Page 3: Health Canada – 2015-2016  – Supplementary Information Tables – Departmental Performance Report – Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Milion or More

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 3.3: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit
    • Sub-Program 3.3.1: First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.1: Health Planning and Quality Management
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.2: Health Human Resources
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.3: Health Facilities
    • Sub-Program 3.3.2: First Nations and Inuit Health System Transformation
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.2.1: Health Systems Integration
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.2.2: e-Health Infostructure
    • Sub-Program 3.3.3: Tripartite Health Governance
Description

The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services. It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit.

The funds are used for: planning and management for the delivery of quality health services; construction and maintenance of health facilities; research activities; encouraging Aboriginal people to pursue health careers; investments in technologies to modernize health services; and integrating and realigning the governance of existing health services.

Results achieved

The capacity of First Nations and Inuit to influence and/or control health programs and services was improved. 365 communities had flexible or block arrangements which support community design, delivery and management of health programs and services, an increase from 331 in the previous year. Additionally, 126 recipients with contribution agreements in 2011 or later had developed plans for managing the operations and maintenance of their health infrastructure.

The quality of programs and service delivery was enhanced through an increase in accreditation of services. In 2015-16, the number of communities accessing accredited health services increased from 59 to 138 communities, and the number of organizations that provided accredited community health services rose from 35 to 58.

Efforts continued to strengthen the safety of health facilities that support program and service delivery. Inspections effectively targeted facilities at the greatest risk, and only 18% of those inspected did not have critical property issues. 74% of high priority recommendations were addressed on schedule. In Budget 2016, the Government of Canada pledged significant new investments in Indigenous health infrastructure, including investments of $270 million over five years for health care facilities on reserve, and $29.4 million in 2016-17 to undertake urgent repairs and renovations of facilities used for early learning and child development on reserve. Funding will be used to support renovations and replacements of health facilities and nursing stations in 2016-17.

Tripartite governance partners of the British Columbia (BC) Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nations Health Governance continued to support reciprocal accountability. 100% of all planned partnership and engagement activities were implemented in 2015-16, as set out in the Agreement in Section 8 entitled ‘Ongoing Commitments of the Parties’.

Audits completed or planned
  • Office of Auditor General of Canada – Establishing the First Nations Health Authority in British Columbia (Fall 2015): completed February 2016.
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation -- Audit of FNIHB Health Facilities Program: planned for December 2016.
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of British Columbia Tripartite Agreement: planned for March 2017.
Evaluations completed or planned
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Services Integration Fund: Completed March 2016;
  • Mental Wellness: Completed July 2016;
  • Health Planning and Quality Management: planned for September 2016
  • Health Facilities: planned for March 2017;
  • e-Health Infostructure: planned for March 2017;
  • BC Tripartite Governance: planned for December 2017; and
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Human Resources: planned for June 2018.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations to outline how Health Canada plans to move forward in fulfilling its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

In 2015-16, Health Canada worked in collaboration with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) towards greater harmonization of policies and procedures, such as the adoption of the Grants and Contributions Information Management System (GCIMS) to reduce the administrative burden on recipients. Health Canada collaborated with First Nations partners, Tuberculosis experts, provincial authorities, and the Public Health Agency of Canada to develop a Monitoring and Performance Framework for Tuberculosis Programs for First Nations on-reserve.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 482,855,878 611,949,625 598,167,682 637,662,686 637,662,686 39,495,004
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 482,855,878 611,949,625 598,167,682 637,662,686 637,662,686 39,495,004

Comments on variances

The variance is mainly due to in-year funding received, which was not included in the 2015-16 planned spending, to maintain health system transformation programs for First Nations and Inuit populations and to make essential and priority investments in First Nations and Inuit Health infrastructure.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 3.1: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
    • Sub-Program 3.1.1: First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.1: Healthy Child Development
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.2: Mental Wellness
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.3: Healthy Living
    • Sub-Program 3.1.2: First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.2.1: Communicable Disease Control and Management
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.2.2: Environmental Public Health
    • Sub-Program 3.1.3: First Nations and Inuit Primary Care
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.3.1: Clinical and Client Care
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.3.2: Home and Community Care
Description

The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities. It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including surveillance, to prevent and/or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards; and, primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services.

Results achieved

First Nations and Inuit communities continued to have access to community-based health promotion and disease prevention programming. For example, the number of community members accessing healthy child development programs and services exceeded targets, as 8,815 women accessed prenatal and postnatal health, 13,386 children accessed early literacy and learning through Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve, and 19,856 children accessed Children’s Oral Health programming. In addition, 92 % of First Nations and Inuit communities had improved access to healthy living programs and services. Through the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative, over 87% of projects supported physical activities and over 81% delivered healthy eating activities.

Efforts continued to support increased capacity of First Nations and Inuit communities to deliver health programs and services through training and certification. For example, the percentage of addiction counsellors in treatment centers who are certified rose slightly from 77 to 78 in 2015-16, and 100% of First Nations communities had access to a trained Community-based Drinking Water Quality Monitor or an Environmental Health Officer to monitor their drinking water quality.

Coordinated responses to primary care services continue to be supported as 69% of First Nations communities have collaborative service delivery arrangements with external primary care service providers.

Audits completed or planned
  • Office of the Auditor General – Access to Health Services for Remote First Nations Communities: completed April 2015
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation (OAE) - Audit of the Resolution Health Support Program 2015-16 : completed March 2016
  • Office of the Auditor General – First Nations and Inuit Oral Health Programs: planned for November 2017
Evaluations completed or planned
  • Mental Wellness: completed July 2016;
  • Environmental Health: planned for October 2016;
  • Nutrition North Canada: planned for March 2018
  • Clinical and Client Care: planned for March 2018;
  • Home and Community Care: planned for June 2018; and
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan: planned for December 2018.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social service organizations to outline how Health Canada plans to move forward in fulfilling its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

In 2015-16, Health Canada continued to work through trilateral forums and similar mechanisms to better align health care services and establish effective coordinating mechanisms to address inter-jurisdictional challenges. As part of Health Canada’s commitment to address mental wellness issues in First Nations and Inuit communities, the department is working with First Nations partners on the implementation of the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 675,173,550 641,124,657 570,922,419 660,238,438 659,852,641 88,930,222
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 675,173,550 641,124,657 570,922,419 660,238,438 659,852,641 88,930,222

Comments on variances

The variance is mainly due to in-year funding received, which was not included in the 2015-16 planned spending, to maintain health promotion, disease prevention and health system transformation programs for First Nations and Inuit populations.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 3.2: Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit
Description

The Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program provides coverage for a specified range of medically necessary health-related goods and services to registered Indians (according to the Indian Act) and Inuit (recognized by one of the Inuit Land Claim Organizations) regardless of residency in Canada where not otherwise covered under a separate agreement (e.g. a self-government agreement) with federal, provincial or territorial governments. The benefits under the NIHB Program include the following, where not otherwise provided to eligible clients through other private or provincial/territorial programs: pharmacy benefits (prescription drugs and some over-the-counter medication), medical supplies and equipment, dental care, vision care mental health counselling, and medical transportation benefits to access medically required health services not available on-reserve or in the community of residence.

