Supplementary Information Tables 2018-2019 : Health Canada

Table of Contents

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Health Care Policy Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) (Voted)

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Description

The HCPCP provides up to $26.9 million per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care systems priorities, including home and palliative, health care systems innovation, and health human resources. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to health care systems.

Results achieved

The Program directed funding toward knowledge development, translation and exchange activities to support innovation and implementation of best practices in key policy areas such as palliative and end-of-life care, medication safety and home care. The Program also supported projects that contributed to improving access to health care services for all Canadians.

Specific examples include:

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: Audit of Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed in Fall 2019. This audit will examine the processes and controls at the funding agreement level.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: Evaluation of the Health Care Policy Contribution Program completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

Overall, the evaluation found that funded projects were generally effective in producing and disseminating information products.

Use of these products varied, ranging from the development of guidance documents to participation in training programs. Furthermore, some projects led to improvements in the health care system such as the adoption of professional standards, practices, and policies, to more physicians with rural and remote experience; however, evidence was limited on the impacts of these changes. Collaboration with relevant partner organizations and strong project leadership were seen to be the most crucial elements for ultimate project success. At the same time, Health Canada's role in knowledge translation and strategic direction, as well as more program support for innovative projects, were identified as areas for improvement.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Funding recipients continue to be engaged through site visits, and regular communication regarding the progress of funded projects. For example, Health Canada met with Pallium Canada to discuss more effective and efficient reporting processes. Senior Program and Policy Advisors have had discussions with many recipients to guide them in the development of their projects' respective performance measurement plans.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 9,284,670 8,737,838 26,874,000 11,300,371 9,489,511 17,384,489
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 9,284,670 8,737,838 26,874,000 11,300,371 9,489,511 17,384,489
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the allocation of funds to other programs as well as delays in calls for proposals.

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) (Voted)

Start date

December 10, 2015

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16 (updated in 2017-18)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Description

The contribution to CFHI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system, adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify savings and efficiencies in the health system by: finding and promoting innovators and innovations; driving rapid adoption of proven innovations; enabling improvement-oriented health systems; and, shaping the future of healthcare.

CFHI previously operated as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF), an arm's-length, non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to fund health services research and promote the use of research evidence to strengthen the delivery of health services. CHSRF received $151.5 million in federal funding under three separate grants (1996-97 to 2003-04).

Results achieved

In 2018-19, CFHI continued to support innovations designed to accelerate improvements in health care delivery by working with health care leaders, governments, policy-makers and other leaders. Examples of results achieved by CFHI in 2018-19 include:

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: Audit of Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed in Fall 2019. This audit will examine the processes and controls at the funding agreement level.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: CFHI was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

The 2018 synthesis evaluation noted that the broad issues (e.g., mental health) addressed by most Pan-Canadian Health Organizations represented areas where more progress is needed in order to improve the health system. Pan-Canadian Health Organizations have made progress towards achieving their expected outcomes, with additional evidence required to demonstrate the achievement of longer-term outcomes.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CFHI, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada maintained regular contact with CFHI through quarterly meetings to receive updates on its programming and finances. Over the course of the year, it also monitored progress and compliance under the funding agreement, including by providing feedback on draft deliverables such as the work plan and annual report.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Note: CFHI's contribution funding is reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Updated 2017-18

Terms and Conditions (Ts and Cs) as approved for the Contribution Agreement will apply to future CADTH agreements until such time as they are superseded. The fiscal year for those Ts and Cs follows the traditional fiscal year calendar, from April 1 through March 31 of the following calendar year.

Effective April 1, 2013, the CADTH funding was transitioned to a Contribution Agreement from a Named Grant. The change allows Health Canada to augment monitoring and management of the funds. In December 2017, CADTH submitted a proposal for a five-year renewal of its existing funding (2017 to 2022) and the additional $36 million investment announced in Budget 2017. The new funding agreement is currently being drafted.

The previous Named Grant covered the period of 2008 to 2013.

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 2: Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices

Description

The CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, territorial governments and Canada's Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (the latter through fees) to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision-makers.

The purpose of the renewed Contribution Agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities;

Results achieved

The purpose of the contribution agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Results include the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost. Additional funding announced in Budget 2017 is supporting CADTH's transition to a Health Technology Management organization in order to deliver results that better meet the needs of the healthcare system by employing a lifecycle approach to technology that involves reassessment and disinvestment.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: CADTH was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

The 2018 synthesis evaluation noted that there is a need to continue addressing broad issues addressed by most Pan-Canadian Health Organizations but there is also a need to clarify roles, responsibilities, strategic direction, and priority setting for these organizations. Pan-Canadian Health Organizations have made progress towards achieving their expected outcomes with additional evidence required to demonstrate the achievement of longer-term outcomes. For example, CADTH has improved its collaboration with stakeholders and demonstrated leadership in identifying drug and non-drug topics of importance for customers through broad consultations.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CADTH, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CADTH has produced numerous products and services including health technology reports, optimal use projects, environmental scans, therapeutic reviews and formulary listing recommendations. These deliverables provide guidance and evidence-based information to health care decision-makers regarding the cost-effectiveness and optimal use of health technologies. In particular, the formulary listing recommendations increases transparency across jurisdictions and provides consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions made by the participating public drug plans. CADTH also convenes, connects and collaborates with patients, clinicians and other health care decision-makers to help support the adoption and use of its products.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 16,058,769 18,058,769 20,058,769 20,058,769 20,058,769 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 16,058,769 18,058,769 20,058,769 20,058,769 20,058,769 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative (Voted)

Start date

November 9, 2017

End date

March 31, 2027

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 3: Home, Community and Palliative Care

Program 4: Mental Health

Description

The Government of Canada is investing $11 billion over ten years (2017-27) to support the provinces and territories (PTs) in implementing home care ($6 billion) and mental health and addictions ($5 billion) initiatives in their jurisdictions as per the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities (CSoP) adopted on August 21, 2017.

By endorsing the CSoP, PTs fulfilled the conditions set out in the Budget Implementation Act 2017 to receive funding for fiscal year 2017-18 through a statutory appropriation ($300 million). The remaining nine years of funding ($10.7 billion) will be provided through bilateral funding agreements with high-level conditions to report on common indicators.

On mental health and addictions, provinces and territories have agreed to focus on:

On home and community care, provinces and territories have agreed to focus on:

Over the 2018-19 fiscal year, the Government of Canada worked with jurisdictions to finalize bilateral agreements that set out the details of how each jurisdiction will use federal funding for future years. These agreements also include details on conditions to receive funding including reporting to the Canadian Institute for Health Information on common indicators.

Results achieved

The federal government concluded bilateral agreements with each province and territory that set out details of how each jurisdiction will use federal funding in future years, based on the priority areas of action outlined in the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities. Bilateral agreements are posted online.

It is expected that through these investments Canadians will experience tangible improvements in access to home and community care as well as mental health and addictions services. This will lead to better health outcomes and a more sustainable health care system, as care is shifted from expensive hospital care to home and community-based service delivery. These investments could also have a broader, positive impact on Canada's economy, by making the health care system more sustainable in the long term, and by enhancing workforce productivity and social participation.

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) led a process with federal, provincial and territorial officials to develop a focused set of common indicators in home and community care and mental health and addiction services to enable Canadians to assess progress on shared priorities. In June 2018, FPT Ministers of Health agreed to a set of 12 common indicators. CIHI will continue to work with governments across Canada to report annually on these indicators.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Planned: An evaluation of Home Care and Mental Health Services Initiative is scheduled for 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Prior to developing the CSoP, with respect to mental health and addictions, the Government of Canada has engaged with provinces and territories, National Indigenous Organizations (NIOs), mental health stakeholders, provincial and territorial medical associations and treatment centres, and academia.

Likewise, with respect to the home and community care, the Government of Canada has engaged with a range of home care stakeholders including representatives from National Organizations working on home, community and palliative care, provincial home care providers, patient and family advocates, and national health professional associations (e.g., the Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Nurses Association and the College of Family Physicians of Canada), as well as academia.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 850,000,000 850,000,000 849,119,329 880,671
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 0 850,000,000 850,000,000 849,119,329 880,671
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to delays in the implementation of the Nunavut agreement.

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (MHCC) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 4: Mental Health

Description

The MHCC, an arm's length, not-for-profit organization established in March 2007 with a ten-year mandate to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness. Between 2007 and 2017, the Government of Canada invested $130 million in the MHCC through a grant, to develop a mental health strategy for Canada, conduct an anti-stigma campaign and create a knowledge exchange centre. In 2016, the MHCC's mandate was renewed for a two-year period, from 2017-18 to 2018-19, with a contribution of $14.25 million per year to advance work on mental health priorities, including problematic substance use, suicide prevention, support for at-risk populations and engagement.

Results achieved

In 2018-19, the MHCC continued to provide valuable mental health expertise and advice to mental health stakeholders. Notable achievements included:

Substance Use

Produced a report that discussed the connection between mental health and substance use. In addition, the MHCC completed a comprehensive Pan-Canadian framework for performance measurement in mental health, entitled: Measuring Progress: Resources for Developing a Mental Health and Addiction Performance Measurement Framework for Canada.

Developed the following knowledge products:

Suicide Prevention

Prepared two suicide prevention toolkits and a fact sheet on older adults and suicide, as well as undertook research on suicide prevention among sexual minorities.

Hosted 60 MHCC events/training across Canada on the topic of suicide prevention, including the Roots of Hope Coalition Meeting on the Burin Peninsula with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Mental Health First Aid training programs which teach participants how to recognize mental health problems and illnesses, support others who need help, encourage self-help, and reduce stigma. The programs are designed for various participants including first responders, workers and employers, and Canadians.

Engagement

Conducted a scan on provincial/territorial mental health and addiction strategies and plans in relation to family and caregiver engagement. In addition, the MHCC maintained a number of partnerships across Canada that support and enhance the work of the Commission. These partnerships provide expertise, strengthen community connections, facilitate engagement and spread knowledge.

Population-Based Initiatives

Produced a number of population-specific mental health initiatives (such as fact sheets, interactive maps, reports, and toolkits), including but not limited to the following:

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: MHCC was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

The 2018 synthesis evaluation noted that the broad issues (e.g., mental health) addressed by most Pan-Canadian Health Organizations represented areas where more progress is needed in order to improve the health system. However, there is a need to clarify roles, responsibilities, strategic direction, and priority setting for Pan-Canadian Health Organizations in order to improve their efficiency. MHCC, like other Pan-Canadian organizations, has made progress towards achieving their expected outcomes. For example, its Mental Health Strategy for Canada has assisted in advancing key priorities related to mental health and mental illness.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including MHCC, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

MHCC is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the funding agreement through the analysis of corporate documents by reviewing their progress/performance reports twice a year (mid-year and year-end) and has bi-weekly meetings with senior management of the organization.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 14,243,652 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,243,652 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Substance Use and Addictions Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) (Voted)

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

March 31, 2022 (Grant)

Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-15Footnote 1

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 5: Substance Use and Addictions

Description

The overall objective of the SUAP is to facilitate the development of responses to legal and illegal substance use issues along the continuum of care from health promotion and prevention to harm reduction, treatment and rehabilitation by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment and related system enhancements; and improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Results achieved

In 2018-19, the SUAP launched a refreshed call for proposals seeking additional opioid prevention and treatment initiatives; enhanced and new cannabis public education and research initiatives; new tobacco prevention and cessation initiatives under Canada's Tobacco Strategy and youth vaping prevention initiatives.

The SUAP provided funding to 60 new multi-year community-based and national substance use prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives in 2018-19, while four existing initiatives ended. Of the new initiatives, nearly half (48%) began their activities in the last quarter of the fiscal year.

The majority of these initiatives focused on responding to the opioid crisis and Indigenous and community-based cannabis public education. Opioid initiatives included those focused on reducing stigma and engaging people with lived and living experience of past or current substance use, best practices for medication-assisted treatments, improving access to different types of treatment, and innovative models for opioid replacement therapy. Cannabis initiatives funded in 2018-19 included those focused on evidence-informed school curriculum; particular populations with known risk factors including youth and young adults new to Canada as well as older adults; dispelling myths regarding cannabis-impaired driving; and, cannabis education and harm reduction in rural and Indigenous communities.

The Program also implemented a Drug Checking Innovation Challenge, a new innovation / experimentation component linked to the Privy Council Office's Impact Canada Initiative. As a result, funding was awarded to nine organizations to further develop drug checking technology prototypes.

While the majority of the SUAP initiatives were in the very early stages of implementation, over 300 knowledge products (guidelines, toolkits, reports) were produced and over 1,400 learning opportunities (workshops, presentations, webinars) were delivered in 2018-19. Early results indicate that those accessing these materials report that they gained knowledge and skills relevant to reducing the harms of substance use in Canada. Further, early results indicate that stakeholders and Canadians targeted by SUAP-funded initiatives intend to use their new knowledge and skills to make positive changes to behaviour, as well as improvements to substance use policies, programs and clinical practices.

Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction

The SUAP continued to provide core funding to the CCSA, as well as $10 million over five years for research on the impact of cannabis legalization and regulation in Canada. In 2018-19, the CCSA worked with partners in Canada and internationally to gather evidence; share knowledge, best practices and advice on substance use to drive action; while focusing on priorities such as stigma, cannabis policy, the opioid crisis, and the costs of substance use in Canada. Over 36 publications were created to provide evidence, 21 events held in relevant communities, and 58 presentations delivered to share knowledge in 2018-19. The CCSA reported positive results for many of its initiatives. Approximately 95% of participants of the Stigma Ends with Me workshops identified at least one practical action they could take to address stigma, and over 80,000 were reached through CCSA's media related to this workshop. CCSA had over 28,062 downloads on the Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies within seven months following its publication. Over 100 researchers, policymakers, lawenforcement representatives, and youth attended the Cannabis Policy Research Meeting, and the Cannabis Symposium which contributed to the research plan for the five-year cannabis research initiative in partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). More than 200 policymakers, researchers, people with lived experience and others attended the Opioid Symposium, and over 86% of attendees said the symposium helped them identify at least one person for potential collaboration. In 2018-19, the CCSA also updated its Canadian Substance Use Costs and Harms study (the world's first in this area) that calculated the societal costs (health, criminal justice, lost productivity, and others) of substance use across Canada.

Mental Health Commission of Canada

Budget 2018 included a commitment to provide $10 million over five years for the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) to help assess the impact of cannabis use on the mental health of Canadians.

This first year of funding was a foundational year for the cannabis and mental health project. The MHCC established an executive advisory committee (EAC) to provide independent, expert advice on the project. The MHCC, with the CIHR, selected two one-year catalyst grant research projects which will explore the potential therapeutic benefit of cannabis and cannabidiol (CBD) on mental health outcomes; and, launched a call for proposals for three five-year team grants that will investigate the potential harms and benefits of cannabis, the impact of social determinants of health, as well as the needs of diverse populations experiencing cannabis use disorder and/or mental illness.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

Planned: Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by Fall 2019. This audit will examine the processes and controls at the funding agreement level. A component of this audit will include files from the Substance Use and Addictions Program and an audit of the 2017-18 solicitation process.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19

Completed: N/A

Planned: Will be evaluated as part of the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy evaluation that is scheduled to be completed in 2021-2022.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Applicants for funding in 2018-19 were engaged through a national call for proposals, with program staff working closely with successful applicant organizations to shape their initiatives. Program staff worked regularly with funding recipients to monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance measurement and evaluation reports.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 100,000 0 100,000
Total contributions 22,793,236 12,969,040 28,050,014 40,761,914 26,938,461 1,111,553
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 22,793,236 12,969,040 28,050,014 40,861,914 26,938,461 1,211,553
Explanation on variances The variance between the actual and the planned spending is mainly due to projects that were delayed to the following year. Total authorities include funding received in-year for opioids and cannabis activities. These projects were the focus of the funding for 2018-19.

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

March 31, 2022

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17 (amended in 2017-18)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 6: Digital Health

Description

Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1 billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50 million over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare, with the funds flowing as a Contribution Agreement. Budget 2017 allocated $300 million over five years to Infoway to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, support the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, help patients to access their own health records electronically, and better link electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions. These funds are to flow as a Contribution Agreement.

Results achieved

The PrescribeIT program continued to grow in fiscal year 2018-19, Memorandums of Understanding to implement the program were signed with 10 jurisdictions (Yukon, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Ontario, Alberta and New Brunswick). As a result, enrollment growth of PrescribeIT accelerated significantly with 897 enrolled prescribers and 877 enrolled pharmacies. The ACCESS Health program is continuing to develop including the July 2018 announcement of ACCESS Atlantic, a collaborative initiative that will make it quicker and easier to access health services in Atlantic Canada.

In November 2018, Infoway launched the ACCESS 2022 awareness campaign, which aims to inspire action toward a vision that includes patients, families and clinicians having access to the information and digital services they need to better manage their health. Through its ACCESS Health program, Infoway has launched nationwide the "Crisis Text Line" powered by Kids Help Phone. Available 24/7 in both English and French, this free service provides youth with support for mental health and other issues through text messaging. By the end of 2018, 71,000 texting conversations and nearly 900 active rescues had taken place, saving an estimated two young lives per day. In addition, Infoway has deployed the First Nations-developed community health record and personal health record in 226 communities across 10 provinces and territories. As of March 31, 2019, it was live in 185 of those communities.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

The annual independent financial and compliance audits were conducted during the year, and both resulted in unqualified audit reports. There were no other audits scheduled or conducted during the year.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: Infoway was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

The 2018 synthesis evaluation noted that the broad issues by most Pan-Canadian Health Organizations represented areas where more progress is needed in order to improve the health system. For example, there a continued need for Infoway to support a national, multi-jurisdictional approach to eHealth in Canada. However, the synthesis evaluation also reported that the roles, responsibilities, strategic direction, and priority setting for Pan-Canadian Health Organizations should be clarified in order to improve their efficiency. Pan-Canadian Health Organizations have made progress towards achieving their expected outcomes, with additional evidence required to demonstrate the achievement of longer-term outcomes.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including Infoway, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement. Health Canada is represented on Infoway's Board of Directors, which meet three to four times per year.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 21,000,000 47,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 49,844,676 155,324
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 21,000,000 47,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 49,844,676 155,324
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to interest earned by Canada Health Infoway and reimbursed to Health Canada.

Note: Infoway is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 1999

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

New Terms and Conditions (Ts and Cs) for the Health Information Initiative (HII) were approved by Treasury Board on June 15, 2017. These new Ts and Cs provide the Minister of Health the authority to renew Funding Agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. There is no expiry date for the HII's Ts and Cs.

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 7: Health Information

Description

The CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (F/P/T) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Between 1994 and 2012 the Government of Canada allocated approximately $757 million in total to CIHI through a series of funding agreements. Under the previous agreement, close to $475 million has been delivered to CIHI over 6 years (2012-13 to 2017-18). Negotiations for a new contribution agreement were completed in early 2018. This contribution agreement will span five years from 2017-18 to 2021-22. Presently, Health Canada funds 78% of CIHI's total budget, while the P/T governments contribute 17%. The remaining funds are generated largely through product sales.

