Supplementary Information Tables 2017-18 Departmental Plan: Health Canada

Table of Contents

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Substance Use and Addictions Program Footnote 1 (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) (Voted)

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-15

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 2.5 Problematic Substance Use (previously Substance Use and Misuse)
    • Sub-Program 2.5.2 Controlled Substances
Description

The overall objective of the SUAP is to support evidence-informed and innovative health promotion, prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives targeting a broad range of licit and illicit substances.

Expected results

Program-level outputs will include partnerships and collaborative working arrangements measured by number, type and level as well as knowledge products and knowledge exchange mechanisms measured by number and type.

The program has several immediate, intermediate and longer-term outcomes (performance measures) and associated performance indicators.

Immediate:

  • Enhanced collaboration and knowledge exchange within and among stakeholders.
  • (Indicators: nature and depth of activities; perceptions regarding benefits/limitations).
  • Evidence-informed information and resources are available for stakeholders.
  • (Indicator: extent to which information and resources generated through the program and projects have been available and accessible to stakeholders).
  • Increased awareness and understanding among target populations of substance use issues.
  • (Indicator: level of awareness and/or understanding of substance use issues by target populations).

Intermediate:

  • Strengthened community and provincial/territorial capacity to address substance use.
  • (Indicators: type/nature of capacity improvements; proportion who indicate their capacity to address substance use has been strengthened).
  • Acquired/improved capacity (skills) of target populations to make informed decisions about substance use.
  • (Indicators: level/nature of acquired or improved skills; extent to which acquired/improved skills are influencing decision-making behaviours around substance use).
  • Uptake of evidence-informed information on substance use by relevant stakeholders.
  • (Indicators: extent stakeholders have changed their standards of practice and/or policies to integrate evidence-based information; stakeholder perceptions of relevance, quality and value of evidence-informed information).

Longer-term:

  • Reduced risk-taking behaviours associated with substance use among target populations. (Indicator: level of change in risk-taking behaviours among target populations reached)
  • Increased efficiency and effectiveness of treatment and prevention programs, services and systems. (Indicators: level of access and availability to quality substance use services; level of reduced duplication and/or cost savings; intent and/or extent activities are sustained post-funding).
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

DSCIF - 2014-15
DTFP - 2013-14

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The first five-year cycle of the SUAP is scheduled to be evaluated by Health Canada in 2019-20.

General targeted recipient groups
  • Non-profit organizations (charities, non-governmental organizations, universities, boards of education or other centres of education, research institutions, health-related entities).
  • Métis, Inuit and off-reserve First Nations not-for-profit organizations.
  • Provinces and territories (for example, provincial and territorial governments and their agencies).
  • Municipalities and local organizations (for example, municipal and regional governments, cities).
  • Business sector associations.
  • Other (for example, ad hoc groups or steering committees).
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Applicants and recipients are engaged through: solicitation processes; project development discussion; and performance reporting and monitoring tools, processes and activities. The program also supports regular knowledge translation and exchange opportunities (in-person and online) between projects, Health Canada and other partners and stakeholders.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 26,350,014 26,350,014 26,350,014 26,350,014
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0  
Total program 26,350,014 26,350,014 26,350,014 26,350,014

Canada Brain Research Fund Program (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Brain Research Fund Program (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

In Budget 2011 and 2016, the Government of Canada committed up to $120M, in matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the Canada Brain Research Fund Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries to improve the health and quality of life for Canadians who suffer from brain disorders." The Government of Canada's objective in funding the Canada Brain Research Fund was: 1) to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding; and 2) to support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers.

Expected results

The expected results for the program include:

Immediate:

  • Donors and partners invest in brain research.
  • Canadian researchers are equipped to undertake collaborative research on the brain and brain diseases/disorders.
  • Canadian researchers advance knowledge on the brain and brain diseases/disorders.

Intermediate:

  • Research stakeholders use research findings to inform future brain research (funding, agenda, community).
  • Stakeholders use knowledge to inform the development of prevention, diagnostic, therapeutic, clinical, technological and health system solutions for brain diseases/disorders.

Longer-term:

  • A health care system responsive to the needs of Canadians at risk of or affected by brain diseases/disorders.
  • Improvements in health outcomes of Canadians at risk of or affected by brain diseases/disorders.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Based on the evaluation recommendation, Health Canada made adjustments to the matched funding model that are reflected in the new Terms and Conditions.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The current funding agreement ends in March 2020 and the program is not scheduled to undergo another evaluation.

General targeted recipient groups

University and research hospital-based neuroscientists from across Canada.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

N/A

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 21,337,305 27,000,000 29,674,646 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 21,337,305 27,000,000 29,674,646 0

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 2.1 Health Products
    • Sub-Program 2.1.2 Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals
Description

To support basic, applied and clinical research, on blood safety and blood product safety and effectiveness issues under the auspices of the Canadian Blood Services. A further $3M was allocated over 2016-2020 to research related to blood donor criteria about men who have sex with men (MSM) as a Minister of Health priority.

Expected results

A strong Research and Development program that supports safety, quality and the supply of blood and blood products.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Evaluation of Canadian Blood Services Grant and Contribution Programs: 2012-13

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Evaluation of Canadian Blood Services Contribution Programs: 2017-18

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Meetings with recipients; knowledge transfer activities; site visits; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Terms and Conditions (Ts and Cs) as approved for the Contribution Agreement will apply to future CADTH agreements until such time as they are superseded. The fiscal year for those Ts and Cs follows the traditional fiscal year calendar, from April 1 through March 31 of the following calendar year.

Effective April 1, 2013, the CADTH funding was transitioned to a Contribution Agreement from a Named Grant. The change allows Health Canada to augment monitoring and management of the funds. Prior to March 31, 2018, CADTH will need to request renewal of funding.

The previous Named Grant covered the period of 2008 to 2013.

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, territorial governments and Canada's Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (the latter through fees) to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision-makers.

The purpose of the current Contribution Agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, Formulary Reviews comprised of the Common Drug Review (CDR) and the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR) and Health Technology Management (HTM) activities covered under Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Optimal Use (OU).

Expected results

Expected results are: creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
  • 2016-17.
  • Health Canada conducted a synthesis evaluation involving this program that was completed in 2016-17.
Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-2022

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
  • Drug Policy Advisory Committee and the Formulary and Optimal Use Working groups, Recommendations from the Common Drug Review and pan Canadian Oncology Review expert committees.
  • Evidence and information from HTA analyses and rapid responses.
  • Policy Forum.
  • Pharmaceutical Directors' Forum.
  • Health Technology Analysis Exchange.
Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769Table footnote * 16,058,769Table footnote *
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769Footnote * 16,058,769Footnote *

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) (Voted)

Start date

December 10, 2015

End date

March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The contribution to CFHI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system, adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify savings and efficiencies in the health system by: building leadership and skill capacity; enabling patient, family and community engagement; applying improvement methodology to drive measurable results; and, creating collaboratives to spread evidence-informed improvements.

CFHI previously operated as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF), an arm's-length, non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to fund health services research and promote the use of research evidence to strengthen the delivery of health services. CHSRF received $151.5M in federal funding under three separate grants (1996-97 to 2003-04).

Expected results

Funding to CFHI will be used to identify and accelerate the spread of promising innovations across Canada by supporting health care organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, health status and value for money in health care spending.

CFHI's activities are expected to result in: health care leaders that are knowledgeable and skilled in carrying out health care improvements; patients, families and communities that are engaged in health care improvement and co-design; and improvements to health care practices, delivery models and related policies of participating organizations. Over time, these best practices are expected to take hold in the system and spread within and across organizations, regions, provinces/territories and ultimately contribute to improvements in health care system performance in Canada.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

N/A (A recipient evaluation of CFHI was conducted in 2013-14)

Decision following the results of last evaluation

N/A

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

No planned evaluation as CFHI's continuous funding of four years is less than the statutory requirement for evaluation.

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CFHI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CFHI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0

CFHI is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 1999

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-12

A Treasury Board Submission to establish new Terms and Conditions (Ts and Cs) for the Health Information Initiative (HII) was approved by Treasury Board on March 29, 2012. These new Ts and Cs provide the Federal Minister of Health the authority to renew Funding Agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. There is no expiry date for the HII's Ts and Cs.

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (F/P/T) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Since 1994, the Government of Canada has provided approximately $757M in total to CIHI through a series of funding agreements until March 2012. Under the current agreement, up to $396M has been delivered to CIHI over 5 years (2012-13 to 2016-17). It is anticipated that the current agreement will be extended for one year in order to transfer $78.8M in 2017-18. Negotiations for a new contribution agreement are underway. Presently, Health Canada funds 78% of CIHI's total budget, while the provincial and territorial governments contribute 19%. The remaining funds are generated through product sales.

This funding allows CIHI to provide essential information on Canada's health systems and the health of Canadians. CIHI provides comparable and actionable data and information that are used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across Canada. CIHI's stakeholders use the broad range of the Institute's health system databases, measurements and standards, together with their evidence-based reports and analyses, in their decision-making processes. CIHI protects the privacy of Canadians by ensuring the confidentiality and integrity of the health care information they provide.

Expected results

The expected results are as follows:

Be a trusted source of standards and quality data by:

  • Increasing the use of health data standards to achieve quality data.
  • Closing the data gaps in priority areas.
  • Making data collection easier and improve timeliness.
  • Making data more accessible.

Expand analytical tools to support measurements of health systems by:

  • Comparing health systems in priority areas.
  • Enriching the information infrastructure, grouping methods and decision-support tools;
  • Expanding their analytical products using innovative approaches, including data linkage and predictive modelling.
  • Transforming CIHI's digital presence into a core strategic asset.

