products through monitoring and assessing the illicit and licit tobacco markets:

  • Public Safety Canada - leads and works with federal partners to coordinate strategic approaches and activities to monitor and combat contraband tobacco activity and related crime;
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police - works with federal partners to identify and investigate criminal activities and to coordinate information on national and international contraband tobacco issues;
  • The Canada Border Services Agency - increases knowledge of contraband domestically and internationally by liaising with tobacco authorities at all levels and by monitoring and providing regular reports on both national and global contraband tobacco. The Canada Border Services Agency provides reports, information and guidance to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure of tobacco;
  • The Canada Revenue Agency - administers the Excise Act 2001, which governs federal taxation of tobacco products and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada; and
  • Public Prosecutions Service Canada - monitors federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences in order to enforce and recover outstanding fines.

Planning highlights

FTCS priorities in 2015-16 include:

  • Pan-Canadian Quitline - Helping more Canadians quit smoking by providing provinces and territories with funding to support increased utilization of quitline services as a result of the pan-Canadian quitline and web address appearing on cigarette and little cigar packages;
  • On-reserve First Nations and Inuit initiatives - Providing support to First Nations and Inuit communities to implement and strengthen tobacco control measures;
  • Marketing awareness and outreach - Encouraging young adults aged 20 to 24 to quit smoking and stay smoke-free. The Break it Off tobacco cessation campaign is a collaboration between Health Canada and the Canadian Cancer Society;
  • Chronic disease risk factors - Providing funding for tobacco-related interventions that aim to reduce tobacco use as a chronic disease risk factor by aligning with broader disease prevention strategies; and
  • Contraband - Advancing efforts to combat the trafficking and cross-border smuggling of contraband tobacco, including a new Criminal Code offence with mandatory penalties of imprisonment for repeat offenders, implementation of up to 10 First Nations officers and creation of an inter-departmental Strategic Level Forum to address the issue of contraband tobacco.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Suzy McDonald
Associate Director General
Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
1st Floor, Main Stats Building
150 Tunney's Pasture Driveway, Tunney's Pasture
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9
Telephone number:  (613) 941-3202
E-mail address:  suzy.mcdonald@hc-sc.gc.ca

Planning Information

Planning Information
Federal organization Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015-16 Planned spending 2015-16 Expected Results 2015-16 Targets
Health Canada Substance Use and Abuse Federal Tobacco Control Strategy $180,899,699 $36,148,999 ER 1.1 Not applicable
Public Health Agency of Canada Public Health Infrastructure Federal Tobacco Control Strategy $1,025,000 $205,000
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Federal Tobacco Control Strategy $9,859,958 $2,250,000
Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement Leadership Akwesasne $2,250,000 $450,000 ER 2.1
Policy Development $800,000 $160,000
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Police Operations Federal PolicingTable footnote 1 $4,244,769 $759,965 ER 3.1
Technical Services and Operational Support $4,038,026 $769,213
Internal Services $485,572 $242,786 Not applicable
Canada Border Services AgencyTable footnote 2 Risk Assessment Intelligence $13,667,034 $2,600,211 ER 4.1
Admissibility Determination Highway Mode
Air Mode
Rail Mode
Marine Mode
Postal
Courier Low Value Shipment
$1,525,243 $278,542
Canada Revenue Agency Taxpayer and Business Assistance Federal Tobacco Control Strategy $4,444,500 $888,900 ER 5.1
Public Prosecutions Service Canada Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions Federal Tobacco Control Strategy $2,000,000 0 ER 6.1
Total for all Federal Organizations $225,239,801 $44,753,616 Not applicable

Table footnotes

Table footnote 1

Under the newly established RCMP's Federal Policing (FP)'s Service Delivery Model, the resources allocated to perform activities under the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy, and all other FP-specific or horizontal related initiatives, are being delivered through broader FP terms across the country. This flexible model allows FP to better align resources to highest priorities thereby being more efficient in the conduct of its business. As such, it would be expected, in any given year, that FP's allocation of funds in support of the FTCS would fluctuate based on evolving priorities.

Return to table footnote 1 referrer

Table footnote 2

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) budget reduced due to reductions in the Agency's overall A-base authorities in 2013-2014.

