Supplementary Information Tables:  2016-17 Departmental Results Report

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 3.3: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit
    • Sub-Program 3.3.1: First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.1: Health Planning and Quality Management
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.2: Health Human Resources
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.3: Health Facilities
    • Sub-Program 3.3.2: First Nations and Inuit Health System Transformation
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.2.1: Health Systems Integration
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.2.2: e-Health Infostructure
  • Sub-Program 3.3.3: Tripartite Health Governance

Description

The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services. It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit.

The funds are used for: planning and management for the delivery of quality health services; construction and maintenance of health facilities; research activities; encouraging Indigenous people to pursue health careers; investments in technologies to modernize health services; and integrating and realigning the governance of existing health services.

Results achieved

The capacity of First Nations and Inuit to influence and/or control health programs and services was improved, with 346 communities now having flexible or block arrangements which support community design, delivery and management of health programs and services (an increase from 334 in the previous year). Additionally, 126 recipients with contribution agreements in 2011 or later had developed plans for managing the operations and maintenance of their health infrastructure. The number of communities served fluctuates depending on which facilities are accredited as they serve a different number of communities (currently 134 - down from 138 last year). The important number to track is the overall number of accredited facilities, which has increased.

Significant new investments in Indigenous health infrastructure, announced in Budget 2016, were directed to support renovations and replacements of health facilities and nursing stations in 2016-17. Health Canada also initiated a three year inspection cycle to ensure that health facilities on-reserve are inspected regularly and resulting high priority deficiencies are prioritized for capital investment.

Health Canada continued to fund 23 devolution/alternative service delivery projects across all regions in 2016-17. In addition to the alternative service delivery projects, Health Canada funded 53 integration projects in 2016-17 that aimed to improve the coordination and integration of federally and provincially-funded health services for First Nations.

Efforts in 2016-17 also focussed on enhancing the quality and accessibility of health services through the development of joint health plans to support greater control by First Nations and Inuit over health resources, and to coordinate collective responses to emerging health crises.

Health Canada continued to support the implementation of the British Columbia (BC) Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nations Health Governance, which included assisting the First Nations Health Authority in meeting its governance and accountability requirements.

Audits completed or planned

  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Facilities Program: Completed in March 2017;
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of Health Canada's Management of the Administration of the BC Framework Agreement: Completed in March 2017; and,
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions: Planned for October 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned

  • Health Planning and Quality Management: Completed November 2016;
  • Health Facilities: Completed March 2017;
  • e-Health Infostructure: Completed March 2017;
  • BC Tripartite Governance: Planned for September 2017; and,
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Human Resources: Planned for June 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations. It informs how Health Canada plans to fulfill its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

Health Canada has also signed an Engagement Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations and an Inuit Health Approach with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. These documents guide engagement processes at the national level.

At the regional level, regional partnership tables have been established that provide important vehicles for engagement with partners. Regional partnership tables feed into planning and priority setting processes within the Branch and play a key role in identifying where and how efforts are directed at the regional level.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 611,949,625 637,662,686 645,276,337 752,135,571 752,135,571 106,859,234
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 611,949,625 637,662,686 645,276,337 752,135,571 752,135,571 106,859,234
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to in-year resources received for Social Infrastructure and a reallocation of resources from other programs within this strategic outcome to meet program needs and priorities.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 3.1: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
    • Sub-Program 3.1.1: First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.1: Healthy Child Development
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.2: Mental Wellness
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.3: Healthy Living
    • Sub-Program 3.1.2: First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.2.1: Communicable Disease Control and Management
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.2.2: Environmental Public Health
    • Sub-Program 3.1.3: First Nations and Inuit Primary Care
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.3.1: Clinical and Client Care
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.3.2: Home and Community Care

Description

The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities. It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including surveillance, to prevent and/or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards; and primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services.

Results achieved

First Nations and Inuit communities continued to have access to community-based health promotion and disease prevention programming. For example, the number of community members accessing healthy child development programs and services exceeded targets, as 8,226 women accessed prenatal and postnatal health, 14,427 children accessed early literacy and learning through Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve, and 19,856 children accessed Children's Oral Health programming. In addition, 92% of First Nations and Inuit communities had improved access to healthy living programs and services. Through the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative, over 87% of projects supported physical activities and over 81% delivered healthy eating activities.

Efforts continued to support increased capacity of First Nations and Inuit communities to deliver health programs and services through training and certification. For example, the percentage of addiction counsellors in treatment centers who are certified raised slightly from 77 to 78 in 2015-16, and 100% of First Nations communities had access to a trained Community-based Drinking Water Quality Monitor or an Environmental Health Officer to monitor their drinking water quality.

Coordinated responses to primary care services continued to be supported as 69% of First Nations communities have collaborative service delivery arrangements with external primary care service providers.

Audits completed or planned

  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of First Nations and Inuit Youth Mental Health Programming : Planned for September 2017; and,
  • Office of the Auditor General - First Nations and Inuit Oral Health Programs: Planned for November 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned

  • Mental Wellness: Completed in July 2016;
  • Environmental Health: Completed in November 2016;
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management: Planned for July 2018- December 2019
  • Mental Wellness: Planned for September 2019 - March 2021;
  • Clinical and Client Care: Planned for March 2018;
  • Home and Community Care: Planned for January 2017 - June 2018;
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan: Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Led; March 2018 - March 2019;
  • Healthy Child Development: Planned for April 2018 - September 2019; and,
  • Healthy Living: Planned for April 2018 - September 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations. It informs how Health Canada plans to fulfill its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

Health Canada has also signed an Engagement Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations and an Inuit Health Approach with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. These documents guide engagement processes at the national level.

At the regional level, regional partnership tables have been established that provide important vehicles for engagement with partners. Regional partnership tables feed into planning and priority setting processes within the Branch and play a key role in identifying where and how efforts are directed at the regional level.

Federally, Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and INAC continue to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burdens associated with grants and contributions.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 641,124,657 659,852,641 621,858,728 738,202,534 694,651,345 72,792,617
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 641,124,657 659,852,641 621,858,728 738,202,534 694,651,345 72,792,617
Comments on variances The variance between actual planned spending is mainly due to in-year resources received for the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan, Mental Wellness Interventions and Services Enhancements for First Nations and Inuit, Nutrition North Canada, Clean Growth and Climate Change, Jordan's Principle - A Child First Initiative, and the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support program.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 3.2: Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit

Description

Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program is a national program that provides registered First Nations and recognized Inuit residents in Canada with coverage for a range of medically necessary health-related goods and services which are not otherwise available to them through other private plans or provincial/territorial health or social programs. NIHB Program benefits include prescription and over-the-counter medications, dental and vision care, medical supplies and equipment, mental health counselling, and transportation to access medically required health services that are not available on-reserve or in the community of residence.