This funding allows CIHI to provide essential information on Canada's health care systems and the health of Canadians. CIHI provides comparable and actionable data and information that are used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across the continuum of care. CIHI's stakeholders use the broad range of the Institute's health system databases, measurements and standards, together with their evidence-based reports and analyses, in their decision-making processes. CIHI protects the privacy of Canadians by ensuring the confidentiality and integrity of the health care information they provide.

Results achieved

In early 2018, a new contribution agreement was signed, providing close to $365 million over five years (2017-18 to 2021-22).

In 2018-19, CIHI continued to make progress towards producing more and better data, more relevant and actionable analysis, and improved client understanding and use of CIHI data and information products.

Below are selected highlights from CIHI's 2018-19 Annual Report.

CIHI launched a Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) program of work in 2015, with hip and knee replacements as a key area of focus. Along with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), CIHI has been co-leading an international working group on patient-reported indicators for hip and knee replacement surgery since December 2017. This work is part of a broader OECD initiative that aims to advance the collection and reporting of comparable patient-reported measures to better monitor health system performance and drive continuous improvement among member countries.

To close existing data gaps, CIHI made progress on the collection of pan-Canadian data to enhance coverage in key areas, including: primary health care, home care, community mental health, addictions, palliative care, pharmaceuticals, patient-reported outcomes and the health of Indigenous populations. CIHI's goals through its Corporate Data Advancement Strategy are to close gaps and expand data collection in each province and territory, to make the data submission process more user-friendly, to broaden adoption of CIHI data standards, and to have more timely and linked data for stakeholders.

With new investments from Budget 2017, CIHI is undertaking a multi-year initiative to support the reporting commitments made by the health ministers in the Common Statement of Principles on Shared Health Priorities.

Over the past year, CIHI facilitated the selection and lead the development of pan-Canadian indicators to measure access to home care and mental health services. Health Ministers endorsed 12 indicators in June 2018, which marked an important step toward improving access to health services in sectors for Canadians. CIHI is continuing their work with health ministries across Canada to report annually on established indicators and to build on data sources to enable more comprehensive reporting.

Since signing the Joint Statement of Action to Address the Opioid Crisis in Canada in 2016, CIHI has supported efforts across the country to reduce opioid harms, including working with governments and other partners to improve data collection and produce timely, relevant information that can help inform harm reduction efforts. Opioid harms and prescribing data assists policy-makers to track progress and see the impact their strategies have on the communities affected by this crisis. This data reveals which geographic areas have the highest rates of hospitalizations and emergency department visits due to harms caused by opioids. CIHI also released a report examining opioid harms and opioid prescribing trends across the country.

In October 2018, CIHI hosted a privacy symposium that brought together thought leaders from across the country and internationally to exchange opinions and ideas about improving access to health data in a privacy-sensitive manner. The symposium was an important first step in exploring potential advancements related to pan-Canadian health data governance, where privacy will be a key component. The discussions from this event will help shape future conversations around enhanced access to data to improve health systems.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: CIHI was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

As noted in the 2018 evaluation synthesis, CIHI continues to address a need to provide comparable health information across provinces and territories. Like CIHI, most Pan-Canadian Health Organisations continue to address areas where more progress is needed in order to improve the health system. At the same time, there is also a need to clarify roles, responsibilities, strategic direction, and priority setting for these organisations in order to improve their efficiency. Pan-Canadian Health Organizations have made progress towards achieving their expected outcomes, with additional evidence required to demonstrate the achievement of longer-term outcomes.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CIHI, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding as per the terms and conditions of the HII.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 78,863,979 81,748,979 83,808,979 83,948,979 83,948,979 140,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 78,863,979 81,748,979 83,808,979 83,948,979 83,948,979 140,000
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to a reallocation of funds to support program needs.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 10: Cancer control

Description

CPAC is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with more than 700 cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives:

Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. CPAC received $250 million from the federal government for its first five-year term (2007 to 2012) and $241 million for its second five-year term (2012 to 2017). Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, which is governed by a five-year agreement (2017 to 2022) for $237.5 million.

Results achieved

Since inception in April 2007, CPAC has:

Throughout fiscal year 2018-19, CPAC worked to refresh the CSCC, consulting with over 7,500 Canadians. The refreshed CSCC focuses on improving equity within the cancer system including First Nations, Inuit and Métis priorities. It also focuses on long-term, sustainable impact, so Canadians can benefit from a high-quality, world-class cancer control system for generations to come. In 2018-19, CPAC also: advanced collaboration with the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) on improving oncology drug sustainability and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) on informing oncology drug funding decisions; launched funding activities to develop new and improved responses to cancer control gaps specific to First Nations, Inuit and Métis with provincial, territorial and national partners; collaborated with the Public Health Agency of Canada to develop a plan to eliminate cervical cancer through the HPV vaccine and screening; published Changing Cancer in Canada: 10-Years of Collaborationto demonstrate the significant impact of the first decade of implementing the CSCC; and released the 2018 Cancer System Performance Report, engaging provincial cancer agencies and programs on how best to utilize data to effect change.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: CPAC was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

The 2018 synthesis evaluation noted that the broad issues addressed by most Pan-Canadian Health Organizations represented areas where more progress is needed in order to improve the health system. However, there is a need to clarify roles, responsibilities, strategic direction, and priority setting for Pan-Canadian Health Organizations in order to improve their efficiency. CPAC has made progress towards achieving its expected outcomes and contributed to several collaborative projects.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CPAC, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement through bi-monthly calls between Health Canada representatives and the CPAC leadership team. CPAC also presented at two Health Portfolio Cancer Working Group meetings to update the federal government on their key activities.

CPAC works to engage stakeholders through communication activities that include media and on-line vehicles to both the broader public and the cancer and health communities, and targeted outreach and partnership building.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 47,500,000 39,854,241 43,100,000 43,100,000 42,971,939 128,061
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 47,500,000 39,854,241 43,100,000 43,100,000 42,971,939 128,061
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to interest earned by CPAC and reimbursed to Health Canada.

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 11: Patient Safety

Description

CPSI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. The first five-year grant funding agreement with CPSI ended on March 31, 2008, and was renewed for an additional five years, starting April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013. A new five-year contribution agreement began on April 1, 2013 and has been extended by one year to March 31, 2019.

Results achieved

In 2018-19, key results achieved by CPSI included:

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: CPSI was evaluated as part of the Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

As indicated in the 2018 synthesis evaluation, CPSI continues to address a need as persistent rates of harm justify an ongoing focus on patient safety within Canada's health care system. However, the evaluation also found that there is a need to clarify roles, responsibilities, strategic direction, and priority setting for Pan-Canadian Health Organizations in general. Pan-Canadian Health Organizations have made progress towards achieving their expected outcomes, with additional evidence required to demonstrate the achievement of longer-term outcomes.

Planned: The next evaluation of Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CPSI, is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

To ensure the CPSI funding agreement is managed in an appropriate and efficient manner, Health Canada officials regularly engage with CPSI senior staff and program officers. In addition, the Department nominates one representative to CPSI's Board of Directors, and participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (CBS Blood R&D Program) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 12: Blood System, Organs, Tissue and Transplantation

Description

To support basic, applied and clinical research, on blood safety and blood product safety and effectiveness issues under the auspices of the Canadian Blood Services.

Results achieved

The CBS Blood R&D Program has generated numerous outputs related to knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.) learning events, collaborative arrangements and the development of highly qualified people in the important areas of basic and applied research.

In 2018-19, the program awarded 189 funding grants in support of R&D and training. It also played a key role in building and maintaining research capacity in transfusion science and medicine. For example, fourteen highly qualified people completed training in transfusion science and medicine through numerous fellowship programs and training positions in research laboratories.

The program's research network published 163 peer-reviewed and 83 non peer-reviewed publications and delivered over 315 conference presentations worldwide. The average h-index, a measure demonstrating the significance and impact of published work, was 31 for CBS research staff, an increase over the prior year and almost three times the average h-index (10.6) for Canadian academic science authors. CBS held eight major education events for specialists in transfusion science and medicine and attracted 3,763 professionals. Various stakeholders used the knowledge generated by R&D projects to inform changes to practices and standards. As a result, there were eight changes to guidelines and processes and one Health Canada license amendment leading to greater efficiency and safety of the Canadian blood system.

Under the Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) Research Grant Program, fifteen research projects were funded that will end by spring 2020.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

No evaluation was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: The next evaluation of these programs is scheduled for 2022-23.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials undertook numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails) with CBS to discuss program progress. Health Canada continues to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,175,000 6,250,000 5,000,000 6,250,000 6,250,000 1,250,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,175,000 6,250,000 5,000,000 6,250,000 6,250,000 1,250,000
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to funding obligations for the MSM research initiative.

Official Languages Health Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (OLHCP) (Voted)

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grants and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 13: Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems

Description

The OLHCP has a total budget of $174.3 million (ongoing, over five years). The program is entering a new funding phase for 2018 to 2023.

The Program supports eligible activities under the following three program streams:

  1. Training and retention of health professionals
    Provide funding for French language academic health programs in 11 colleges and universities outside of Quebec, and to McGill University for English language academic training and for health professionals and intake personnel in Quebec.
  2. Health Networking
    Provide funding to 38 existing community based health networks across Canada to continue increasing or improving access for Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs) to health services.
  3. Innovative Projects to Improve Access to Health Services for OLMCs
    Provide funding for projects aimed at improving access to health services for OLMCs in priority areas such as home care, mental health, and palliative and end of life care. Initiatives must support: health human resource integration; knowledge development and dissemination; and community health improvement.

Results achieved

In 2018-19, Health Canada supported a range of initiatives through the OLHP. The impacts of these initiatives include an increase in the availability of health service providers to meet the needs of OLMCs, enhanced mechanisms for providing effective health services for these communities, and improved understanding and measurement of health issues and challenges.

Through the OLHP, Health Canada continued to provide financial support to community organizations and training institutions (e.g., la Société Santé en français (SSF), l'Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne (ACUFC)-Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS), McGill University, Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN). These organizations implemented various initiatives to improve access to health services for OLMCs.

Training and retention of health professionals in OLMCs

In 2018-19, the OLHP supported a range of training and retention initiatives to increase the availability of bilingual health professionals and improve access to services in OLMCs. For example:

Strengthening and improving local health networking capacity in OLMCs

In 2018-19, the OLHP continued to support initiatives to strengthen and increase networking activities to improve access to health services for English and French speaking minorities. A total of 39 community-based health networks (covering all provinces and territories) managed by both SSF and CHSSN collaborated with various health sector stakeholders to improve access to health services for OLMCs. These efforts had a direct impact on the accessibility of health services for OLMCs across Canada. For example:

In Quebec, through its activities and partnerships, the CHSSN:

Outside Quebec, through its activities and partnerships, the SSF:

Projects to improve access to health services for OLMCs

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

In 2018-19, Health Canada continued to carry out site visits to ensure that funding for OLMCs is spent effectively and that stakeholder organizations are achieving expected outcomes in compliance with funding agreements and terms and conditions.

No audits were conducted in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

No evaluation was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: Will be evaluated in 2021-22 as part of the Horizontal Evaluation of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Representatives of OLCDB and departmental senior management attended annual general meetings and meetings of Boards of Directors of OLMC organizations, and were in frequent contact with recipients of the Program.

Further engagement was facilitated through the Federal Health Portfolio Consultative Committee for OLMCs, created in 2017, to inform the Health Portfolio's various programs and policies on the specific needs of OLMCs. In 2018-19, the committee met twice (in June and October) to discuss Health Portfolio priority matters, such as access to palliative care, mental health, child and youth health, and the inclusion of official language considerations in the bilateral agreements negotiated with the provinces and territories. Membership on the Committee includes Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Public Health Agency of Canada as well as targeted recipients under the OLHP, including: SSF, CNFS, CHSSN and McGill University.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 36,400,000 33,800,001 33,800,000 36,100,000 36,100,000 2,300,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 36,400,000 33,800,001 33,800,000 36,100,000 36,100,000 2,300,000
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to in-year funding received through the Supplementary Estimates process.

Canada Brain Research Fund Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Brain Research Fund Program (CBRF) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 14: Brain Research

Description

In Budget 2011 and 2016, the Government of Canada committed up to $120 million, in matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the CBRF Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries to improve the health and quality of life for Canadians who suffer from brain disorders." The Government of Canada's objective in funding the CBRF was:

Results achieved

While most research supported by Brain Canada is fundamental and basic in nature, thirty percent of CBRF funding supported clinical trials, interventions and implementation research. As a result, projects targeting several brain diseases led to findings and products adopted by stakeholders in the form of new medical devices, drugs, early disease detection/diagnosis and through knowledge mobilization. Examples of these promising projects include research on Alzheimer's disease and certain types of depression.

To date, CBRF supported projects produced various knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.), learning events, partnerships, and grants. These projects connect over 74 disciplines involving more than 1,000 researchers at 115 institutions. During 2018-19, investments under the Program have supported the training of more than 110 highly qualified personnel who have contributed to the publication of over 300 research publications. CBRF investments have also generated over 59 new partnerships and continued to support over 240 projects across Canada. To illustrate this impact, as of March 2019, more than 9,980 citations of CBRF-funded publications were made by other authors in Canada and internationally, demonstrating the use of knowledge by other stakeholders to inform solutions to brain diseases and disorders.

In addition, that same year, Brain Canada's partnerships with various institutions, health charities and donors, research networks, provincial agencies and corporations, enabled the organization to raise $14.8 million in funds and disburse $40.6 million to 29 major research grants. For example, in April 2018, Brain Canada and the Azrieli Foundation launched the Early-Career Capacity Building Grant. These grants are intended to accelerate novel and transformative research that aim to fundamentally change scientific understanding of nervous system function and dysfunction and their impact on health.

Over the years, Brain Canada's network has significantly expanded. Brain Canada has taken on the role of a brain research convener and this has created the space to evolve its collaboration involving a constellation of over 100 partners and stakeholders across sectors. The result is a brain research community that has increased coordination to achieve common goals. For example, in February 2018, the Minister of Health, the Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, and MP David Lametti, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, joined Brain Canada to announce a $10.17 million grant to establish the Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (CONP). The announcement was made on the first day of the inaugural plenary meeting of the CONP. The goal of the accompanying plenary meeting was to bring together the members and funders of the platform to discuss infrastructure, training, and governance, as well as the research priorities and opportunities.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

No evaluation was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: A second evaluation is not scheduled as the current funding agreement ends March 2020, before the end of the five-year evaluation cycle for this Program.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Brain Canada is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 24,992,085 20,000,000 23,500,000 23,500,000 23,500,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 24,992,085 20,000,000 23,500,000 23,500,000 23,500,000 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (Voted)

Start date

June 19, 2015

End date

April 10, 2019Footnote 2 (this program was replaced by the Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program)

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 15: Thalidomide

Description

The program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:

Results achieved

Ongoing tax-free payments were distributed to 100% of known Thalidomide survivors. 100% of payments were made before the end of April 2018, as per the time frame service standard of the third-party administrator.

The independent third-party program administrator processed 21 Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund (EMAF) applications. The EMAF assists survivors with costs related to extraordinary health support needs such as specialized surgeries and home or vehicle adaptations. Two new thalidomide survivors were confirmed in 2018-19. One survivor passed away increasing the total from 121 to 122 Canadian thalidomide survivors.

Outreach data for 2018-19 showed that 76% of Thalidomide survivors who responded to the survey said that the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (TSCP) is helping them age with dignity, which aligns with the purpose of the program.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

No evaluation was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: A departmental evaluation is currently scheduled for completion in 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada engaged the independent third party administrator of the TSCP by responding to inquiries and undertaking regular monitoring activities such as progress and performance measurement reporting, and meetings and ongoing communication to support program implementation.

Health Canada engaged the Thalidomide Victims Association of Canada (TVAC), a key stakeholder, in meetings as needed, regarding program implementation. Health Canada also provided information about the program to individual Thalidomide survivors, the general public and to individuals who believe they are survivors of Thalidomide, through direct correspondence and online.

The administrator continued to implement its outreach strategy (direct mail and web-based) to provide the Thalidomide survivor community with updates on program implementation and results.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 11,185,847 9,967,690 8,489,664 9,500,408 9,500,408 1,010,744
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 11,185,847 9,967,690 8,489,664 9,500,408 9,500,408 1,010,744
Explanation on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to increased funding obligations, resulting from two additional survivors admitted to the program, confirmation of another survivor, which was previously pending, as well as lower than projected actuarial mortality rates.

Territorial Health Investment Fund

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 16: Territorial Health Investment Fund

Description

THIF was provided an investment of $70 million over three years (2014-15 to 2016-17). Due to a significant delay resulting from a number of factors in implementing the contribution agreements in year one, the terms and conditions were extended, with no additional funding, until 2017-18 to ensure territorial governments could complete projects as planned.) The THIF was subsequently renewed in 2017-18 with an additional $108 million over four years (2017-18 to 2020-21). Of this funding, $54 million will be allocated to Nunavut, $28.4 million to Northwest Territories and $25.6 million to Yukon. This funding will enable each territory to continue pursuing innovative activities in support of strong, sustainable health systems, while at the same time maintaining funding to offset costs associated with medical travel to improve Northerners' access to the health care they need.

Terms and Conditions of the THIF were amended in 2017-18 to enable the transfer of funds as a grant rather than a contribution. The use of grant agreements will minimize the administrative burden on territories related to financial reporting and thereby increase their ability to reduce overhead costs of the THIF.

Results achieved

Renewed THIF funding in 2018-19 continued to offset the medical transportation costs experienced by territorial governments and has supported foundational planning for the adoption of innovations to strengthen territorial health systems. For instance, in 2018-19:

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018-19

Completed: An evaluation of the Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) was completed in 2018-19.

Summary of Findings:

The 2018 evaluation found that THIF enabled territorial governments to implement strategic and systems-level changes to support better service delivery, and contributed to improved access to health care services for residents. The evaluation also noted that the design of a new THIF grant (launched in 2017-18) was expected to improve efficiency by removing some reporting requirements in order to allow for more flexibility on the part of funding recipients.

Planned: As THIF is scheduled to sunset in 2020-21, there is no further planned evaluation for this fund.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

A federal/territorial Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) Working Group, composed of ADMs from all three territories and Health Canada, continued to provide a forum for ongoing monitoring and progress, including: ensuring individual territorial work plans meet the objectives and intent of the initiative; sharing best practices and collaborating on policy and management approaches; and developing a Progress Report in 2020-21.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 0
Total contributions 20,000,000 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Payments to Provinces and Territories for the Purpose of Emergency Treatment Funding

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Payments to Provinces and Territories for the Purpose of Emergency Treatment Funding (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2018

End date

March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 2: Health Protection and Promotion
Program 29: Controlled Substances

Description

The one-time Emergency Treatment Fund (ETF) provided funding of $150,000,000 to provinces and territories in 2018-19, through bilateral agreements, to improve access to evidence-based treatment services for problematic substance use, including opioids. The funding is matched by the province and territory beyond the first $250,000 and the jurisdiction has up to five years to match the initial influx of funding. Funding was allocated based on the severity of the opioid crisis in the province or territory and the size of the population in the province or territory. This ensured that provinces and territories most impacted by the crisis had enough support, and those jurisdictions that were not yet as affected were able to prepare for possible future impacts.