Results achieved

72.3% of eligible First Nations and Inuit population accessed at least one non-insured health benefit in 2015-16 and Health Canada processed over 23 million pharmacy, medical supplies and dental claim transactions.

Audits completed or planned
  • Office of the Auditor General of Canada – Access to Health Services for Remote First Nations Communities: completed April 2015.
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation -- Audit of Key Financial Controls: planned for December 2016.
  • Office of the Auditor General of Canada - First Nations and Inuit Oral Health Programs: planned for November 2017.
Evaluations completed or planned
  • Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit: planned for December 2016
Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations to outline how Health Canada plans to move forward in fulfilling its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

In 2015-16, Health Canada continued to engage First Nations and Inuit partners on improving the delivery of NIHB to First Nations and Inuit. A joint Assembly of First Nations and NIHB Steering Committee completed a review of NIHB mental health benefits, and activities are underway to implement the recommendations. An Inuit-NIHB Senior Bilateral Committee is also underway, based on a work plan for priority issues outlined by Inuit Regions.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 195,140,821 191,378,390 202,486,815 202,668,836 200,370,251 -2,116,564
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 195,140,821 191,378,390 202,486,815 202,668,836 200,370,251 -2,116,564

Comments on variances

The variance is mainly due to funding held frozen that is not available for use.

Territorial Health Investment Fund (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2018

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014 to 2018

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

The Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) is a three-year investment of $70 million to support territorial health systems, starting in 2014.

The THIF targets territorial health priorities including children's oral health, mental health and chronic disease. THIF funding is intended to strengthen territorial capacity to manage and deliver health services in those targeted areas, while leading towards a reduced reliance on medical travel. Its design features three funding streams: Territorial, Pan-Territorial and Medical travel.

The Territorial stream ($13 million per fiscal year, $4.33 million per territory) funds projects to strengthen health services in-territory in the targeted areas that have persistent challenges and poor health outcomes. The Pan-Territorial stream provides $2 million per fiscal year for collaboratively developed projects that offer innovative solutions to health systems problems. The focus of the Pan-Territorial stream, which is administered by Nunavut on behalf of all three territories, is enhanced mental health service delivery through E-mental health initiatives. The Medical Travel Stream ($12 million in 2014-15, $8 million in 2015-16, $5 million in 2016-17) is a declining subsidy to offset medical transportation costs in the short term, while incenting immediate measures to reform medical travel programs and increase service capacity in-territory. Given its significant medical travel costs, Nunavut receives the majority of these funds, followed by Northwest Territories (NWT) and Yukon.

Results achieved

In 2015-16, Territorial governments undertook territorial and pan-territorial projects in targeted areas. For example, funding under the Medical Travel stream helped territorial governments offset medical transportation costs associated with accessing health services out-of-territory. All three territories fully utilized the federal funding available under this stream ($8 million).

Under both the Territorial and Pan-Territorial/E-mental health streams respectively, efforts continued to target improved health care service delivery capacity across the territories. Chronic disease and mental health priorities are supported by THIF funding primarily through structural/organizational change, recruitment/retention, and clinical skills training. For example, THIF funding in NWT is supporting the amalgamation of health and social services into one integrated territorial system intended to streamline service delivery for Northerners. In Nunavut, efforts focused on mental health and addictions following the territory’s Suicide Inquiry in 2015. In 2015-16, THIF funding supported the development of community psychiatric nursing standards/guidelines; the piloting of a youth mentorship program and the provision of professional development opportunities to front line staff to standardize community mental health and addictions training and increase available services. Finally, Yukon is piloting and evaluating the use of tele-health/tele-psychiatry as a means of providing forensic psychology support; improving access in rural areas and providing urgent consultation services.

Oral health funding in Nunavut has supported the implementation of a community-based oral health project, which provides early screening and intervention for children with the intent of reducing incidence of treatment of early childhood caries under general anesthetic. In NWT, a status report was developed, which sets out the current oral health programs services that are available in the territory, as well as distribution, costing, and standards. Draft protocols and training materials to support the provision of a fluoride therapy program have been developed and are being tested in the Beaufort Delta Region.

Audits completed or planned

No audits are underway or planned.

Evaluations completed or planned

This evaluation is planned to be completed March 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The implementation of the THIF was undertaken in partnership with territorial governments. Health Canada worked with territorial governments to set out THIF eligibility criteria, review and approve territorial proposals, and develop territorial-specific funding agreements.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 26,190,000 23,000,000 23,000,000 22,990,300 -9,700
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 26,190,000 23,000,000 23,000,000 22,990,300 -9,700

Comments on variances

N/A

Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (Voted)

General Information

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-15

Strategic outcome

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 2.5: Substance Use and Abuse
    • Sub-Program 2.5.2: Controlled Substances
Description

In December 2014, the Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (ADSI) was created, which consolidated two previous Health Canada contribution funding programs - the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) and the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP), into one joint fund. ADSI will continue to deliver the National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) Prevention and Treatment Action Plan mandates. Reporting on ADSI commenced in 2015-16.

The DSCIF contributes to reducing illicit drug use and prescription drug use among Canadians, particularly among vulnerable populations such as youth, by focusing on health promotion and prevention approaches to address substance abuse before it happens. The objectives of the DSCIF is to facilitate the development of local, provincial, territorial, national and community-based solutions to drug use among youth and to promote public awareness of substance use among youth. The program is nationally delivered.

The DTFP, under the NADS, provides financial support annually to provincial and territorial governments and non-government organizations to strengthen drug treatment systems.

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund
Results achieved

The prevention component of ADSI (formerly DSCIF) supported 34 projects across Canada focused on substance use health promotion and prevention targeting both youth and communities. Of these 34 projects, 22 contributed to acquired/improved youth capacity (knowledge and skills) to make informed decisions about substance use; eight contributed to reducing risk-taking behaviours associated with youth substance use; eight contributed to increasing community engagement; four contributed to uptake of knowledge and resources; and, five contributed to improving community capacity and community practices related to substance use health promotion and prevention.

ADSI also supported six projects focused on prescription drug abuse and prescriber education, as well as funding to support National Prescription Drug Drop-Off Day 2015, run by the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, where over 1000 pounds of prescription drugs were returned for disposal. Of these seven projects, three contributed to enhanced collaboration and knowledge exchange within and among stakeholders; three contributed to increased evidence-informed information and resources available for stakeholders; and two contributed to increased awareness and understanding of prescription drug abuse and its negative consequences. Further contributions at the immediate and intermediate outcome levels are expected as the projects advance.