Results achieved

72.4% of eligible First Nations and Inuit population accessed at least one non-insured health benefit in 2016-17. The Health Canada Dental Predetermination Centre (DPC) handles dental claims requests that require predetermination (prior approval). The Program processes over 306,000 claim requests annually, of this, 4% of claims require predetermination. In 2016-17, the DPC met the 10 day service standard for issuing predetermination 65% of the time. The DPC is working towards increasing its staffing complement to a capacity that will allow the Centre to meet the standards that have been established.

Audits completed or planned

  • Office of the Auditor General of Canada - First Nations and Inuit Oral Health Programs: Planned for November 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned

  • Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit: Planned for September 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations. It informs how Health Canada plans to fulfill its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

Health Canada has also signed an Engagement Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and an Inuit Health Approach with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK). These documents guide engagement processes at the national level.

In 2016-17, Health Canada continued to work collaboratively with the AFN on the NIHB Program Joint Review in order to enhance client access to benefits, identify and address gaps in benefits, streamline service delivery to be more responsive to client needs, and increase program efficiencies. Health Canada also continued to work collaboratively with the ITK Senior Bilateral Committee to identify and respond to Inuit-specific issues related to the NIHB Program.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 191,378,390 200,370,251 210,928,523 211,160,821 210,429,939 -498,584
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 191,378,390 200,370,251 210,928,523 211,160,821 210,429,939 -498,584
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the demand driven nature of this program.

Territorial Health Investment Fund (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014 - 2018

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) is a three-year investment of $70M to support territorial health systems, starting in 2014. The Terms and Conditions of the THIF were extended for one year (with no additional funds) and are currently in place until March 31, 2018, in order to enable the territories to fully implement the projects currently underway.

The Territorial stream ($13M per fiscal year, $4.33M per territory) funds projects to strengthen health services in-territory in the targeted areas that have persistent challenges and poor health outcomes. The Pan-Territorial stream provides $2M per fiscal year for collaboratively-developed projects that offer innovative solutions to health systems problems. The Medical Travel stream ($12M in 2014-15, $8M in 2015-16, $5M in 2016-17) is a declining subsidy to offset territories' eligible medical transportation costs in the short-term, incenting immediate measures to reform medical travel programs and protocols and increase service capacity in-territory.

Results achieved

Chronic disease and mental health priorities have been supported by THIF funding primarily through structural/organizational change, recruitment/retention, and clinical skills training.

For example, THIF funding in the Northwest Territories (NWT) supported the amalgamation of health and social services into one single territorial Health and Social Services Authority, which now provides seamless access to health services anywhere in the NWT, regardless of home region.

In Nunavut, THIF funding has supported the development of mental health services capacity in the territory, including: training and capacity building for mental health service providers; the development and implementation of mental health screening and assessment tools and clinical standards of practice; and projects to provide school-based mental health and addictions services and supports.

In Yukon, funding has supported enhanced service delivery/service integration in mental wellness care and chronic disease management through skills development training for health providers and the implementation of home health monitoring for patients with chronic diseases.

Funding under the Medical Travel stream helped territorial governments offset medical transportation costs associated with accessing health services out-of-territory.

Audits completed or planned

No audits were completed or planned.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the Territorial Health Investment Fund is planned from August 2017 - January 2019

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan seeks to pursue better mechanisms for involving First Nations and Inuit in the Branch's planning and decision making processes. This includes commitments to find more effective and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate with First Nation, Inuit, provincial and territorial partners.

FNIHB's Northern Region work in close partnership with First Nations, Inuit, territorial governments and other partners in the North to advance issues of mutual interest and concern. Partnership tables in the territories are focussed on health-related issues of common interest and seek to better align, coordinate, and integrate efforts between and among partners.

The Nunavut Partnership Table on Health is a well-established senior-level table with participation from the Northern Region, the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. that meets quarterly to strengthen coordination and identify shared priorities and opportunities for action, with the purpose of improving health outcomes of Inuit in Nunavut.

The Northern Region has frequent bilateral Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)-level meetings with the Government of the Northwest Territories' Department of Health and Social Services, and with the NWT-based Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, with the purpose of establishing joint priorities and enhancing collaboration.

Northern Region regularly participates at the First Nations-led Yukon First Nations Health and Social Development Commission to share information and discuss shared priorities, and engages trilaterally with First Nations and the Yukon Government at the Yukon Health Table.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 26,190,000 22,990,300 20,000,000 20,000,000 20,000,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 26,190,000 22,990,300 20,000,000 20,000,000 20,000,000 0
Comments on variances NIL

Substance Use and Addictions Program (Voted) Footnote 1

General Information

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-15

Strategic outcome

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 2.5: Problematic Substance Use Footnote 2
    • Sub-Program 2.5.2: Controlled Substances

Description

Aligned with the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy, the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) supports evidence-informed and innovative initiatives across health promotion, prevention, harm reduction, treatment and rehabilitation, targeting a broad range of licit and illicit substances including opioids, alcohol, cannabis and prescription drugs. The overall objective of the SUAP is to support other levels of government, community and non-profit organizations to respond to drug and substance use issues across Canada by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment and related system enhancements; and, improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Results achieved

The SUAP managed 57 ongoing or approved contribution funding projects in 2016-17. These included: 11 projects previously funded under the former Drug Treatment Funding Program; 34 prevention-focused projects previously funded under the former Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund; a cohort of six prescription drug-focused projects previously funded under the former Anti-Drug Strategy Initiative funding program; one agreement with the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addictions; and five new projects approved in a targeted call for proposals launched in 2016-17. A total of 46 out of the 57 projects in fiscal year 2016-17 ended by March 31, 2017. Submission and analysis of project-level evaluation reports are currently being assessed. Results compiled to date indicate that:

Prevention

Favourable changes were reported by all projects reporting to date on increased knowledge, understanding of addiction and confidence in decision-making. For example, one project found a statistically significant finding of a 62% increase in knowledge from pre- to post-evaluation around key themes such as safer choices, refraining from or cutting down on substance use, the effects of substances and where to get help and resources.

The majority of projects reporting on acquired or improved capacity (knowledge and skills) to avoid illicit drug use to date had positive results. For example, statistically significant findings were found from pre- to post-evaluation in a number of domains including: emotional control, mindful awareness, and improvements in depression symptoms, optimism, social skills, and concentration and parenting skills.

In terms of individual capacity, positive results were reported in terms of youth resilience and coping skills. Projects reported increased social support and positive changes in thinking and decision-making skills and resulting decreases in substance use over time.

Based on reported findings to date, there is evidence that the funded projects increased access to health promotion and prevention resources through the creation and implementation of a range of knowledge products. Several projects were able to measure uptake of these tools and resources within schools and with service providers.

