Proposed Special Review Decision PSRD2020-04, Special Reviews of Pymetrozine and Its Associated End-use Products

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Pest Management Regulatory Agency
15 October 2020
ISSN: 2561-636 (PDF version)
Catalogue number: H113-30/2020-4E-PDF (PDF version)

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Table of contents

1.0 Introduction

Pursuant to subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) initiated a special review of pymetrozine in 2015 (Canada, 2015) based on the 2014 Norway regulatory decision to prohibit all uses of pymetrozine (Rotterdam Convention 2014). The aspect of concern for the special review under subsection 17(2) is relevant to human health (potential carcionogenicity of pymetrozine).

In addition, pursuant to subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act, Health Canada initiated a special review of pymetrozine in 2017 (Canada, 2017) based on information related to pymetrozine and its transformation products in drinking water. The aspect of concern for the special review under subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act is relevant to human health (potential cancer risk from pymetrozine and its metabolites through drinking water exposure).

Pursuant to subsection 18(4) of the Pest Control Products Act, Health Canada has evaluated the aspects of concern that prompted the above two special reviews of pest control products containing pymetrozine.

Scientific assessments and the proposed special review decisions of pymetrozine under subsection 17(2) and subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act are outlined below.

2.0 Uses of pymetrozine in Canada

Pymetrozine is an insecticide used for the control of aphids in leafy vegetables (Crop Group 4), potatoes, highbush blueberries, tobacco, Rhodiola rosea, outdoor ornamentals, greenhouse vegetables (pepper, tomato, cucumber and eggplant) and to control Balsam twig aphid on Christmas trees. It is also registered for the control of aphids and the reduction of whiteflies on ornamental plants in greenhouses.

Pymetrozine end-use products are formulated as water dispersible granules. Application methods include aerial, groundboom, airblast and handheld equipment. All registered pest control products containing pymetrozine (Appendix I of PSRD2020-04) are considered for the two special reviews.

3.0 Aspects of concern that prompted the special review:

Special review under subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act: Based on the review of the Norway information (Rotterdam Convention, 2014), Health Canada identified the aspect of concern that prompted the special review of pymetrozine under subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act as:

Special review under subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act: Based on information related to pymetrozine and its metabolites in drinking water, Health Canada identified the aspect of concern that prompted the special review under subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act as:

4.0 Evaluation of the aspect of concern that prompted the special review

Following the initiation of the special reviews, Health Canada requested information related to the aspects of concern from provinces and other relevant federal government departments and agencies in accordance with subsection 18(2) of the Pest Control Products Act. In response, no information was received related to the aspects of concern. In addition, Health Canada requested information from the provinces with respect to available water monitoring data of pymetrozine, and information received was considered in the assessment.

In order to evaluate the aspects of concern for pymetrozine, Health Canada considered currently available relevant scientific information, which includes the information submitted by the registrant under subsection 19(1) of the Pest Control Products Act, environmental fate information from the European Commission, the Canadian water monitoring data, the Norwegian decision, and existing Health Canada assessments (Canada 2002 and Canada, 2003).

4.1 Evaluation of the aspect of concern under subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act: potential carcinogenicity of pymetrozine

Based on the available information, pymetrozine is not considered to be genotoxic. Long-term studies in both rats and mice provided evidence of treatment-related tumours in the liver at the highest dose level tested in both mice and rats. A slightly increased incidence in benign hepatoma or carcinoma or combined hepatoma and carcinoma was also seen at the second highest dose level in female rats and male mice (Canada, 2002).

Possible genotoxic effects for the metabolite CGA 300407 were mentioned in the Norwegian decision (Rotterdam Convention, 2014). The available information on the pymetrozine metabolite, CGA 300407 (CA 1055 B), showed that CGA 300407 was negative in the bacterial reverse mutation assay and did not induce micronuclei in a mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, although it was uncertain if the test material reached the bone marrow in the second study. It was also negative in an unscheduled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis assay with primary mouse hepatocytes. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the mouse liver in vitro (Comet assay). However, CGA 300407 was clastogenic in mammalian cytogenetic assays in Chinese hamster ovary cells and in human lymphocytes in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. It also induced DNA damage in the mouse fore-stomach in vivo. Overall, Health Canada concluded that the available information does not provide sufficient evidence to indicate that CGA 300407 is less toxic than parent pymetrozine. In addition, genotoxicity of other metabolites of pymetrozine was considered as part of the dietary assessment (see Section 4.2.2).