Over 139,000 youth, 11,400 parents and 2,100 workers/schools have been reached through ADSI-funded prevention interventions. Projects focused on capacity building have resulted in over 13,500 youth, and 4,900 workers/teachers being trained on various topics including peer leadership, facilitation, life skills, critical thinking and youth engagement.

Audits completed or planned

No audits were planned or completed.

Evaluations completed or planned

The program is leading a cluster evaluation, which uses standardized tools across projects to assess specific program outcomes. Baseline data collection for the cluster evaluation started in 2014-15 for prevention projects. Post test data will be collected at the end of projects so results will not be available until after current project agreements ends. An evaluation of the NADS is scheduled for 2016-17 (led by Justice Canada) in which ADSI will participate. The next departmental evaluation of the ADSI is currently scheduled for completion in September 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

ADSI continued to engage recipients through various channels. Recipients participated in the collection of data related to the core program outcomes and program consultants worked regularly with recipients to monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance and evaluation reports. Recipients were also encouraged to use Prevention Hub Canada, a resource and knowledge sharing web site hosted by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, as a platform to promote collaboration and knowledge sharing on prevention initiatives.

Drug Treatment Funding Program
Results achieved

The treatment component of ADSI (formerly DTFP) supported 13 projects across Canada with both provincial and territorial governments and national non-governmental organizations to strengthen substance use treatment systems. Of these 13 projects, 12 contributed to implementation of evidence-informed practices; 10 contributed to strengthening performance measurement and evaluation capacity; and nine contributed to enhanced knowledge sharing.

To date, projects have reported involving over 2,100 individuals in consultations and have reached over 41,600 individuals through the production and distribution of knowledge exchange mechanisms, multi-media products, publications, performance/evaluation tools and reports, standards/guidelines and training/education.

Additionally, evaluations of treatment projects report success in strengthening substance abuse treatment systems across Canada. For example:

  • The introduction of and increased reporting against national treatment indicators has provided consistent data on treatment system utilization across the country for the first time; and
  • The production of evidence-based standards and guidelines has led to increased consistency and quality of treatment care.

Prior to ADSI treatment funding, many provinces and territories reported working in silos where collaboration with other sectors or regions was limited. Evidence shows that treatment funding has helped establish the conditions necessary to support collaboration, including the development of a national knowledge exchange platform for all treatment projects, leading to improvements in efficiency and effectiveness and quality for substance abuse treatment systems and services.

Audits completed or planned

No audits were planned or completed.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the NADS is scheduled for 2016-17 (led by Justice Canada) in which ADSI will participate. The next departmental evaluation of the ADSI is currently scheduled for completion in September 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

ADSI continued to engage recipients through various channels. Program consultants worked regularly with recipients to negotiate and monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance and evaluation reports. Teleconferences and e-mail contact were used to engage and inform applicants about funding for the next funding period.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions - formerly Drug Strategy community Initiatives Fund 4,473,038 8,259,353 22,787,514 26,100,014 25,467,729 2,680,215
Total contributions - formerly Drug Treatment Funding Program 13,537,265 4,637,561
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 18,010,303 12,896,914 22,787,514 26,100,014 25,467,729 2,680,215

Comments on variances

The variance is mainly due to the consolidation of the Grant to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse and ADSI, which was not included in the 2015-16 planned spending.

Note: The Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund and Drug Treatment Funding Program were consolidated as of December 2014 into a single contribution program entitled Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (ADSI).

Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011
(Actual funding received Supplementary Estimates C 2011-12)

End date

March 31, 2020

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-12
(No stand-alone terms and conditions (Ts & Cs) were developed, Ts & Cs are included within the Agreement).

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

In Budget 2011, the Government committed up to $100 million to Brain Canada Foundation (“Brain Canada”), in dollar-for-dollar matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the Canada Brain Research Fund. The purpose of this Fund is to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding, and to support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers. Through open competition and rigorous Canadian and international peer review, the Fund supports the full spectrum of brain and mental research as funding is provided through three mechanisms:

  • Multi-Investigator Research Initiatives (MIRIs) support multidisciplinary teams that aim to accelerate research that will change the understanding of the brain and brain diseases/ disorders;
  • Platform Support Grants (PSGs) fund the operation and maintenance of major existing research platforms providing national or regional technical capability to multiple neuroscience investigators; and,
  • Training awards are granted to outstanding doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows undertaking brain research training.
Results achieved

Although it took some time for the ramping up of operations, in 2015-16, Brain Canada reached good momentum and raised $17.3M in funds from private and charitable donors. For example, under their Strategic Partnership Programs, a total of 15 partnerships and collaborative arrangements were initiated with such institutions as the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada, the Canadian Cancer Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Bell Canada and the Royal Bank of Canada.

Through the Canada Brain Research Fund, Brain Canada has disbursed the matched public-private funds to support research grants to researchers across Canada. Research grants awarded range between three to five years. The majority of grants target basic research, however, the portfolio of funded projects is well balanced in terms of transactional, pre-clinical and clinical research. For 2015-16, Brain Canada has continued to increase momentum on funding research with more than 60 research grants announced in priority research areas such as, Alzheimer’s Disease, autism, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and brain cancer. Brain Canada disbursed $4.8 million in research funding for four Multi-Investigator Research Initiatives, $12.6 million for seven projects under the Platform Support Grants program, and $1.5 million for 17 training awards.

Brain Canada has demonstrated increased collaboration through the partnerships it has formed with private and charitable donors, as well as the research partnerships it has funded. Funding research is long-term in nature and it is too early to see results, as the vast majority of the research projects are in their preliminary years. Early indications suggest that the Program is on track and it is expected that in the coming years the research projects, updated research platforms and training awards, will start to contribute to other outcomes such as more Highly Qualified Personnel working in brain research in Canada, a more interconnected brain research community, and increased knowledge on the brain and brain diseases / disorders, leading to the increased use of this knowledge. In the longer term, this is expected to contribute to improvements in the heathcare system and health outcomes for people affected by brain diseases / disorders.

Audits completed or planned

As specified in the funding agreement, Brain Canada must submit independently audited financial statements to Health Canada each calendar year.

Evaluations completed or planned

In January 2016, the Office of Audit and Evaluation for Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada began conducting an evaluation of the Canada Brain Research Fund. The purpose of the evaluation was to assess its relevance and performance (effectiveness, economy and efficiency). Results of the evaluation will be available by the end of December 2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Brain Canada is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 6,747,567 5,404,909 20,000,000 20,000,000 6,180,793 -13,819,207
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 6,747,567 5,404,909 20,000,000 20,000,000 6,180,793 -13,819,207

Comments on variances

As per the terms of agreement, Health Canada can only match and contribute the exact amount of non-federal government funding collected by Brain Canada in the previous year.

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and conditions (Ts & Cs) for this contribution program became effective April 1, 2013.