For the 11 projects focused on community engagement or community capacity building, there was a significant change from baseline to post-project evaluation. Specifically, increases were reported in participation of community partners / stakeholders; leadership capacity; engagement with community structures; linking with others; and, sense of community created by the project.

Treatment

All provincial/territorial jurisdictions reporting and analysed to date have reported progress at the project level towards the program outcomes of: enhanced collaboration and knowledge exchange within jurisdictions and stakeholders; increased availability/access and understanding of evidence-informed practice information; and, increased capacity to evaluate substance use treatment system performance.

Several provincial/territorial jurisdictions reported success in effecting changes to standards, policies and practices that indicate success in strengthening substance use treatment systems across Canada.

Prescription Drugs / Prescriber Education

The SUAP supported six projects focused on prescription drug use and prescriber education in 2016-17 and included the publishing of the 2017 Canadian Guideline for Opioid Therapy and Chronic Non-Cancer Pain.

Several projects reported positive results in terms of uptake of information and knowledge on opioid use and prescribing and plans to change their practice as a result of this new knowledge. For example, an interdisciplinary, online continuing education course developed by one of the projects received recognition from the Canadian Association for University Continuing Education. Those targeted by the online course reported significant improvement in their knowledge of opioid use; in their perception of collaborating with each other and understanding of each other's roles; in their self-confidence; and, a number indicated they planned to change their practices.

Note: For new SUAP projects that began in 2016-17, it is too early in the project life cycles to enable reporting on results achieved. Results will be reported in subsequent fiscal years.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the National Anti-Drug Strategy was completed by the Department of Justice in 2016-17. A five-year evaluation assessing relevance and performance of the SUAP is planned for 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Applicants for funding in 2016-17 were engaged through a targeted call for proposals, with program staff working closely with applicant organizations to shape their initiatives. Program staff worked regularly with funding recipients to monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance measurement and evaluation reports.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions - formerly Drug Strategy community Initiatives Fund 8,259,353 25,467,729 26,350,014 23,296,410 22,793,236 -3,556,778
Total contributions - formerly Drug Treatment Funding Program 4,637,561
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 12,896,914 25,467,729 26,350,014 23,296,410 22,793,236 -3,556,778
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to delays in the call for project proposals and unspent funds by recipients.

Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

(Actual funding received Supplementary Estimates C 2011-12)

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-12 - 2015-16: No stand-alone terms and conditions (Ts & Cs); Ts & Cs included within the Agreement).

2016-17 - 2019-20: New Contribution Agreement has separate Ts & Cs.

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

In Budget 2011, the Government committed up to $100M over eight years until 2019-20 to the Brain Canada Foundation (Brain Canada), in dollar-for-dollar matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the Canada Brain Research Fund (CBRF). The purpose of the CBRF is to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding, and to support research that advances knowledge of the brain. Budget 2016 committed an additional $20M starting from 2016-17 until 2019-20.

Results achieved

Through a competitive process, CBRF grants are awarded to brain research projects across Canada. This funding is distributed across various brain research themes with approximately 31% directed to neurodegenerative disorders, 21% for multiple disorders, 24% split equally for neurodevelopmental disorders and for brain and spinal cord injury, 11% for brain cancer. 10% for mental illness, and 3% for other brain research themes..

To date, funding provided through the CBRF has generated over 100 partnerships that support 188 projects across Canada involving more than 800 researchers at 112 institutions. During 2016-17, initiatives supported through the CBRF produced various knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.), learning events, partnerships, and grants. For example, CBRF investment supported the training of 54 highly qualified personnel and the publication of over 120 research articles.

In addition, through partnerships with various institutions, health charities and donors, research networks, provincial agencies and corporations, Brain Canada raised $27.4M in funds and disbursed $46.6M supporting 219 research grants. For example, in December 2016, the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society of Canada, Biogen, and Brain Canada announced a partnership totalling over $7M in research funds to support an MS Progression Cohort that will provide a platform to address research questions related to the mechanisms of progression, treatments and the impact of MS.

Funding research is long-term and, typically, CBRF research grants range between three to five years. This means that the vast majority of research projects are mid-way and results are expected to begin in 2017-18. Funded projects are expected to equip Canadian researchers to undertake collaborative brain research in order to advance brain knowledge and to inform future brain research. It is also expected that stakeholders will use knowledge to inform the development of solutions (e.g., prevention, diagnostic, clinical, etc.) to address brain diseases and disorders.

At this time, there are early indications of some promising projects. For example, Dr. Michel Cayouette and his team, at the Institute de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, received a $1.5M grant to investigate the link between the shape of a cell and brain function. The team has made important advances in the understanding of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders and are paving the way to identifying new treatments.

Another promising advance has been made by Dr. Xiao-Yan Wen and his team at St. Michael's Hospital. Recipients of $2.4M in funding for platform enhancement, the team has been using tropical fish to find treatments for brain disorders. The team built a platform to screen drugs used to target brain disorders and has made significant progress in developing disease models for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Lou Gehrig's disease or ALS, epilepsy, and other brain disorders. Their research has also led to a preclinical and clinical phase including the development of screens for stroke and Alzheimer's disease.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

A Program evaluation was completed in February 2017. A second evaluation is not scheduled as the current funding agreement ends March 2020 before the end of the five-year evaluation cycle for this Program. If the Program does not continue, the Recipient will be required to complete a Recipient-led evaluation and submit a final evaluation report by March 31, 2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Brain Canada is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,404,909 6,180,793 5,794,032 24,992,085 24,992,085 19,198,053
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,404,909 6,180,793 5,794,032 24,992,085 24,992,085 19,198,053
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to a reprofile of funding from future years, which was required for the Government of Canada to match the funds raised by Brain Canada, as well as an additional funding received in-year.

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and conditions (Tso & Cs) for this contribution program became effective April 1, 2013.

Strategic outcome

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 2.1: Health Products
    • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals

Description

The Canadian Blood Services Research and Development (CBS R&D) Program helps maintain and increase the safety, supply and efficiency of the Canadian blood system by advancing innovation and maintaining Canadian capacity in transfusion science and medicine. The program pursues these goals by fostering relevant discovery and development research, facilitating dissemination and application of knowledge, educating the next generation of scientific and health care experts, and engaging with an interdisciplinary network of partners in Canada and beyond. In 2016-17, the agreement was amended to implement the Minister's $3M commitment related to blood donor policy on Men who have Sex with Men (MSM).

Results achieved

The CBS R&D Program has generated numerous outputs related to knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.) learning events, collaborative arrangements and the development of highly qualified people in the important areas of basic and applied research. For example, the program established 44 new partnerships and awarded 151 funding grants in support of R&D and training. The program's research network also published 312 peer-reviewed publications and delivered over 300 presentations worldwide.