Produce actionable analysis and accelerate its adoption by:

  • Producing analyses that contribute new information and insights, working with external partners and with intended end-users to create a culture of co-development.
  • Engaging with stakeholders to enable better use of health data and information.
  • Providing customized products and services to support decision-making needs.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Evaluation of the Health Information Initiative: 2012-13 to 2014-15

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Evaluation of the Health Information Initiative: 2019-20

General targeted recipient groups

The HII was developed to support CIHI only; as such, CIHI is the only recipient of HII funding. This caveat is noted in the Ts and Cs for the HII, which stipulates that CIHI is, and only ever will be, the recipient of HII funding.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 78,748,979 78,748,979 78,808,979 77,658,979
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 78,748,979 78,748,979 78,808,979 77,658,979

Note - The decrease in planned spending in 2019-20 is mainly due to funding level decreases for activities related to preventing problematic prescription drug use.

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The CPSI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. The first five-year grant funding agreement with CPSI ended on March 31, 2008, and was renewed for an additional five years, starting April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013. A new five-year contribution agreement began on April 1, 2013.

Expected results

CPSI provides leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: education, with a focus on developing curriculum and training programs; interventions and programs, with a focus on coordinating and supporting evidence-informed clinical interventions and programs; research, to increase the scope and scale of patient safety research; and tools and resources, with a focus on creating tools and resources that can be applied by health care organizations. For 2013-18, CPSI is focusing and aligning its activities with a new emphasis on the strategic goals that are most likely to drive further system-level transformation over the five-year period, and beyond. This includes an overarching goal to develop an Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan that will identify the priority patient safety areas most likely to lead to system-wide change and to find ways to increase the pace of safety improvements.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
  • External evaluation : 2012-13
  • Health Canada synthesis evaluation : 2013-14.
Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2017-18

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CPSI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CPSI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CSCC) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Statutory Authority, Budget 2006

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-2018

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (the Partnership) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the CSCC. The CSCC was developed in consultation with more than 700 cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives: (1) to reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; (2) to enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and (3) to lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer. Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. The Partnership's initial five-year grant provided $250M for 2007-12, and a named contribution agreement provided an additional five years and $241M for 2012-17. The 2017-2022 contribution agreement will provide $237.5M over five years.

Expected results
  • Enhanced cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Indigenous organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments.
  • A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2015-16

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2020-21

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with the Partnership to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement. This also includes maintaining regular contact with the Partnership to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17 Forecast spending 2017-18 Planned spending 2018-19 Planned spending 2019-20 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 47,500,000 $47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (MHCC) (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-2018 to 2018-2019

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

Ten years ago, the federal government committed $130M to establish the MHCC, an arm's length, not-for-profit organization designed to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness.

Budget 2015 included an announcement of the government's intention to renew the mandate of the MHCC.

In December 2016, the government renewed the funding of the MHCC over two years to advance work on mental health priorities, including problematic Substance Use, suicide prevention, and support for populations at risk.

Funding will be managed as a two-year contribution agreement in keeping with Treasury Board's requirement of greater oversight of transfer payments.

Expected results

This initiative is expected to contribute, in the long run, to the improved mental health and well-being of Canadians, specifically in the areas of problematic substance use, suicide prevention, and stigma reduction.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada evaluation of Mental Health and Mental Illness Activities, including the MHCC, (2010-11 to 2014-2015): 2015-2016.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

The 2015-2016 evaluation of Mental Health and Mental Illness Activities found that the MHCC had been successful in addressing the three specific elements of its first mandate. The MHCC was encouraged, for the balance of its mandate, to expand outreach to stakeholders, particularly organizations addressing problematic substance use and National Indigenous Organizations.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

An evaluation of Mental Health and Mental Illness activities (including the Mental Health Commission) will take place in 2020-21.

General targeted recipient groups

The MHCC is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Regular meetings with the recipient; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring performance and results.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 14,250,000 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0

Note - For fiscal years 2017-18 and 2018-19, funding will be managed as a contribution agreement in keeping with Treasury Board's requirement of greater oversight of transfer payments.

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) (Voted)

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The HCPCP provides up to $26.9M per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care system priorities, including palliative and end-of-life care, health care system innovation, and health human resources. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada will contribute to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to the health care system.

Expected results

Program funding will support a wide range of projects designed to ultimately contribute to improvements in the health care system. For example, health care innovation projects will support activities that develop, implement and evaluate tools, models, and practices that address identified health care system priorities. Other projects will produce resources that enable health providers to maximize their roles in a range of settings; provide system managers and decision- makers with data and decision-making tools to enhance system planning and performance; and engage key stakeholders in collaborative efforts that contribute to specific health care system improvements relevant to program priorities.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2013-14

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2018-19

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations, other levels of government and other national organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Program engages recipients, potential recipients, and the public in various ways, for example, through stakeholder meetings and project site visits and by providing opportunities for stakeholder input in the development of program tools and templates.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 25,849,000 26,874,000 26,874,000 26,874,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 25,849,000 26,874,000 26,874,000 26,874,000

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)
Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.3 Official Language Minority Community Development
Description

The Official Languages Health Contribution Program, under the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration and Communities was approved for a five-year period (2013-14 to 2017-18) with a total budget of $174.3M. The primary components of the program include:

  1. Integrating health professionals for official language minority communities (OLMCs) ($106.5M).
    • Provide funding to French-language academic health programs in 11 colleges and universities outside of Quebec to generate additional health professionals in French minority language communities. In Quebec, Health Canada funds one organization to coordinate language training courses for health professionals and intake personnel (such as medical secretaries) who are already working in the health system.
  2. Strengthening local health networking capacity ($25M).
    • Provide funding so that 38 existing community-based health networks across Canada continue operating and making improvements in health and health services access for official language minority communities.
  3. Health services access and retention projects ($38.5M).
    • Provide funding for activities aimed at encouraging bilingual health professionals to practice in official language minority communities, engaging front-line health service providers in providing services in the second official language, supporting health human resource retention strategies, and addressing health needs specific to the demographics of official language minority communities.
Expected results
  • Increased access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in official language minority communities.
  • Increased offering of services in the minority language within health institutions and communities. Indicator: Number of health institutions and communities where bilingual health services are available for official language minority communities (target year: 2017-18).
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22 (TBC)

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients under the program are non-profit entities, provincially-accredited postsecondary institutions and provincial and territorial government bodies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada analyses and reviews of financial cash flows and outcomes for each recipient, as well as hold bilateral discussions on the nature of the outcomes and their pertinence to meeting program objectives for improving health and health services in both official languages.

Regular meetings between Health Canada officials and recipient organizations, including management meetings, community-based events (conferences, consultations, research fora), face-to-face meetings, and site visits.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 36,400,000 33,800,000 33,800,000 33,800,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 36,400,000 33,800,000 33,800,000 33,800,000

Note - The decrease in planned spending is mainly due to the expiry of budgetary spending authorities related to the delivery of time limited projects.

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (Voted)

Start date

June 19, 2015

End date

March 31, 2021Thalidomide - Footnote *

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program activity 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:

  1. receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and
  2. have transparent and easy access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund.
Expected results

Expected results are that thalidomide survivors will access care, treatment and/or support which in turn will contribute to their aging with dignity.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

N/A (new program)

Decision following the results of last evaluation

N/A

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2019-20

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian not-for-profit and for-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Applicants and recipients are engaged through solicitation processes and regular monitoring activities such as reporting, performance measurement, meetings and ongoing communication to support simple, pro-active, accessible program delivery to meet the needs of thalidomide survivors. Key stakeholders are engaged in program design.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 8,160,000 8,323,200 8,489,664 8,659,457
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 8,160,000 8,323,200 8,489,664 8,659,457

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1 billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50M over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare, with the funds to flow as a Contribution Agreement.

Expected results

Increased access to digital health technology (e-prescribing and telehomecare) for health care providers and patients; increased engagement of governments in expanding digital health innovation; safer medication practices by prescribers and pharmacists; increased medication adherence by patients; improved efficiencies and productivity; improved quality of care and quality of life for patients and caregivers.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

N/A.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

N/A.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

No planned evaluations due to limited time horizon of contribution funding. An evaluation will be considered by Health Canada, in the context of its annual risk-based evaluation plan.

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the Contribution Agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 21,000,000 29,000,000 0 0
Total other types of transfer paymentsTable footnote 1 0 0 0 0
Total program 21,000,000 29,000,000 0 0

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 3.3 Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit
    • Sub-Program 3.3.1 First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.1.1 Health Planning and Quality Management
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.1.2 Health Human Resources
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.1.3 Health Facilities
    • Sub-Program 3.3.2 First Nations and Inuit Health System Transformation
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.2.1 Health Systems Integration
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.2.2 e-Health Infostructure
    • Sub-Program 3.3.3 Tripartite Health Governance
Description

The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services. It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit. The funds are used for: planning and management for the delivery of quality health services; construction and maintenance of health facilities; research activities; encouraging Indigenous people to pursue health careers; investments in technologies to modernize health services; and integrating and realigning the governance of existing health services.

Expected results
  • First Nations and Inuit are collaborating with federal, provincial and territorial partners in the delivery of health programs and services.
  • First Nations and Inuit are able to influence and/or control (design, deliver and manage) health programs and services.
  • First Nations and Inuit have the capacity to enter into and manage funding arrangements;
  • First Nations have the capacity to manage their infrastructure.
  • First Nations have the capacity to plan, manage and deliver quality health services.
  • First Nations and Inuit funding recipients have a "Low Risk" score on the Department's Program Management component of the General Assessment Tool.
  • Indigenous people participate in post-secondary education leading to health careers;
  • Health care services delivered in First Nations communities are provided in a safe environment.
  • Key stakeholders are engaged in the integration of health services for First Nations and Inuit.
  • Partners within multi-jurisdictional health services integration projects are collaborating.
  • First Nations communities have access to e-Health Infostructure.
  • First Nations and Inuit have access to provincial/territorial health information systems.
  • Tripartite governance partners have reciprocal accountability as stated in section 2.2 of the British Columbia (BC) Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
  • Health Planning and Quality Management: 2016-17.
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Human Resources: 2013-14.
  • Health Facilities: 2016-17.
  • e-Health Infostructure: 2016-17.
  • Health Services Integration Fund: 2015-16.
  • BC Tripartite contributions: 2012-13.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
  • Health Planning and Quality Management: Continuation.
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Human Resources: Continuation.
  • Health Facilities and Capital: Continuation.
  • e-Health Infostructure: Continuation.
  • Health Services Integration Fund: Continuation.
  • BC Tripartite contributions: Continuation.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
  • Health Planning and Quality Management: 2021-22.
  • Health Facilities: 2021-22.
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Services Integration Fund: 2020-21.
  • e-Health Infostructure: 2021-22.
  • BC Tripartite Governance: 2017-18.
General targeted recipient groups

First Nations in Canada (i.e., Communities, Bands, District, Tribal Councils and Associations), Inuit Associations, Councils and Hamlets, Canadian National Indigenous Organizations, non-governmental and voluntary associations and organizations, including non-profit corporations, educational institutions, hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, Health Authorities and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan seeks to pursue better mechanisms for involving First Nations and Inuit in the Branch's planning and decision-making processes. This includes commitments to find more effective and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate with First Nation, Inuit, provincial and territorial partners, and support First Nations and Inuit participation in the development and management of health programs and services that affect them.