As part of each bilateral agreement, an action plan was developed and posted on the Health Canada website. In addition, each province and territory is required to report at regular intervals to demonstrate the progress made to increase access to innovative and evidence-based treatment in their jurisdiction.

Results achieved

Bilateral agreements with all provinces and territories were signed in 2018-19. Health Canada expects that short-term and medium-term outcomes will begin to be achieved in a jurisdiction within a year of signing their bilateral agreement, and those results will continue to be achieved until 2023, as provinces and territories may choose to implement multi-year projects using the one-time federal funding. It is expected that the Emergency Treatment Fund will increase availability of treatment services for problematic substance use across jurisdictions and reduce the harms and deaths associated with problematic opioid use. It should be noted that specific timeframes to achieve expected results will vary by jurisdiction, per the timelines proposed for initiatives in their respective action plans. Provinces and territories have provided baseline data to Health Canada and began reporting results in the fall of 2019.

Findings of audits completed in 2018-19

No audit was completed in 2018-19.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2018–19

No evaluation was completed in 2018-19.

Planned: Will be evaluated as part of the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy evaluation that is scheduled to be completed in 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Negotiations with provinces and territories to develop bilateral agreements and action plans under the ETF began in 2018-19. All 13 bilateral agreements were signed by March 31, 2019. Health Canada continues to engage with provinces and territories to monitor implementation and ensure compliance with the bilateral agreements.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 150,000,002 150,000,002 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 0 0 150,000,002 150,000,002 0
Explanation on variances Not applicable

Horizontal Initiatives

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner departments

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Statistics Canada (StatCan)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., Correctional Service Canada) are supporting the federal response to the opioid crisis. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission "Addressing the Opioid Crisis."

Non-federal and non-governmental partners

N/A

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2018

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

Illegal drugs and problematic substance use have always presented health and safety challenges in Canada and around the world. Recently, however, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of overdoses and deaths due to problematic opioid use. In 2016, there were 3,017 opioid-related deaths in Canada, 4,100 in 2017, and 4,460 in 2018.

The federal government is taking significant actions in areas of federal jurisdiction to address the crisis. However, despite significant efforts to date, the opioid crisis in Canada continues. According to data from the Public Health Agency of Canada, 11,577 people lost their lives in Canada between January 2016 and December 2018 related to opioids. It is estimated that approximately 250,000 Canadians do not have access to treatment when seeking help for problematic substance use. Since people who use drugs have traditionally been stigmatized, Canadians struggling with substance use disorder often encounter barriers when accessing health, medical and social services. Further, fentanyl and its analogues continue to poison the illegal drug supply, contributing to increased overdoses among people who use illegal drugs.

While the Government of Canada is taking a number of actions to respond to the opioid crisis, this horizontal initiative is specific to measures announced in Budget 2018 to:

Ultimately, these complementary activities are intended to contribute to a reduction in opioid-related harms and deaths in Canada.

Governance structures

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing a comprehensive federal response to the opioid crisis. Each department/ agency will be responsible for leading its respective initiatives and providing updates to the interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level Working Group on Opioids chaired by the Associate-ADM of Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch. This working group will be used as a forum for information and consultation on next steps toward a comprehensive, collaborative federal response to the opioid crisis. Updates and decisions from this working group will feed into the federal, interdepartmental Deputy Ministers Task Force on the Opioid Crisis as required. This Task Force, chaired by the Deputy Minister of Health Canada, serves as a time-limited forum to provide leadership and oversight of federal initiatives to respond to the opioid crisis. The Task Force will remain an established committee until such time that the public environment no longer requires it.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. Departments and agencies will provide updates to, and consult with, provincial and territorial colleagues as required through the federal/ provincial/ territorial (FPT) ADM-level Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee (PSUH), co-chaired by Health Canada and British Columbia and comprised of ADMs responsible for drug policy in their jurisdiction. They will also provide updates to and consult with PT colleagues as required through the FPT Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses (SAC), co-chaired by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada and Saskatchewan's Chief Medical Officer of Health and comprising of Chief Medical Officers of Health from each jurisdiction. While the PSUH is an established committee intended as a long-term forum for drug policy discussions, the SAC is a time-limited mechanism for public health collaboration and information sharing between jurisdictions related to the opioid crisis in Canada. Upon sun setting, activities under SAC will be transferred to established committees and organizations as needed.

Total federal funding allocated (from start to end date) (dollars)

$82,241,365 and $12,523,446 ongoing

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$21,467,133

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$13,855,445

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

Shared outcome of federal partner departments

Reducing harms and deaths related to opioid use.

Performance indicator(s)

PI 1 Number of hospital admissions due to opioid poisoning (including overdoses) per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)

PI 2 Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)

Target(s)

T1 & T2 Percent reductionFootnote 1 by March 31, 2021

Results/Data Source/Frequency:

R1 Opioid poisoning hospitalizationsFootnote 2

Table 1: National summary of opioid poisoning hospitalizations, for calendar year 2017
Rate per 100,000 populationFootnote 3 16.5
Male 17.8
Female 15.3
By age
< 15 1.8
15-24 14.8
25-44 20.1
45-64 21.2
65+ 18.5
Table 2: Age-adjusted rate of opioid poisoning hospitalizations by province or territory, for calendar year 2017
Region Rate per 100,000 populationFootnote 4
British Columbia 29.3
Alberta 22.7
Saskatchewan 21.6
Manitoba 12.3
Ontario 14.8
QuébecFootnote 5 9.8
New Brunswick 13.1
Nova Scotia 8.4
Prince Edward Island 9.5
Newfoundland and Labrador 16.6
Yukon 31.8
Northwest Territories 33.7
NunavutFootnote 6 Not reported
Table 3: Rate of opioid poisoning hospitalizations by age group and gender, for calendar year 2017
Age Group Males Females
<15 1.2 2.5
15-24 15.3 14.2
25-44 25.9 14.3
45-64 21.3 21.1
65+ 17.3 19.4

Data Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI): Opioid-Related Harms in Canada, December 2018. Ottawa, ON: CIHI; 2018

Frequency: TBDFootnote 7

R2 Apparent opioid-related deaths

Table 1: Summary of apparent opioid-related deaths, for calendar year 2018
Rate per 100,000 populationFootnote 8 12.0
Percent Male 73%
Percent Female 27%
Percent by age group
19 year and under 2%
20 to 29 years 20%
30 to 39 years 26%
40 to 49 years 21%
50 to 59 years 22%
60 to 69 years 8%
70 year and over 1%
Table 2: Rate and gender distribution of apparent opioid-related deaths by region, for calendar year 2018
Region Rate per 100,000 population Percent MaleFootnote 9 Percent FemaleFootnote 9
British Columbia 30.6 80% 20%
Alberta 18.0 76% 24%
Saskatchewan 8.2 58% 42%
Manitoba 4.6 56% 44%
Ontario 10.3 73% 27%
Québec 5.1 75% 25%
New Brunswick 3.5 43% 57%
Nova Scotia 5.9 68% 32%
Prince Edward Island 4.6 SuppressedFootnote 10 SuppressedFootnote 10
Newfoundland and Labrador 1.9 SuppressedFootnote 10 SuppressedFootnote 10
Yukon 12.4 50% 25%
Northwest Territories 4.5 SuppressedFootnote 10 SuppressedFootnote 10
Nunavut SuppressedFootnote 10

Data Source: Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses. National report: Apparent opioid-related deaths in Canada (January 2016 to March 2019). Web Based Report. Ottawa: Public Health Agency of Canada; September 2019

Frequency: Quarterly

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Name of theme (1)

Supporting additional prevention and treatment interventions

Theme outcome

Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 11 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 12 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice

Theme performance indicator(s)

Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informedFootnote 13 improvements to opioid use policies, programs and practice (by type of improvementFootnote 13)

Theme target(s)

Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019Footnote 14.

Theme results/Data Source/Frequency:

Funding recipients were in the early stages of project implementation in 2018-19. These recipients have not yet submitted data to Health Canada. Progress towards results will be reported in future reporting cycles as data becomes available.

Name of theme (2)

Addressing Stigma

Theme outcome

Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue

Theme performance indicator(s)

Percentage of Canadians who believe that the opioid crisis in Canada is a public health issue

Theme target(s)

Increase by 5%Footnote 15 by March 31, 2021

Theme results/Data Source/Frequency:

Initial benchmarks to be available late July 2019 and will be reported in the 2019-20 Departmental Results Report (DRR).

Data source: Contracted public opinion research.

Frequency: As needed.

Name of theme (3)

Taking Action at Canada's Borders

Theme outcome

Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry

Theme performance indicator(s)

Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs (compared to random resultant rate)

Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, resulting from targeted examinations (compared to random resultant rate)

Theme target(s)

A target will be established in 2019-20 once a baseline has been established. The objective will be to maintain or exceed previous years' results.

Theme results/Data Source/Frequency:

Results not applicable for fiscal year 2018-19Footnote 16.

Data source: Commercial and Trade Branch, Commercial Compliance Division, Non-Intrusive Inspection Unit (CBSA)

Frequency: Annually.

Name of theme (4)

Enhancing the Evidence Base

Theme outcome

Enhanced quality surveillanceFootnote 17 data is available

Theme performance indicator(s)

  1. Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 18 disseminated publicly
  2. Percentage of data files published on time

Theme target(s)

  1. 11 by March 31, 2020
  2. 100% by March 31, 2020

Theme results/Data Source/Frequency:

  1. 14

Data Sources:

Frequency: Annually

b. 100%

Data sources:

Frequency: Annually

Performance highlights

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Although no opioid-based funding was accessed during fiscal year 2018-19 period, the following activity was completed:

Commenced project planning and held a preliminary engagement session with law enforcement representatives to increase awareness and support for Public Safety's opioids de-stigmatization awareness training initiative. This activity was completed using modest internally reallocated resources.

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Contact information

Health Canada

Guy Morissette
Director General
Key Initiatives
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Guy.Morissette@canada.ca
613-954-2686

Performance information
Federal departments Link to the department's (Program Alignment Architecture or Program Inventory) Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2018-19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018-19 Actual spending (dollars) 2018-19 Expected results 2018-19 Performance indicators 2018-19 Targets Date to achieve target 2018-19 Actual results
Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Expanded contribution funding 13,169,264 3,985,225 3,001,683 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 TBC in June 2019 once baseline is establishedFootnote 19 AR 1.1.1
ER 1.1.2 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 AR 1.1.2
Controlled Substances Public education campaign 12,456,900 4,813,853 4,813,853 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 2.1.1
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2021 AR 2.1.2
Internal Services 873,836 300,922 300,922          
Public Safety Countering Crime De-stigmatization awareness training for law enforcement 3,396,428 0 9,783 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 March 31, 2023Table footnote 1 AR 2.2
Information sharing with law enforcement and international partners 346,828 0 0 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1
Internal Services 723,217 0 0          
Canada Border Services Agency Commercial Trade and Facilitation and Compliance Equipping safe examination areas and regional screening facilities 1,638,673 366,922 0 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.1.1
Force Generation 2,153,613 566,285 5,399
Buildings and Equipment 11,353,992 4,808,535 1,104,025
Field Technology Support 7,951,329 1,184,445 635,987 PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2023 AR 3.2.1.2
PI 3.2.1.3 T 3.2.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.1.3
Targeting Augmenting intelligence and risk assessment capacity 2,041,704 408,853 0 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2 T 3.2.2 TBD AR 3.2.2
Intelligence Collection and Analysis 3,284,279 580,059 400,055 ER 3.2.3 PI 3.2.3 T 3.2.3 March 31, 2023 AR 3.2.3
Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Enhancement of Detector Dog Program 1,831,150 677,312 333,434 ER 3.2.4 PI 3.2.4.1 TBD TBD AR 3.2.4.1
PI 3.2.4.2 TBD TBD AR 3.2.4.2
Internal Services 3,125,260 516,589 516,589          
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion, and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Expansion of public health surveillance 14,928,466 2,495,738 2,112,056 ER 4.1 PI 4.1 T 4.1 March 31, 2020 AR 4.1
Internal Services 971,534 212,395 212,395          
Statistics Canada Socio-economic Statistics Re-design and operation of the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED) 1,905,286 527,738 387,002 ER 4.2 PI 4.2 T 4.2 TBC when target is established in March 2020 AR 4.2
Internal Services 89,606 22,262 22,262          
Total for all federal departments Not applicable Not applicable 82,241,365 21,467,133 13,855,445 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Table footnotes

Table footnote 1

The date to achieve the target has been revised to March 31, 2023, to account for the time required to develop course content that was reflective of stakeholder input and to convert it into an interactive online module.

Return to table footnote 1 referrer

Expected results

Health Canada

Public Safety

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Actual Results

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Variance Explanation:

Health Canada: The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to recipients underspending as a result of delays in project implementation.

Public Health Agency of Canada: The variance between actual and planned is due to delays in staffing and unexpected departure of employees.

Public Safety Canada: The variance between actual and planned is due to the Department not receiving funding for this program in 2018-19. Funds were internally reallocated to support the program needs.

Statistics Canada: The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to delays in determining a common information technology approach for a central database. Funds were reallocated to support the individual offices to ensure each jurisdiction has an electronic case management system.

Footnote 1

Decrease in baseline year over year to 2021. Baseline for hospital admissions: 16.5 per 100,000 population in 2017. Baseline for apparent opioid-related deaths: 10.9 per 100,000 population in 2017.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

CIHI data related to opioid poisoning hospitalizations are only available for fiscal year 2017.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

This is the crude rate, meaning that the data are not adjusted by age distribution in the population. It is simply the rate against the total population.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Data have been adjusted to allow for differences in age distribution among the provinces and territories, allowing for more meaningful comparison.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Quebec data is from 2016 (the most recent year of data available).

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

CIHI did not receive Nunavut records for hospitalizations between September 1, 2016, and March 31, 2017.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

The frequency of reporting has yet to be determined, but will likely be quarterly. As of December 2019, data will be published on the Public Health InfoBase as a component of opioid related harms reporting.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

This is the crude rate, meaning that the data are not adjusted by age distribution in the population. It is simply the rate against the total population.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Includes deaths with completed investigations where the coroner or medical examiner determined that the death was unintentional. This category also includes deaths with ongoing investigations where the manner of death was believed to be unintentional or had not been assigned at the time of reporting.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Suppressed – Data may be suppressed in provinces or territories with low numbers of cases

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, program materials).

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Types of improvement is a reference to data that will be submitted to Health Canada by funded SUAP projects broken down by policy, program or practice change. Examples could include adopting policies to ensure the meaningful involvement of people with lived experience; changes to programs to make them more culturally relevant or trauma-informed; and practice changes that improve treatment service such as adopting current national opioid treatment guidelines

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Performance indicators, targets and target dates will be determined as part of the SUAP performance indicators' review process.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Baseline: 74% in 2017

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Funding was not received until December of 2018 thereby leaving only 3 months to deliver on any commitments

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/ events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Performance indicators, targets and target dates will be determined as part of the SUAP performance indicators' review process.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

Enhanced capability is reference to six additional dog teams and the introduction of the fentanyl scent (through training) to existing teams

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

SUAP performance indicators are currently being reviewed. Target values will be determined as part of this review process.

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

Baseline: 21% in 2017

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Baseline: 61% in 2017

Return to footnote 24 referrer

Footnote 25

Baseline is 0 as these are new facilities not yet established and no officers have been trained.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

Target may be adjusted in future years once DSSAs are fully operational.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Anticipated activities not set to begin until fiscal year 2019-20. A target will be established in March 2020.

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

Activities did not start until fiscal year 2019-20, therefore the baseline was not establish for fiscal year 2018-19.

Return to footnote 28 referrer

Footnote 29

Training to commence in early 2020.

Return to footnote 29 referrer

Footnote 30

Considering we did not have these installed and operational until the end of 2018/19, there will be no results to report until 2019/20.

Return to footnote 30 referrer

Footnote 31

Anticipated activities not set to begin until fiscal year 2019/20.

Return to footnote 31 referrer

Footnote 32

Activities did not start until fiscal year 2019-20, therefore the baseline was not established for fiscal year 2018-19.

Return to footnote 32 referrer

Footnote 33

There were no data tables released in 2018-19, as such satisfaction with the product cannot be determined.

Return to footnote 33 referrer

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner departments

Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2022 and ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Government of Canada is committed to a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, which uses a public health approach when considering and addressing drug issues. To that end, on December 12, 2016, the Minister of Health announced an updated drug strategy for Canada: The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS).

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health, supported by Health Canada and 14 other federal departments and agencies. The CDSS formally restores harm reduction as a key pillar of Canada's drug strategy alongside prevention, treatment and enforcement. With this change, harm reduction-focused policies — such as support for properly established and maintained supervised consumption sites, and increased access to naloxone — are now a formal part of the Government's strategy. The public health focus of the CDSS, along with the inclusion of harm reduction as a core pillar of the strategy, will better enable the Government to address the current opioid crisis, and to work toward preventing the emergence of new challenges. Following the Budget 2017 announcement, CDSS received $102.4 million over 5 years (2017-18 to 2021-22) and $23.0 million ongoing to Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Indigenous Services CanadaFootnote 1 and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to support the CDSS, building on its ongoing existing funding.

The CDSS replaced the National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS). The NADS was established in 2007 and lead by the Department of Justice. Allocated federal funding from 2007-12 was $570.4 million, with $114.1 million ongoing, for twelve federal departments and agencies for prevention, treatment and enforcement action plans. In 2014, the NADS was expanded to activities to address problematic prescription drug use (with an additional investment of $44.32 million over 5 years (2014-15 to 2018-19) with $5.01 million ongoing (2019-20 onwards) to Health Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The objective of the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) is to strengthen Canada's current approach to problematic drug and substance use by:

The four pillars of the CDSS are:

A strong evidence base supports the use of timely, comparable, national-level data to help develop effective drug and substance policies.

The CDSS recognizes that the national approach to substance use requires coordinated efforts from all levels of government working in their respective areas of jurisdiction. It also recognizes the importance of incorporating stakeholder views on an ongoing basis, including people with lived and living experiences.

Governance structures

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health. The strategy is currently coordinated through a Director-General (DG) level steering committee that reports to Assistant Deputy Ministers.

Current federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) engagement is achieved through a number of F/P/T mechanisms, including the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee that is co-chaired by Health Canada and the Province of British Columbia. Secretariat support for the CDSS is provided by the Controlled Substances Directorate of Health Canada.

Health Canada is currently working with federal partners under the CDSS to assess the existing governance structure of the strategy in order to increase its effectiveness and support the goals of the CDSS.Footnote 4

Total federal funding allocated (2017-18 to 2021-22) (dollars)

$660,073,934

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$260,759,664

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$305,582,320

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

Shared outcome of federal partner departments

Health Canada is working with other federal CDSS partners to update the shared outcomes to better reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS, which is focussed on implementing a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy that is based on a public health approach. The following are the current shared long-term outcomes:

Performance indicators / targets / data sources and frequency of monitoring and reporting / results

Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to update the performance indicators and targets (including their associated data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting) for the shared long term outcomes.