Strategic outcome

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 2.1: Health Products
    • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals
Description

To support basic, applied and clinical research on blood safety and effectiveness issues through the auspices of Canadian Blood Services (CBS).

Results achieved

The CBS Research and Development (R&D) Program helps maintain and increase the safety, supply and efficiency of the Canadian blood system by advancing innovation and maintaining Canadian capacity in transfusion science and medicine. The CBS R&D Program has generated numerous outputs, specifically knowledge products such as journal articles, learning events, and the development of highly qualified people in the important areas of basic and applied research that support the mission of CBS. The Program has shown a good level of achievement across its immediate and intermediate outcomes. In particular, the Program has played a key role in building and maintaining research capacity in transfusion science and medicine. At the immediate level, more than 1,700 healthcare professionals and researchers attended learning events and most reported enhanced knowledge. At the intermediate level, CBS has reported that key stakeholders in the transfusion and transplantation community are applying the knowledge created by R&D projects, such as updating standard operating procedures and license amendments.

Audits completed or planned

None

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation assessing relevance and performance was completed in 2013-14. The next planned evaluation will be completed in 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CBS participated in a Health Canada Branch-level pilot test of an automated system for collecting performance information. A CBS representative sat on the advisory committee overseeing the pilot and was a recipient user, testing the new system.

Health Canada officials undertook numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails) with CBS to discuss program progress and revisions to the performance measurement strategy.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 0

Comments on variances

N/A

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

March 31, 2018

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and Conditions as approved for the Contribution Agreement will apply to future Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) agreements until such time as they are superseded. The fiscal year for those Terms and Conditions follows the traditional fiscal year calendar, from April 1 through March 31 of the following calendar year.

Effective April 1, 2013, the CADTH funding was transitioned to a Contribution Agreement from a Named Grant. The change allows Health Canada to augment monitoring and managements of the funds. Prior to March 31, 2018 CADTH will need to request a renewal of funding.

The previous Named Grant covered the period of 2008 to 2013.

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

The CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Results achieved

The purpose of the Contribution Agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Results include: creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

CADTH is currently undergoing an independent evaluation as per the terms of the contribution agreement. This recipient-led evaluation began in September 2015 and the report will be available in December 2016. The next departmental evaluation is scheduled to be completed in March 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CADTH has produced numerous products and services including health technology reports, optimal use projects, environmental scans, therapeutic reviews and formulary listing recommendations. These deliverables provide guidance and evidence-based information to health care decision-makers regarding the cost-effectiveness and optimal use of health technologies. In particular, the formulary listing recommendations increases transparency across jurisdictions and provides consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions made by the participating public drug plans.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 16,396,848 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 16,396,848 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 0

Comments on variances

N/A

Note: CADTH received permission to carry forward $300,000 of Health Technology Management 2014-15 funding to 2015-16. Due to an underspend in their Common Drug Review stream, CADTH anticipates a repayment of funds to Health Canada as follows: Funds related to fiscal year 2015-16 operations $16,788 (Audited Financial Statement and Audit Report in July 2016).

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 1999

The current contribution agreement began in 2012-13, and was amended to be extended by one year, ending on March 31, 2016. A second amendment was recently completed, for another one year extension, ending March 31, 2017. Negotiations for a new five-year agreement are underway.

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

A Treasury Board Submission to establish new terms and conditions (Ts & Cs) for the Health Information Initiative (HII) was approved by Treasury Board on March 29, 2012. These new Ts & Cs provide the Federal Minister of Health the authority to renew funding agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. The contribution agreement with CIHI is governed by the HII Ts & Cs, for which there is no expiry date.

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the federal/provincial/territorial Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its analyses respond to questions about Canada's health systems and assist a variety of stakeholders, including funders, policy makers, health system managers, analysts, clinicians and researchers, in making informed decisions.

Since 1999, the federal government has provided funding to CIHI through a series of grants and conditional grants, known as the Roadmap Initiatives. More recently CIHI's funding has been consolidated through the HII, and is currently delivered through a contribution agreement. This combined funding has allowed CIHI to produce quality and timely health information ranging from health care system capacity, wait times data to the development of pan-Canadian health indicators.

The HII extended funding to CIHI for their 2012-17 Plan: "Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians". This contribution agreement, which began in fiscal year 2012-13, was amended to be extended by one year, and to include additional funds for activities to reduce Prescription Drug Abuse (PDA). A second amendment was recently completed to extend the agreement by another year, ending March 31st, 2017. The amended agreement spans over fiscal years 2012-13 to 2015-17 and provides $396,057,136 million to CIHI over five years, with annual funding as follows:

Table 1: Current amended contribution agreement with PDA funds detailed (dollars)
Fiscal Year 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 Total
Amended Agreement Totals 81,746,294 79,293,905 77,758,979 78,508,979 78,748,979 396,057,136
PDA Funds (included in totals above) 0 0 100,000 850,000 1,090,000 2,040,000

The new agreement, starting April 1st, 2017 will provide the remaining PDA funds ($2.24 million); $1,090,000 in 2017-18 and $1,150,000 in 2018-19. Thus, $4.28 million of PDA funding will be provided over fiscal year 2014-15 to 2018-19.

Results achieved

In 2015-16, CIHI continued to make progress in producing more and better data, more relevant and actionable analysis, and improved client understanding and use of CIHI data and information products. The following are selected highlights from the President's Quarterly Reports, and are accurate as of July, 2016. More detailed information on results achieved for 2015-16 is available in the CIHI Annual Report released in mid-July 2016.

Improving the Comprehensiveness, Quality and Availability of Data

There has been solid progress in data collection, especially surrounding the comprehensiveness and availability of CIHI data holdings. Progress has been made most notably in:

  • Data access and integration strategy
    • A first series of custom designed client dashboards for the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres (CAPHC)’s annual benchmarking report, was released in Q2 2015–16.
    • In collaboration with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, CIHI identified opportunities for making the Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) and the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) data available for quickstrike projects for the Pan-Canadian Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Network.
  • New or amended Data Sharing Agreements (DSAs)
    • Statistics Canada – new DSA for access to home care, long-term care and Hospital Mental Health Database (HMHDB) data.
    • New Brunswick Health Council – new DSA for the Canadian Patient Experience Reporting System.
    • A data sharing agreement was signed with Manitoba Health, Healthy Living and Seniors.
  • Canadian Multiple Sclerosis Monitoring System (CMSMS)
    • The CMSMS phase 2 feasibility pilot with new multiple sclerosis (MS) clinics was completed. Pilot project reports have been received from all 4 pilot sites.
    • The NACRS Clinic Lite pilot project at the Ottawa Hospital MS Clinic showed potential for significant cost savings for clinics using NACRS.
    • All of the activities for the CMSMS Phase 2 feasibility pilot were completed and the final report was submitted to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Four MS clinics from Ontario and Nova Scotia participated in the pilot. One third-party data request was completed, the first involving linkage of CMSMS and DAD data.
    • CIHI ceased operating the CMSMS in April 2016 due to limited participation. Since its launch in 2012, CMSMS had received data from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
    • PHAC and Health Canada were involved in planning the official external closure notification. CMSMS data received prior to closure of the data holding will be available via CIHI’s data request process.
  • Canadian Organ Replacement Registry (CORR)
    • CIHI continues to collaborate on the future transition of CORR’s donation and transplantation data collection to Canadian Blood Services (CBS).
    • CIHI worked with the CBS transition team to finalize the process mapping of CORR collection and reporting of transplant and donor data, and initiated work on data dictionary alignment and mapping.
    • CORR released centre-specific clinical measures and demographic reports, containing 2013 data, to dialysis and transplant centres. The 2014 data year for CORR data was closed in September 2015, more than 5 weeks earlier than the 2013 data year. The 2014 CORR data was released as annual statistics in March 2016.
    • The transition from paper submission to the CORR web entry data form continued. To date, 106 users from 40 transplant and dialysis centres have received access to submit via web entry. An eLearning module for new submitters was made available upon request.
    • The upgrade from paper submission to the CORR web-based data submission form was completed. Due to efficiency gains and improved timelines for closure of the CORR, two annual releases and Quick Stats refreshes (for 2013 and 2014 data, respectively) were disseminated for the CORR within the same fiscal year – in April 2015 and March 2016.
    • CIHI continued to provide support, through current process mapping, data mapping and knowledge sharing sessions, for the transition of transplant and donor data collection to CBS. The transition will potentially take place starting with the 2017 data collection year.
  • Prescription Drug Abuse (PDA)
    • CIHI is making progress on multiple fronts. First, through stakeholder engagement and consultation, CIHI is identifying the indicators and measures necessary to support federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) monitoring and surveillance. CIHI will engage partners to ensure appropriate indicators are established and updated regularly.
    • Second, CIHI has begun collecting and analyzing high priority data such as the prevalence of misuse and abuse, measures of harm, and the number of deaths due to opioids. Two analytic products are currently under development: a pan-Canadian analysis of emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to opioid poisoning; and pan-Canadian trends in opioid and benzodiazepine utilization.
Support population health and health system decision-making
  • Health System Performance Measurement
    • Scoping exercises are under way for phase 2 of the Your Health System (YHS): Insight project, which will include the Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio (HSMR) and the corporate client linkage standard implementation.
    • The implementation of the client linkage standard in Clinical Administrative Databases was initiated.
    • The YHS web tool was refreshed on December 16, 2015. The update consisted of the most recent data for 20 indicators, including HSMR data for 2014–15, two indicators of emergency department wait times and 22 contextual measures. In addition, there was significant increase in the level of reportable long-term care data for both Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador. The web tool now provides definitions and methodologies for more than 100 indicators in a searchable and easy to use format.
    • Development is underway to include the HSMR indicator in the update to the YHS Insight tool planned for April 2016. Communications are underway with stakeholders to support the transition from the two current eHSMR tools that will be decommissioned.
    • Work continued to assess the usefulness of the updated Statistics Canada Regional Peer Group methodology as a comparator for CIHI HSP indicators in general, with particular emphasis on rural and remote region lens.
    • Phase II updates for Your Health System Insight were released as planned on April 21, 2016. This project implemented the Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio (HSMR) indicator.
    • Development activities for the Your Health System Spring upgrade continued and are on schedule for release in May 26, 2016. This release will include updates to 23 indicators, eight contextual measures, and addition of data years to indicators and contextual measures.
  • International Comparisons and Benchmarking
    • CIHI contributed Canadian data to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Health Statistics 2015 report that was released on July 7, 2015. Many OECD countries saw further reductions in health spending.
    • An update to the OECD Interactive Tool: International Comparisons was released on November 4, 2015. The update looks at how Canada and its provinces compare with other member countries of the OECD on a variety of health system indicators. A companion report, International Comparisons: A Focus on Diabetes (2015), which explores Canada’s results on indicators of diabetes prevention and management, was also released.
    • CIHI participated in the OECD’s Health Care Quality Indicator Experts meeting held in Paris, France on November 9-10, 2015. At the end of November, CIHI submitted Canadian feedback on key components of the OECD’s proposed hospital performance data collection and the Health Care Quality Indicator questionnaire on hospital performance measurement for cardio/cerebrovascular disease.
    • CIHI participated in several activities in support of the OECD. Among these activities were:
      • Participation in the new OECD hospital cost variation pilot project;
      • Completion of the OECD survey on hospital performance measurement for cardiovascular disease and dementia;
      • Updates to the OECD Health Care Quality Indicator survey related to patient reported experience measures; and
      • Coordinated response to the OECD survey that will help provide a better understanding of the extent to which patient-reported outcome measures are used in OECD health systems.
    • To enable linkages and comparability across clinical data standards, the World Health Organization is building a common foundation among:
      • International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 11th Revision (ICD-11);
      • International Classification of Functioning (ICF); and
      • Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMEDCT).
      • Implementation of ICD-11 is expected to take approximately three to five years after release to the World Health Assembly in 2017.
Deliver organizational excellence

Some notable achievements from the last year include:

  • CIHI collaborated with Statistics Canada to streamline the transmission of CCRS, Ontario Mental Health Reporting System, HCRS and HMHDB data files from CIHI to the Statistics Canada vault. The data transfer is secure, timely and coordinated and is a significant change to the historical data transfers that were completed by copying data to CD and was sent via courier. Efforts are under way to use the same process for DAD and NACRS files.
  • Efficiencies with record-level data processing were achieved through the implementation of revisions to existing minimum data sets in SAS for the 2015 health workforce data submissions. This included data for occupational therapists, physiotherapists, pharmacists, medical laboratory technologists and medical radiation technologists.
  • New publishing processes and resource materials for making documents accessible to people with disabilities were developed and implemented as part of making CIHI’s products and services compliant with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).
  • 17 CIHI staff earned their Yellow Belt for CIHI Lean certification following workshops delivered in Ottawa and Toronto in November 2015. Enrollment for workshops scheduled for Q4 2015-16 is full with 20 staff members expected to participate.
  • Progress was made on the Web Redevelopment project, which will result in a redesigned website aligned to CIHI’s digital strategy. External stakeholder engagement is under way with a view to ensuring that CIHI’s redeveloped website meets stakeholder needs. The new website is scheduled for release at the end of 2016-17.
  • A new standard electronic Terms and Conditions clause for accessing secure data on CIHI’s web-based products was implemented on April 14, 2016. The new clause was designed to enhance and streamline the client services self-service model.
Audits completed or planned

Under the terms of its agreement with Health Canada, CIHI was required to have a performance audit completed and reported on by March 31, 2015. KPMG completed the audit in September 2014.