In 2017-18, Health Canada will continue to advance collaborative efforts with provinces/territories and First Nations and Inuit to ensure quality service delivery, build partnerships to advance health service integration and increase First Nations and Inuit participation in the delivery of health services. Health Canada will work with partners to explore and develop approaches in areas of mutual interest for advancing First Nations and Inuit health, guide health survey research and analysis, and revise the Community Health Planning Guide.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 737,078,087 752,465,894 691,864,957 725,714,416
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 737,078,087 752,465,894 691,864,957 725,714,416

Note - The decrease in planned spending in 2018-19 is mainly due to the expiry of budgetary spending authorities related to Social Infrastructure funding. The Department would have to request funding for this initiative for future years.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 3.1 First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
    • Sub-Program 3.1.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1 Healthy Child Development
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2 Mental Wellness
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.3 Healthy Living
    • Sub-Program 3.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.1 Communicable Disease Control and Management
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.2 Environmental Public Health
    • Sub-Program 3.1.3 First Nations and Inuit Primary Care
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3.1 Clinical and Client Care
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3.2 Home and Community Care
      • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.3.3 Jordan's Principle - A Child First Initiative
Description

The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities. It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including monitoring and surveillance, to prevent and/or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards, and health-related impacts of climate change; and primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services.

Expected results
  • First Nations and Inuit are healthy and safe.
  • First Nations and Inuit communities have the capacity to deliver community-based health promotion and disease prevention programs and services.
  • Women in First Nations communities have access to breastfeeding and pre/postnatal nutrition services and supports.
  • First Nations have access to healthy child development programs and services.
  • First Nations and Inuit have access to mental wellness programs and services.
  • First Nations and Inuit clients who have received addictions treatment abstain from or decrease drug and alcohol use up to six months after completing treatment.
  • First Nations and Inuit have access to healthy living programs and services.
  • First Nations are engaged in healthy behaviours.
  • First Nations have community capacity to respond to health emergencies.
  • Communicable diseases among First Nations on-reserve are prevented, mitigated and/or treated.
  • First Nations children on-reserve are vaccinated against mumps, measles and rubella (MMR).
  • Information about environmental health hazards in First Nations communities is available to decision-makers.
  • Environmental health risks relating to water quality are decreased in First Nations and Inuit communities.
  • First Nations communities have access to collaborative service delivery arrangements with external primary care service providers.
  • First Nations populations have access to Clinical and Client Care services.
  • Health Canada nurses providing Clinical and Client Care services have completed mandatory training.
  • First Nations and Inuit populations have access to Home and Community Care services.
  • First Nations children receive health and social supports.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
  • Healthy Living and Healthy Child: 2014-15.
  • Mental Wellness: 2016-17.
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management: 2014-15.
  • Environmental Public Health: 2016-17.
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan: 2013-14.
  • Clinical and Client Care: 2013-14.
  • Home and Community Care: 2013-14.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

  • Healthy Living and Healthy Child: Continuation.
  • Mental Wellness: Continuation.
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management: Continuation.
  • Environmental Public Health: Continuation.
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan: Continuation.
  • Clinical and Client Care: Continuation.
  • Home and Community Care: Continuation.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
  • Healthy Child Development: 2019-2020.
  • Mental Wellness: 2021-22.
  • Healthy Living: 2019-2020.
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management: 2019-20.
  • Environmental Public Health: 2021-22.
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan: 2018-19.
  • Clinical and Client Care: 2017-18.
  • Home and Community Care: 2018-19.
  • Jordan's Principle - A Child First Initiative: 2018-19.
General targeted recipient groups

One or more of the following recipient groups as established under the approved Terms and Conditions: First Nations and Inuit organizations or communities in Canada; non-government and voluntary associations and organizations; municipal, provincial and territorial governments; Health Authorities; and Health Agencies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan seeks to pursue better mechanisms for involving First Nations and Inuit in the Branch's planning and decision making processes. This includes commitments to find more effective and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate with First Nation, Inuit, provincial and territorial partners, and support First Nations and Inuit participation in the development and management of health programs and services that affect them.

In order to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burden associated with grants and contributions, the Branch will continue its efforts to standardize recipient reporting, multi-departmental contribution agreements, and standardization of processes, procedures requirements, and tools for transfer payment programs through the joint Grants and Contributions Information Management System project initiative between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 743,649,199 802,295,540 772,326,514 653,159,029
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 743,649,199 802,295,540 772,326,514 653,159,029

Note - The decrease in planned spending in 2018-19 is mainly due to the expiry of budgetary spending authorities for the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The Department would have to request funding for this initiative for future years.

The decrease in planned spending in 2019-20 is mainly due to the expiry of budgetary spending authorities for the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative and the Immediate Mental Wellness Interventions and Service Enhancements for First Nations and Inuit. The Department would have to request funding for these initiatives for future years.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 3.2 Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit
Description

Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program is a national program that provides registered First Nations and recognized Inuit resident in Canada with coverage for a range of medically necessary health related goods and services which are not otherwise available to them through other private plans or provincial/territorial health or social programs. NIHB Program benefits include prescription and over-the-counter medications, dental and vision care, medical supplies and equipment, mental health counselling, and transportation to access medically required health services that are not available on reserve or in the community of residence.

Expected results
  • First Nations and Inuit have access to non-insured health benefits.
  • Dental Predetermination Centre (DPC) requests are handled within the 10 days service standard.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

General targeted recipient groups

First Nations and Inuit organizations or communities in Canada (i.e., Communities, Bands, Tribal Councils and Associations), hospitals and treatment centres, municipal, provincial and territorial governments, and Health Authorities.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan seeks to pursue better mechanisms for involving First Nations and Inuit in the Branch's planning and decision making processes. This includes commitments to find more effective and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate with First Nation, Inuit, provincial and territorial partners, and support First Nations and Inuit participation in the development and management of health programs and services that affect them.

Health Canada will continue to work collaboratively with the Assembly of First Nations and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami on joint reviews of the NIHB Program in order to enhance client access to benefits, identify and address gaps in benefits, streamline service delivery to be more responsive to client needs, and increase program efficiencies.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 209,482,361 220,707,524 210,197,641 210,197,641
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 209,482,361 220,707,524 210,197,641 210,197,641

Note - In Budget 2013, the Government committed to stable funding and growth for supplementary health benefits for First Nations and Inuit. The total amount is confirmed annually based on the prior year's spending reported in the Public Accounts of Canada plus a growth factor. Therefore, the 2018-19 and 2019-20 planned spending amounts will be adjusted and confirmed through a future Estimates process.

Territorial Health Investment Fund (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Territorial Health Investment Fund (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2014-18

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) is a three-year investment of $70M to support territorial health systems, starting in 2014.

The THIF targets priority health areas (children's oral health, mental health and chronic disease) and is intended to strengthen territorial capacity to manage and deliver health services in those targeted areas, which in turn can lead to a reduced reliance on medical travel. Its design features three streams, Territorial, Pan-Territorial and Medical travel.

The territorial stream ($13M per fiscal year, $4.33M per territory) funds projects to strengthen health services in-territory in the targeted areas that have persistent challenges and poor health outcomes. The Pan-territorial stream provides $2M per fiscal year for collaboratively developed projects that offer innovative solutions to health systems problems. The territories may also leverage Pan-territorial Stream investments to reform medical travel. The Medical Travel Stream ($12M in 2014-15, $8M in 2015-16, $5M in 2016-17) is a declining subsidy to offset territories eligible medical transportation costs in the short-term, incenting immediate measures to reform medical travel programs and protocols and increase service capacity in-territory.
The Terms and Conditions of the THIF were recently extended for one year (with no additional funds) and are currently in place until March 31, 2018, in order to enable the territories to fully implement the projects currently underway.

Expected results
  • Act as a catalyst to address current and emerging health issues and priorities.
  • Improve and maintain strategic partnerships with key national provincial/territorial regional partners (e.g., through funding such as Grants and Contributions) to advance health system priorities.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

N/A (new program)

Decision following the results of last evaluation

N/A

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2017-18.

General targeted recipient groups

Territorial governments (Government of the Northwest Territories, Government of Yukon, Government of Nunavut).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Health Branch Strategic Plan seeks to pursue better mechanisms for involving First Nations and Inuit in the Branch's planning and decision making processes. This includes commitments to find more effective and culturally appropriate ways to collaborate with First Nation, Inuit, provincial and territorial partners, and support First Nations and Inuit participation in the development and management of health programs and services that affect them.

Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 20,000,000 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,000,000 0 0 0

Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million

Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System (Voted)

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System (Voted)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 2.1 Health Products
    • Sub-Program 2.1.2 Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals
Main objective

To support the development of a national organ and tissue donation and transplantation system that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting the federal role and interest in organ and tissue donation and transplantation.

Planned spending in 2017-18

$3.6M

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Evaluation of the Canadian Blood Services Grant and Contribution Programs: 2013-14

Note: The Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Program was evaluated with the Canadian Blood Services - Research and Development Program because both programs are administered by the same recipient.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable)

The Canadian Blood Services Contribution Programs: 2017-18

Note: The Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Program will be evaluated with the Canadian Blood Services - Research and Development Program because both programs are administered by the same recipient.