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Name of theme (1)

Prevention

Theme outcomes/performance indicators/targets / data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) for the Prevention pillar to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS.

Theme results

Theme results will be reported once outcomes, indicators and targets are identified.

Name of theme (2)

Treatment

Theme outcomes/performance indicators/targets / data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) for the Treatment pillar to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS.

Theme results

Theme results will be reported once outcomes, indicators and targets are identified.

Name of theme (3)

Harm Reduction

Theme outcome

Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people with problematic drug or substance use.

Theme performance indicator(s)

Theme target(s)

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Theme results

Name of theme (4)

Enforcement

Theme outcomes/performance indicators/targets

Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to revise and update the shared outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) for the Enforcement pillar to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS.

Theme results

Theme results will be reported once outcomes, indicators and targets are identified.

Name of theme (5)

Evidence Base

Theme outcome

Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners.

Theme performance indicator(s)

Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence-informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice by: type of improvementFootnote 7

Theme target(s)

60% of targeted stakeholders reporting evidence-informed improvements to substance use policies, programs, and practices by 2021 (Baseline to be established in 2018-19).

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Aggregated data from multiple recipients of Substance Use and Addictions Program contribution funding (secondary data sources), collected annually with reporting starting in 2019-20.

Theme results

Not available

Performance highlights

In 2018-19, CDSS partners continued to work to address problematic substance use in Canada, including the opioid crisis, across the four pillars of the strategy. Key activities included efforts to inform Canadians about the health risks of problematic substance use and the negative impacts of stigma; providing emergency treatment funding to provinces and territories and removing federal regulatory barriers to evidence-based treatment options; advancing harm reduction efforts including further streamlining supervised consumption site applications, launching a Drug-Checking Technology Challenge, and rolling out a Prison Needle Exchange Program; taking measures to address organized drug crime, including drug trafficking with a focus on toxic substances like fentanyl; and ensuring compliance with federal controlled substances regulations.

Other activities include ongoing research and evidence collection; proposing regulations to restrict the alcohol content in single-serve flavoured purified alcohol beverages; hosting a Law Enforcement Roundtable on Drugs; and advancing public health focussed issues including stigma at the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs. CDSS partners also reviewed CDSS objectives, outcomes and performance indicators to ensure they align with the strategic focus, and consulted the public to obtain new ideas on potential next steps under the CDSS.

Contact information

Michelle Boudreau
Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Michelle.Boudreau@canada.ca
613-960-2496

Performance information
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal Initiatives activities Total allocation (from 2017-18 to 2021-22) (dollars) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Actual spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve Target 2018–19 Actual results
Health Canada (HC) Controlled Substances Office of Controlled Substances
(Enforcement)
$31,221,420Footnote i $6,244,284Footnote i $14,584,281Footnote i ER 1.1 PI 1.1 T 1.1 March 2019 AR 1.1
Transfer to Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities
(Enforcement)
$9,753,510Footnote i $1,950,702Footnote i $1,387,773
Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy
(Harm Reduction & Evidence Base)
$ 5,802,490 $1,187,402 $1,445,651Footnote i ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 2019
April 2022
AR 1.2
$ 4,109,773 $1,328,722 1,350,001
$ 9,207,092 $1,906,380 $1,906,380
$ 8,520,776 $1,125,431 $3,398,715Footnote i
Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP)
(Prevention, Treatment, Harm Reduction & Evidence Base)
$113,937,570Footnote ii $22,787,514Footnote ii $16,648, 668Footnote ii ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 Not applicable AR 1.3
$10,000,000Footnote ii $2,000,000Footnote ii $ 2,056,526Footnote ii March 2019
Drug Analysis Services
(Enforcement)
$53,825,065Footnote i $10,765,013Footnote i $13,009,502 ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 2019 AR 1.4
Drug Analysis Services
(Harm Reduction)
$ 6,572,662 $4,100,027 $2,227,729
Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) (Prevention) $18,601,667Footnote i $5,680,866Footnote i $2,921,258 ER 1.5 PI 1.5 T 1.5 March 2019 AR 1.5
Health Canada Lead Role for the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy $2,436,740 $487,348 $798,444Footnote i ER 1.6 PI 1.6 T 1.6 March 2019 AR 1.6
  Internal Services (CDSS Harm Reduction and Evidence Base) $2,280,107 $472,938 $472,938 Not applicable
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Chronic (non-communicable) Disease and Injury Prevention Chronic Disease and Injury Surveillance (Evidence Base) $844,603Footnote i $281,720Footnote i $44,484 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 April 2022 AR 2.1
Communicable Diseases and Infections Control Grants and contributions - Transmission of Sexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infections
(Harm Reduction)
$30,000,000Footnote ii $6,000,000Footnote ii $4,697,119 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 April 2022 AR 2.2
Internal Services (CDSS Evidence Base) $55,397 $18,280 $18,280 Not applicable
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Research in Priority Areas Research on Drug Treatment Model
(Treatment)
$6,874,990 $1,974,998 $2,262,773 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 2019 AR 3.1
Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (Evidence Base) $10,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,962,223 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 April 2022 AR 3.2
Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) Mental Wellness (First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness Program) Grants and Contributions –Mental Wellness Program
(Harm Reduction)
$15,000,000Footnote ii $2,000,000Footnote ii $1,880,740 ER 4.1 PI 4.1 T 4.1 March 2019
March 2021
AR 4.1
Grants and Contributions – Mental Wellness Program
(Treatment)
$60,357,585Footnote i $12,071,517Footnote i $15,421,385
Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) (Prevention) $14,376,000Footnote ii $2,838,000Footnote ii $2,838,000 Not applicable
Department of Justice (DoJ) Drug Treatment Court Funding Program Youth Justice Fund
(Treatment)
$18,156,380 $3,631,276 $3,725,000 ER 5.1 PI 5.1 T 5.1 March 2019 AR 5.1
Youth Justice Youth Justice (Treatment) $7,957,625 $1,591,525 $1,366,728 ER 5.2 PI 5.2 T 5.2 AR 5.2
Internal Services $42,375 $8,475 $ 8,475 Not applicable
Public Safety Canada (PS) Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation
(Enforcement)
$2,942,660 $588,532 $568,749 ER 6.1 PI 6.1 T 6.1 March 2019 AR 6.1
Internal Services $75,710 $15,142 $15,142 Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Federal Policing (FP)
Prevention
Federal Policing Public Engagement (FPPE)
(Prevention)
$11,555,602 $2,335,986 $2,335,986 ER 7.1 PI 7.1 T 7.1 March 2019 AR 7.1
Federal Policing (FP)
Investigations
Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations
(Enforcement)
$85,974,790 $17,379,960 $17,379,960 ER 7.2 PI 7.2 T 7.2 Not applicable AR 7.2
Internal Services $14,439,825 $2,836,065 $2,549,609 Not applicable
Correctional Services Canada (CSC) Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders (Enforcement) $3,027,280 $743,349 $762,813 ER 8.1 PI 8.1 T 8.1 March 2019 AR 8.1
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders (Enforcement) $6,231,200 $1,108,348 $1,088,884
Parole Board of Canada (PBC) Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions – (Provincial reviews)
(Enforcement)
$5,557,500 $199,000 $186,000 ER 9.1 PI 9.1 T 9.1 March 2019 AR 9.1
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Provincial reviews)
(Enforcement)
$2,137,500 $97,000 $90,000 ER 9.2 PI 9.2 T 9.2 March 2019 AR 9.2
Internal Services $1,710,000 $35,000 $32,000 Not applicable
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.Footnote 8
(Enforcement)
$33,182,275 $6,636,455 $2,535,597 ER 10.1 PI 10.1 T 10.1 Not applicable AR 10.1
Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services (Enforcement) $15,596,460 $3,119,292 $27,684,622 ER 10.2 PI 10.2 AR 10.2
Internal Services Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable. (Enforcement) $4,863,660 $972,735 $304,769 ER 10.3 PI 10.3 Not applicable AR 10.3
Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services (Enforcement) $2,345,825 $469,165 $3,341,726
Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) Risk Assessment Targeting Intelligence Security Screening
(Enforcement)
$10,500,000 $2,100,000 $2,100,000 ER 11.1.1
ER 11.1.2
ER 11.1.3
PI 11.1 T 11.1 March 2019 AR 11.1
Criminal Investigations $1,000,000 $200,000 $200,000 ER 11.2
Internal Services $6,500,000 $1,300,000 $1,300,000 Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS)
(Enforcement)
$4,500,000 $900,000 $919,078 ER 12.1 PI 12.1 T 12.1 March 2019 AR 12.1
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Domestic Compliance Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG)
(Enforcement)
$4,209,225 $820,002 $1,261,760 ER 13.1 PI 13.1 T 13.1 March 2019 AR 13.1
Internal Services $790,775 $90,510 $119,989 Not applicable
Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) Specialized Programs and Services Financial Intelligence Program
(Enforcement)
$3,000,000 $600,000 $589,799 ER 14.1 PI 14.1 T 14.1 Not applicable AR 14.1
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
(FINTRAC)
Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program
(Enforcement)
$0 $0 $1,900,645 ER 15.1 PI 15.1 T 15.1 Not applicable AR 15.1
  Internal Services $0 $0 $272,210 Not applicable
Total for all federal organizations $660,073,934 $134,998,956 $163,972,411  

Total Funding Allocation and Planned Spending amounts are shown including EBPs @ 20% and PWGSC accommodation premium @ 13%, unless specified otherwise.

Table Footnote i

Amount includes EBPs @ 20%, PWGSC accommodation premium @ 13% and internal services

Return to footnote i referrer

Table Footnote ii

Amount constitutes Grants and/or Contributions, therefore do not include EBP or Accommodation premiums

Return to footnote ii referrer

Comments on variances

Health Canada
The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the costs related to advancing harm reduction efforts, including the expansion of supervised consumption and overdose prevention sites (from 2 to 40 sites), launching a Drug Checking Technology Challenge, the increased level of engagement respecting international drug policy and consulting the public to obtain new ideas on potential next steps under the CDSS.

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP):

Public Health Agency of Canada
The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to delays in staffing and projects.

Canada Revenue Agency
The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to additional resources required for higher than anticipated audits.

Indigenous Services Canada
The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to internal reallocations to meet the program needs and priorities.

Financial Transaction and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)
FINTRAC is an unfunded partner within CDSS. The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to internal allocations to support this initiative.

2018-19 Expected Results

Health Canada

ER 1.1

ER 1.2

ER 1.3

Provide up to $26.3 million under the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) to support evidence-informed and innovative health promotion, prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives to address substance use, including core funding for the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addition (CCSA). In 2018-19, the focus will be on funding and supporting the early implementation of a new cohort of prevention, treatment and harm reduction initiatives resulting from a call for proposals launched late in the 2017-18. As a result, performance measurement will focus on program output and short-term indicators.

ER 1.4

ER 1.5

ER 1.6

Effective coordination of the CDSS.

Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 2.1

The Public Health Agency of Canada, through national-level surveillance of opioid-related deaths and other harms, will provide a pan-Canadian picture of the public health impact of opioid overdoses to effectively guide policy, prioritize and develop evidence-based interventions, and drive research.

ER 2.2

Support for time-limited projects are expected to increase knowledge of how to reduce risk behaviours related to the sharing of injection and inhalant drug use equipment, and result in a reduction in risk-taking behaviours. The program will result in enhanced capacity to prevent infections associated with shared drug use equipment and increased access to harm reduction and other services, while also reducing stigma and discrimination among this population.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 3.1

In alignment with the CDSS goals, in 2018-19, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will continue to fund the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) Network, a national research consortium in problematic substance use, with four research Nodes across Canada (located in British Columbia, the Prairies, Ontario, and Quebec and the Maritimes) that enhances collaboration between researchers, service providers, policy makers and people with lived experience.

In 2018-19, it is expected that CRISM will:

In 2018-19, CIHR will deliver up to 18 knowledge syntheses relevant to one or more of the four pillars of the CDSS (i.e., prevention, harm reduction, treatment and enforcement) and the opioid crisis.

ER 3.2

In 2018-19, a baseline will be established for the percentage (%) of federal health publications in areas related to problematic substance use (from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada) citing CIHR-funded research.

Indigenous Services Canada

ER 4.1

Indigenous Services Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Branch has the capacity to fund a range of treatment services and programs to First Nations and Inuit communities.

With ongoing CDSS investments, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to maintain the availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this strategy will be measured by the nature of services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices.

With CDSS investments, FNIHB also plans to maintain treatment programs and services to address substance use in First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by:

Department of Justice

ER 5.1

The criminal justice system supports alternative ways of responding to the causes and consequences of offending.

ER 5.2

Increased availability of, and access to, drug treatment services and programs for youth involved in the justice system.

Public Safety Canada

ER 6.1

Coordinated enforcement action to address illegal drugs and substances, including illegal opioids.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 7.1

The RCMP will increase awareness of drugs and illegal substances among stakeholders by developing education products, supporting outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

ER 7.2

The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on the highest threats related to organized crime networks including those involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs, including illegal opioids.

Correctional Service Canada

ER 8.1

Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (Schedule II).

Parole Board of Canada

ER 9.1

Conditional release decisions contribute to keeping communities' safe.

ER 9.2

The timely exchange of relevant information with victims, offenders, observers, other components of the criminal justice system, and the general public.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

ER 10.1

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA in all provinces and territories regardless of which police agency investigates the alleged offences, except Quebec and New Brunswick. In these two provinces, the PPSC prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the RCMP.

ER 10.2

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

ER 10.3

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 11.1.1

Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illegal drug issues relative to the border.

ER 11.1.2

Continue to increase intelligence and analytical support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the CDSS.

ER 11.1.3

Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the CDSS to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting, information sharing and laboratory analysis related to illegal drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the CDSS as they relate to the border.

ER 11.2

Continue to sample, analyse and use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 12.1

To assist the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States-Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS-CICAD) to fulfill their respective mandates in the fight against drugs and transnational crime, including efforts to reduce the supply and availability of illegal drugs. The expected results for fiscal year 2018/2019 will be increased capacity of port officials in selected countries in the Americas to intercept and seize illegal drug smuggled via legal maritime containerized cargo.

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 13.1

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 14.1

Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

ER 15.1

In 2018-2019 FINTRAC will continue to be an unfunded partner within the CDSS. Given the importance of the CDSS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

2018-19 Performance Indicators

Health Canada

PI 1.1

Percentage of licensed dealers inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations.

PI 1.2

PI 1.3

  1. Number of knowledge products created by funding recipients.
  2. Number of learning opportunity delivered by funding recipients.
  3. Number of individuals accessing the knowledge products.
  4. Number of participants in learning opportunities.
  5. Percentage of target population reporting that they have the social and physical supports they need.
  6. Percentage of target population reporting that they intend to use the knowledge and skills.
  7. Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained knowledge.
  8. Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained skills.

PI 1.4

  1. Percentage of samples analyzed within service standards (60 days or negotiated date).
  2. Number of alerts issued to clients and to provincial and territorial health authorities on newly identified potent illegal drugs in communities.

PI 1.5

Percentage of pharmacies inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations.

PI 1.6

CDSS performance measurement strategy revised and implemented.

Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 2.1

PI 2.2

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

PI 3.1

The proportion of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals

PI 3.2

Indigenous Services Canada

PI 4.1

  1. Number of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver harm reduction programming.
  2. Average percentage of First Nations people and Inuit per community who received substance use community-based supports.

Department of Justice

PI 5.1

Percentage of Drug Treatment Court participants retained for 6 months or longer in the court-monitored treatment program.

PI 5.2

Number of active projects funded under Youth Justice Fund's Drug Treatment component per fiscal year.

Public Safety Canada

PI 6.1

Timely sharing of evidence-based knowledge and intelligence to support law enforcement actions against illegal drugs and substances, including illegal opioids.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

PI 7.1

Awareness:

  1. Number and nature of awareness products.
  2. Number and category (targeted audiences) of stakeholders reached.
  3. Percentage of participants from targeted audiences who demonstrate an increase in awareness of problematic drug and substance use.

Partnerships:

  1. Number and nature of number of partnerships and collaborations.
  2. Qualitative assessment of extent partners have been engaged.

PI 7.2

Investigations:

  1. Number and nature of collaboration and coordination efforts related to enforcement with domestic partners.
  2. Number and nature of collaboration and coordination efforts related to enforcement with international partners.
  3. Number of investigations initiated regarding illegal drug production and/or distribution.
  4. Number/type/nature of seizures made by Federal Serious and Organized Crime (FSOC) units related to investigations on illegal drug production and/or distribution.

Correctional Services Canada

PI 8.1

Parole Board of Canada

PI 9.1

The number and proportion of provincial offenders convicted of drug offences who successfully complete parole.

PI 9.2

The percentage of individuals (i.e., general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

PI 10.1

PI 10.2

PI 10.3

Percentage of overall CDSS-related expenditures for corporate support to in-house legal staff.

Canada Border Services Agency

PI 11.1

Average dollar value of goods, shipments and conveyances seized attributed to Intelligence.

Global Affairs Canada

PI 12.1

Canada Revenue Agency

PI 13.1

80% or more of audits resulting in (re) assessments.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

PI 14.1

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

PI 15.1

Total number of FINTRAC disclosures of actionable financial intelligence made to regime partners, and the number of unique disclosures of actionable financial intelligence that relate to at least one drug-related offence.

2018-19 Targets

Health Canada

T 1.1

The risk-based methodologies behind assigning compliance ratings for licensed dealers are evolving. The target value will be identified /determined by March 31, 2020.Footnote 10

T 1.2

T 1.3

T 1.4

  1. 95% of certificates of analysis issued within service standards or negotiated date.
  2. Demand driven.

T 1.5

95%Footnote 12 by March 31, 2019.

T 1.6

Implemented by March 31, 2019.

Public Health Agency of Canada

T 2.1

T 2.2

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

T 3.1

100% annually.

T 3.2

Indigenous Services Canada

T 4.1

Department of Justice

T 5.1

50% of participants are retained for six months in federally funded Drug Treatment Court programs.

T 5.2

The budget allocation is fully committed to support drug treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system.

Public Safety Canada

T 6.1

100% completion of planned coordination activities based on an integrated law enforcement work plan.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

T 7.1

  1. 5 drug related awareness products.
  2. Approximately 500 stakeholders will be reached (stakeholders include Police, Public/Youth, and Industry/Other stakeholders).
  3. 85% of participants from targeted audiences will demonstrate an increase in awareness
  4. At least 20 partnerships/collaborations.
  5. Qualitative assessment.

T 7.2

Targets are not applicable as these will vary by province/territory and is based on need.

Correctional Services Canada

T 8.1

Parole Board of Canada (PBC)

T 9.1

98% of provincial offenders serving sentences for drug offences who are on parole are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.

T 9.2

80% of individuals are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

T 10.1

Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC's workload and mandate.

Canada Border Services Agency

TI 11.1

9:1 ratio.