Evaluations completed or planned

The Office of Evaluation evaluated the relevance and performance of the HII for the period of 2012-15, as required by the contribution agreement. The evaluation was completed in December 2014 in anticipation of a new funding agreement to come into effect on April 1, 2016. It confirmed that HII objectives, mandate and activities were aligned and consistent with Health Canada objectives, federal government priorities and the federal role in the development of pan-Canadian health data. The next departmental evaluation is planned for December 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding as per the terms and conditions of the HII.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 79,293,905 77,758,979 78,509,979 78,509,979 78,509,979 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 79,293,905 77,758,979 78,509,979 78,509,979 78,509,979 0

Comments on variances

N/A

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and Conditions are embedded in the funding agreement.

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is responsible for implementing the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control with the following objectives: (1) to reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; (2) to enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and (3), to lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer.

The mandate of CPAC is to provide a leadership role with respect to cancer control in Canada, through the management of knowledge and the coordination of efforts among Provinces and Territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups and Aboriginal organizations to champion change and improve health outcomes related to cancer. CPAC acts as a pan-Canadian resource to provide the most up-to-date knowledge across strategic priority areas including prevention, screening/early detection, patient-centered care, guidelines, standards, as well as supporting key research activities and facilitating the development of a pan-Canadian surveillance system.

Results achieved

Since it began operating in April 2007, CPAC has:

  • Armed cancer patients and physicians across Canada with state-of-the-art knowledge about what works best to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.
  • Improved the quality of our national cancer system by monitoring its performance and identifying gaps.
  • Provided on-line cancer training for over 700 medical providers serving more than 215 First Nations communities and organizations with the @YourSide Colleague® Cancer Care Course.
  • Improved the quality of life for cancer victims by providing information that addressed their social, emotional and financial needs.
  • Implemented a large-scale effort to raise awareness of the common risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases.
  • Implemented the country's largest population health study of risk factors - the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project - which has enrolled 300,000 Canadians to explore why some people develop cancer and others do not.
  • Launched a First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control, in collaboration with First Peoples.
  • Expanded cancer screening programs in all provinces and encouraged hard-to-reach populations, such as women living with cervical cancer, to undergo screening - which helps doctors catch cancer earlier; and
  • Developed programs to help survivors through the tremendous uncertainty following treatment.
Audits completed or planned

As specified in the funding agreement, CPAC must submit independently audited financial statements to Health Canada each calendar year. Also required is an annual report detailing activities conducted and outcomes achieved.

Evaluations completed or planned

Evaluations of CPAC were completed in 2010-11 and 2015-16.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CPAC works to engage stakeholders through communications activities that include media and on-line vehicles to both the broader public and the cancer and health communities, and targeted outreach and partnership building. In 2015-16, CPAC: drove uptake of evidence-informed programs and policies in other jurisdictions through Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention initiatives; expanded the utilization of standardized electronic synoptic reporting for surgery and pathology results across the country; supported launch of a new Pan-Canadian research strategy, Target 2020: Strategy for Collaborative Action; reached consensus on indicators related to palliative and end-of-life care, patient reported outcomes and primary care, through the National Measurement Steering Committee; launched an Indigenous Health Supports Initiative to bring together and share promising practices and resources; provided researchers, in Canada and globally, with access to data through the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project, one of the largest population health research platforms in the world which allows researchers to conduct long-term studies that look at people’s health, lifestyle and other factors that increase the risk of cancer and chronic diseases; invested in multi-jurisdictional networks to support knowledge exchange in rural, remote and isolated communities; and focused on public engagement through digital and social media channels and deepening engagement with the patient community.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 48,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,296,994 -203,006
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 48,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,296,994 -203,006

Comments on variances

The variance represents interest earned by CPAC in 2015-16 and reimbursed to Health Canada. As per the terms of the contribution agreement, the interest earned by the recipient from the deposit of the funding is deemed to be part of the payment. In summary, Health Canada provided total funding of $47,500,000, and received $203,006 from the recipient relating to interest earned, resulting in a net actual spending of $47,296,994.

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

General Information

Start date

December 10, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) is an independent not-for-profit corporation mandated to provide leadership and coordinate the work necessary to build a culture of patient safety and quality improvement throughout the Canadian health system. CPSI promotes leading ideas and best practices, raises awareness and provides advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety.

CPSI's first two grant agreements provided financial assistance to help support implementation of the commitments governments made under the 2003 First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal related to improving health care quality by strengthening system co-ordination and improving national collaboration related to patient safety. Funding is now delivered through a five-year contribution agreement, covering April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018. For 2013-18, CPSI will focus and align its activities with a new emphasis on the strategic goals that are most likely to drive further system-level transformation over the five-year period, and beyond.

Results achieved

To continue to fulfill its mandate, CPSI focused on its strategic goals of: inspiring and sustaining patient safety knowledge within the system, and through innovation, enabling transformational change; building and influencing patient safety capability at organizational and systems levels; engaging all audiences across the health system in the national patient safety agenda; and providing leadership on the establishment of a National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan. In 2015-16, key results achieved included:

  • Significant work continued on the implementation of a National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan that identifies the priority patient safety areas most likely to lead to system-wide change and find ways to increase the pace of safety improvements. To develop and implement the action plan, CPSI convened the National Patient Safety Consortium, a group of more than 40 key organizations in Canadian healthcare who are working collaboratively to advance the action plan work. An action plan has been developed that includes measures to address some of the biggest patient safety challenges in the areas of surgical care safety, medication safety, infection prevention and control and home care safety, with an additional focus on patient safety education.
  • The Safer Healthcare Now! campaign had over 1200 organizations throughout the country implementing evidence-based interventions known to reduce risk for patient harm in areas such as medication reconciliation, infection prevention and control, and surgical safety.
  • Over 1100 participants registered for Canadian Patient Safety Week 2015, a national annual campaign started in 2005 to inspire improvement in patient safety and quality by highlighting patient safety issues, sharing information about best practices, and expanding patient safety and quality initiatives.
  • Training was delivered to increase capacity in local organizations through programs such as the Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety educational program for health care leaders, the Patient Safety Education Program Canada, the Advancing Safety for Patients in Residency Education program and through the opportunities provided to the more than 1700 participants at Canada's Forum on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.
  • Targeted patient safety research was released in areas including medication safety and patient handovers.
  • There was continued implementation and expansion of a Global Patient Safety Alerts system, which provides an ongoing resource of actionable information on specific patient safety incidents.
  • Patients for Patient Safety Canada, a patient-led program of CPSI, continued to strengthen its reach in the health care system, by bringing the patient perspective to collaborations at all levels at the system.
Audits completed or planned

CPSI's financial records are reviewed and audited annually by independent external accountants.