General targeted recipient groups

The Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions.

Horizontal Initiatives

Chemicals Management Plan

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Chemicals Management Plan

Lead departments

Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)

Federal partner organizations
  • Health Canada
    • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
      • Safe Environments Directorate;
      • Consumer Product Safety Directorate; and,
      • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate.
    • Health Products and Food Branch
      • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate;
      • Food Directorate;
      • Policy, Planning and International Affairs Directorate; and
      • Veterinary Drugs Directorate.
    • Pest Management Regulatory Agency
    • Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch
      • Consumer Product Safety Program; and,
      • Environmental Health Program.
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
    • Health Security Infrastructure Branch
    • Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response.
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
    • Environmental Protection Branch
      • Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate;
      • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate;
      • Energy and Transportation Directorate; and,
      • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate.
    • Science and Technology Branch
      • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate;
      • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate;
      • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate; and,
      • Water Science and Technology Directorate.
    • Enforcement Branch
      • Environmental Enforcement Directorate.
    • Strategic Policy Branch
      • Economic Analysis Directorate.
Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2007-08

End date of the horizontal initiative

2020-21

Total federal funding allocated (from 2007-08 to 2020-21) (dollars)

1,308,179,400

The total federal funding allocated includes all three phases of the CMP.

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars)

814,892,950

The total federal planned spending includes the first and the second phases of the CMP.

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars)

776,085,148

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Governance structures

In the overall delivery of the CMP, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada have a shared responsibility in attaining objectives and results. In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, the Departments deliver their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures, as well as a joint CMP governance structure to address shared responsibilities. Efforts are also made to harmonize vertical and horizontal performance reporting indicators (e.g. PAA, CMP Performance Management Strategy, the CMP contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, etc.) for CMP.

The CMP has a horizontal governance framework which ensures integration, co-ordination, joint decision making and clear accountabilities. Under the CMP Integrated Horizontal Governance Framework, the joint CMP Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) reports to both the Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada Deputy Ministers.

The CMP ADM committee is supported by a DG committee. The CMP DGs Committee consists of Directors General from all partner programs within Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, and provides strategic direction, oversight and a challenge function for the CMP's overall implementation. The CMP DGs also play a lead role in directing, monitoring and providing a challenge function for the core elements of the CMP, namely the delivery of the chemicals agenda under CEPA.

These Director General level committees are supported by the CMP Steering Committee, which is a Director level committee intended to provide oversight on CMP issues related to the CEPA chemicals agenda.

Contact information
  • Suzanne Leppinen
    Director, Chemicals and Environmental Health Management Bureau
    Safe Environments Directorate
    Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
    Health Canada
    269 Laurier Avenue West
    Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9
    PL: 4905B
    Telephone: 613-941-8071
    E-mail: suzanne.leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Greg Carreau
    Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement
    Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
    Environment and Climate Change Canada
    200, boul. Sacré-Coeur
    Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
    Office 8-873
    Telephone: 819-953-6072
    E-mail: greg.carreau@ec.gc.ca
Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

  • setting priorities and government-imposed timelines for risk assessment and risk management of chemicals and other substances of concern;
  • enhancing research, monitoring and surveillance;
  • increasing industry stewardship and responsibilities for substances;
  • collaborating internationally on chemicals assessment and management;
  • communicating to Canadians the potential risks of chemical and other substances; and,
  • engaging industry to inform risk assessment and risk management action while also enhancing trust in the program.

Jointly managed by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), the Fisheries Act and the Forestry Act.

In the second phase of CMP (CMP2), priority setting for existing substances was refined and the remaining substances were grouped to provide efficiencies for risk assessment and risk management as a result of lessons learned from the first phase of the program (CMP1). The third phase (CMP3) includes both substance groupings and single substance assessments. Similar to CMP2, groupings are created where possible to gain efficiencies in the assessment process. Where groupings are not possible, single substance assessments are conducted.

Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, cosmetic, health, drug and other products. In addition to releases from products, substances may be released at various points along other areas of their life cycle, such as during the manufacturing and disposal.

The same core functions that have been part of phases one and two continue in phase three of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and, policy and program management. Information gathering is a key activity undertaken to support these core functions.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2018-19, led by Health Canada

Shared outcome of federal partners

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Research knowledge on substances of concern is made available to Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada recipients to inform risk assessment, risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities;
  • Information on the risks of substances is used by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada recipients to inform risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, monitoring and surveillance, and research activities;
  • Data on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products is used by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada recipients or other stakeholders;
  • Targeted industry conforms or complies with requirements of risk management measures; and,
  • Targeted industry takes voluntary or enforced action to protect Canadians and the environment.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Risks associated with harmful substances in humans, the environment, food, pesticides, and consumer products are prevented, minimized or eliminated;
  • Targeted industry understands its obligations to take action to protect Canadians and the environment;
  • Canadians use information to avoid or minimize risks posed by these substances;
  • Canadians and stakeholder groups understand information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern; and,
  • Improved program decision-making and program performance.

Final Outcome:

  • Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances.
Performance indicators

2017-18 performance indicators are under development, as part of a program review of the Performance Measurement Framework for the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan. These performance indicators and targets will be reported in the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Targets

2017-18 targets are under development, as part of a program review of the Performance Measurement Framework for the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan. These performance indicators and targets will be reported in the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data sources for the measurement of the performance indicator(s) for the shared outcome will be available upon completion of the program review of the Performance Measurement Framework for the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not Applicable

Planning information

In 2017-18, the program will continue to implement improvements as described in the Management Response and Action Plan resulting from the Program Evaluation conducted in 2015. The program will also assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining priority existing substances from CMP1 & CMP2 and continue science based assessments and early thinking on risk management, as needed, on the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,550 existing substances included in CMP3.

A key activity undertaken to support the core functions of the CMP is information gathering. This involves a range of voluntary and mandatory activities, ensuring the engagement of stakeholders. Having up-to-date information and understanding trends in the Canadian marketplace are necessary to inform risk assessment and risk management activities and support sound decision making by Government. In 2017-18 key information gathering initiatives will include:

  • Inventory Update (under s.71) - receiving up-to-date market data from a survey addressing approximately 1,500 substances in Canada;
  • Risk Management Survey (under s.71) - receiving information from a survey addressing approximately 80 substances used to help inform Risk Management and performance measurement efforts;
  • Animate Survey (under s.71) - receiving information on certain products of biotechnology;
  • Other surveys under s.71 of CEPA - surveys may be completed as needed to support risk assessment activities in the third phase of the CMP;
  • On-going targeted follow-up to industry stakeholders on the previous Inventory Update information to inform CMP3 risk assessment activities; and,
  • On-going information gathering under s.70 and the New Substances Notifications Regulations, as well as other targeted approaches and voluntary data gathering to inform data needs for the third phase of the CMP.

Draft Screening Assessment Reports covering approximately 215 petroleum stream sector substances, and approximately 165 other phase three substances are planned to be published in 2017-18. In addition, Final Screening Assessments Reports for approximately 10 petroleum stream sector substances, 40 substances from the Groupings Initiative and approximately 450 substances from phase 3 are planned to be published.

Proposed Risk Management (RM) Instruments will also be developed and published in Part I of the Canada Gazette. These RM instruments include: Amendments to the Concentration of Phosphorus in Certain Cleaning Products Regulations; Amendments to the Chromium Electroplating, Chromium Anodizing and Reverse Etching Regulations; Proposed Notice for the Pollution Prevention Plan of Reaction products of 2-propanone with diphynelamine (PREPOD); Proposed Notice for the Pollution Prevention Plan of Triclosan; Proposed Regulations Repealing the Chlor-Alkali Mercury Release Regulations under CEPA; Proposed Regulations Repealing the Chlor-Alkali Mercury Liquid Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act; Proposed Regulations Respecting Reduction in the Release of Volatile Organic Compounds (Petroleum Sector); and, Amendments to the schedules of the Notice requiring the preparation and implementation of pollution prevention plans for Toluene Diisocyanates (TDIs).

Final RM Instruments will be published in Part I or Part II of the Canada Gazette, as required. These publications will include: final regulations to prohibit the manufacture, import, sale or offer for sale of microbead-containing personal care products used to exfoliate or cleanse; and, Regulations Amending the Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances Regulations, 2012 (BNST).

Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada will also continue to use the new substances program to identify and manage, as appropriate, the human health and environmental risks of new substances before import to, or manufacture in, Canada. The program will perform risk assessments on approximately 500 new substances, including chemicals, polymers, products of biotechnology, substances in Food and Drugs Act (F&DA) regulated products and nanomaterials prior to their introduction to Canada. The program will intervene as early as possible when the assessment identifies a risk to human health or the environment by developing any needed risk management measures.

The program will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address identified risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods and food packaging materials, products available to consumers, cosmetics and drinking water. Highlights for 2017-18 include compliance and enforcement activities related to toys and cosmetics, among others.Approval of up to five guidelines/guidance documents, as part of the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality, will also be sought from the provinces and territories.

Work will continue on substances/products regulated under the F&DA, including: the assessment of those substances on the Revised In Commerce List identified during prioritization as requiring further consideration; amendments to the Food and Drug Regulation pertaining to environmental assessments of products regulated under the F&DA; research and consultations on non-regulatory initiatives aimed at reducing the release of non-F&DA products and substances into the environment; and, re-evaluation of food additives, food contaminants and food packaging materials.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to work with passenger conveyance industry stakeholders in order to identify and address potential risks to travellers. In 2017-18, PHAC will continue the implementation of its modernized potable water regulations and continue to provide food safety oversight utilizing authorities under the Food and Drugs Act, in support of the protection of the travelling public from risks associated with potable water and food served to passengers on board conveyances.

Work will also continue on the re-evaluation of the remaining 37 older chemicals (registered prior to 1995) and on the cyclical re-evaluation of pesticides registered after 1995, as per the legislated timelines. As well, Health Canada will continue to monitor health and environmental incidents related to pesticides, analyzing trends and sales data, and taking regulatory action, as needed.

Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada will continue to conduct targeted monitoring and surveillance activities to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Specific monitoring activities for 2017-18 include the release of the Fourth Report on Human Biomonitoring of Environmental Chemicals in Canada, which presents national biomonitoring data on the Canadian population's exposure to chemicals, collected as part of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Sample collection for cycle five has begun and will continue until December 2017.

Health Canada will continue to support targeted monitoring and surveillance activities in the Canadian Arctic, in partnership with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) through the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP). The NCP funds biomonitoring and human health projects on an annual basis.

Three monitoring and surveillance projects have been implemented to address the Risk Assessment Program's short term data needs to help meet 2020 CMP commitments and will continue into 2017-18. Work will also continue related to the Total Diet Study, and other targeted studies, to fill in anticipated gaps for future CMP priorities. Environmental monitoring of priority chemicals in air, water, sediments, aquatic biota, birds, fish and wastewater to detect and characterize environmental change will continue in 2017-18, as well as the establishment of Environmental Quality Guidelines.

Research will continue in order to address outstanding questions and knowledge gaps related to the effects and exposure of chemical substances to humans and the environment to inform risk management, risk assessment and international activities. Opportunities for collaboration and synergy with government organizations, universities and international partners will be leveraged and expert engagement in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines Programme will continue. Four research projects have also been implemented to address the Risk Assessment Program's short term data needs to help meet 2020 CMP commitments and will continue into 2017-18.

The program will develop compliance strategies and compliance promotion and enforcement plans and will continue to deliver related activities to raise regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and promote their compliance with, regulatory requirements for certain assessed CMP substances. Focus will be on delivering compliance promotion activities and conducting inspections and investigations for the highest priority instruments.

The program will also continue to reach out to stakeholders and the public in order to implement the CMP successfully and help achieve the overall goal of protecting health and the environment for all Canadians. Focus will remain on increasing transparency and predictability, as well as expanding the reach of key stakeholder engagement activities.

The program will continue to increase proactive communications to the public to raise awareness of the risks and safe use of substances, including greater use of partnerships to expand the reach of messaging. Regular stakeholder consultations, ongoing sector based working groups, conferences, workshops, working groups, and webinars are means that will continue to be explored and strengthened as part of an integrated stakeholder engagement plan. The renewed CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council and bi-annual publication of the CMP Progress Report will continue to inform stakeholders about key activities related to the Government of Canada's recent work under the CMP.

Efforts will also continue to support the sound management of chemicals through participation in a range of international activities that support domestic efforts.

Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from 2016-17 to 2020-21) (dollars)Table footnote 1 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected result 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 TargetsTable footnote 2 Link to department's Strategic Outcomes [or Core Responsibilities] Link to government priorities
Health Canada 2.1 Health Products a. Risk Assessment 6,136,645 1,227,329 ER 1.1     Strategic Outcome No. 2: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians A clean environment and a strong economy
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 4,251,945 850,389
2.2 Food Safety and Nutrition a. Risk Assessment 6,186,965 1,237,393
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 5,901,575 1,180,315
c. Research 3,476,195 695,239
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 4,757,430 951,486
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 848,425 169,685
2.3 Environmental Risks to Health a. Risk Assessment 51,766,940 10,353,388
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 35,431,185 7,086,237
c. Research 49,822,575 9,964,515
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 49,298,520 9,859,704
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 14,076,085 2,815,217
f. Policy and Program Management 11,041,590 2,208,318
  2.4 Consumer Product and Workplace Chemical Safety a. Risk Assessment 12,098,165 2,419,633      
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 12,748,975 2,549,795
2.7 Pesticides a. Risk Assessment 22,817,180 4,563,436
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 4,232,080 846,416
HC Internal Services 34,979,720 6,995,944  
Public Health Agency of Canada 1.3.2 Border Health b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 15,914,255 3,182,851 ER 2.1     Strategic Outcome No. 1: Protecting Canadians and empowering them to improve their health A clean environment and a strong economy
Environment and Climate Change Canada 3.1 Substances and Waste Management a. Risk Assessment 19,367,335 3,873,467 ER 3.1 Strategic Outcome No. 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized A clean environment and a strong economy
b. Risk Management 68,088,480 13,617,696
c. Research 9,420,790 1,884,158
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 24,399,675 4,879,935
3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement: Pollution a. Compliance Promotion 4,272,045 854,409
b. Enforcement 11,075,675 2,215,135
ECCC Internal Services 10,876,000 2,175,200  
Total for all federal organizations 493,286,450 98,657,290  
ER 1.1 - Expected Results: Health Canada
  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities (Risk Assessment);
  • Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, CCPSA and F&DA (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement);
  • Drinking water quality guideline technical documents/guidance documents (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement);
  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans (Research);
  • Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products (Monitoring and Surveillance); and,
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders (Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications).
ER 2.1 - Expected Results: Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Mitigation of human health risks associated with contamination of water, food and sanitation on board passenger conveyances (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement).
ER 3.1 - Expected Results: Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities (Risk Assessment);
  • Risk management measures under CEPA and/or Fisheries Act;
  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans (Research);
  • Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food, consumer products and waste (Monitoring and Surveillance);
  • Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures (Compliance Promotion); and,
  • Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions (Enforcement).

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organizations
  • Health Canada
    • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
      • Tobacco Control Directorate
    • First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
    • Communications and Public Affairs Branch
    • Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
    • Public Health Infrastructure
    • Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
  • Public Safety Canada
    • Akwesasne
    • Policy Development
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • Police Operations
  • Canada Border Services Agency
    • Risk Assessment
    • Admissibility Determination
  • Canada Revenue Agency
    • Taxpayer and Business Assistance
  • Public Prosecutions Service Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2001

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated from 2007-08 to 2021-22 (dollars)

789,603,545

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars)

529,960,780

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars)

438,120,654

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Governance structures

Health Canada is the lead department for the federal government with responsibility for the coordination and implementation of the FTCS.

Federal partners manage the control of tobacco products through monitoring and assessing the illicit and licit tobacco markets:

  • Public Safety Canada - leads and works with federal partners to develop and coordinate strategic approaches and activities to monitor and combat contraband tobacco activity and related crime;
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police - works with federal partners to identify and investigate criminal activities and to coordinate information on national and international contraband tobacco issues;
  • The Canada Border Services Agency - increases knowledge of contraband domestically and internationally by liaising with tobacco authorities at all levels and by monitoring and providing regular reports on both national and global contraband tobacco. The Canada Border Services Agency provides reports, information and guidance to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure of tobacco;
  • The Canada Revenue Agency - administers the Excise Act 2001, which governs federal taxation of tobacco products and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada; and,
  • Public Prosecutions Service Canada - monitors federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences in order to enforce and recover outstanding fines.
Contact information
  • Suzy McDonald
    Director General
    Tobacco Control Directorate
    Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
    Health Canada
    Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9
    Telephone number: 613-941-1977
    E-mail address: suzy.mcdonald@canada.ca
Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy was initiated in 2001. In 2012, the Strategy was renewed for five years to provide a focused federal presence to preserve the gains of the past decade and continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence. The renewed Strategy focuses on the core areas of federal responsibility and invests in new priorities including populations with higher smoking rates. The objective of the Strategy is to reduce the use of tobacco and the potential for tobacco-related death and disease in Canada. The Strategy was further extended by one year to March 2018 in order to provide sufficient time to develop a new and innovative long-term plan.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22 lead by Health Canada

Shared outcome of federal partners

To preserve the gains made over the past decade, and to continue the downward trend in smoking prevalence.

Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Activity Architecture Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from 2017-18 to 2021-22) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Link to department's Strategic Outcomes [or Core Responsibilities] Link to government priorities
Health Canada 2.5 Substance Use and Abuse Policy and International Commitments; Research & Surveillance; Regulations & Compliance. 148,244,995 29,648,999 ER 1.1 PI 1.1 T1.1 Strategic Outcome No. 2:Table footnote 1
Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadian
Growth for the middle class
3.1.1.3 Health Living Federal Tobacco Control Strategy Community Interventions. 25,000,000 5,000,000
Public Health Agency of CanadaFootnote * 1.1.2 Public Health Information and Networks Policy & International Commitments 1,025,000 205,000 Strategic Outcome No. 2:
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally.
Growth for the middle class
1.2.3 Chronic (non-communicable Disease and Injury Prevention Community Interventions 10,000,000 2,000,000 Strategic Outcome No. 2:
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Growth for the middle class
Public Safety Canada 1.3.2.1
1.3 Countering Crime
1.3.2 Law Enforcement Leadership
1.3.2.1 - Serious and Organized Crime
Akwesasne 2,250,000 450,000 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 Public Safety Canada's Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Resilient Canada Growth for the Middle Class Security and Opportunity
Policy Development 800,000 160,000 Growth for the Middle Class Security and Opportunity
Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceTable footnote ** 1.1.2.3 Criminal IntelligenceTable footnote ** Criminal Intelligence 3,760,505 752,101 E.R. 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 Strategic Outcome No. 2:
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Growth for the Middle Class Security and Opportunity
1.1.3.1 Technical Investigations Technical Investigations $3,958,545 $791,701 E.R. 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 Strategic Outcome No. 2:
Canada's police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Growth for the Middle Class Security and Opportunity
Internal Services N/A 291,398 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Canada Border Services AgencyTable footnote *** 1.1 Risk Assessment 1.1.1 Intelligence 15,200,000 2,717,208 E.R. 4.1 PI 4.1 N/A Strategic Outcome No. 1:
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.
Growth for the Middle Class Security and Opportunity
1.3 Admissibility Determination 1.3.1 Highway Mode
1.3.2 Air Mode
1.3.3 Rail Mode
1.3.4 Marine Mode
1.3.5 Postal
1.3.6 Courier Low Value Shipment
0 301,920 E.R. 4.1 P. 4.1 N/A Strategic Outcome No. 1:
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.
Growth for the Middle Class Security and Opportunity
Canada Revenue Agency PA1. Taxpayer and business assistance
PA2. Assessment of returns and payment processing
Regulations & Compliance 4,444,550 888,910 ER 5.1 PI 5.1 T 5.1 Strategic Outcome No. 1:
Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada's revenue base is protected.
Growth for the Middle Class
Public Prosecutions Service Canada Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions Regulations & Compliance     ER 6.1 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total for all federal organizations   214,683,595 43,207,237  