Global Affairs Canada

T 12.1

Canada Revenue Agency

T 13.1

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

T 14.1

The Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG) is expected to maintain the equivalent of three dedicated resources to work with law enforcement agencies. The targets are dependent on the projects assigned to FAMG by law enforcement agencies and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

T 15.1

FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

2018-19 Actual Results

Health Canada

AR 1.1 100%

AR 1.2

AR 1.3

  1. 226
  2. 360
  3. 17,646
  4. 11,847
  5. Funding recipients have not yet reported on this indicator; data is expected in future reporting cycles.
  6. 82%
  7. 95%
  8. 53%.Footnote 15

AR 1.4

  1. 96.8% (118, 604 Certificates of Analysis issued within service standards out of 122,519)
  2. 40 alerts issued

AR 1.5 75%

AR 1.6

DG CDSS Steering Committee approved a new draft logic model in April 2019. In 2019-20, the CDSS Evaluation and Reporting Working Group will review and update the indicators and targets to support the new logic model.

Public Health Agency of Canada

AR 2.1

AR 2.2

Project-level performance data will be reported to the Agency at the end of fiscal year 2019-20 once the two-year projects have been completed. As such, program-level results will not be available until early 2020-2021.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

AR 3.1

Baseline to be established in 2020-21

AR 3.2

Indigenous Services Canada

AR 4.1

Department of Justice

AR 5.1

46%

AR 5.2

10 projects

Public Safety Canada

AR 6.1 100%

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

AR 7.1

  1. 4 drug related awareness products (a national presentation on "The Meth Situation in Canada"; a "Methamphetamine Fact Sheet"; "Identification and Reporting of Suspicious Chemical Transactions" fact sheet; and a national standardized presentation on the opioid crisis) and 1 fact sheet on fentanyl (2017) for a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) news report on fentanyl toxicity and naloxone.
  2. 852 stakeholders (approximately), including police, public, youth, industry, indigenous communities and other stakeholders.
  3. 57%Footnote 18 increased their awareness of synthetic opioids such as fentanyl; 8 of the 9Footnote 19 youth drug prevention programs (for 210 youth in Saskatchewan) demonstrated increased awareness of the harms of drug use.
  4. 21 new engagement opportunities were identified between domestic and international police services, international-based government officials serving in public safety and security roles, and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Drug Advisory Committee.
  5. Coordinated and led learning exchanges for enhancing law enforcement awareness of opioids, good practices in forensic drug lab analyses/techniques, and strategies employed by the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Units (CFSEU) in tackling drugs, gangs and organized crime. The Drug Abuse Resistance EducationFootnote 20 program was delivered 704 times in various communities throughout Canada. Over 200 Aboriginal Shield ProgramsFootnote 21 were delivered throughout Canada.

AR 7.2

  1. 2 collaborative working arrangements (30 meetings and teleconferences) related to opioids.
  2. 2 collaborative working arrangements (8 meetings) related to opioids.
  3. 10,040 occurrences.Footnote 22
  4. 21,732 drug seizuresFootnote 23 valued at $101,134,206.

Correctional Services Canada

AR 8.1

Parole Board of Canada

AR 9.1

100%

AR 9.2

89%

Public Prosecution Service of CanadaFootnote 26

AR 10.1

AR 10.2

AR 10.3

11%

Canada Border Services Agency

AR 11.1

20:10Footnote 27

Global Affairs Canada

AR 12.1

Canada Revenue Agency

AR 13.1

35 audits

Public Services and Procurement Canada

AR 14.1

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

AR 15.1

2,276, including 678 unique cases. These case disclosures relate to suspicions of money laundering or terrorist financing where the predicate offence is believed to be drug distribution or production.

Footnote 1

Pursuant to the Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, effective on November 30, 2017, the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) was transferred from the Department of Health to the Indigenous Services Canada (ISC).

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

While cannabis is encompassed by the CDSS, federal activities, performance measures and funding amounts are reported on through a separate horizontal initiative (Implementing a Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis).

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Additional federal activities to address the opioid crisis are reported through a separate horizontal initiative (Addressing the Opioid Crisis).

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

The governance structure was revised in 2018-19. The renewed DG Steering Committee is designed to reflect and support the CDSS's comprehensive approach to drug and substance use issues. The committee is composed of DGs from federal departments/agencies whose mandates are relevant to drug and substance use (including departments that formally receive CDSS funding and those that do not). The committee, which meets at least twice a year and also on an ad hoc basis, is supported by three working groups: the Demand and Harm Reduction Working Group; the Supply Reduction Working Group; and the Evaluation and Reporting Working Group.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) performance indicators are currently being reviewed as part of approved changes to Health Canada's Departmental Results Framework. Theme target values will be determined as part of this review process.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

This performance indicator and target will be replaced in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) performance indicators are currently being reviewed as part of approved changes to Health Canada's Departmental Results Framework. Theme target values will be determined as part of this review process.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

In the 2018-19 Department Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative, the total allocation and the 2018-10 financial numbers were published backward (i.e. 10.1 funding was reported against 10.2 activity).

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

This performance indicator will be changed in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Pilots to assign compliance ratings using historical and recent information are ongoing. Once the data from the pilots are analyzed, a new baseline will be established. An appropriate target will be established by March 31, 2020.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) performance indicators are currently being reviewed as part of approved changes to Health Canada's Departmental Results Framework. Theme target values will be determined as part of this review process

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

This target has been revised for 2019-20 to 80% given the implementation of new risk-based methodologies behind assigning compliance ratings. As a result of the new approach, compliance rates are expected to decrease, and therefore the target has been revised accordingly.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

PHAC is responsible for the data collection of "Provincial and territorial coroner and medical examiner data collected annually (at different stages of readiness)"

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

This target will be changed in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Percentage represents the average value of projects reporting to date. SUAP funding recipients are in the early stages of project implementation, limiting the amount of available data for 2018-19. Only 3 of 27 SUAP projects funded under the CDSS have reported on this indicator to date.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

PHAC reports this figure by calendar year; this number is for the period January to December 2018.

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

This performance indicator and target will be replaced in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

21% of federal partners and stakeholders surveyed (of the RCMP Federal Policing Prevention and Engagement (FPPE) unit) responded "neither agree or disagree", this may mean that this question was not applicable to these respondents.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Many students in one program did not complete the post-test (the RCMP facilitated a youth drug prevention program include pre and post-tests measuring student knowledge about the harms of drug use).

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

The DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program teaches critical thinking and life skills to youth in grades 5 and 6.

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

The Aboriginal Shield Program (ASP) a culturally sensitive substance abuse program targeted specifically at Canadian Aboriginal youth. The program is inspired by the concept of the Dream Shield, a traditional symbol of sheltering and learning found in many Aboriginal cultures and communities.

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

This number represents the total number of occurrences. Not all occurrences result in an "investigation". We are unable to determine if the occurrence was initiated as a result of information pertaining to illegal drug production and/or distribution.

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

This number reflects all RCMP investigations related to illegal drug production and distribution.

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Represents monthly average.

Return to footnote 24 referrer

Footnote 25

Represents monthly average.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

This information excludes any charges laid under the Cannabis Act, which would have been previously included under the CDSA.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Mid-year the Key Performance Indicator (KPI) target changed from 9:1 to 20:1 given the long term success of the program in exceeding the target but it should be noted the KPI changed for all intelligence-led seizures not for this specific deliverables. This KPI will be discontinued for the in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Chemicals Management Plan

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Chemicals Management Plan

Lead department

Health Canada
Environment and Climate Change Canada

Federal partner departments

Public Health Agency of Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2007-08

End date of the horizontal initiative

2020-21

Description of the horizontal initiative

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

Jointly delivered by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), the Fisheries Act and the Forestry Act.

In the second phase of CMP (CMP2, 2011-12 to 2015-16), priority setting for existing substances was refined and the remaining substances were grouped to provide efficiencies for risk assessment and risk management as a result of lessons learned from the first phase of the program (CMP1, 2007-08 to 2010-11). The third phase (CMP3, 2016-17 to 2020-21) includes both substance groupings and single substance assessments. Similar to CMP2, groupings are created where possible to gain efficiencies in the assessment process and to consider substances that may be used as alternatives. Where groupings are not possible, single substance assessments are conducted.

Integration across government programs remains critical since many substances are found in consumer, cosmetic, health, drug and other products. In addition to releases from products, substances may be released at various points in their life cycle, such as during their manufacturing and disposal.

The same core functions that have been part of the first two phases continue in the third phase of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and, policy and program management. Information gathering is a key activity undertaken to support these core functions.

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal.

Governance structures

In the overall delivery of the CMP, Health Canada and ECCC have a shared responsibility in attaining objectives and results. In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, the Departments fulfill their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures, as well as a joint CMP governance structure to address shared responsibilities. Efforts are also made to harmonize vertical and horizontal performance reporting indicators (e.g. CMP Performance Management Strategy, the CMP contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, etc.) for CMP.

The CMP has a horizontal governance framework which ensures integration, co-ordination, joint decision making and clear accountabilities. Under the CMP Integrated Horizontal Governance Framework, the joint CMP Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) reports to both the Health Canada and ECCC Deputy Ministers.

The CMP ADM committee is supported by a Director General (DG) committee. The CMP DG Committee consists of DGs from all partner programs within Health Canada and ECCC, and provides strategic direction, oversight and a challenge function for the CMP's overall implementation. The CMP DGs also play a lead role in directing, monitoring and providing a challenge function for the core elements of the CMP, namely the delivery of the chemicals agenda under CEPA.

This DG level committee is supported by the CMP Steering Committee, which is a Director level committee intended to provide oversight on CMP issues related to the CEPA chemicals agenda.

Total federal funding allocated (from start to end date) (dollars)

$1,308,179,400 (includes all three phases)

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$1,110,864,820

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$1,069,428,868

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

October 2014

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars)

Phase three, $493,286,450; Source of funding: Budget 2015

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019-20

Shared outcome of federal partner departments

Shared (Final) Outcome (1)

Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances

Performance indicator(s)

Long-term risk of a selected group of representative or significant harmful substances where risk management actions have been put in place

Target(s)

This is a long term outcome with no specific annual targets. The target value is substance-dependent. However, in general, the CMP is aimed at reducing risks to human health and the environment, and therefore a reduction in risk is desired

Results/Data Source/Frequency

Results are expected to be available by March 2028.

Over the life of the CMP, significant investments have been and continue to be made towards measuring the final outcome in a meaningful manner. Specific to 2018-19 and building on previous work, a commissioned study to identify a subset of pilot projects for examination and undertaking of a statistical analysis to identify potential temporal trends was completed. This study confirmed that temporal trends for four substances (BPA, lead, mercury and PBDE) are possible, but that additional years of data collection would be required.

Data Source: Literature Review, Canadian Health Measures Survey and other available monitoring data

Frequency: 10-20 years

Shared Outcome (2)

Risk management measures reduce the potential for exposure to harmful substances

Performance indicator(s)

Exposure or release levels for a select group of substances where risk management measures are in place. (Substance-based Performance Measurement)

Target(s)

The target value is substance-dependent. However, in general, risk management actions are taken in order to reduce exposure, and therefore a downward trend in exposure levels is desired

Results/Data Source/Frequency

Results are expected to be available by March 31, 2022.

Work is on-going to monitor the extent to which the Program's risk management activities are reducing the potential for exposure to harmful substances. Substance-Based Performance Measurement (SBPM), and potentially Instrument-Based Performance Measurement (IBPM), will continue to be used to determine whether or not risk management actions have collectively met substance specific objectives. Specific to 2018-19, a performance evaluation for the bisphenol A (BPA) health component of the risk management approach was conducted in December 2018. It found a 96% decrease in exposures of infants to BPA.

Data Source: Literature Review, Canadian Health Measures Survey and other available monitoring data

Frequency: OtherFootnote 1

Shared Outcome (3)

Canadians use the information (that meets their needs on the risks and safe use of substances of concern) to avoid or minimize risks posed by substances of concern

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)Footnote 2

Results/Data Source/Frequency

Results:Footnote 3

Data Source:

Frequency:

Shared Outcome (4)

Canadians and stakeholder groups have access to information that meets their needs on the risks and safe use of substances of concern

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Results/Data Source/Frequency

Results:

Data Source:

Frequency:

Shared Outcome (5)

Knowledge, information and data on substances of concern is made available to Health Canada and ECCC recipients (or other stakeholders) to inform risk management; risk communication and stakeholder engagement; research; risk assessment; monitoring and surveillance; and international activities

Performance indicator(s)

Percentage of CMP research projects conducted that address risk assessment, risk management, economic research, monitoring and surveillance, research and international priorities

Target(s)

100%

Results/Data Source/Frequency

Results: 100%

Data Source: Operational Planning templates

Frequency: Annually

Shared Outcome (6)

Industry conforms/complies with established risk management measures

Performance indicator(s)

Industry conforms or complies with established risk management instruments

Target(s)

ECCC Enforcement Branch to complete an analysis of compliance in high risk regulated sectors

Results/Data Source/Frequency

Results: Non-Compliance Detection level for CMP Regulations: 17%Footnote 4

Data Source: Gavia (ECCC's Enforcement Database)

Frequency: Annually

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Name of theme

Not applicable

Performance highlights

Summary

In 2018-19, Health Canada (HC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) continued to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from priority existing substances. Screening Assessment Reports and Risk Management Strategies for most priorities identified in a publicly available work plan were completed, and risk management measures continued to be developed, implemented, tracked and monitored. As well, new substance notifications were assessed within their mandated timelines, and risk management instruments were developed within mandated timeframes as required for substances considered harmful to human health and/or the environment.

HC continued to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address risks posed by harmful substances in foods and food packaging materials, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water while work continued on the re-evaluation of previously approved pesticides according to legislated initiation requirements under the Pest Control Products Act.

In 2018-19, Health Canada modernized the process for developing drinking water quality guidelines by enhancing transparency, finding efficiencies and focusing on key information. As a result, the number of new or updated guidelines published has increased as compared to previous year. These guidelines are used by all Federal, Provincial and Territorial jurisdictions in Canada as the basis for establishing their drinking water requirements.

The program continued to conduct research and monitoring programs to address existing and emerging substances of concern, and to inform risk assessment and risk management activities.

Compliance promotion strategies and enforcement plans were also developed and delivered for CMP substances. The focus in 2018-19 was on delivering compliance promotion and enforcement activities for the highest priority instruments as determined by the compliance and enforcement priority setting processes.

In the areas of stakeholder engagement and public outreach, a key milestone in 2018-19 was the launch of a new Healthy Home social marketing campaign on chemicals and pollutants in and around the home. The new Healthy Home web site makes it easier for Canadians to find CMP information that is relevant to the general public and includes general safety messaging along with plain language information on CMP substances of concern. A new top 10 tips brochure was released to support outreach efforts. With this new campaign, public outreach continues to be delivered through multiple platforms such as national media (print and radio), social media, print products, and grass roots outreach through Health Canada regional offices.

Performance Details

Risk Assessment/Risk Management

In 2018-19, 128 CMP substances were assessed in Draft Screening Assessment Reports (DSARs). ECCC and HC also published Final Screening Assessment Reports (FSARs) for 599 substances.

In 2018-19, HC's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) completed two proposed re-evaluation decisions (risk assessments) for consultation on old pesticides (those registered prior to 1995), six cyclical re-evaluations (those registered after 1995) and three special reviews.

Targeted risk management activities were published in 2018-19 for substances that were deemed harmful to human health and/or the environment. In total, there were ten risk management instruments put in place to manage these toxic substances, including three proposed risk management instruments and seven Final risk management (RM) instruments. Seven RM Scope documents and one RM Approach documents were also published.

In 2018-19, 371 new substance notifications were received pursuant to section 81 of CEPA and the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). Seven Notices were published applying the SNAc Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions to seven substances; 12 Ministerial Conditions were published on 11 new substances. Six SNAc Notices of Intent (NOIs) were issued for existing substances on a total of 20 substances.

During 2018-19, 30 notifications of new animate products of biotechnology were received and were assessed under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). While no SNAc Notices were issued for new living organisms, an Order applying the SNAc provisions to five existing living organisms was published in 2018-19.

HC also contributed to risk management activities related to drinking water quality in 2018-19, publishing online six final and ten draft Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality / guidance documents, to be used by all jurisdictions in Canada as the basis for their regulatory requirements.

The Consumer Product Safety Program (CPSP) continued to manage potential risks related to chemicals in consumer products and cosmetics, including the completion of cyclical enforcement projects for lead in kettles, boric acid and phthalates in toys, chemical requirements of ceramic foodware products, methylisothiazolinone/ methylchloroisothiazolinone (MI/MIC) in cosmetics, levels of lead and cadmium in children's jewellery, lead in surface coatings of children's products, and consumer chemicals under the requirements of the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001 (CCCR, 2001). In total, the cyclical enforcement projects included 166 inspections, where 236 samples were collected, leading to 20 recalls and 15 stop sales. In addition, final amendments to regulations for children's jewellery and lead in consumer products were published in 2018-19. Consumer Product Safety risk assessors and risk managers co-authored a DSAR for talc, as well as drafting DSARs for parabens, lotus corniculatus and triclocarban, which are planned to be published in 2019-20. CPSP provided cosmetic notification data to support the assessment of numerous CMP substances. The Product Safety Laboratory developed a method and conducted testing of children's rubber products to identify and quantify the presence of mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT).

The Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) of HC continued to provide information to support the development of CMP screening assessments as well as provide a review function for food-related sections of those assessments. It also continued its commitment to re-evaluate and assess food additives, food contaminants, other food ingredients and food packaging materials for which CMP screening assessments and new science identified potential risks for consumers and where CMP assessments identified food as a contributing/main source of exposure.

In 2018-19, HC's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) made 12 re-evaluation decisions for older chemicals (those registered prior to 1995). 26 Final decisions for cyclical re-evaluations; and two special reviews were also completed.

Stakeholder Engagement and Public Outreach

Stakeholder engagement activities delivered in 2018-19 focussed on targeted stakeholders in order to facilitate information sharing. The CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council (SAC) held two meetings in 2018-19. The purpose of the Council is to obtain advice and feedback from stakeholders regarding implementation of the CMP and to foster dialogue between stakeholders and the government to address any related concerns. The program published two issues of the CMP Progress Report in July 2018 and March 2019. The third term of the CMP Science Committee began in the fall of 2018, and continues to provide a strong science foundation to the CMP by enabling external science professionals from national and international sources to share their expertise with HC and ECCC.

The program managed a rigorous posting schedule for the Chemical Substances Website content on Canada.ca to ensure the public had the opportunity to participate in CMP.

Materials and information for the Healthy Home Campaign were developed, piloted and implemented throughout 2018-19, culminating in the launch and national roll out of a new Healthy Home social marketing campaign on chemicals and pollutants in and around the home. In January 2019, the new Healthy Home website was released on Canada.ca. This website delivers CMP and related environmental health information in plain, non-technical language, making it easier for Canadians to find CMP information that is relevant to the public. Healthy Home website materials also include general safety messaging along with plain language information on CMP substances of concern, a look up section containing information on common chemicals and pollutants found in the home, and a new top 10 tips brochure. Social media posts on Facebook and Twitter were issued throughout the year to inform Canadians of assessment results for high profile substances of concern

Public outreach activities (e.g., trade shows, workshops, etc.) were conducted through HC Regional Offices to increase Canadians' awareness of the health risks of chemicals in and around the home and provide information for them to take action to protect their health and that of vulnerable populations. Across Canada, 62 public outreach activities related to chemical effects on health resulted in approximately 20,723 interactions with Canadians.