Evaluations completed or planned

The next departmental evaluation is planned for completion in June 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

To ensure the CPSI funding agreement is managed in an appropriate and efficient manner, Health Canada officials regularly engage with CPSI. In addition, the Department nominates one representative to CPSI's Board of Directors, and participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance 2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,760,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,760,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0

Comments on variances

N/A

Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

March 31, 2017

Budget 2015 announced the renewal of the Mental Health Commission of Canada's (MHCC) mandate for another 10 years beginning in 2017. A new funding agreement is in development.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2008-09 to 2016-17

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

As part of Budget 2007, the Government of Canada announced funding for the establishment of a MHCC, an independent, arm's length organization, with a mandate to act as a catalyst for improving the mental health system and changing the attitudes and behaviors of Canadians around mental health issues.

Results achieved

The MHCC has made significant progress since 2007, and has become a valuable source of expertise, advice, programs and policies in the mental health field. In 2015-16, priority areas and achievements of the MHCC included:

  • Anti-Stigma
    • In April 2015, a mental wellness conference called Mental Health Matters – A Whisper to a Scream, brought together students from over 50 different Newfoundland high schools. This is one example of the 28 regional summits which have hosted 4,000 students and another 1,000 adults (teachers and community partners). The conference is part of the MHCC’s HEADSTRONG, its national youth anti-stigma campaign.
    • The MHCC coordinated efforts to bring Road to Mental Readiness (R2MR) training to police and first responder organizations across Canada. The goals of the course are to improve short-term performance and long-term mental health outcomes, as well as to reduce barriers to care and encourage early access to care.
  • Children and Youth
    • The MHCC’s Youth Council created a youth version of Changing Directions, Changing Lives: The Mental Health Strategy for Canada. The Mental Health Strategy for Canada: A Youth Perspective is an adapted version of the original which includes examples of best practices that help bring to life many of the recommendations in the Strategy.
    • The MHCC convened 200 delegates and special guests to participate in the Consensus Conference on the Mental Health of Emerging Adults: Making Transitions a Priority in Canada. The conference explored the factors that affect the mental health of emerging adults and examined how health and social systems can work together to better support their overall mental well-being.
  • Knowledge Exchange Centre
    • The MHCC released the Informing the Future – Mental Health Indicators for Canada which compiles 55 indicators reflecting mental health for children and youth, adults and seniors.
    • The MHCC launched the Taking the Caregiver Guidelines off the Shelf: Mobilization Toolkit which intends to build capacity among caregivers and organizations to help them understand and implement recommendations outlined in the National Guidelines for a Comprehensive Service System to Support Family Caregivers of Adults with Mental Health Problems and Illnesses.
  • Recovery
    • The MHCC developed the Guidelines for Recovery-Oriented Practice, a comprehensive reference document for understanding recovery and promoting a consistent application of recovery principles at policy, program and practice levels.
  • Workplace
    • The MHCC released interim findings of the Case Study Research Project to better understand how organizations across Canada are implementing the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (the Standard). Forty-one organizations are participating in the pilot project, which will end on January 31, 2017.
    • The MHCC hosted the first ever Social Business Forum, which gathered organizations and entrepreneurs who are working to promote the employment of people with lived experience of mental illness.
  • Additional Foundational Initiatives
    • The MHCC has adapted specific needs Mental Health First Aid courses in partnership with First Nations and Inuit organizations and worked closely in the development of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami National Suicide Prevention Strategy.
    • Further information on these initiatives can be found on the MHCC's website
Audits completed or planned

As specified in the funding agreement, the MHCC must submit independently audited financial statements to Health Canada each fiscal year. Also required is an annual report detailing activities conducted and outcomes achieved. These reports are due to Health Canada no later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year (i.e., July 29, 2016).

Evaluations completed or planned

The MHCC was evaluated as part of a broader evaluation on Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada mental health and mental illness activities. The final report was released on July 19, 2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

MHCC is the sole recipient of the grant. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the funding agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 14,550,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,550,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0

Comments on variances

N/A

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

The Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) provides up to $25.7 million per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care system priorities, including building the evidence base and advancing innovation in the areas of health human resources, system adaptation to the needs of an aging population, and palliative and end-of-life care. Through the implementation of funding agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, the Program contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to the Canadian health care system.

Results achieved

The Program directed funding toward knowledge development, translation and exchange activities to support innovation and implementation of best practices in key policy areas such as medication safety, care for aging populations, and palliative and end-of-life care. The Program also supported projects that contributed to the sharing of statistics and data analysis to aid in decision-making about the right number, mix and distribution of physicians throughout the country, and improving access to health care services for all Canadians, particularly in underserved areas.

Specific examples include:

  • In 2015-16, the Future of Medical Education Post-Graduate Implementation project came to a successful completion. This multi-year project focused on collaboratively improving the medical education system to better meet the health care needs of the Canadian population.
  • In addition, the Program continued to support the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER) to enhance its foundational database and develop statistics and analytical reports related to post-MD training in Canada. CAPER products and services are instrumental to medical educators and provincial/territorial governments as they work together to achieve the right number, mix and distribution of physicians to meet the health care needs of populations and communities throughout Canada.
  • Funding was provided to the Canadian Home Care Association for the development of a Home Care Knowledge Network that aims to increase evidence based program and policy making by sharing research, data and tools to inform decision making. Project results include the development of an on-line Home Care Knowledge Network  and the creation of four Network HUBs involving over 99 participants exploring a range of topics such as coordination of care, falls prevention, and core home care services.
  • Program support was provided to Saint Elizabeth Health Care to develop and implement person-centred care training and educational supports for front line staff working in select home care, assisted living facilities and long-term care homes. Project results include the development and testing of online educational supports and training workshops that were piloted in seven sites across Canada in home and community care, long-term care, group homes and supported/assisted living residences. An online toolkit titled, A Guide for Implementing Person and Family-Centred Care Education across Health Care Organizations was created to support interested providers and staff working in long-term care facilities and home care to incorporate person-centred care practices at all levels of their organizations.
Audits completed or planned

Under the Health Care Policy Contribution Program in 2015-16, an audit of one contribution agreement with the Canadian Medical Association was completed.

Evaluations completed or planned

The next evaluation is scheduled for June 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Funding recipients continue to be engaged through site visits, and regular communication regarding the progress of funded projects.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 19,712,535 20,382,789 25,709,000 19,430,484 17,839,928 -7,869,072
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 19,712,535 20,382,789 25,709,000 19,430,484 17,839,928 -7,869,072

Comments on variances

The variance is mainly due to the winding down of the Internationally Educated Health Professionals Initiative as well as the underspending of funds by some recipients in this initiative.

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and conditions for this contribution program became effective April 1, 2013

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program 1.3: Official Language Minority Community Development
Description

The Official Languages Health Contribution Program (OLHCP) was renewed by Treasury Board on November 28, 2013 with total funding of $174.3 million over five years (2013-14 to 2017-18 fiscal years) under the Government of Canada's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-18: Education, Immigration, Communities initiative.