The program has met or exceeded its outcome targets. In particular, the program has played a key role in building and maintaining research capacity in transfusion science and medicine. For example, 25 highly qualified people were formally trained and over 70 major education events were held, attracting 6,500 professionals. In addition, various stakeholders used knowledge generated by R&D Projects to inform changes to practices and standards. As a result, there were three changes in national and international standards and four Health Canada license amendments.

Audits completed or planned

No audits were completed and none are planned or underway.

Evaluations completed or planned

A joint federal evaluation is underway of this program and of the Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Program (administered under a separate agreement). Results are expected early fall 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials undertook numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails) with CBS to discuss program progress. Health Canada continues to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,175,000 5,175,000 175,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,175,000 5,175,000 175,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to supporting funding obligations for the new MSM research initiative.

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and Conditions as approved for the contribution agreement will apply to future Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) agreements until such time as they are superseded. The fiscal year for those Terms and Conditions follows the traditional fiscal year calendar, from April 1 through March 31 of the following calendar year.

Effective April 1, 2013, the CADTH funding was transitioned to a contribution agreement from a named grant. The change allows Health Canada to augment monitoring and management of the funds. Prior to March 31, 2018, CADTH will need to request a renewal of funding. CADTH is currently working with Health Canada to develop a solicitation package to seek renewal of its funding prior to the expiry of the current contribution agreement and incorporate funding announced in Budget 2017. This will be completed prior to the expiry of the existing contribution agreement on April 1, 2018.

The previous named grant covered the period of 2008 to 2013.

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Results achieved

The purpose of the contribution agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Results include: the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

As per the terms of its contribution agreement, an independent evaluation of CADTH's activities was conducted for the period between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2016. The final results of this recipient-led evaluation were made available in December 2016. A departmental evaluation of CADTH activities between 2012-13 and 2015-16 was conducted and approved by Health Canada in March 2017 and is available online.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CADTH has produced numerous products and services including health technology reports, optimal use projects, environmental scans, therapeutic reviews and formulary listing recommendations. These deliverables provide guidance and evidence-based information to health care decision-makers regarding the cost-effectiveness and optimal use of health technologies. In particular, the formulary listing recommendations increases transparency across jurisdictions and provides consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions made by the participating public drug plans.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 0
Comments on variances NIL

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (Voted)

General information

Start date

December 10, 2015

End date

March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic Outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities

Description

The contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) supports the federal government's interest (in a federal, provincial and territorial partnership context) in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify savings and efficiencies in the health system by: building leadership and skill capacity; enabling patient, family and community engagement; applying improvement methodology to drive measurable results; and, creating collaboratives to spread evidence-informed improvements. Contribution funding was made available to CFHI in Budgets 2015 and 2016. A contribution agreement is currently in effect that covers the period from 2015-16 to 2018-19.

Results achieved

In 2016-17, CFHI continued to support innovations designed to accelerate improvements in health care delivery by working with health care leaders, governments, policy-makers and other leaders. Examples of results achieved by CFHI in 2016-17, include:

  • Support for numerous large-scale health care improvement initiatives, for example:
    • In partnership with the Canadian Frailty Network, CFHI supported 18 health care teams across Canada in the Acute Care for Elders Collaborative by providing funding, coaching, educational materials and tools that allowed each team to adapt and deliver the Mount Sinai Hospital's (Toronto) innovative model of care for seniors, the Acute Care for Elders Strategy, in their own communities. The Collaborative supported the teams to become experts in health care practices benefitting older patients in the communities where they reside in order to improve patients' experience of care, coordination of care and system outcomes (e.g., reduced hospital use, patient complications).
    • In partnership with the New Brunswick Association of Nursing Homes, CFHI supported 15 nursing homes to improve care for patients by adopting a patient-centred, non-pharmacological approach to managing challenging behaviours associated with dementia. The 15 teams identified residents on antipsychotic medications who did not have a diagnosis of psychosis and could benefit from non-pharmacological alternates to their care. Through the initiative, 43% of participating patients had their antipsychotics safely reduced or discontinued, and among these residents: falls decreased by 6%; social engagement, wakefulness and the ability to self-manage care were significantly improved; and, aggressive behaviours and use of other psychotropic medications did not increase.
  • Support for 36 leaders through 10 improvement projects across Canada as part of the Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA) program. Examples of innovative projects undertaken include:
    • improving the accessibility, availability and coordination of palliative home care services; supporting the smooth transition of seniors between hospital and home settings; improving access to palliative care by establishing a centralized point of intake for patients referred for palliative care services; and, improving the integration of community pharmacists into family medicine groups to enhance patient care.
    • Disseminated results from recent CFHI-led improvement initiatives in support of a broader knowledge translation strategy so that health care institutions and providers who did not participate in the improvement initiatives can be aware of and adopt the initiatives that have been found to be most effective at improving care in their own settings.

Audits completed or planned

No audits were completed and none are planned or underway.

Evaluations completed or planned

No evaluations were completed and none are planned or underway.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CFHI to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement and maintains regular contact with CFHI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement. In addition, the Department nominates one representative to CFHI's Board of Directors, and, in that capacity, participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 2,000,000 12,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 5,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 2,000,000 12,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 5,000,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to funding received in-year, which was not included in the 2016-17 planned spending.

Note: CFHI is also reported under the Up-Front Multi-Year funding supplementary information table.

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 1999

The current contribution agreement (CA) began in 2012-13; it was amended to be extended by one year, ending on March 31, 2016, and to provide additional funds for the development of a coordinated pan-Canadian approach for the monitoring and surveillance of prescription drug abuse Footnote 3 (PDA) in 2014-15 and 2015-16. The CA was amended a second time for another one year extension, ending March 31, 2017, also including funds for PDA. The CA was amended a third time in 2016-17 to include funds for the Commonwealth Fund Survey. Finally, the CA was amended a fourth time to extend another year, ending March 31, 2018, still including funds for PDA. Negotiations for a new five-year agreement are underway.

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

A Treasury Board Submission to establish terms and conditions (T&Cs) for the Health Information Initiative (HII) was approved by Treasury Board on March 29, 2012. These T&Cs provide the Federal Minister of Health the authority to renew funding agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. The current CA with CIHI is governed by those T&Cs for the HII. New T&Cs for the future CA were approved by Treasury Board on June 15th, 2017.

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system, and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the FPT Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its analyses respond to questions about Canada's health systems and assist a variety of stakeholders, including funders, policy makers, health system managers, analysts, clinicians and researchers, in making informed decisions.

Since 1999, the federal government has provided funding to CIHI through a series of grants and conditional grants, known as the Roadmap Initiatives. More recently CIHI's funding has been consolidated through the HII, and is currently delivered through a CA. This combined funding has allowed CIHI to produce quality and timely health information ranging from health care system capacity and wait times data to the development of pan-Canadian health indicators.