Research

Research continued to address CMP3 priorities identified under the following themes: a) Nanomaterials; b) Integrated Hazard Characterization and Exposure Assessments for CMP3 priority chemicals, mixtures or CEPA substances; c) Monitoring and surveillance of CMP priority chemicals; and, d) Methods and Tools Development for the assessment of CMP3 priority chemicals, mixtures or CEPA substances.

In 2018-19, six targeted research projects were carried out to address short term data needs for risk assessment to help meet 2020 CMP commitments. In addition, 20 research projects were conducted to support CMP3 priority substances in collaboration with RA and RM and to support key scientific regulatory areas. Data generated from CMP research projects were used to support the development of nine DSARs and nine FSARs.

At ECCC, 20 research projects were completed by the end of fiscal year 2018-19. These projects were conducted on priority chemicals, such as: flame retardants; benzotriazoles and benzothiazoles; hindered phenols; platinum group elements: and, rare earth elements.

Monitoring and Surveillance

HC and ECCC continued to conduct monitoring programs to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. At ECCC, a total of 17 substances and/or groups of substances were measured in select media: fresh water; sediments; fish and wildlife; ambient air; municipal wastewater; and, biosolids.

The Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) continued the assessment of prenatal exposure to chemicals and established national estimates of maternal and fetal exposures. In 2018-19, participant recruitment began for the latest MIREC Research Platform study, MIREC-ENDO. MIREC ENDO studies the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals on puberty and metabolic function in the child, as well as maternal health. HC's human biomonitoring efforts continued in 2018–19 with the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), measuring environmental chemical exposures in blood and urine of a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 3 to 79.

Both ECCC and HC contribute to the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) led by Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC). Four human biomonitoring and health project proposals were funded in 2018-19 under the NCP.

Compliance and Enforcement

Compliance promotion activities focused on pollution, including the release of toxic substances to air, water or land, and the import and export of hazardous waste that presents a risk to the environment and/or human health. These activities aimed to increase voluntary compliance with regulatory and non-regulatory instruments, thereby mitigating consequential enforcement actions. ECCC conducted 1,162 inspections related to CMP regulations and issued 312 enforcement measures. ECCC also conducted 184 inspections relating to the Environmental Emergency Regulations, 2019, and issued 33 enforcement measures.

In 2018-19, compliance promotion activities were carried out for regulatory and non-regulatory instruments related to CMP substance. 13,137 known or potential regulatees received compliance promotion awareness materials and 1,179 stakeholders contacted Compliance Promotion Officers for clarification of regulatory requirements and/or additional information.

Public Health Agency of Canada

During 2018-19, the Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency) Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) continued their risk-based inspection program to identify and address human health risks associated with water, food and sanitation on passenger conveyances such as aircraft, trains, cruise ships and ferries. Ninety-four percent (94%) of conveyance and facility operators successfully met public health requirements during or in response to 471 inspections. The Agency conducts these inspections to measure compliance with the Department of Health Act, the Potable Water on Board Trains, Vessels, Aircraft and Buses Regulations as well as food safety provisions of the Food and Drugs Act.

Contact information

Suzanne Leppinen
Director, Chemicals and Environmental Health Management Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9
Postal Locator: 4905B
Telephone: 613-941-8071
E-mail: Suzanne.Leppinen@canada.ca

Nicole Davidson
Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement
Program Development and Engagement
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351, boul. Saint-Joseph, 6th Floor
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-938-5055
Email: Nicole.Davidson@canada.ca

Performance information
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Actual spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results
Health Canada Health Impacts of Chemicals Health Products:
Risk Assessment
9,437,645 1,227,329 1,055,741 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 2019 AR 1.1.1
Health Products:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
27,105,536 850,390 759,322 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 2019 AR 1.2
Health Products:
Research
2,479,000 - - ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 March 2019 AR 1.3
Health Products:
Monitoring and Surveillance
1,172,000 - - ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 2019 AR 1.4
Food and Nutrition: Risk Assessment 15,820,926 1,237,393 1,194,983 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 2019 AR 1.1.2
PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 2019 AR 1.1.3
PI 1.1.4 T 1.1.4 March 2019 AR 1.1.4
Food and Nutrition: Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 17,370,505 1,180,315 1,205,183 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 2019 AR 1.2
Food and Nutrition: Research 8,255,875 695,239 681,171 ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 March 2019 AR 1.3
Food and Nutrition: Monitoring and Surveillance 10,176,044 951,486 925,208 ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 2019 AR 1.4
Food and Nutrition: Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 1,872,830 169,685 140,822 ER 1.5 PI 1.5 T 1.5 March 2019 AR 1.5
Environmental Risks to Health: Risk Assessment 119,216,074 10,353,388 10,369,492 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.5 T 1.1.5 March 2019 AR 1.1.5
PI 1.1.6 T 1.1.6 AR 1.1.6
PI 1.1.7 T 1.1.7 AR 1.1.7
Environmental Risks to Health: Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 148,668,626 7,086,237 7,556,720 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 2019 AR 1.2
ER 1.6 PI 1.6 T 1.6 March 2019 AR 1.6
Environmental Risks to Health: Research 127,637,665 9,964,515 11,140,264 ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 March 2019 AR 1.3
Environmental Risks to Health: Monitoring and Surveillance 126,597,444 9,859,704 12,757,426 ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 2019 AR 1.4
Environmental Risks to Health: Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 24,214,067 2,815,217 2,280,649 ER 1.5 PI 1.5 T 1.5 March 2019 AR 1.5
Environmental Risks to Health: Policy and Program Management 23,160,059 2,208,318 2,414,829 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Consumer Product Safety and Workplace Hazardous Materials: Risk Assessment 24,878,577 2,419,633 1,772,732 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.4 T 1.1.4 March 2019 AR 1.1.4
Consumer Product Safety and Workplace Hazardous Materials: Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 38,292,551 2,549,795 2,950,095 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 2019 AR 1.2
Pesticides Pesticides: Risk Assessment 53,620,643 4,563,436 4,211,342 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.8 T 1.1.8 March 2019 AR 1.1.8
Pesticides: Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 22,204,309 846,416 1,125,576 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 2019 AR 1.2
Pesticides: Research 1,734,562 - - ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 March 2019 AR 1.3
Internal Services – Health Canada 77,301,654 6,995,944 6,995,944 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Public Health Agency of Canada Border and Travel Health Border Health: Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 25,462,808 3,182,851 2,487,969 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 2019 AR 2.1
Environment and Climate Change Canada Substances and Waste Management Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Assessment
48,911,770 3,873,467 3,626,392 ER 3.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 2019 AR 3.1.1
PI 3.1.2 T 3.1.2 March 2019 AR 3.1.2
Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Management
195,879,665 13,524,953 13,520,655 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 2019 AR 3.2
Substances and Waste Management:
Research
21,114,525 1,884,158 1,884,158 ER 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 2019 AR 3.3
Substances and Waste Management:
Monitoring and Surveillance
73,584,555 4,879,935 3,978,633 ER 3.4 PI 3.4 T 3.4 March 2019 AR 3.4
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution: Compliance Promotion 8,609,790 854,409 792,592 ER 3.5 PI 3.5 T 3.5 March 2019 AR 3.5
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution: Enforcement 22,357,970 2,215,135 2,179,937 ER 3.6 PI 3.6 T 3.6 March 2019 AR 3.6
Internal Services – ECCC 31,041,725 2,267,943 2,267,943          
Total for all federal organizations 1,308,179,400 98,657,290 100,275,778          

Note: The amounts above include contributions to Employee Benefit Plans, Shared Services Canada Core Information Technology Services, and Public Services and Procurement Canada accommodation costs.

Variance Explanation: Not applicable

Expected Results:

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Performance Indicators:

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Targets:

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Actual Results

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Footnote 1

Frequency is indicated as "Other" because these studies will be conducted following implementation of risk management activities when sufficient time has passed to reasonably expect to see the effects of the risk management activities, and when the specific data is available.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

These performance indicators and associated targets and data sources are being reviewed.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Results were not calculated because these two indicators are being reviewed.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Non-compliance detection level is the percentage of inspections conducted (at the regulation level) that found non-compliance. Since most CMP regulations are inspected following a referral, it is expected that detecting non-compliance would likely be higher compared to random or market inspections.

In addition, to better inform its planning and priority setting, ECCC is committed to developing Threat Risk Assessments (TRAs) to identify the highest risks of non-compliance that causes the greatest harm to human health and/or the environment. This work will help ECCC target its enforcement efforts toward the worst forms of non-compliance.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Partner engagement cannot be determined until the early onset of drafting the risk assessments (when exposure routes are identified). Therefore, identifying a predetermined "target value" for risk assessments that will require CMP partner generated information is not possible.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

A target was not developed for 2018-19 because the indicator was replaced for 2019-20. A baseline will be established in 2019-20.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Tracking began in the third quarter of fiscal year 2018-19.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

No results are available for 2018-19. A new indicator will be used for 2019-20.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Horizontal initiative close-out report

Name of horizontal initiative: Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

Start date: April 1, 2001

End date: March 31, 2019

Lead department: Health Canada (HC)

Number of times renewed: 3 (2007, 2012, 2018)

Partner departments: Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Public Safety Canada (PS), Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and Public Prosecutions Service Canada (PPSC)

Other non-federal partners: Not applicable

Expenditures

Total federal funding from 2007-08 to 2018-19Footnote 1 (authorities and actual)
Themes and internal services Authorities (according to the TB submission) Actual spending Variance(s)
Federal Tobacco Control Strategy HC $518,866,663 $446,263,939 $72,602,724
ISCFootnote 2 $10,000,000 $11,768,071 -$1,768,071
PHACFootnote 3 $15,294,958 $11,836,913 $3,458,045
PS $7,245,375 $7,255,097 -$9,722
RCMP $20,685,877 $18,394,718 $2,291,159
CBSA $65,763,069 $56,419,851 $9,343,218
CRA $10,733,220 $10,638,698 $94,522
PPSCFootnote 4 $12,839,709 $11,870,401 $969,308
Internal services (see note below)
Totals $661,428,871 $574,447,688 $86,981,183

Note: Internal Services and Public Services and Procurement Canada accommodation costs are included in the above numbers.

Comments on Variances:

Health Canada:

The variance between actual spending and authorities is mainly due to lower than anticipated provincial and territorial funding requirements for the pan-Canadian Quitline and the Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey. As a result, the funding was reallocated to other departmental priorities.

Indigenous Services Canada:

The variance between actual spending and authorities is mainly due to new funding to begin implementing the Canada's Tobacco Strategy in 2018-19.

Public Health Agency of Canada:

The variance between actual spending and authorities is mainly due to the complex process required to negotiate new projects under the Healthy Living & Chronic Diseases Prevention Multi-Sectoral Partnership program and the requirement for partnerships, matches funding & pay for performance milestones.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police:

The variance between actual spending and authorities is mainly due to reallocation of resources to other RCMP priorities.

Canada Border Services Agency:

The variance between actual spending and authorities is mainly due to lower spending than anticipated with respect to the FTCS initiative as planned.

Results

Performance indicator(s) and trend data for shared outcome(s)

Shared outcome: Reduced smoking prevalence among Canadians.

Performance indicators Trend dataFootnote 5
Prevalence of current smokers (daily and occasional) in Canada (aged 15+) 2001 22%
2006 19%
2011 17%
2013 15%
2015 13%
2017 15%

Brief explanation of performance

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) was introduced in 2001 as a ten-year strategy with the goal of reducing tobacco-related disease and death in Canada. Over the first five years, key tobacco control activities included mass media; development and enforcement of regulations pursuant to the Tobacco Act; research and surveillance; national co-ordination of tobacco control efforts; collaboration with federal partners to monitor contraband tobacco; support for First Nations and Inuit tobacco reduction programs; and funding various activities through Grants and Contributions (G&Cs).

Five objectives were set out as the basis for key measures of FTCS effectiveness, including reducing smoking prevalence from 25% to 20%. A summative evaluation conducted in 2006 found that almost all of the FTCS objectives were either met or exceeded.

The strategy was renewed in 2007 with a revised overarching goal of further reducing smoking prevalence in Canada from 19% to 12% by 2011. Health Canada's functions with respect to surveillance, research, regulations, and compliance remained similar to those described in 2001. However, emphasis on compliance shifted from retailers to manufacturers, and intelligence gathering with respect to the industry. Policy functions also remained similar, but additional focus was placed on international activities and examining the next generation of tobacco control.

An evaluation completed in 2017 found that overall, the strategy contributed to some decline in smoking prevalence through its labelling and youth access regulations, as well as its support to implement provincial second-hand smoke bans. However, the goal of reducing prevalence to 12% by 2011 was not met.

In 2012 the strategy was renewed for an additional five years with the goal of preserving the gains made over the previous decade and continuing the downward trend of smoking prevalence. Key activity areas of the renewed FTCS included Policy and International Commitments; Research and Surveillance; Regulations and Compliance; and Community Interventions, including First Nations and Inuit Community-Based Projects.

Canada's Tobacco Strategy (CTS) was launched in May 2018 with the goal of reaching less than 5% tobacco use by 2035, committing more than $330 million over 5 years to help Canadians who smoke to quit while protecting the health of young people and non-smokers from the dangers of nicotine.

Programs receiving ongoing funding
Program Ongoing funding Purpose
HC $41,950,316 Helping Canadians Addicted to Tobacco (Cessation and Harm Reduction) - Modernize cessation services and deliver grant and contribution funding
Protecting Young Canadians and Non-users - Support regulatory agenda and compliance and enforcement and prevent vaping in non-tobacco-users
Strengthening our Foundation - Bolster tobacco research and surveillance programs to better address emerging products
PHAC $4,705,000 Helping Canadians Addicted to Tobacco (Cessation and Harm Reduction) - Bolster targeted tobacco cessation and prevention projects for populations with high prevalence
ISC $9,310,000 Co-develop Distinctions-Based Approaches
with Indigenous peoples - Co-develop and implement distinctions-based approaches to reduce commercial tobacco use
PS $3,340,000 Protecting Young Canadians and Non-users - Increase understanding of the illicit tobacco market through evidence-based research
RCMP $3,000,000 Protecting Young Canadians and Non-users - Increase knowledge and understanding of the illicit tobacco market and links to organized crime
CBSA $3,019,208 Protecting Young Canadians and Non-users - Support the identification and interception of illicit tobacco through evidence-based research
CRA $888,910 Protecting Young Canadians and Non-users - Administer the Excise Duty Program
Total $66,213,434  

Plans (including timelines) for evaluation and/or audit

Based on Health Canada's Departmental Evaluation Plan for 2019-20 to 2023-24, an evaluation of Health Canada's tobacco activities is scheduled for June 2020 – June 2021.

An evaluation of Indigenous Services Canada's Healthy Living Program, including activities for tobacco, is currently underway and planned to be completed in 2019-20.

Footnote 1

This table reports authorities and actual spending starting from 2007-08 to reflect amounts from Health Canada's 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Pursuant to the Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, effective on November 30, 2017, the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) was transferred from HC to ISC. Therefore separate ISC reporting under this HI started in 2017-18.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

FTCS funding for PHAC started in 2012-13.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

FTCS funding for PPSC ended 2012-13.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Data for 2001-2011 based on data from the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) 2012 and results for 2013-2017 are based on results from the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS)

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner departments

Health Canada
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., the Department of Justice) are supporting the new federal cannabis framework. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission "Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis."

Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2022

Description of the horizontal initiative

The objective of this horizontal initiative is to implement and administer a new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. The Cannabis Act received Royal Assent on June 21, 2018, and came into force on October 17, 2018. The initiative is designed to follow through on the Government's key objective of protecting public health, safety, and security. More specifically, the initiative aims to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements, and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework.

Federal partner organizations implement the ongoing delivery of the regulatory framework including: licensing; compliance and enforcement; surveillance; research; national public education and awareness activities; and, framework support.

The initiative also supports law enforcement capacity to collect and assess intelligence on the evolution of organized crime's involvement in the illegal cannabis market and other related criminal markets.

Activities are organized by five high-level themes:

  1. Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework;
  2. Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms;
  3. Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety;
  4. Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities; and,
  5. Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travelers and goods.

Governance structures

The Government of Canada continues to support a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing and administering the new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. At the federal level, this governance structure includes: regular engagement among Deputy Ministers of Health, Justice and Public Safety to provide strategic direction and oversight on implementation activities; an Assistant Deputy Ministers' Committee that coordinates policy and implementation activities; a Directors-General Committee that coordinates policy, regulatory development, and implementation activities across federal departments and agencies; an interdepartmental Communications Working Group to lead cannabis communications, public awareness and education efforts; and, a Federal Partners Cannabis Data Working Group to promote horizontal collaboration and support evidence-based policy and program development.

Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch assumes a central coordinating role in tracking key project milestones and in reporting to federal Ministers.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. In May 2016, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) Senior Officials Working Group on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation was struck, to enable F/P/T governments to exchange information on important issues about the legalization and regulation of cannabis throughout the consultation, design and implementation of the legislation, regulations, and non-regulatory activities. Supporting F/P/T working groups and committees also facilitate ongoing engagement in key priority areas, including public education and awareness, data development and information sharing, national inventory tracking, and drug-impaired driving. In addition, existing F/P/T bodies, are also considering the implications of cannabis legalization and regulation, including F/P/T Deputy Ministers responsible for Justice and Public Safety, and F/PT Ministers responsible for Finance.

Total federal funding allocated (from start to end date) (dollars)

$546,807,456

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$168,865,207

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars)

$142,359,398

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Shared outcome of federal partner departments (1/2)

  1. Cannabis is kept out of the hands of Canadian children and youth

Performance indicator(s)

PI 1. Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-17 and 18-24) who have used cannabis in the last 12 months (Health Canada)

Target(s)

T1. To be established in 2020 (baseline: 17.5% of Canadians aged 15-17 and 28.4% of Canadians aged 18-24, data from 2015)

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

  1. 2017 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS) (data collected between February and December 2017). CTADS is conducted biennially.

Results

R1: 26.9% overall (ages 15-24) or 14.2% of Canadians aged 15-17 and 31.4% of Canadians aged 18-24

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Shared outcome of federal partners (2/2)

  1. Criminal involvement in the illegal cannabis market is reduced

Performance indicator(s)

PI 2. Qualitative assessment on trends related to criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market (RCMP)
PI 3. Number of cannabis import interdictions at the border (CBSA)

Target(s)

T2. To be established in 2020
T3. To be determined once CBSA establishes a monitoring and reporting framework, which will also identify an appropriate baseline. CBSA could be in a position to report on this indicator in 2020.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

  1. 2018-19 National Criminal Intelligence Estimate on Illicit Drugs. Data is reported on an annual basis. Moving forward, a stand-alone assessment of organized crime group (OCG) involvement in the cannabis market will be completed.
  2. To be determined once CBSA establishes a monitoring and reporting framework.