Return to tablefootnote 2 referrer

ER 1.1 - Expected Results:  Health Portfolio

The Health Portfolio will achieve results in the following areas:

  • Regulations and Compliance - Conduct compliance monitoring activities and undertake enforcement measures with respect to the Tobacco Act and its regulations;
  • Research - Conduct research and surveillance to support decision making and the development of anti-tobacco policies and programs;
  • Policy - Lead the development of policies supporting the renewal of the FTCS in 2017 and facilitate stakeholder engagement. This includes coordinating and supporting policies associated with Canada's membership in the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), as well as collaborating with provinces and territories in tobacco control activities;
  • Litigation - Provide base funding for tobacco litigation and for the defense of the Tobacco Act and its regulations; and
  • Community interventions - Funding will be used to leverage existing networks and seek innovative partnerships that:  contribute to an integrated approach to chronic disease prevention; support interventions and programming that aim to reduce tobacco use, particularly among young adults, First Nations on-reserve and Inuit in recognized Inuit communities; and, work with partners from the public and private sectors to promote healthy living and prevent chronic diseases caused by risk factors such as tobacco use.

ER 2.1 - Expected Results:  Public Safety Canada

  • Enhance partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police through the administration of contribution funding for the monitoring activities in connection with determining trends and levels of contraband tobacco activity;
  • Lead interdepartmental efforts to analyse the likely implementation costs and benefits to Canada associated with the Protocol to Eliminate the Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products under the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and
  • Provide policy leadership and development of strategies to support law enforcement efforts to combat organized crime involved in the contraband tobacco market, including the development of an inter-departmental Strategic Level Forum, supporting work on Bill C-10, Tackling Contraband Tobacco Act, and the design and implementation of up to 10 First Nations officers.

ER 3.1 - Expected Results:  Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Federal Policing conducts a wide range of activities that support the objectives of the FTCS. While several of these activities are not funded under the FTCS, they do represent an investment by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to contribute to the Government of Canada's efforts to enhance control of tobacco products and contribute the FTCS' intermediate and ultimate outcomes.

  • Technical Investigations (FTCS Funded) - Improve border through the use of sophisticated technology which permits detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions, resulting in vital intelligence in support of criminal investigations. Investigators rely heavily on this technology in the fight against well-orchestrated organized crime networks that target the shared border to move illicit tobacco products.
  • Criminal Intelligence (FTCS Funded) - Collect, collate, and analyze statistical data and criminal intelligence relevant to  contraband tobacco manufacture and trade, and prepare and provide regular reports to partner law enforcement, government and non-governmental agencies in respect to the contraband tobacco manufacturing and trade market within Canada. Attend joint agency group conferences/meetings and present to other partners and key Ministerial entities, as well as participate in information and intelligence sharing with domestic and international law enforcement. Provide support and subject matter expertise to criminal investigations and prosecutions, including developing and delivering training and outreach initiatives relevant to new and existing legislation and Criminal Code penalties for trafficking in contraband tobacco.
  • Project-based Investigations (Internally Funded) - Federal Policing focuses on larger organized crime investigations relating to tobacco trafficking. While these investigations tend to be lengthier, they target and disrupt higher levels of the distribution chain within the illicit tobacco market. Under the newly established Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Federal Policing (FP)'s Service Delivery Model, the resources are prioritized based on the scope and scale of the threat and are being delivered through broader FP teams across the country. This flexible model allows FP to better align resources to highest priorities thereby being more efficient in the conduct of its business.
  • General Investigations (Internally Funded) - The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will continue to investigate and respond to calls for service from partner agencies and the general public related to the illicit tobacco market. To support and advance these general investigations, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police will continue to work with partner agencies (Canada Border Services Agency, Canada police, and provincial/territorial government agencies) to combat the illicit tobacco market. In 2015-16, the enactment of Bill C-10 (Tackling Contraband Tobacco Act) will also give the Royal Canadian Mounted Police a new ability to investigate offences relating to contraband tobacco trafficking and charge individuals who commit this offence.

ER 4.1 - Expected Results: Canada Border Services Agency

  • Risk Assessment
    • Provide advice to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco.
    • Monitor and report on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada.
    • Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  • Admissibility Determination
    • Collection of tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians.

ER 5.1 - Expected Results:  Canada Revenue Agency

  • Ensure compliance with legislative requirements imposed on the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada;
  • Verify export activity;
  • Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco;
  • Support Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada Border Services Agency enforcement activities; and,
  • Maintain accounts and provide services related to transactions (including refunds), and produce reports of tobacco-related activities.

ER 6.1 - Expected Results:  Public Prosecutions Service Canada

Funding for this activity has ended.

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan

As of 2015-16, the Early Childhood Development Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children and the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan initiatives will no longer be reported as horizontal initiatives. These initiatives have reported as horizontal initiatives since their launch in 2002 and 2008, respectively. As the initiatives are now part of the ongoing program funding base of the implicated departments, they are being included in section II of the Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) of each individual department. Past horizontal reports on these initiatives can be found in Supplementary Information Tables of RPPs and DPRs.

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