The HII extended funding to CIHI for its 2012-17 Strategic Plan: Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. The current CA began in 2012-13; the amended agreement spans over fiscal years 2012-13 to 2017-18 and provides $474,782,049M to CIHI over six years, with annual funding as follows:

Table 1: Current amended contribution agreement with PDA funds detailed (dollars)
Fiscal Year 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 Total
Amended Agreement Totals 81,746,294 79,293,905 77,758,979 78,508,979 78,748,979 396,057,136
PDA Funds (included in totals above) 0 0 100,000 850,000 1,090,000 2,040,000

Results achieved

In 2016-17, CIHI continued to make progress in producing more and better data, more relevant and actionable analysis, and improved client understanding and use of CIHI data and information products.

Following are selected highlights from CIHI's 2016-17 Annual Report; more detailed information on results achieved in 2016-17 is available in the President's quarterly reports.

The results achieved focus on CIHI's three strategic goals:

  1. Be a trusted source of standards and quality data;
  2. Expand analytical tools to support measurement of health systems; and,
  3. Produce actionable analysis and accelerate its adoption.

1. A trusted source of standards and quality data

CIHI supported the delivery of more timely, comparable and accessible data across the health continuum. Some of CIHI's accomplishments in this area are outlined below.

International activities and learning from international peers

  • In 2016, CIHI participated in the Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey, which compared access to medical care and patient experience in 11 countries.
  • CIHI developed a web tool that compares Canada's international performance on premature mortality and published a report that looks at the performance of 17 other high-income countries from 1960 to 2010.
  • CIHI has worked closely with colleagues around the world to share knowledge and experiences in health care. This exchange of ideas and best practices helps inform health care decisions in Canada and other high-income countries.

Dealing with the opioid crisis

  • CIHI has partnered with national health organizations to help address the opioid crisis by playing a leading role in supporting substance abuse surveillance.
  • In November 2016, the federal and Ontario ministers of health co-chaired a national opioid conference and summit. They led national discussions to address and reduce the harms related to opioids in Canada.
  • In partnership with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, CIHI released its first report on prescription drug abuse prior to the opioid summit. It reported on hospitalizations and emergency department visits due to opioid poisonings.
  • Through its partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), provincial/territorial public health representatives, and coroners and chief medical examiners, CIHI is addressing the data gap in comparable death data. A consensus was reached to establish a national definition of opioid-related death. More consistent reporting and data collection on the use and harms of opioids will be done over the long-term. CIHI is now reporting weekly data on emergency department visits for opioid overdoses to the Ontario ministry and will be expanding that coverage across Canada to provide more data on this issue.

Children and youth mental health assessment tool

  • CIHI implemented an assessment tool developed by interRAI Footnote 4 focused on child and youth mental health. CIHI is collaborating with the Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services to implement this interRAI instrument in order to gather data to support clinical practices and research. To date, approximately 50 agencies across Ontario are testing the instrument, which is expected to rise.

Comprehensiveness of CIHI's data holdings

CIHI continuously works to enhance the scope and availability of its data for analysis and decision-making. In 2016-17, several jurisdictions made progress submitting data to CIHI:

  • New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba and Alberta began submitting patient experience data.
  • Yukon began to submit claims data from its public drug plans.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador now has complete coverage of its residential care facilities and began submitting home care data.
  • In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, historical physician-level service and payment data feeds were replaced with ongoing feeds of patient-level physician billing data, which enables much more detailed analysis and reporting. CIHI is working to get this type of detailed information from other jurisdictions.
  • In Saskatchewan, four additional hospitals began submitting emergency department data.
  • In all jurisdictions submitting data to CIHI's Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) and National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), acute care hospitals have committed to submit their clinical data two months earlier than previously. More than 95% of records are already being submitted by the new deadline.
  • New Brunswick is implementing a new assessment system in its residential care sector, which will enable long-term care facilities to submit data to CIHI in 2017-2018.

2. Expand analytical tools to support measurement of health systems

Below are some examples of the delivery of reporting tools, methods and information that help enable improvements in health system performance and population health.

  • CIHI partnered with the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) to determine how safe hospitals are in Canada. This collaboration resulted in a measure that includes 31 different types of events that are deemed to be preventable by clinicians.
  • In October 2016, Measuring Patient Harm in Canadian Hospitals was launched during the Canadian Patient Safety Week. The report provides a pan-Canadian overview of patient harm in Canada and introduces new measures intended to monitor variations in patient safety in acute care settings.

Care planning tools for First Nations communities

  • CIHI's Care Planning Tools: Changing Practice among Alberta First Nations Communities won two awards from the Canadian Health Informatics Association and the Information Technology Association of Canada. In the pilot phase of the tool, CIHI worked with the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Health Canada, Momentum Healthware, the First Nationals Alberta Technical Services Advisory Group, interRAI, Alberta Health Services and six First Nations communities.

Improving outcomes for patients

  • In November 2016, the latest update of Hospital Deaths was reported in both the In Brief and In Depth sections of CIHI's Your Health System web tool. This measure compares the actual number of deaths in a region or hospital with the number that would have been expected based on the types of patients a region or hospital treats.

Produce actionable analysis and accelerate its adoption

CIHI collaborated with stakeholders to increase their ability to use data and analysis to accelerate improvements in health systems in the health of populations.

2016 Ontario Electrical Safety Award

  • The Electrical Safety Authority (ESA) in Ontario presented CIHI with the Chief Public Safety Officer's Special Recognition Award. In its annual Ontario Electrical Safety Report, ESA used CIHI's National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) emergency department data to identify the number of injuries from electrical fires. ESA noted that "the information you provide helps to develop important safety insights that drive change and help us address the areas of greatest risk to improve electrical safety

Patient-Centred Measurement Peer Learning Day

  • CIHI held its first Patient Centered Measurement Peer Learning Day last December. The 40 attendees had a broad range of knowledge and experience in the use of patient centred measurement data. Presenters included experts from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio and the Bureau of Health Information in Australia. Several patients also participated, adding a unique perspective to the dialogue.

World interRAI Conference

  • CIHI helped to coordinate the first-ever World interRAI Conference, held in Toronto in April 2016 with colleagues from 30 countries. The conference focused on real patient situations through the continuing care system - from home care to hospital to long-term care.

Audits completed or planned

Under the terms of its agreement with Health Canada, CIHI was required to have a performance audit completed and reported on by March 31, 2015. KPMG completed the audit in September 2014.

Overall, KPMG found that CIHI had designed and implemented practices and processes that promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of funding received from Health Canada. Four areas of improvement were also identified (clearly defining areas of focus; clarifying documentation supporting investment decisions; improving the understanding of necessary resources to support the existing suite of products, including new additions; and bolstering the security settings of its suite of databases). Since the report, CIHI has implemented new practices to respond to these comments.