Results

R2: With regards to trends related to criminal involvement in the cannabis market, Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC), an entity stewarded by the RCMP and responsible for providing criminal intelligence products and services to the law enforcement community, completed a preliminary assessment within four months of the passage of the Cannabis Act as part of its National Criminal Intelligence Estimate on Illicit Drugs. This assessment found that approximately 44 percent of assessed OCGs were involved in the cannabis market in the period of time leading up to the implementation of the Cannabis Act. Almost all of these groups were also involved in at least one other illicit drug market and are unlikely to be disrupted by legalization given their alternate streams of revenue. In the short term (1-2 years), as the supply of legal cannabis continues to adjust to meet market demand, OCGs can be expected to continue to fill any supply gaps. However, the number of OCGs in the illicit cannabis market is expected to decrease incrementally over the long term (3+ years), as the licit market supply increases.

The RCMP acknowledges that four months post-legalization was not sufficient time to conclusively assess the new framework's mid- to long-term impact on OCG involvement in the cannabis market. Consequently, a stand-alone assessment of OCG involvement in the cannabis market will be completed by December 2019 to identify OCG involvement, and current and future trends.

R3: Automated cannabis reporting functionality is under development with the expectation that systematic reporting will be available in April 2020.

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Name of theme

Not applicable

Performance highlights

The Cannabis Act and its regulations came into force on October 17, 2018. Together, they create a new legal framework that aims to protect public health and safety and, in particular, to protect the health of young persons by restricting their access to cannabis; protecting young persons and others from inducements to use cannabis; providing for the legal production of cannabis to reduce illicit activities in relation to cannabis; deterring illicit activities in relation to cannabis through appropriate sanctions and enforcement measures; reducing the burden on the criminal justice system in relation to cannabis; providing access to a quality-controlled supply of cannabis; and enhancing public awareness of the health risks associated with cannabis use.

Working with provincial and territorial governments, the Government of Canada has established a legal framework for a well-regulated, legal supply chain that is capable of displacing the illegal market. In 2018-19, the number of cannabis licence holders increased by more than three times the number that existed in May 2017 to meet the demand for legal cannabis while protecting the health and safety of Canadians. Legal sales of cannabis have also grown from $133 million to $672 million between the third quarter of 2018 and the third quarter of 2019 and the legal industry's share of the estimated total market demand has increased from 9% to 40%.

Health Canada has also maintained a system that provides reasonable access to cannabis for medical purposes. When the Cannabis Act and Cannabis Regulations came into force in October 2018, targeted improvements to the medical access program were implemented, including the ability for patients to request the transfer of their medical document between federally licensed sellers. The Government will continue to actively monitor the medical access program and will evaluate the framework within 5 years of the coming into force of the Cannabis Act.

The Government of Canada has also established, promoted compliance with, and enforced regulatory standards to protect public health and safety. On October 17, 2019, amendments to the Cannabis Regulations came into force that reduce the health and safety risks, including appeal to young persons, associated with the new classes of cannabis products, namely edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals. During inspections of licence holders in 2018-19, Health Canada found a 97% compliance rate with controls established under the Cannabis Act.

The Cannabis Act and strong drug-impaired driving laws are also being enforced and the capacity to enforce the new laws continues to increase. The CBSA implemented border-related compliance strategies to assist in preventing the movement of cannabis and cannabis-related products across the border. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) developed new courses on cannabis and impaired driving to increase law enforcement capacity, and tripled its capacity to process security clearances to identify criminality or associations to criminal organizations. Public Safety Canada provided training and information packages to increase law enforcement capacity. As of March 31, 2019, the number of active Drug Recognition Experts in Canada had increased by approximately 43% since 2017, and the number of officers trained to detect drug-impaired driving continues to increase.

Public education efforts are fundamental to achieving the Government's objective of protecting public health and safety, especially for youth. Health Canada has made significant investments in 2018-19 to support Canadians in making informed decisions about cannabis and to help minimize the health impacts of cannabis use. Health Canada activities include the advertising campaign entitled "Your Cannabis Questions, Answered. Get the Honest Facts" which provides evidence-based answers to Canadians' questions about cannabis; and, the "Pursue Your Passion" interactive tour to help youth and young adults learn about cannabis health and safety and encourage them to make healthy lifestyle choices. The Public Health Agency of Canada also worked with partners and stakeholders for priority populations, such as health care professionals and new or expectant parents, to help inform them about cannabis health and safety. The Canada Border Services Agency installed signage at all major ports of entry, updated its website to include information on cannabis-related border rules, included a new cannabis-related question at primary inspection lines, and released short videos on social media informing travellers of the continued prohibition of taking cannabis across the border. We anticipate that some of the impacts of these efforts on performance indicators will be available in 2020.

The Government of Canada is closely monitoring the impacts of cannabis legalization through research and surveillance activities to inform operational planning and policy development, and to assess the effectiveness of the program. Key early results have indicated no reported increase in the prevalence of cannabis consumption, including among young people, while the share of household spending on cannabis from the legal market also continues to rise.

The Cannabis Act is subject to a legislative review three years following its coming into force (to be completed by April 2023), which will provide an opportunity to assess the impact, progress and results of the Act on public health and safety.

Contact information

John Clare
A/Director General
Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Secretariat
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Health Canada
613-941-0355
John.Clare@canada.ca

Performance information
Federal departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Actual spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results
Health Canada Cannabis Program

Licensing: License federal producers and other legal market participants; provide client registration and other client services

(Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative)

$216,075,849 $40,671,729 $38,062,489 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.1
PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.2

Compliance and enforcement: Design and promote compliance and enforcement; robust inspection program, involving pre- and post-licence inspections

(Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative)

$153,976,353 $21,587,000 $19,837,724 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2.1
ER 1.3 PI 1.3.1 T 1.3.1 March 31, 2022 AR 1.3.1
   

Public education and outreach: Provide Canadians with information about health and safety risks associated with cannabis use

(Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms)

$16,121,003 $7,603,037 $7,603,037 ER 1.4 PI 1.4.1 T 1.4.1 TBD in 2020 AR 1.4.1
  ER 1.5 PI 1.5.1 T 1.5.1 TBD in 2020 AR 1.5.1
Internal Services (Health Canada)     $44,485,622 $8,179,314 $5,628,080          
Canada Border Services Agency Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program Traveller awareness (Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods) $1,008,014 $ 336,669 $458,075 ER 2.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2019 AR 2.1.1
PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2019 AR 2.1.2

Port of entry processing

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

$20,952,092 $3,539,698 $3,742,333 ER 2.2 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2019 AR 2.2.1

Regulatory compliance and enforcement

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

$4,074,333 $1,121,939 0 ER 2.3 PI 2.3.1 T 2.3.1 TBD in 2020 AR 2.3.1
   

Policy, monitoring and reporting

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

$4,766,720 $ 811,011 $831,317 ER 2.4 PI 2.4.1 T 2.4.1 TBD by March 31, 2019 AR 2.4.1
Field Technology SupportFootnote 1

Laboratory Services

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

$ 1,011,397 $ 241,485 $365,293 ER 2.5 PI 2.5.1 T 2.5.1 March 31, 2019 AR 2.5.1
Recourse

Regulatory compliance and enforcement

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

$2,788,297 $ 620,722 $349,775 ER 2.6 PI 2.6.1 T 2.6.1 The CBSA will report performance results on June 1, 2019 for fiscal year 2018-2019 AR 2.6.1
PI 2.6.2 T 2.6.2 AR 2.6.2
PI 2.6.3 T 2.6.3 AR 2.6.3
PI 2.6.4 T 2.6.4 AR 2.6.4
PI 2.6.5 T 2.6.5 AR 2.6.5
PI 2.6.6 T 2.6.6 AR 2.6.6
PI 2.6.7 T 2.6.7 AR 2.6.7
PI 2.6.8 T 2.6.8 AR 2.6.8
Internal Services (CBSA)     $5,095,567 $827,945 $827,945          
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Program

Develop public health advice to support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) through knowledge translation and horizontal analysis

(Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms)

$2,586,174 $623,472Footnote 2 $522,630 ER 3.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 TBD by March 31, 2020Footnote 3 AR 3.1.1
  ER 3.2 PI 3.2.1 T 3.2.1 TBD by March 31, 2020Footnote 3 AR 3.2.1
Internal Services (PHAC)     $206,951   $45,988          
Public Safety Canada Crime Prevention

Public education and awareness

(Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms)

$1,173,345 $266,303 $211,896 ER 4.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.1.1
ER 4.2 PI 4.2.1 T 4.2.1 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.2.1
Serious and Organized Crime

Training for law enforcement

(Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety)

$3,810,640 $912,419 $628,258 ER 4.3 PI 4.3.1 T 4.3.1.1 T 4.3.1.2 TBDFootnote 4
TBDFootnote 4
AR 4.3.1.1 AR 4.3.1.2
ER 4.4 PI 4.4.1 T 4.4.1 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.4.1
PI 4.4.2 T 4.4.2 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.4.2
PI 4.4.3 T 4.4.3 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.4.3

Develop policies to inform operational law enforcement efforts

(Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety)

See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime ER 4.5 PI 4.5.1 T 4.5.1 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.5.1
    ER 4.6 PI 4.6.1 T 4.6.1 TBDFootnote 4 AR 4.6.1
Internal Services (PSC)     $500,353 $119,321 $119,321          
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Police Operations

Build capacity to provide security screening reports (i.e., Law Enforcement Records Checks / LERCs) to HC to complete applications for the production of cannabis for non-medical purposes

(Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative)

$18,314,319 $2,538,948 $2,411,997 ER 5.1 PI 5.1.1 T 5.1.1 TBD once service standards are negotiated with HCFootnote 4 AR 5.1.1
Police Operations

Enhance RCMP's capacity to develop and deliver prevention and outreach activities on the new cannabis regime from a law enforcement perspective

(Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety)

$5,507,991 $1,177,246 $729,478 ER 5.2 PI 5.2.1 T 5.2.1 TBD in 2019 AR 5.2.1
Police Operations (Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety) $8,495,091 $2,159,248 $1,037,285 ER 5.3 PI 5.3.1 T 5.3.1 March 31, 2020 AR 5.3.1
PI 5.3.2 T 5.3.2 TBD in 2019 AR 5.3.2
PI 5.3.3 T 5.3.3 March 31, 2020 AR 5.3.3
Police Operations

Enhance RCMP's ability to collect, assess and disseminate information and intelligence related to the evolution of organized crime's involvement in the illicit substances market

(Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities)

$4,402,524 $1,352,871 $948,239 ER 5.4 PI 5.4.1 T 5.4.1 TBD in 2019-2020 AR 5.4.1
Police Operations $9,521,726 $3,225,386 $1,615,492
Police Operations $4,697,527 $1,561,693 $304,368 ER 5.5 PI 5.5.1 T 5.5.1 TBD in 2019-2020 AR 5.5.1
Police Operations $1,704,611 $655,094 $264,745 PI 5.5.2 T 5.5.2 TBD in 2019-2020 AR 5.5.2
Police Operations Ensure that the RCMP is able to develop and deliver extensive training to its officers across Canada to support national implementation and ensure appropriate and standardized criminal enforcement of the new regime Included in the amount under Theme 4 Included in the amount under Theme 4 Included in the amount under Theme 4 ER 5.6 PI 5.6.1 T 5.6.1 October 31, 2020 AR 5.6.1
Police Operations (Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities) $2,898,054 $1,648,489 $1,645,771 ER 5.7 PI 5.7.1 T 5.7.1 October 31, 2020 AR 5.7.1
Police Operations $3,574,262 $3,230,183 $294,109
Internal Services (RCMP)     $9,058,641 $2,455,806 $2,423,710          
Total for all federal departments Not applicable Not applicable $546,807,456 $107,467,028 $90,909,355 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Expected Results

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicator(s)

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Target(s)

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Actual Results

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Variance Explanations:

CBSA

The variance between planned and actual is mainly due to delay in the development of an IT system and the fact that there has been no litigation cost in 2018-19.

PSC

The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to lower than expected costs related to training for law enforcement and research.

RCMP

The variance between actual and planned spending is explained in part due to delays in implementation at the RCMP and funds have been reprofiled to future years to account for these delays.

Footnote 1

CBSA transitioned from the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) to the Departmental Results Framework (DRF) in fiscal year 2018-19. During the transition, CBSA continues to refine the activities within the program inventories, as such the laboratory services which were included in the ''Traveller Facilitation & compliance'' program in the 2018-19 DP, are now linked to the ''Field Technology Support'' program.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

2018-19 Planned Spending includes $45,988 for Internal Services.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

A target will be established once two points of data are collected.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

According to the 2019-20 Departmental Plan, the target date will be determined by March 2020.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

In the 2019-20 Departmental Plan, this indicator has been revised to the "number of licence applications decisions per year" in order to capture the volume of applications reviewed.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Minor changes to the wording were made to clarify which organizations are expected to use the information, knowledge and data products.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Once reporting functionality is in place (CBSA does not have automated reporting capacity related to cannabis). Ability to report by 2020.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

CBSA will be able to report on these indicators once baseline data is generated and reporting capability is in place.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Note that both the target and its associated indicator have been aligned in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan to capture a percentage.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Once two points of data are collected

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

To be determined once service standards are negotiated with HC. For reporting purposes, the RCMP has applied an internal service level objective of 75% of all files with no adverse information completed within 15 business days.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

399 licence applications were approved out of a total of 417 licence application decisions made between November 2018 and March 2019.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Data is unavailable at this time. As this indicator aggregates data from multiple licence types, and since the Cannabis program is working towards setting service standards for all licence types, cleaning data and changing processes, it is expected that the Cannabis Program will be able to start to collect data for the purpose of annual reporting on April 1, 2020, and that it will be able to report data accurately on this indicator for the fiscal year 2020-21.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Data is unavailable as the survey is currently in development.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Data collected from Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CSTADS) in 2016-17. The next set of data (2018-19) will be available in 2020.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Data collected in 2016 from the Survey on Awareness, Knowledge and Behaviour Associated with Recreational Use of Marijuana. The next survey round is planned for 2019-20.

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Results will be available once target has been determined in 2020.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

There were no trade-related appeals received.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

With 100% of first contacts within 14 calendar days; and, 100% of final contacts within 40 calendar days.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

Data is not yet available.

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

Baseline data to be collected in 2020.

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

Data collection for this indicator will begin in 2019-20.

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

This indicator cannot be reported on as the majority of planned research projects were primarily multi-year/ongoing in nature, with funding occurring across fiscal years, and work formally completed and disseminated in the subsequent fiscal year(s).

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Data collection for this indicator will begin in 2019-20.

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Footnote 25

Note that 33% of federal partners and stakeholders surveyed responded "neither agree or disagree", this may mean that this question was not applicable to these respondents.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

Note that 43% of federal partners and stakeholders surveyed responded "neither agree or disagree", this may mean that this question was not applicable to these respondents.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Data captures the Youth Officer Training delivered in September 2018 in Moncton. No data is available for the 2018 Youth Officer Training in Toronto.

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

Two information/intelligence products, six awareness products, and one three-day Cannabis Orientation Session.

Return to footnote 28 referrer

Gender-based analysis plus

Governance structures

The implementation of Gender-based analysis plusFootnote 3 (GBA+), or better known as Sex and Gender-based analysis plus (SGBA+) at Health Canada, is focussed around our Sex and Gender Action Plan 2017-20. Each branch of the Department participates with at least one signature activity. These efforts have been further advanced by the federal government's focus on gender equality, diversity and inclusion, which have increased the demand from across the department for SGBA+ advice and assistance.

Accountability mechanisms such as the requirement of SGBA+ in Memorandums to Cabinet (MCs), Treasury Board (TB) submissions and regulations as well as the department results framework, performance information profiles, and budget proposals help ensure that sex, gender and diversity are integrated in departmental decision-making processes.

The Gender and Health Unit, the responsibility unit for implementing the use of SGBA+ and integrating sex, gender and diversity related findings into Departmental work, tracks the use and quality of SGBA+ in decision-making processes such as MCs, TB submissions and through sex and / or gender specific indicators in the department's performance information profiles, as appropriate. This information is included in reports to departmental senior management as well as the Department of Women and Gender Equality, and published annually on our website.

Human resources

The total number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) focussed on SGBA+ at Health Canada for 2018-19 was 17.5. There were three FTEs working in the SGBA+ Responsibility Unit and 14.5 FTEs distributed across the Department in various roles such as policy, regulatory development, drug and chemical review, research, etc.

Major initiatives: results achieved

Launched in 2017, Health Canada's Sex and Gender Action Plan provides a framework that strengthens the integration of sex, gender and diversity considerations (such as age, ethnicity and disability status) in externally as well as internally facing work of the department. The Action Plan aims to: i) increase positive impacts on health outcomes and the health status of Canadians by designing initiatives to address the diverse needs of Canadian women, men, girls, boys and gender-diverse individuals; and ii) maximize positive impact on workplace health and engagement by developing policies and processes to address the diverse needs of our employees.

Current priorities of the three-year Action Plan are to i) increase departmental capacity to apply sex and gender based analysis (SGBA+); ii) strengthen the sex, gender and diversity-related evidence base and expertise; and iii) increase the accountability and transparency for implementing SGBA+.

Each branch has identified at least one signature initiative and the Department in collaboration with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has established research-policy partnerships, which support researchers, with both subject matter and SGBA+ expertise, to engage with departmental staff on priority Health Canada initiatives.

Key Sex and Gender related results include:

Cannabis

Health Canada, in collaboration with CIHR, co-funded a researcher with sex and gender expertise, and supported the development, testing and delivery of gender-sensitive cannabis messages. These were in the form of fact sheets for key population sub-groups such as pregnant women and LGBTQ2 individuals. Training was provided for Health Portfolio staff on evidence-based sex, gender diversity and cannabis related issues. The findings have helped to shape public education and awareness campaigns through more focussed targeting of sub-populations by sex and age as well as key messages. These evidence-based insights will also be used to frame harm reduction messages.

The Department also designed its new Canadian Cannabis Survey to collect additional demographic variables, including sex, gender identity and sexual orientation, to better understand cannabis use.

Evaluation

The Department piloted the application of PHAC's Health Equity Tool in the evaluation of Health Canada's Food Safety Program. Findings included: communications and outreach efforts to Canadians have been targeted toward those most at risk (i.e., seniors, those with compromised immune systems, pregnant women, and children under five years of age), and specific products (e.g., pamphlets and posters) have been developed to reach them. The Program has conducted surveys of Canadians' knowledge and behaviours related to food safety, which helps to better target high-risk groups. In addition, the tool was updated to align with the Treasury Board 2016 Policy on Results and the Treasury Board guidance document "Integrating GBA+ into Evaluation", and is now being applied as the Public Health Agency of Canada/Health Canada Program Evaluation Division's SGBA+ Lens for Evaluation.