Note: The amounts in the above table include Shared Services Canada core information technology services and PWGSC accommodation costs

Performance indicators
PI 1.1 - Performance Indicators: Health Portfolio
  • % of current Canadian (aged 15+) tobacco product users reduced;
  • % of products that are deemed to be non-compliant with the Tobacco Act and its Regulations related to manufacturing and importing through the inspection program;
  • # of World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) reports issued on progress every two years;
  • #, nature and reach (# of participants of interventions/projects implemented PHAC); and,
  • # of smoke-free spaces situated in First Nations and Inuit communities.
PI 2.1 - Performance Indicators: Public Safety Canada
  • % of FTCS activities that are coordinated with its partners, with Provinces/Territories and other stakeholders;
  • % of FTCS activities/outputs generate knowledge/awareness of the contraband tobacco market;
  • Number of environmental scans, policy analyses, threat assessments, intelligence, and other reports as well as surveys and studies generated and used to: inform senior officials; develop policies and/or directions; support participation to the WHO; and,
  • Number of Interdepartmental Strategic Level Forum meetings held.
PI 3.1 - Performance Indicators: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • List intelligence reports disseminated to our partners, including: Canada Revenue Agency (CRA); Finance Canada; Public Safety (PS); Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC); and, Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA);
  • Description of engagements among FTCS partners, particularly within the Public Safety Portfolio (committees, working groups, etc.); and,
  • # of border sensors deployed.
PI 4.1 - Performance Indicators: Canada Border Services Agency
  • # of relevant reports related to contraband tobacco;
  • % of engagement forums with provincial and territorial governments and other authorities; and,
  • Average dollar value of goods, shipments and conveyances seized attributed to Intelligence.
PI 5.1 - Performance Indicators: Canada Revenue Agency
  • # of audits and regulatory reviews completed; and,
  • # of returns and rebates processed and the gross excise duty assessed.
Targets
T 1.1 - Targets: Health Portfolio
  • Fewer than 17% of Canadians report any tobacco product use in the past year;
  • Less than 5% of tobacco products are non-compliant with the Tobacco Act and its Regulations; and,
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada: 700 smoke-free spaces.
T 2.1 - Targets: Public Safety Canada
  • 100% of FTCS activities are coordinated with its partners, with provinces/territories and other stakeholders;
  • 100% of FTCS activities/outputs generate knowledge/awareness of the contraband tobacco market;
  • Ten environmental scans, policy analyses, threat assessments, intelligence, and other reports as well as surveys and studies generated and used to: inform senior officials, develop policies and/or directions; support participation to the WHO; and,
  • Two Interdepartmental Strategic Level Forum meetings held.
T 3.1 - Targets: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Two Reports
    1. Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) Annual Report.
    2. Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) Mid-Year Report.
  • The RCMP will continue to be actively involved in the following three fora:
    1. The Interprovincial Investigations Conference (IIC): The aim is to develop, increase and maintain cooperation among all those who are involved in combating the contraband tobacco market by providing current information and contacts in other jurisdictions.
    2. The U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop: The workshop aims to bring together managers, investigators and analysts as well as relevant agencies involved in tobacco enforcement. The workshop is part of an ongoing commitment by the core agencies to address the growing illicit tobacco market and its cross-border flow through an integrated policing and intelligence-sharing approach.
    3. The Joint Agency Group Contraband Tobacco Control Meeting: The aim is to develop, increase and maintain cooperation among all those who are involved in combating the contraband tobacco market by providing current information and contacts in other jurisdictions.
  • 100 Border sensors deployed
T 4.1 - Targets: Canada Border Services Agency
  • 2017-18 targets are under development. These will be reported on in the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.
T 5.1 - Targets: Canada Revenue Agency
  • 100% of audit and regulatory review coverage of federal tobacco licensees; and,
  • 100% of accounts maintained and transactions processed.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source would include the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey and the Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Survey which are done every 24 months and the FTCS annual performance report.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners
ER 1.1 - Expected Results: Health Portfolio

The Health Portfolio (Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada) will achieve results in the following areas:

  • Regulations and Compliance - Lead the development of regulations, including the development of an approach for the plain packaging of tobacco products. Conduct compliance monitoring activities and undertake enforcement measures with respect to the Tobacco Act and its regulations;
  • Research - Conduct scientific and market research and surveillance to support decision making and the development of policies and regulations;
  • Policy - Lead the process for renewal of the policy authority of the FTCS, work towards the development of an approach for the plain packaging of tobacco products, and facilitate stakeholder engagement. As well, lead Canada's participation in the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) obligations, as well as collaborating with provinces and territories in tobacco control activities;
  • Litigation - Provide base funding for tobacco litigation and for the defense of the Tobacco Act and its regulations; and,
  • Community Interventions - Funding will be used to leverage existing networks and seek innovative partnerships that contribute to an integrated approach to chronic disease prevention. Working in partnerships with the public and private sectors we will promote healthy living and prevent chronic diseases caused by risk factors such as tobacco use. In addition, funding will contribute to supporting interventions and programming that aim to reduce tobacco use, particularly among young adults, First Nations on-reserve and Inuit in recognized Inuit communities.
ER 2.1 - Expected Results: Public Safety Canada
  • Enhance partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police through the administration of contribution funding for the monitoring activities in connection with determining trends and levels of contraband tobacco activity;
  • Lead interdepartmental efforts to analyze the likely implementation costs and benefits to Canada associated with the Protocol to Eliminate the Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products under the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and,
  • Provide policy leadership and strategy development to support law enforcement efforts to combat organized crime involved in the contraband tobacco market, including leading meetings of the inter-departmental Strategic Level Forum, supporting participation to the WHO, and establishing the plans and implementation of agreement to support up to five First Nations officers to address organized crime activities in First Nation communities.
ER 3.1 - Expected Results: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Criminal Intelligence: The RCMP will collect, collate, and analyze data related to the contraband tobacco market and provide regular reports to partner law enforcement agencies, government and non-governmental agencies. The RCMP will continue to participate in joint agency meetingsand to be involved in information and intelligence sharing with domestic and international law enforcement partners. In addition, the RCMP will provide support and subject matter expertise to criminal investigations and prosecutions.
  • Technical Investigations: The RCMP will provide technical tools and employ technology to enhance detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions. Advancements in technology are essential to provide vital intelligence for criminal investigations and border security. Border surveillance technologies are deployed to detect cross-border criminality including contraband. Front-line police officers rely heavily on this technology in the fight against well-orchestrated organized crime networks that target the border to move illicit tobacco products.
ER 4.1 - Expected Results: Canada Border Services Agency

Risk Assessment

  • Provide advice to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco;
  • Monitor and report on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada;
  • Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners; and,
  • Collection of tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians.
ER 5.1 - Expected Results: Canada Revenue Agency
  • Ensure compliance with legislative requirements imposed on the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada;
  • Verify export activity;
  • Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco;
  • Support Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada Border Services Agency enforcement activities; and,
  • Maintain accounts and provide services related to transactions (including refunds), and produce reports of tobacco-related activities.
ER 6.1 - Expected Results: Public Prosecutions Service Canada

Funding for this activity has ended.

Planning information
  • Plain Packaging - Development of an approach for plain packaging requirements for tobacco products;
  • FTCS Modernization - Develop and seek approval of policy options to support the FTCS modernization process;
  • Vaping - Support Tobacco Act legislative amendments and develop new compliance monitoring and enforcement training program;
  • Menthol Prohibition - Develop new compliance monitoring and enforcement training program should the Menthol Order come into force;
  • Pan-Canadian Quitline - Help more Canadians quit smoking by providing provinces and territories with funding to support increased utilization of quitline services as a result of the pan-Canadian quitline and web address appearing on cigarette and little cigar packages;
  • First Nations on-reserve and Inuit Community initiatives - Provide support to First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities to implement and strengthen comprehensive tobacco control measures;
  • Marketing awareness and outreach - Through the Break It Off tobacco cessation campaign — collaboration between Health Canada and the Canadian Cancer Society — encourage young adults aged 20 to 24 to quit smoking and stay smoke-free;
  • Encouraging young adults aged 20 to 24 to quit smoking and stay smoke-free. The Break it Off tobacco cessation campaign is a collaboration between Health Canada and the Canadian Cancer Society;
  • Chronic disease risk factors - Provide funding for tobacco related interventions that aim to reduce tobacco use as a chronic disease risk factor by aligning with broader disease prevention strategies; and,
  • Contraband - Advance efforts to combat the trafficking and cross-border smuggling of contraband tobacco, organized crime involvement related to these activities, participation in World Health Organization (WHO) fora and initiatives, implementation of placing up to five First Nation officers with First Nation police services and leading meetings of the inter-departmental Strategic Level Forum to address the issue of contraband tobacco.

Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative

Lead departments

Health Canada

Federal partner organizations
  • Health Canada
    • First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
  • Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
    • Children and Families Branch
Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

September 29, 2016

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2019

Total federal funding allocated (2016-17 to 2018-19) (dollars)

382,500,000

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars)

Not applicable

Total federal actual spending to March 2016 (dollars)

N/A

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

N/A

Governance structures

The Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative will have joint Health Canada and INAC Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)-level oversight. A new ADM-level committee consisting of Health Canada FNIHB's Senior ADM and INAC's ADM of Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships will meet regularly, and as often as needed to:

  • provide oversight and strategic direction on implementation of this initiative;
  • oversee financial management of investments (Enhanced Service Coordination and Service Access Resolution fund);
  • engage and negotiate with P/Ts and First Nations leadership on the development of long-term policy and program reforms;
  • discuss requests, policy and programming issues and seek resolution and solutions (respectively);
  • monitor progress and results;
  • manage exceptions beyond the provincial/territorial normative standards and create a process for appeals;
  • engage and negotiate with Province/Territories (P/T) and First Nations leadership on the development of a long-term plan, including consideration of federal and P/T roles and responsibilities in an integrated system of supports and services; and,
  • coordinate and assess horizontal impacts (e.g., Health Accord; Truth and Reconciliation Commission).
Contact information
  • Tracey Hazelwood
    Jordan's Principle National Coordinator
    Health Canada
    613-952-4646
    tracey.hazelwood@hc-sc.gc.ca
  • Neil McVicar
    Children and Families Directorate
    Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
    Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

Jordan's Principle applies to all First Nations children and all jurisdictional disputes, including those between federal government departments. The Child-First Initiative is one of a series of proactive measures under Jordan's Principle to address the needs of the most vulnerable children.

The Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to help ensure that First Nations children have access to health and social services available to children elsewhere in their province/territory. For some of these children, service delivery problems may arise because of the involvement of both federal and provincial/territorial service providers, resource limitations, geographic location, and limitation of existing programs.

The Government of Canada has committed up to $382.5 million in new funding for this proactive response implemented over three years starting in 2016-17, with the objective to improve service coordination and ensure service access resolution so that children's needs are assessed and responded to quickly. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

This initiative aligns with the Health Canada Strategic Outcome 3: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status, and with Indigenous and Northern Affair's Strategic Outcome 2: The People - Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

A program review (i.e., Formative Evaluation) is scheduled to be completed by 2018-19.

Shared outcome of federal partners

First Nations children receive health and social supports.

Performance indicators
  • The number of First Nations children requesting services through the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative who receive services consistent with the provincial/territorial normative standard of care.
  • The number and percentage of First Nations parents and guardians requesting services for their children through the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative reporting on follow-up that they have access to a coordinated system of supports and services.
  • The number of First Nations children requesting services through the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative who have accessed specific services by type of service (such as respite care, home and community care, speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy).
Targets

A target will be set once a baseline is established after the first year results are gathered and analyzed.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

  • Focal Point Case Management Form (annual reporting)
  • Client Satisfaction Survey (annual reporting)
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners

N/A

Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to organization's Program Activity Architecture Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to government priorities
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status. 3.1.3.3 Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative. 381,215,704 137,486,282 ER 1.1 PI 1.1 T 1.1 Strategic Outcome 3: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals received health services and benefits that are responsible to their needs so as to improve their health status. Diversity is Canada's Strength
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Assisted Living; First Nation Child and Family Services; Income Assistance; Education programs Strategic Outcome 2: The People - Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit. 1,284,296 513,718 ER 1.1 PI 1.1 T 1.1 Strategic Outcome 2: The People - Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit. Diversity is Canada's Strength
Total for all federal organizations 382,500,000Table footnote * 138,000,000Table footnote * N/A
ER 1.1 - Expected Results: Health Canada & Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

First Nations children receive health and social supports.

PI 1.1 - Performance Indicators: Health Canada & Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
  • The number of First Nations children requesting services through the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative who receive services consistent with the provincial/territorial normative standard of care.
  • The number and percentage of First Nations parents and guardians requesting services for their children through the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative reporting on follow-up that they have access to a coordinated system of supports and services.
  • The number of First Nations children requesting services through the Jordan's Principle - A Child-First Initiative who have accessed specific services by type of service (such as respite care, home and community care, speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy).
T 1.1 - Targets: Health Canada & Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

A target will be set once a baseline is established after the first year results are gathered and analyzed.

Internal audits

Internal audits
Title of internal audit Internal audit subject Status Expected completion date
Audit of the Grants and Contribution Management Control Framework Transfer payment agreement management, internal controls, IT systems In progress December 2017
Audit of Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals program Planned March 2018
Audit of First Nations and Inuit Youth Mental Health Programming Management Control Framework Planned March 2018
Audit of Accounts Receivable Financial Management Planned February 2018

Programs planned to be evaluated in the next five yearsPrograms - Footnote 1

Programs planned to be evaluated in the next five years
Fiscal year (of the planned date for deputy head approval of the evaluation report) Title of the evaluation Completion of last evaluation Link to department's Program Inventory Planned spending associated with the program(s) evaluated (dollars)Table footnote 2
2017-18 Contributions to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute 2012 (Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Organizations 2008-2009 to 2012-2013) 1.1.1 Health System Priorities 7,600,000
2017-18 Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-2018: Education Immigration Communities - Horizontal led by CH 2013 1.3 Official Language Minority Community Development 1,418,752
2017-18 Canadian Blood Services Contribution Program 2013 2.1.2 Biologics and Radio-pharmaceuticals 8,580,000
2017-18 Food Safety (including Veterinary Drugs) 2014 (Evaluation of the Food Safety and Nutrition Quality Program) 2.2.1 Food Safety 54,834,239
2017-18 Canadian Drug and Substances Strategy - Horizontal led by Health Canada 2012 2.5.2 Controlled Substances 0
2017-18 Marijuana for Medical Purposes Program N/A 2.5.2 Controlled Substances 33,350,958
2017-18 Nutrition North Canada - Horizontal led by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) 2014 (Evaluation of Healthy Living and Healthy Child Development) 3.1.1.3 First Nations and Inuit (FN&I) Healthy Living 13,445,455
2017-18 FN&I Clinical and Client Care 2013 3.1.3.1 FN&I Clinical and Client Care 200,311,598
2017-18 BC Tripartite Governance 2013 3.3.3 Tripartite Health Governance 468,083,328
2018-19 Health Care Policy Contribution Program 2013 1.1.1 Health System Priorities 26,874,000
2018-19 Transfer Payments to Pan-Canadian Organisations 2014 1.1.1 Health System Priorities 202,557,748
2018-19 Food Safety Information Network - Horizontal led by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) 2013 2.2.1 Food Safety 539,525
2018-19 Animal Health Program (including BSE) - Horizontal led by CFIA 2014 2.2.1 Food Safety 1,180,133
2018-19 Federal Contaminated Sites - Horizontal led by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2014 2.3 Environmental Risks to Health 0
2018-19 Chemicals Management Plan (including water quality) 2015 2.3.2 Water Quality 2.3.3 Health Impacts of Chemicals 66,084,828
2018-19 Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada - Horizontal led by the Public Health Agency of Canada 2014 3.1.2.1 FN&I Communicable Disease Control and Management 22,230,719
2018-19 First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan - Horizontal led by INAC 2013 3.1.2.2 FN&I Environmental Health 25,984,062
2018-19 FN&I Home and Community Care 2013 3.1.3.2 FN&I Home and Community Care 104,139,049
2018-19 Jordan's Principle N/A 3.1.3.3 Jordan's Principle 133,039,084
2018-19 FN&I Health Human Resources 2013 3.3.1.2 FN&I Health Human Resources 10,034,653
2019-20 Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program N/A 1.1.1 Health System Priorities 8,323,200
2019-20 Public Service Health Program N/A 1.2 Specialized Health Services 14,409,851
2019-20 Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network 2014 2.1.1 Pharmaceutical Drugs 898,086
2019-20 Consumer Product Safety 2014 (Evaluation of the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan) 2.4.1 Consumer Product Safety 30,336,356
2019-20 Workplace Chemical Safety N/A 2.4.2 Workplace Hazardous Materials 3,525,128
2019-20 Substance Use and Addictions Program 2010 2.5.2 Controlled Substances 26,350,014
2019-20 FN&I Healthy Child Development 2014 3.1.1.1 FN&I Healthy Child Development 100,876,970
2019-20 FN&I Healthy Living 2014 3.1.1.3 FN&I Healthy Living 66,075,632
2019-20 FN&I Communicable Disease Control and Management 2015 3.1.2.1 FN&I Communicable Disease Control and Management 36,609,472
2020-21 Canada Health Act Administration N/A 1.1.2 Canada Health Act Administration 1,643,801
2020-21 Implementation Review of HPFB Regulatory Program 2014 2.1.1 Pharmaceutical Drugs 2.1.2 Biologics and Radio-pharmaceuticals 2.1.3 Medical Devices 93,108,349
2020-21 Nutrition Policy and Promotion Program 2015 2.2.2 Nutrition Policy and Promotion 4,132,568
2020-21 Canada's Clean Air Regulatory Agenda - Horizontal led by ECCC 2015 2.3.1 Air Quality 21,414,008
2020-21 Pesticides Program 2015 2.7 Pesticides 33,759,225
2020-21 FN&I Mental Wellness 2016 3.1.1.2 FN&I Mental Wellness 357,092,482
2020-21 FN&I Health Planning and Quality Management (including Health Services Integration Fund) 2016 3.3.1.1 FN&I Health Planning and Quality Management 3.3.2.1 FN&I Systems Integration 135,139,637
2021-22 Genomics Research and Development Initiative - Horizontal led by National Research Council Canada (NRCC) 2017 1.1.1 Health Systems Priorities 20,253,474
2021-22 The Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2017 1.3 Official Language Minority Community Development 33,800,000
2021-22 Natural Health Products Program 2016 2.1.4 Natural Health Products 16,437,612
2021-22 Canada's Clean Air Agenda - Climate Change - Horizontal led by ECCC 2017 2.3.1 Air Quality 0
2021-22 Federal Tobacco Control Strategy and Vaping Activities 2017 2.5.1 Tobacco Control 24,301,279
2021-22 Radiation Protection Activities 2016 2.6 Radiation Protection 16,061,225
2021-22 FN&I Environmental Public Health 2016 3.1.2.2 FN&I Environmental Public Health 19,602,979
2021-22 FN&I Supplementary Health Benefits (Non-Insured Health Benefits) 2017 3.2 Supplementary Health Benefits for FN&I 1,232,305,489
2021-22 FN&I Health Facilities 2017 3.3.1.3 FN&I Health Facilities 140,992,085
2021-22 FN&I e-Health Infostructure 2017 3.3.2.1 FN&I Systems Integration 3.3.2.2 FN&I e-Health Infostructure 39,352,843
Total organizational spending       3,857,089,896

Programs with no planned evaluations in the next five yearsPrograms - Footnote 3

Programs with no planned evaluations in the next five years
Link to the departmental Program Inventory Completion of last evaluation Rationale for not evaluating in the current five-year cycle Planned spending associated with the programs not planned to be evaluated (dollars)
Contributions to the Brain Canada Foundation for the Brain Research Fund 2017 There is no plan to renew the program for the next five years 27,000,000
Employee Assistance Program 2014 Health Canada is the delivery agent rather than program owner.
Low Need: Evaluation conducted within last seven years (2014-15); No senior management or program need for evaluation.
Low Risk: Low Enterprise risk.
0
Internationally Protected Persons N/A Low Need: No requirement to inform major policy or spending decisions.
Low Risk: Low Enterprise risk.
390,442
Total organizational spending     27,390,442

Total planned organizational spending in dollars (programs planned to be evaluated in the next five years plus programs with no planned evaluations in the next five years): $3,884,480,338

Up-Front Multi Year Funding

Conditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway

General Information

Name of recipient

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start date

March 31, 2001(a)

(a) The original allocation (2001) was governed by a Memorandum of Understanding. Presently, Infoway is accountable for the provisions of four active funding agreements, signed in: March 2003 (encompasses 2001 and 2003 allocations), March 2004, March 2007, and March 2010.