Evaluations completed or planned

The Office of Evaluation evaluated the relevance and performance of the HII for the period of 2012-15, as required by the contribution agreement. The evaluation was completed in December 2014 in anticipation of a new funding agreement to come into effect on April 1, 2016. The next departmental evaluation is planned for December 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding as per the terms and conditions of the HII.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 77,758,979 78,508,979 78,748,979 78,863,979 78,863,979 115,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 77,758,979 78,508,979 78,748,979 78,863,979 78,863,979 115,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending in mainly due to a reallocation to support the increased funding obligation to CIHI.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and Conditions are embedded in the funding agreement.

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is responsible for implementing the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control with the following objectives: reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer.

The mandate of CPAC is to provide a leadership role with respect to cancer control in Canada, through the management of knowledge and the coordination of efforts among provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups and Indigenous organizations to champion change and improve health outcomes related to cancer. CPAC acts as a pan-Canadian resource to provide the most up-to-date knowledge across strategic priority areas including prevention, screening/early detection, patient-centered care, guidelines, standards, as well as supporting key research activities and facilitating the development of a pan-Canadian surveillance system.

Results achieved

Since it began operating in April 2007, CPAC has:

  • Armed cancer patients and physicians across Canada with current evidence-based knowledge about what works best to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer;
  • Improved the quality of our national cancer system by monitoring its performance and identifying gaps;
  • Improved the quality of life for cancer patients by providing information that addressed their social, emotional and financial needs;
  • Implemented a large-scale effort to raise awareness of the common risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases;
  • Implemented the country's largest population health study of risk factors - the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project - which has enrolled 300,000 Canadians to explore why some people develop cancer and others do not;
  • Launched a First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control, in collaboration with First Peoples;
  • Expanded cancer screening programs in all provinces and encouraged hard-to-reach populations, to undergo screening - which helps doctors catch cancer earlier; and;
  • Developed programs to help survivors through the tremendous uncertainty following treatment.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

No evaluations of CPAC were completed in 2016-17.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CPAC works to engage stakeholders through communications activities that include media and on-line vehicles to both the broader public and the cancer and health communities, and targeted outreach and partnership building. In 2016-17, CPAC: identified gaps in cancer care for adolescents and young adults; engaged the public in decisions on drug funding to inform the work of policy-makers; expanded data to enhance research through the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project, one of the largest population health research platforms in the world which allows researchers to conduct long-term studies that look at people's health, lifestyle and other factors that increase the risk of cancer and chronic diseases; supported the development of online resources for patients and health care providers on palliative and end-of-life care; advanced quality through synoptic reporting for surgery and pathology results by demonstrating the feasibility of collecting data and measuring results against select performance indicators; supported cancer survivors in the workplace through the launch of Cancerandwork.ca, a website addressing the needs of Canadian cancer survivors who are staying at, returning to or looking for work; helped patients transitioning out of treatment by conducting the first, large-scale study of cancer survivors from across the country involving more than 13,000 people from all 10 provinces; and highlighted disparities in cancer care through the release of the 2016 Cancer System Performance Report which revealed that lower-income cancer patients are less likely to survive the disease than higher-income patients, even when accounting for other risk factors.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 47,500,000 47,296,994 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 47,500,000 47,296,994 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 0
Comments on variances NIL

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

General Information

Start date

December 10, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) is an independent not-for-profit corporation mandated to provide leadership and coordinate the work necessary to build a culture of patient safety and quality improvement throughout the Canadian health system. CPSI promotes leading ideas and best practices, raises awareness and provides advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety.

CPSI's first two grant agreements provided financial assistance to help support implementation of the commitments governments made under the 2003 First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal related to improving health care quality by strengthening system co-ordination and improving national collaboration related to patient safety. As of 2013, funding to CPSI is delivered through a contribution agreement (currently covering April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2019). CPSI focuses on fulfilling its mandate by: inspiring and sustaining patient safety knowledge within the system and guiding transformational change in areas most likely to drive patient safety improvement; building and influencing patient safety capability at organizational and systems levels; engaging all audiences across the health system in the national patient safety agenda; and providing leadership on the establishment of a National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan.

Results achieved

In 2016-17, key results achieved by CPSI included:

  • Advancement of the National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan that is driving improvement in the areas of home care safety, surgical safety, medication safety, infection prevention and control, and patient safety education. CPSI convened the National Patient Safety Consortium, a group of more than 40 key organizations in Canadian health care who are working collaboratively to advance each area of the Action Plan.
  • Key deliverables from the National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan in 2016-17 included the release of a 10-year review of surgical safety incidents in Canada, and the distribution of 5 Questions to Ask about Your Medications, a set of questions designed to help patients and their caregivers talk about medications with their health care providers. The list has been translated into 30 languages, endorsed by 80 Canadian organizations, and shared at the WHO Global Consultation on Medication Safety, the World Health Assembly and International Medication Safety Network meetings.
  • A new SHIFT to Safety improvement program was launched, serving as a source of patient safety best practices for the public, health care providers and leaders that expand beyond clinical guidelines to the behavioural changes that will make practice environments safer.
  • With the Canadian Institute for Health Information, a new Hospital Harm Measure was launched that tracks the incidence of unintended harm that could have been prevented by implementing evidence-informed practices. To accompany the new measure, CPSI released a Hospital Harm Improvement Resource that provides hospitals with tools to implement evidence-informed practices that could reduce the incidence of harm, specific to each of the different types of harm included in the measure.
  • Nearly 2,000 participants registered for Canadian Patient Safety Week 2016, a national annual campaign started in 2005 to inspire improvement in patient safety and quality by highlighting patient safety issues, sharing information about best practices, and expanding patient safety and quality initiatives.
  • Training was delivered to increase patient safety capacity in local organizations. This included the launch of the first Patient Safety Education Program - Canada workshop taught by patients, youth and family members to an audience of peers involved in organizational and system level improvement.
  • The Global Patient Safety Alerts system, which provides an ongoing resource of actionable information on specific patient safety incidents, was expanded.
  • Patients for Patient Safety Canada, a patient-led program of CPSI, continued to strengthen its reach in health care systems, by bringing the patient perspective to collaborations at all levels of care.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

A departmental evaluation was completed in August 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

To ensure the CPSI funding agreement is managed in an appropriate and efficient manner, Health Canada officials regularly engage with CPSI. In addition, the Department nominates one representative to CPSI's Board of Directors, and participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Comments on variances NIL

Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

March 31, 2017

Budget 2015 announced the renewal of the Mental Health Commission of Canada 's (MHCC) mandate for another 10 years beginning in 2017.

While the funding grant ended on March 31, 2017, the Government renewed the MHCC's funding for 2017-18 and 2018-19 under a new contribution program.

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2008-09 to 2016-17

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

In Budget 2007, the Government of Canada announced funding for the establishment of the MHCC, an independent, arm's length organization, with a mandate to act as a catalyst for improving the mental health system and changing the attitudes and behaviors of Canadians around mental health issues.