Health product labelling

Health Canada is proposing to change the regulations for the labelling of Natural Health Products to make them easier for consumers to read and understand. As part of this initiative, the Department along with research partners from McGill University completed a sex-based analysis on public opinion data. The data shows that both male and female consumers rely on product labels to display important safety and other information about the product; however, the desired information varies based on sex. A higher proportion of males than females read the warning labels on products and desire more information than males on the package regarding directions for use, dosage, and product features. A higher proportion of males read the labels to learn about the ingredients in the product and check for endorsements. The results are being used to help support the proposal for improved labelling of natural health products by showing there is a need for this information to be easily available on the products label and that different sex's desire different information on the product necessitating a range of information be available to consumers at the point of purchase.

Health products – risk communications

The Department is applying a sex and gender lens to risk communications for health products. An initial literature review indicated that there are gender-relevant considerations for risk communications such as differences in risk perception, negative dominance (tendency towards a negative interpretation), and trust determination concepts. These were incorporated into bilingual Sex Gender and Risk Communication Webinars provided over 2018-19. An advisory group was created to guide future work on this issue.

Home care

Over 2018-19, Health Canada launched an initiative to develop an evidence-based technology assessment framework that explicitly addresses sex, gender and diversity considerations for digital technology to support informal caregivers. The process included a Canada-wide survey as well as interviews with informal caregivers, which suggest significant differences in technology preferences between male and female caregivers. The results are being disseminated to stakeholders in the field and can be used by Health Canada to develop sex, gender and diversity sensitive policies.

Pest management

Pesticides must undergo a high level of scientific evaluation before they can be registered for use in Canada. Companies applying to register a pesticide must provide Health Canada with a large number of health and environmental studies, which must follow internationally accepted scientific standards. When a pesticide is being evaluated for its potential risks to human health, the Department takes into account that chemicals may pose higher risks to groups of people based on differences in biology and behaviour, for example differences due to sex, gender, age and occupation. In 2018-19, Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) produced an infographic illustrating how sex, gender and vulnerable populations are taken into consideration in the regulation of pesticides in Canada, for use in outreach activities.

Vaping

In May 2018, the government enacted the new Tobacco and Vaping Products Act, regulating the sale of vaping products. Health Canada is committed to integrating sex, gender and diversity considerations into all aspects of its emerging vaping products framework, including policy, programs, regulations, communications, surveillance, research and evaluations. The Department has incorporated sex and gender identity factors into surveillance activities. These activities include: the new Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey (CTNS), set to be launched in 2020; an ongoing 'vapers' panel survey; public opinion research using peer-group segmentation; and the development and implementation of a new grants and contributions stream through the Substance Use and Addictions Program that incorporates requirements for reporting SGBA+ data. The findings from these activities would be expected to improve the quality of data and decision-making.

Workplace health

Health Canada is developing a toolkit that applies a sex and gender lens to mental health in the workplace. It will contribute to a better understanding of how sex, gender and diversity contribute to the experiences of mental health within a workplace. Based on early findings, a training session was provided to departmental staff and a gender sensitive "Mental Health in the Workplace Tool Kit" is being prepared to contribute to how sex, gender and diversity can impact workplace mental health.

Similarly, the Department is applying a sex, gender and diversity lens to Employee Assistance Service (EAP) policies, procedures and services through a review of the literature, key informant interviews and a mapping of processes. Based on the recommendations, a Management Response and Action Plan was created to implement and monitor progress. These findings will be used to better tailor services to employee needs.

Reporting capacity and data

SGBA+ is applied to all policies and programs developed in the department. Results of the Health Canada Program Inventory indicate that 24 programs have completed SGBA+ between 2014 and 2018.

Most of our externally facing programs have a broad, higher level focus and do not collect individual level micro data.

Health Canada is in the process of completing a department wide data / information mapping exercise as part of the modernization of our Sex and Gender Information Practices. This exercise will identify all databases and datasets that include sex and / or gender identity information and review them to ensure that they are consistent with the new Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Policy Direction to Modernize the Government of Canada's Sex and Gender Information Practices. This information will be reported as required by the TBS.

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

Organ Donation in Canada

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Health (HESA) heard that the federal government could help strengthen Canada's organ donation and transplantation system by:

HESA agrees with witnesses that the federal government has a leadership role to play in strengthening Canada's organ donation and transplantation system in these areas. It also believes that a more accessible and equitable organ donation and transplantation system in Canada requires closer collaboration between federal, provincial and territorial governments, which can be achieved through a stronger role for Canadian Blood Services in the coordination of organ donation and transplantation across the country. HESA believes that the seven recommendations outlined in its report supports these objectives.

The Government Response acknowledges HESA's efforts, highlighting the Minister of Health's mandate commitments in this area, and indicating areas of alignment between the Report and areas for action emerging from the activities supported by the Government to improve the organ donation and transplantation system in Canada. In addition, the Response highlights the Government's recent demonstrations of concrete support, as seen in an October 2018 research funding announcement. The Government also supported Bill C-316, An Act to amend the Canada Revenue Agency Act (organ donors) at second reading and referred it to HESA.

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Pre-Mixed Drinks Combining High Alcohol, Caffeine, and Sugar Content

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Health (HESA) recommended that restrictions be placed on the alcohol, sugar and caffeine content of high alcohol, caffeine, and sugary beverages. It also recommends that the labelling, packaging, marketing and branding of alcoholic beverages that are targeted to youth be prohibited through stronger regulations. Finally, it also recommends an increase in federal excise taxes on highly sweetened pre-mixed alcoholic beverages to make them more expensive, along with the consideration of establishing a national minimum price for alcohol per standard serving. Given the increasing harms, both in terms of hospitalization rates and deaths attributed to alcohol dependency and poisoning among Canadians, particularly youth, HESA believes that it is necessary to re-examine more broadly current approaches for the regulation of alcohol in Canada.

The Government Response acknowledges HESA's efforts and underlines the specific commitments made by the Government to restrict the amount of alcohol in single-serve containers of highly sweetened alcoholic beverages. In addition, the Response indicates the Government's support for efforts to address negative impacts of alcohol consumption in Canada, as well as to consult publically on a broader approach to addressing alcohol-related harms through the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS). To ensure that policies under the CDSS continue to be based on a strong foundation of evidence, the Government launched consultations in the fall of 2018 with the public and key stakeholders.

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Pharmacare Now: Prescription Medicine Coverage for All Canadians

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Health (HESA) believes that the best way to move forward in establishing a universal single payer public prescription drug coverage program is by expanding the Canada Health Act to include prescription drugs dispensed outside of hospitals as an insured service under the Act. A study by the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer, which was commissioned by HESA, examined this approach and found that it has the potential to reduce total annual prescription pharmaceutical expenditures by $4.2 billion, based upon prudent estimates. Such an approach would also ensure that all Canadians have equitable and affordable access to life saving prescription drugs. The report contains 18 concrete recommendations that HESA believes will lay the framework for the provision of pharmacare to all Canadians.

The Government Response notes that, in Budget 2018, the Government announced the creation of an Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare. The Response also highlighted that the management of drugs in Canada is an area of shared responsibility across Federal, Provincial and Territorial governments and improving the affordability, accessibility and appropriate use of prescription drugs for Canadians is a shared priority. The Government of Canada is committed to providing leadership and to working collaboratively with Provinces and Territories on its pharmaceuticals agenda which supports this priority. Initiatives underway are closely aligned with the Report's recommendations and address many of the system inefficiencies identified in the Report.

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Managing the Risk of Fraud

The House of Commons Public Accounts Committee (PACP) held hearings to study the matters raised in the Office of the Auditor General of Canada's Managing the Risk of Fraud audit. Throughout these hearings, PACP found that all five federal organizations selected for this audit (including Health Canada) did not appropriately manage all of their fraud risks; however, PACP did recognize that there were a number of sound practices in all the organizations examined.

Health Canada (HC) agrees with the recommendations set out in PACP's Thirty-Sixth Report and developed a comprehensive departmental action plan to address the report findings. All recommendations in the report have now been implemented. HC's response to PACPs Reportacknowledges the need for the Government of Canada to make sure that it effectively manages the risk of fraud to maintain Canadians' confidence in public services, preserve employee morale and avoid the loss of public money or property.

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Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

Response to audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD)

Report 1, Audit of Toxic Substances, tabled on October 2, 2018

Summary of Findings:

CESD concluded that Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and Health Canada (HC) still had significant work to do in selected areas to effectively control the risks of toxic substances. Specifically regarding HC's role, the CESD concluded that ECCC and HC had not evaluated whether they had achieved their overall objectives to reduce risks to the environment and human health for the six toxic substances examined. However, both departments had made satisfactory progress with developing action plans for lead and mercury.

CESD also concluded that HC communicated to the public the risks of toxic substances using various communication tools. However, the information on its website was often unclear and difficult to find.

Response:

HC agreed with CESD's results and acknowledged that a more systematic process was needed to assess the efffectiveness of risk management actions. HC confirmed that work is under way to finalize remaining substance-based performance measurement evaluation reports and discussions with ECCC counterparts have begun to develop a more systematic approach to review the effectiveness of risk management already in place.

Recognizing that each substance may represent different risks (hazards and exposures), each substance may require different approaches, both in how risks are managed and how progress is evaluated. HC noted that it will work with ECCC to develop a performance measurement strategy that will establish a long-term approach to systematically assess the effectiveness of risk management controls for substances and risk management instruments.

HC also indicated that it has several activities under way to communicate to Canadians on toxic substances and improve outreach and communications to the public. Furthermore, HC has a five-year strategy and timelines related to communicating toxic substances (including web-based information and social media), which has guided its recent outreach efforts.

Based on an analysis of the public opinion research findings conducted in 2017, HC will launch a new suite of activities and messaging per the strategy to address the information needs of Canadians. Most notably, following the audit Health Canada launched the Healthy Home social marketing campaign, which included new supporting web content and social media outreach to help Canadians more easily find relevant and useful information‎ about toxic substances.

Although the communication teams in both departments already consult and collaborate on toxic substances that pose risks to both human and environmental health, they also committed to expanding the scope of that work and collaborating on a risk-based approach to communications, to help the public avoid or minimize the environmental and human health risks posed by toxic chemicals.

Audit Report

Report 2, Audit of Departmental Progress in Implementing Sustainable Development Strategies, tabled on October 2, 2018

Summary of Findings:

CESD concluded that the organizations examined (including HC) adequately applied the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals to most policy, plan, and program proposals submitted for approval to Cabinet in 2017. Overall, the organizations had applied the Directive to 93% of proposals (HC was 100% compliant), which represents a significant improvement in comparison with observations made in previous reports on the same topic over the past five years. These organizations also made satisfactory progress toward meeting their commitments to strengthening their strategic environmental assessment practices.

Response:

The OAG made no recommendations to HC, as such, there was no response from the Department.

Audit Report

Report 4, Environmental Petitions Annual Report, tabled on October 2, 2018

Summary of Findings:

This Report informed Parliament and Canadians that the Office of the Auditor General of Canada received 10 environmental petitions between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018, that addressed a wide variety of issues. HC received three petitions, including one related to the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals; one on Electromagnetic Radiation; and one on non-fuel radioactive waste (the Minister of Health advised the Petitioner that the Minister of Natural Resources would provide the joint Government of Canada Response for this one, due to the nature of the issues raised in the petition).

CESD conducted petitioner satisfaction surveys this year and the results showed some common themes. For example, petitioners noted that they found departmental and agency responses vague or not addressing the questions that had been asked. However, the petitioners gave positive ratings to the responses that included specific examples and detailed information that supported the responses' conclusions.

Response:

The petitions and their responses are an important source of information when CESD decides on the issues they intend to audit. However, the annual reports do not provide recommendations and as such, there were no departmental responses.

Environmental Petitions Annual Report

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC)

Results of the System-Wide Staffing Audit, published on December 19, 2018

Summary of Findings:

PSC's review of 386 appointments from 25 participating departments and agencies (across Canada), indicated full compliance with staffing system requirements, and all organizations made the changes to their staffing systems as required by the New Direction in Staffing. Regarding appointments, the PSC found high levels of compliance with legislative, regulatory and policy requirements with respect to merit, consideration of persons with a priority entitlement, and appointment-related authorities (Attestation Form and Oath/Solemn Affirmation).

The audit results also pointed to some areas that required improvement, particularly those related to obligations regarding official languages and the application of the order of preference. Exchanges with participating departments and agencies suggest that a lack of awareness and understanding is the primary cause of non-compliance in applying the order of preference. As for official languages, many of the discrepancies identified between the English and French versions of key staffing documents (assessment tools) point to a lack of quality control on the part of delegated departments and agencies.

Additionally, the PSC found that some appointments were not supported by sufficient information. Although departments and agencies were subsequently able to provide the required information for the majority of appointments, in some cases the required information could not be provided, and as a result, compliance could not be determined.

Furthermore, results revealed general awareness and understanding of applicable requirements by staffing advisors and hiring managers associated with the sample of appointments covered by the audit, but only a modest indication of staffing culture change was observed at the time of the audit.

Response:

All recommendations that emerged from this audit were directed towards the PSC to support policy adjustments and program improvements, as required. Hence, no recommendations were made to HC and as such, there was no HC response.

Audit Report

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Conditional Grant to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General information

Name of recipient

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

Start date

1996-97

End date

N/A

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Description

When CHSRF was established as an independent organization, its priorities were to bring researchers and decision-makers together to identify gaps in applied health services research, fund the researchers who could investigate those gaps, and promote best practices of health services delivery and their outcomes. To reflect the evolution of its work, CHSRF was renamed the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) in 2012. CFHI aims to identify proven innovations and accelerate their spread across Canada by supporting healthcare organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, population health and value-for-money.

Up-front multi-year funding to CFHI has included:

Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

CFHI's financial records are reviewed and audited annually by independent external auditors. The 2018-19 external financial and pension audits showed no major concerns.

Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

CFHI pursues ongoing internal evaluative and measurement work of its activities and reports its results through its website and annual reports.

Summary of results achieved by the recipient

No new results associated with the conditional grant to report for 2018-19. CFHI held the remaining up-front multi-year funding (approximately $11 million) in reserve for costs related to its potential organizational wind-down (e.g., legal obligations related to its pension plan and contracts), should it be required in the future.

Financial information (dollars)
2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Explanation of variances  

Note: CFHI's contribution funding is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Conditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway

General information

Name of recipient

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start date

March 31, 2001Footnote 4

End date

March 31, 2015Footnote 5

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 6: Digital Health

Description

Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and Telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1 billion to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding consisting of: $500 million in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHRs as a priority; $600 million in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHRs and Telehealth; $100 million in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400 million in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait time reductions; and $500 million in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR systemFootnote 6. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

The annual independent financial and compliance audits were conducted during the year, and both resulted in unqualified audit reports. There were no other audits scheduled or conducted during the year.

Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

N/A

Summary of results achieved by the recipient

Results associated with Infoway's legacy activities funded under Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (2001 to 2010) to Canada Health Infoway include the following initiatives and activitiesFootnote 7.

Closing the Circle of Care First Nations Expansion ProjectFootnote 8

Infoway and Mustimuhw Information Solutions Inc. are partnering on the Mustimuhw solution, which focuses on the community health centre and will give people access to their health information when combined with the Mustimuhw Personal Health Record. This solution was developed by First Nations for First Nations. Secure messaging is an important component of the solution, enhancing interactions between patients and providers. This is especially helpful in northern and remote care settings. As of March 31, 2019, this initiative was serving 185 communities out of a target of 226 communities across 10 provinces and territories.

Patient Portals

Patient portals are gaining momentum in several jurisdictions. They can include features such as access to appointment bookings, diagnostic imaging reports, lab test results, vaccines and immunization histories and prescription and medication history. Specific Infoway projects include:

Telehomecare

In 2018-19, Infoway continued to support telehomecare projects for individuals with chronic conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure Recent telehomecare reports indicate a 44-85% reduction in hospitalizations and a 35-63% reduction in trips to the emergency department. These projects have also resulted in improved patient experience and knowledge about their illness. Specifically, 91% of telehomecare patients feel more informed about their chronic condition, 91% are better able to manage their health condition as a result of the program, and 87% feel they have improved quality of life.

The use of Telehealth, including virtual technologies such as videoconferencing and tele-dermatology has exceeded one million consultations a year across Canada for the first time. This represents growth of more than 500 per cent since 2010. Virtual technologies such as tele-mental health and tele-stroke helped patients living in rural and remote communities avoid more than $420 million in costs and more than 280 million kilometres of travel in 2018. More than 40,000 Canadians have been enrolled in telehomecare programs since 2010, with 8,500 having been enrolled in 2018-19.

Pan-Canadian Leadership in Digital Health Knowledge and Collaboration

In 2018-19, Infoway continued to provide national leadership and insights in areas such as privacy, security, solution architecture and standards, interoperability, clinical engagement, change management and benefits evaluation. The 2018 Infoway Partnership Conference, "Driving Access to Care" included a diverse line-up of national and international speakers who discussed opportunities and addressed the challenges of transforming health care delivery in Canada. Infoway also hosted representatives of the privacy oversight community (Information Commissioners and similar roles) and ministries of health for one of two meetings of the Pan-Canadian Privacy Forum held in 2018-19.

The Canadian Clinical Drug Data Set, a new national drug terminology, was co-developed by Health Canada and Infoway. It was published monthly in 2018-19 to enable the electronic prescribing of new drugs approved for use in Canada.

Financial information (dollars)
2016–17 Actual spending 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2018–19 actual minus 2018–19 planned)
37,877,924 25,847,647 14,260,425 14,260,425 14,260,425 0
Explanation of variances  

Note: Budget 2016 and 2017 contribution funding to Infoway is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

This Program's Terms and Conditions were amended in 2018-19.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Support payments will continue throughout the entire lifetime of Canadian thalidomide survivors and the program will be reviewed every five years.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) and Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) refer to the same concept. Within the Health Portfolio we have chosen to use SGBA+ to emphasize the fact that differences between women, men and gender diverse individuals can be biological (sex related) and/or socio-cultural (gender related).

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

The original allocation (2001) was governed by a Memorandum of Understanding. Presently, Infoway is accountable for the provisions of four active funding agreements, signed in: March 2003 (encompasses 2001 and 2003 allocations), March 2004, March 2007, and March 2010.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

As per the 2010 funding agreement, the duration of the agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Up-Front Multi-Year Funding provided has been expended; or March 31, 2015. The duration of the 2007 funding agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Grant Funding provided has been expended; or March 31, 2012.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Note that this report captures only those Infoway legacy activities remaining from historical up-front multi-year funding agreements. The bulk of Infoway's current activities relate to Budget 2016 and 2017 contribution funding to Infoway, which is reported through the 2018-19 Departmental Results Report.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Please note that this section reports on Infoway's legacy activities funded under up-front multi-year funding agreements. The majority of Infoway's current activities relate to Budget 2016 and 2017 contribution funding to Infoway that supports implementation of a multi-jurisdiction e-prescribing solution (Prescribe IT), as well as the ACCESS Health initiative that aims to provide Canadians with access to their personal health information and digital health solutions, and allow health care providers to share patient information.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

The Closing the Circle of Care First Nations Expansion Project is partially funded by the 2003 funding agreement and by a contribution agreement for funds allocated under Budget 2017.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Carnet Santé is partially funded by the 2003 funding agreement and by a contribution agreement for funds allocated under Budget 2017.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

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