The OLHCP Program has the following objectives:

  • To increase access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada; and
  • To increase the active offer of health services for English and French linguistic minority communities within health institutions and communities.

These objectives are achieved through the following three mutually reinforcing program components:

  • Integrating health professionals within official language minority communities through French-language academic health programs in 11 colleges and universities outside of Québec offering 100 French-language academic health programs to generate additional health professionals in French minority language communities. The funding supports student and teacher recruitment, the development of French-language training tools, purchasing teaching equipment, and, the availability of bursaries and internships for professors and students. For the province of Québec and its administrative regions, funding is provided to McGill University to coordinate English and French language training courses geared to health professionals and intake personnel. To improve access to health services in English and French linguistic minority communities, health professionals need to be proficient in the language of the patient.
  • Strengthening and improving local health networking capacity through the 38 existing community-based health networks across Canada through the development of health strategies by health authorities for English and French linguistic minority communities.
  • Through Health Services Access and Retention Projects, encouraging bilingual health professionals to practice in English and French linguistic minority communities. This includes the engagement of front-line health service providers in providing services in the second official language, supporting English and French linguistic minority communities' specific health human resource retention strategies and addressing specific health needs.
Results achieved

In the Quebec regions, 73% of health professionals completed program-funded language training. Seven specialized French second-language courses were also provided to McGill University health sector students to integrate them into the Quebec healthcare system as bilingual health professionals. Outside of Quebec, 860 French-speaking students graduated from health-related programs in 11 postsecondary institutions funded by the Program. Follow up survey results with graduates demonstrated a placement rate of 75% in health care institutions in official language minority communities, increasing the pool of health human resources available to meet the needs of official language minority communities in Canada.

A 2015 evaluation of incentive bursaries provided to Québec English speaking health system graduates over 2011-14 to encourage them to practice in regions outside of Montréal found that 88% were currently still practicing in those regions well after having completed the one-year period for which they had agreed to practice in those regions.

A two-year agreement (September 2015 to September 2017) was reached between Cité Collégiale and Nunavut Department of Health to facilitate student work placements in health services and social services institutions in Nunavut to encourage retention.

Health Networks: 38 community-based health networking partnerships were maintained in all provinces and territories, and in 14 health administrative regions of Québec. These networks collaborate with various health sector stakeholders to improve access to health services for English and French speaking minorities.

Examples of specific results in Quebec include:

  • Several Community Health Education videoconference sessions were deployed simultaneously to community meetings across Quebec to enable community-based learning, exchange and transfer of knowledge on specific health issues.
  • Partnership agreements were signed with the Community Health and Social Services Network and the ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux to introduce accreditation procedures for English language health and social services and develop recommendations on the use of English language interpreters in Québec's health and social services facilities.

Results outside of Québec include:

  • A collaborative initiative with the Société Santé en français and Accreditation Canada to develop or enrich standards for culturally and linguistically adapted care services for hospitals, long-term care centres and other health care organizations. This initiative is available to all official language minority communities, including Anglophones residing in Québec, and Francophone people living outside Québec.
  • A multidisciplinary medical clinic to serve the French-speaking community of Calgary opened on May 1st, 2015.
  • The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada integrated French-speaking medical graduates from Canada’s English-language universities into French-speaking minority communities through 16 internship placements in 8 cities, and 332 completed relevant training.
Audits completed or planned
  • Audit of Laurentian University: to be completed for October 2016
  • Audit of Megantic English-Speaking Community Development Corp (MCDC) (third party recipient via Community Health and Social Services Network, primary recipient): to be completed for October 2016
Evaluations completed or planned
  • The evaluation of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2013-17 is being undertaken and will be completed by March 31, 2017.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

Representatives of the Official Language Community Development Bureau (OLCDB) and departmental senior management attended annual general meetings and meetings of Boards of Directors of official language minority community organizations, and were in frequent contact with beneficiaries of the Program.

Health Canada's regional official languages coordinators also attended meetings with official language minority community organizations in various parts of the country, and shared information about Health Canada programs and initiatives.

The following site visits were conducted to monitor the achievement of expected results:

  • Health PEI and Collège Acadie
  • Clinique francophone de Calgary (ACFA régionale de Calgary).
  • University of Alberta – Campus Saint-Jean, Réseau Santé Albertain.
  • Centre de Santé Communautaire Saint-Thomas.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 24,861,552 35,835,074 36,400,000 36,400,000 36,399,999 -1
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 24,861,552 35,835,074 36,400,000 36,400,000 36,399,999 -1

Comments on variances

N/A

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

June 19, 2015

End date

March 31, 2021

Note: Support payments will continue throughout the entire lifetime of Canadian thalidomide survivors and the program will be reviewed every five years.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to the organization’s programs
  • Program activity 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The purpose of the Program is to contribute to meeting the needs of Thalidomide survivors for the remainder of their lives so that they may age with dignity. The objectives in supporting the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (TSCP) are to ensure that eligible Thalidomide survivors:

  • receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and
  • have transparent and timely access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund (EMAF).
Results achieved

Ongoing tax-free payments were distributed to 100% of known Thalidomide survivors – those who were confirmed through the 1991 Extraordinary Assistance Plan for persons born with disabilities as a result of Thalidomide. New survivors confirmed under the TSCP will receive their 2015-16 ongoing support payments following an assessment of their disability level in 2016-17.

The independent third-party program administrator initiated development of administrative processes and a schedule of eligible expenses for the EMAF. The Fund will be launched in May 2016.

Eight new thalidomide survivors were confirmed. Additional new Thalidomide survivors may still be identified as this process continues into 2016-17.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

There is a departmental evaluation currently scheduled for December 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada engaged the Thalidomide Victims Association of Canada (TVAC), a key stakeholder, during the early phases of program implementation. Health Canada also provided information about the program to individual Thalidomide survivors and to individuals who believe they are survivors of Thalidomide, through direct correspondence and online.

Health Canada selected an independent third party to administer the TSCP and engaged the organization by responding to inquiries and undertaking regular monitoring activities such as reporting, performance measurement, meetings and ongoing communication to support program implementation.

The third party administrator engaged TVAC in developing health assessment methodologies and in developing a schedule of eligible expenses for the EMAF. The administrator also developed and implemented an outreach strategy to ensure ongoing communication with the Thalidomide survivor community. In 2015-16, this consisted of direct mail and web-based information.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment 2013-14
Actual spending
2014-15
Actual spending
2015-16
Planned spending
2015-16
Total authorities available for use
2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 8,000,000 8,000,000 8,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 0 0 8,000,000 8,000,000 8,000,000

Comments on variances

The variance is mainly due to funding received in-year, which was not included in the 2015-16 planned spending.

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