End date

March 31, 2015(b)

(b) As per the 2010 funding agreement, the duration of the agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Up-Front Multi-Year Funding provided has been expended; or March 31, 2015. The duration of the 2007 funding agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Grant Funding provided has been expended; or March 31, 2012

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture:
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1B to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding and consisting of: $500M in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority; $600M in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100M in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400M in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait times reductions; and $500M in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of healthcare and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)
Total Funding Approved Total Funding Received Planned Funding
2017-18
Planned Funding
2018-19
Planned Funding
2019-20
2,100,000,000 2,043,159,418Footnote (c) To be determinedFootnote (d) To be determinedFootnote (d) To be determinedFootnote (d)

Note: Infoway is also reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5M or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Summary of annual plans of recipient

Digital health technologies are key enablers for health innovation that will help bridge gaps in delivering care and bending cost curves. With federal funds, Infoway has co-invested with provincial/territorial governments in critical foundational assets that form the basic infostructure of Canada's digital health ecosystem. This infostructure can now be leveraged to empower Canadians and deliver better health system outcomes. In 2017-18, Infoway will also continue to invest in technologies that will enable patients to take control and manage their health, as well as support seamless care coordination, communication and collaboration among patients, their families and their care teams. To support ongoing health innovation across Canada, Infoway has identified four goals for 2017-18.

  1. Promote medication safety, patient and provider convenience and efficiency through PrescribeIT™, a multi-jurisdiction e-prescribing solution.
    PrescribeIT™ will allow a community-based prescriber to electronically transmit a prescription to a patient's pharmacy of choice, thereby facilitating collaboration among health care providers to support safer prescribing and improving efficiencies in the prescribing process. When fully operational, it will support other aspects of medication management, e.g., providing prescribing analytics to regulators and policy makers and support for prescription drug monitoring programs. During 2017-18, Infoway will:
    • Launch and pilot test the PrescribeIT™ service in two provinces with participation from the targeted number of prescribers, pharmacies, and electronic medical records and pharmacy management system suppliers.
    • Expand the reach of the service by securing commitments from one additional jurisdiction and retail pharmacy organizations representing at least half of retail stores in targeted provinces.
    • Meet Infoway's commitments to Health Canada's Action on Opioid Misuse.
  2. Scale and spread innovative technologies, especially in priority areas where digital health has demonstrated the greatest potential.
    Providing digital health technologies to Canadians supports health care transformation by breaking down outmoded care delivery silos, increasing access to care, improving the effectiveness of care, and generating savings that can be reinvested in high-quality health care. Emerging evidence demonstrates that improved patient satisfaction and better access to health information results in better health outcomes. These improved outcomes, together with the added convenience that digital health technology provides, also contribute to system efficiencies. During 2017-18, Infoway will:
    • Scale and expand telehomecare technologies in at least five jurisdictions to support an additional 5,000 patients to receive care in their homes.
    • Engage with patients/families and support clinical and faculty peer networks, to ensure robust input into Infoway's priorities, and effective use of digital health tools.
    • Contingent on new funding, partner with stakeholders and invest in digitally connecting care, particularly in priority areas where there is great need e.g., chronic disease management, mental health, palliative care, and access to health care services for Indigenous peoples and others in remote and isolated communities.
  3. Connect Canadians with their health information so they can more actively manage their health and wellness.
    Infoway and its jurisdiction partners have put in place the strong digital health technology foundations necessary for patient engagement and connectivity. These foundational systems are now ready to be leveraged to empower Canadians to take control of their health and create seamless interactions with their care team. To this end, Infoway plans to launch a new program called MyHealth Coast to Coast (MyHealth C2C) to increase Canadians' access to their health information through their preferred digital devices, by establishing and expanding patient platforms across Canada and bringing together the data stored in clinical systems funded through past investments. During 2017-18, Infoway will:
    • Work with partners to bring existing EHR and EMR projects to or near completion and enable further leveraging of those systems for patients' access to their health information.
    • Continue to leverage current knowledge and support the deployment of patient portals in at least three jurisdictions.
    • Contingent on new funding, launch the MyHealth C2C program, and undertake planning for proof-of-concepts of the enabling platform and services with partner jurisdictions.
  4. Continue to provide digital health thought leadership by influencing relevant policies and legislation, and leading efforts in solution architecture, clinical interoperability, standards as well as privacy and security.
    Improving patients' and families' health experiences, optimizing outcomes and maximizing value for money spent on health care are not technology-only issues. Meeting these objectives requires several critical enablers: effective governance and leadership; supportive legislation and policies; people capacity within a culture of collaboration; practice and process change; interoperable and connected systems; and strong business cases for investments. In addition to its role as an investor, Infoway works to address these critical enablers, both independently and by collaborating with stakeholders. During 2017-18, Infoway will:
    • Facilitate implementation and adoption efforts by providing leadership and insights in the areas of privacy, security, architecture and standards, interoperability, change management, and the effective use of emerging technologies.
    • With its partners, stimulate the Canadian economy through investment expenditures, and advance its Benefits Evaluation Strategy with a focus on research into Consumer Health Solutions, e-prescribing implementation and roll-out, and the value of EHRs.
    • Catalyze digital health by focusing and incenting innovation that promotes standardized approaches across the country.
    • Continue to promote the benefits and appropriate use of data and analytics to enable a high-performing system in the context of the envisioned digital health ecosystem.

For additional information, please see Infoway's 2017-18 Summary Corporate Plan.

Conditional Grant to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI)

General Information

Name of recipient

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

Start date

1996-97

End date

N/A

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1 Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities
Description

The Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) previously operated as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF), an arms-length, non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to fund health services research and promote the use of research evidence to strengthen the delivery of health services. CHSRF received $151.1 million in federal funding under separate up-front grants (1996-97 to 2003-04) as outlined below.

To reflect the evolution of its work, CHSRF was renamed CFHI in 2012. The organization is now receiving contribution funding which supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify savings and efficiencies in the health system by: building leadership and skill capacity; enabling patient, family and community engagement; applying improvement methodology to drive measurable results; and, creating collaboratives to spread evidence-informed improvements.

Up-front multi-year funding to CFHI has included:

1996-97: A $66.5M endowment established the CHSRF. Additional federal grants were provided to CHSRF for the following purposes:

1999: $25M to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention, management, leadership and the issues emerging from health system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund).

1999: $35M to support its participation in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

2003: $25M to develop a program to equip health system managers and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use research to better manage the Canadian health care system (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA).

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)
Total Funding Approved Total Funding Received Planned Funding
2015-16
Planned Funding
2016-17
Planned Funding
2017-18
151,500,000 1996 - 66,500,000
1999 - 60,000,000
2003 - 25,000,000
N/A N/A N/A

Note: CFHI is also reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Summary of annual plans of recipient

CFHI facilitates ongoing interaction, collaboration, and exchange of ideas and information between governments, policy-makers, health system leaders and providers. It does so by converting evidence and innovative practices into actionable health care improvement policies, programs, tools and leadership development programs.

As a result of a transition to the receipt of contribution funding in response to Budget 2015 and 2016 funding commitments to CFHI, any remaining up-front, multi-year funding will be held in reserve for costs related to its potential organizational wind-down (e.g. legal obligations related to its pension plan and contracts), should it be required in the future.

User Fees and Regulatory Charge

Fee proposal name

Pest Control Products Fees and Charges Regulations

Fee type(s)

Regulatory

Fee-setting authority

  • Financial Administration Act
  • Pest Control Products Act

Reason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

  • Cost increases owing to inflation and the growing complexity of pest control product applications.

Effective date of planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

2017-18

Consultation and review process planned

Informal stakeholder consultations on the modernization of the pest control product cost recovery regime began in 2010. Consultations were conducted with registrants of pest control products, importers, exporters and distributors, Canadian agriculture producers and associations, federal and provincial government departments and the Canadian public. Input from these consultations was used to develop the proposed fee structure.

Regular bilateral and multilateral consultations (with registrants of pest control products, Canadian agriculture producers and associations, federal and provincial government departments and the Canadian public), including discussions of proposed fees, occurred between 2010 and 2015 via meetings of the Economic Management Advisory Council and the Pest Management Advisory Council (Health Canada's PMRA advisory bodies) as well as formal presentations to committees of CropLife Canada and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (i.e. the main industry associations for the pest control product industries).

On March 14, 2014, the Pesticide Cost Recovery Consultation — A Consultation Document in Advance of Parliamentarywas published and posted on the Health Canada Web site and provided a 45-day comment period. As part of the consultation process, Health Canada hosted two webinars (on March 19, 2014, and April 17, 2014) to provide stakeholders with an overview of the proposal as they developed comments on the proposal for submission to Health Canada.

Industries, individuals and Canadians have also been consulted through the Consulting with Canadians website and the Canada Gazette, Part I at appropriate times during the regulatory development process.

Canada Gazette Part I: Notices and Proposed Regulations
ARCHIVED — Vol. 150, No. 24 — June 11, 2016
Pest Control Products Fees Regulations

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