Results achieved

In 2016-17, the MHCC continued to provide valuable mental health expertise and advice to mental health stakeholders. Notable achievements included:

Anti-Stigma

  • The MHCC worked with over 150 partner organizations and agencies on anti-stigma initiatives involving youth, health care providers, workplace, first responders and media.
  • In 2016, the MHCC held two HEADSTRONG summits, enabling 500 students from 24 First Nations to enact mental wellness projects in their communities. HEADSTRONG is the MHCC's anti-stigma initiative for youth.

Knowledge Exchange Centre

  • The MHCC undertook research and knowledge exchange activities to inform the development of a plan on e-Mental health, including hosting a series of roundtables with key stakeholders and decision makers in Canada.
  • The Supporting the Promotion of Activated Research and Knowledge (SPARK) training program helps participants apply techniques for moving evidence-informed research and knowledge in mental health, substance use, and addictions more quickly into practice. In 2016, the MHCC hosted two SPARK training workshops, in partnership with the National Mental Health Commission of Australia and New South Wales Mental Health Commission.
  • The MHCC released " The Case for Diversity: Building the Case to Improve Mental Health Services for Immigrant, Refugee, Ethno-cultural and Racialized Populations " report in October 2016. The study examines published research and promising practices on the mental health of immigrant, refugee, ethno-cultural and racialized peoples in Canada.
  • The MHCC adapted its Road to Mental Readiness (R2MR) training program for first responders. The training includes a self-assessment tool and a set of evidence-based, cognitive behavioural therapy techniques to help people cope with stress and improve their resiliency on the job. More than 44,000 first responders from across Canada completed the training by March 31, 2017.

Workplace

  • The MHCC, in partnership with Ottawa Public Health, developed 13 bilingual videos on the psychological factors that impact mental health in the workplace.
  • The MHCC released a case study on the implementation of the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (the Standard) by 40 Canadian organizations. The Standard is a voluntary set of guidelines, tools and resources to help employers promote mental health and prevent psychological harm in the workplace. The need for senior level engagement, adequate resources, and effective communication were among the best practices identified in the case study for effectively integrating mental health and wellness in the workplace.

Suicide prevention

  • The MHCC provided support and advice in the development of the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy.
  • The MHCC developed a partnership with the Canadian Distress Line Network to support suicide prevention training.
  • The MHCC worked with the Canadian Police Knowledge Network to launch an interactive online training module for suicide prevention.

Recovery

  • The MHCC worked with the MHCC Youth Council to develop a video for health providers that helps them understand the youth perspective on recovering from mental illness.

Workplace

  • The MHCC released interim findings of the Case Study Research Project to better understand how organizations across Canada are implementing the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (the Standard). 41 organizations are participating in the pilot project, which will end on January 31, 2017.
  • The MHCC hosted the first ever Social Business Forum, which gathered organizations and entrepreneurs who are working to promote the employment of people with lived experience of mental illness.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

The MHCC was evaluated as part of a broader evaluation on Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada mental health and mental illness activities. The final report was approved in July 2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

MHCC is the sole recipient of the grant. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the funding agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,243,652 -6,348
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,243,652 -6,348
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to lower than anticipated expenditures.

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) provides up to $25.7M per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care system priorities, including palliative and end-of-life care, health care system innovation, and health human resources. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, the Program contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to the Canadian health care system.

Results achieved

The Program directed funding toward knowledge development, translation and exchange activities to support innovation and implementation of best practices in key policy areas such as medication safety, the integration of internationally educated health professionals, and palliative and end-of-life care. The Program also supported projects that contributed to the sharing of statistics and data analysis to aid in decision-making about the right number, mix and distribution of physicians throughout the country, and improving access to health care services for all Canadians, particularly in underserved areas.

Specific examples include:

  • The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care received funding to develop and implement province-wide strategies to improve the integration of internationally educated health professionals (IEHP) into the health workforce. The three-pronged strategy to improve labour market outcomes for this group included: an IEHP workforce integration network program that targeted health care managers, supervisors and co-workers; a training program to promote the practice readiness of IEHPs; and an alternative career program designed to match IEHPs with opportunities for meaningful employment in the health field while they continue to seek licensure.
  • The Canadian Medical Association received funding to develop and pilot a course to build knowledge regarding end-of-life-care options and medical assisted dying for Canadian physicians.
  • The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) received funding for the Canadian Medication Incident Reporting and Prevention System. The initiative promoted medication safety improvement through the analysis of medication incidents and the development of takeaway knowledge, tools, and educational initiatives for the medical community and general public. ISMP worked collaboratively with the health care community, regulatory agencies and policy makers, provincial, national and international organizations, the pharmaceutical industry and the public to promote safe medication practices.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

The next evaluation is scheduled for June 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Funding recipients continue to be engaged through site visits, and regular communication regarding the progress of funded projects.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 20,382,789 17,839,928 25,509,000 10,642,698 9,284,670 -16,224,330
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,382,789 17,839,928 25,509,000 10,642,698 9,284,670 -16,224,330
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the realignment of the program to address the new Health Accord priorities, which were still in development in 2016-17.

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Terms and conditions for this contribution program became effective April 1, 2013.

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.3: Official Language Minority Community Development

Description

The Official Languages Health Contribution Program (OLHCP) was renewed by Treasury Board on November 28, 2013 with total funding of $174.3M over five years (2013-14 to 2017-18 fiscal years) under the Government of Canada's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-18: Education, Immigration, and Communities initiative.

The OLHCP Program has the following objectives:

  • To increase access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada; and,
  • To increase the active offer of health services for English and French linguistic minority communities within health institutions and communities.

These objectives are achieved through the following three mutually reinforcing program components:

  • Integrating bilingual health professionals within official language minority communities (OLMCs) through French-language academic health programs in 11 colleges and universities outside of Québec offering 100 French-language academic health programs to generate additional health professionals in French minority language communities. The funding supports student and teacher recruitment, the development of French-language training tools, the development and delivery of programs to respond to current and emerging labor market needs, and, the availability of bursaries and internships for students. For the province of Québec, funding is provided to McGill University to coordinate English and French language training courses geared to health professionals and intake personnel, provide bursaries and internships for integrating health professionals in regions where there is significant need for English-language services, and, promote research on OLMCs.
  • Strengthening and improving local health networking capacity through the 38 existing community-based health networks across Canada through the development of health strategies by health authorities for English and French linguistic minority communities.
  • Through Health Services Access and Retention Projects, encouraging bilingual health professionals to practice in English and French linguistic minority communities. This includes the engagement of front-line health service providers in providing services in the second official language, supporting English and French linguistic minority communities' specific health human resource retention strategies and addressing specific health needs.

Results achieved

In the Quebec regions, 72% of health professionals completed program-funded language training. Eight specialized English language courses were provided to French-speaking health network personnel that were interested in improving their English language skills in order to adequately serve Quebec's English-speaking clients. Outside of Quebec, 787 French-speaking students graduated from health-related programs in 11 postsecondary institutions funded by the Program. Follow-up survey results with graduates demonstrated a placement rate of 71% in health care institutions in OLMCs, increasing the pool of health human resources available to meet the needs of OLMCs in Canada.

Health Networks: 38 communities-based health networking partnerships were maintained in all provinces and territories, and in 14 health administrative regions of Quebec. These networks collaborate with various health sector stakeholders to improve access to health services for English and French speaking minorities.

Examples of specific results in Quebec include:

  • McGill launched an English training tool to enable health professionals to intervene effectively with English-speaking communities in Quebec. This training meets the linguistic needs of three professional fields: health workers, social service workers and administrative and reception staff. Adapted to the needs of the environment, this program takes into account the diversity of the professional fields, the geographical disparity and the multiple time constraints of the participants.
  • In September 2016, with financial support from Health Canada, McGill University allocated $175,000 in bursaries to approximately 20 students from selected Quebec regions with identified English and French language needs. Students pursuing full-time studies in health and social service programs committed to returning to a Quebec region to work for a minimum of one year in a public health and social services institution, thus improving access to bilingual health services and to promoting health care in French and English among young professionals and within the population.
  • In June 2016, the Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN) released its Baseline Data Report on English-language Health and Social Services Access in Quebec, which presents findings of the 2015 CHSSN/CROP Survey on Community Vitality on the use of services, access to services and patient satisfaction with services across the regions of Quebec. The CHSSN also released in May 2016 a study on the Mental and Emotional Health of Quebec's English-speaking Communities based on findings from the 2011-12 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the participation of five Quebec-based community stakeholders involved in addressing the mental health concerns of these communities.

Audits completed or planned

No audits were completed or planned.

Evaluations completed or planned

The evaluation of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2012-2013 to 2014-2015 was completed. The final report was approved in March 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Representatives of the Official Language Community Development Bureau (OLCDB) and departmental senior management attended annual general meetings and meetings of Boards of Directors of official language minority community organizations, and were in frequent contact with recipients of the Program.

In the fall of 2016, a consultation process was carried out to collect ideas and feedback on the design of the next cycle of the OLHCP. An online consultation was held from September 13 to November 4, 2016 and targeted OLMCs, academic researchers, federal, provincial, and territorial civil servants, and the Canadian public as a whole. In addition, in-person meetings were held in October and November 2016 between the management of the Program's four designated recipients (SSF, CNFS, CHSSN and McGill University) and Health Canada's Official Language Community Development Bureau. The final report on these consultations is scheduled to be released in the fall of 2017.The following site visits were conducted to monitor the achievement of expected results:

  • Community Health and Social Services Network (secretariat and three networks: African Canadian Development and Prevention Network; Assistance and Referral Centre; and, Collective Community Services).
  • National secretariat of the Consortium national de formation en santé.
  • National secretariat of the Société Santé en français.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 35,835,074 36,399,999 36,400,000 36,400,000 36,400,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 35,835,074 36,399,999 36,400,000 36,400,000 36,400,000 0
Comments on variances NIL

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

June 19, 2015

End date

March 31, 2021

Note: Support payments will continue throughout the entire lifetime of Canadian Thalidomide survivors and the program will be reviewed every five years.

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program activity 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities

Description

The purpose of the Program is to contribute to meeting the needs of Thalidomide survivors for the remainder of their lives so that they may age with dignity. The objectives in supporting the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (TSCP) are to ensure that eligible Thalidomide survivors: receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and have transparent and timely access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund (EMAF).

Results achieved

Ongoing tax-free payments were distributed to 99% of known Thalidomide survivors; one file is pending confirmation. 92% of payments were made within the time frame service standard of the third-party administrator; and steps have been taken to make the process more consistent moving forward.

The independent third-party program administrator processed 27 EMAF applications. The EMAF assists survivors with costs related to extraordinary health support needs such as specialized surgeries and home or vehicle adaptations. New thalidomide survivors were confirmed in 2016/17, for a total of 122 Canadian thalidomide survivors

Outreach data for 2016-17 showed that 80% of Thalidomide survivors who responded said that the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (TSCP) is helping them age with dignity, which aligns with the purpose of the program.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2: Planned January 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

There is a departmental evaluation currently scheduled for December 2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada engaged the independent third party administrator of the TSCP by responding to inquiries and undertaking regular monitoring activities such as progress and performance measurement reporting, and meetings and ongoing communication to support program implementation.

Health Canada engaged the Thalidomide Victims Association of Canada (TVAC), a key stakeholder, in semi-annual meetings to monitor overall program implementation. Health Canada also provided information about the program to individual Thalidomide survivors and to individuals who believe they are survivors of Thalidomide, through direct correspondence and online.

The third party administrator engaged TVAC in finalising the parameters for implementing the EMAF. The administrator continued to implement its outreach strategy (direct mail and web-based) to provide the Thalidomide survivor community with updates on program implementation and results.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 8,000,000 8,160,000 11,185,847 11,185,847 3,025,847
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 8,000,000 8,160,000 11,185,847 11,185,847 3,025,847
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to a reallocation to support an increased funding obligation as a result of an upward shift in the number of survivors and assessments of the level of disability of survivors.

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities

Description

Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1B in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50M over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and tele homecare, with the funds to flow as a contribution agreement.

Results achieved

The Program demonstrated a good level of achievement in 2016-17. Nearly 24,000 Canadians have participated in telehomecare programs since 2010 and an estimated 7,000 patients were enrolled in provincial/territorial programs in 2016. On e-prescribing, Alberta and Ontario have committed to work with Infoway to launch its e-prescribing service while Nova Scotia and other provinces have expressed interest in integrating e-prescribing into their planning cycles.

Audits completed or planned

Canada Health Infoway must submit annual independently audited financial statements to Health Canada.

Evaluations completed or planned

No evaluations are planned given the limited time horizon of the contribution funding.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014-15 Actual
spending
2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Planned
spending
2016-17 Total
authorities available for use
2016-17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016-17 actual minus 2016-17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 21,000,000 21,000,000 21,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 0 0 21,000,000 21,000,000 21,000,0000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to funding received in-year, which was not included in the 2016-17 planned spending.

Note: Infoway is also reported under the Up-Front Multi-Year funding supplementary information table.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

In April of Fiscal Year 2016-17, Health Canada received the approval to change the name from Anti-Drug Strategy Initiative (ADSI) to Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP).

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Formerly Substance Use and Abuse

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Now referred to as Prescription Drug Misuse.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

A collaborative network of researchers in 32 countries committed to improving services for vulnerable populations including older persons, persons with disabilities and those affected by mental illness.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

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