In order to determine the approach for characterization of cancer risks for pymetrozine, Health Canada considered all available information, including several mechanistic type studies conducted in rats and/or mice (for example, hepatic cell proliferation, liver and thyroid biochemical and morphology, promotional effects) (Canada, 2002), as well as the newly submitted data on the CGA 300407 metabolite. In light of the uncertainty regarding the mode of action for the observed pymetrozine-induced tumours, Health Canada continues to consider a more conservative quantitative risk assessment methodology utilizing linear extrapolation, as described in PRDD2002-03, to be appropriate for characterization of potential cancer risks in humans. A cancer potency factor (q1*) of 1.19 × 10–2 (mg/kg bw/day)-1 calculated on the basis of the total tumour data (combined benign hepatomas and carcinomas) from the mouse oncogenicity study was used to assess cancer risks for the Canadian population.

4.1.1 Potential cancer risk from exposure to pymetrozine

To determine if risk to Canadians from exposure to pymetrozine was acceptable, Health Canada conducted scientifically-based risk assessments relative to the aspect of concern (potential cancer risk).

Exposure to pymetrozine may occur through consuming food and drinking water, working as a mixer/loader/applicator, and/or by entering treated sites to perform postapplication activities. There is also a potential for non-occupational exposure to spray drift during commercial applications. As such, Health Canada assessed potential dietary (Section 4.1.1.1) occupational (Section 4.1.1.2) and non-occupational (Section 4.1.1.3) cancer risks resulting from exposure to pymetrozine.

The cancer risk is determined by calculating the lifetime average daily dose (LADD) from dermal, inhalation and/or oral exposure. The LADD is multiplied by the cancer potency factor (q1*) to obtain a lifetime cancer risk estimate, which is a measurement of probability. A lifetime cancer risk in the range of 1 × 10-5 in worker populations and in the range of 1 × 10-6 in residential populations is generally acceptable.

4.1.1.1 Dietary exposure and risk assessment

Based on the risk assessment, the cancer dietary (food plus drinking water) risk is not considered acceptable under the current conditions of use. To mitigate potential dietary risks, all outdoor uses of pymetrozine are proposed for cancellation. For details of the cancer dietary risk assessment refer to Section 4.2.5.

4.1.1.2 Occupational exposure and risk assessment

Exposure to pymetrozine may occur through working as a mixer/loader/applicator, and/or by entering treated sites to perform postapplication activities.

4.1.1.2.1 Dermal absorption factor

A dermal absorption factor was determined to be 7% based on an in vivo rat study (Canada, 2002).

4.1.1.2.2 Cancer risk assessment for mixer/loaders and applicators

There is a potential for dermal and inhalation exposure of workers mixing/loading and applying pymetrozine. Based on the current use pattern the following exposure scenarios are expected:

  • Mixing/loading of water-dispersible granules and application as a spray using groundboom equipment (outdoor ornamentals, potatoes, Crop Group 4 leafy vegetables, tobacco, Christmas trees, Rhodiola rosea)
  • Mixing/loading of water-dispersible granules and application as a spray using airblast equipment (outdoor ornamentals, Christmas trees, highbush blueberries)
  • Mixing/loading of water-dispersible granules and application as a spray using aerial equipment (potatoes)
  • Mixing/loading of water-dispersible granules and application as a spray using hand-held equipment (outdoor and greenhouse ornamentals, greenhouse tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and eggplants)
  • Mixing/loading of water-dispersible granules and application as a spray using an automated sprayer in a greenhouse (greenhouse ornamentals and greenhouse vegetables)

Chemical-specific handler exposure data were not available for pymetrozine, therefore, dermal and inhalation exposures were estimated using unit exposure data from the Agricultural Handlers Exposure Task Force (AHETF) and the Pesticide Handlers Database (PHED).

For workers mixing/loading and applying (M/L/A) using automated sprayers in greenhouses, only the mixing/loading scenario was assessed as no applicator exposure is anticipated for this type of application equipment.
Additional assumptions included using maximum application rates, default values for area treated per day, current personal protective equipment (PPE), and an average worker body weight of 80 kg. Dermal exposure was adjusted for a 7% dermal absorption factor. To calculate a lifetime average daily dose (LADD), daily exposure was amortized over an individual’s lifetime assuming an exposure frequency of 30 days per year, a career duration of 40 years, and a life expectancy of 78 years.

The cancer risk assessment for mixer/loaders and applicators is summarized in Appendix II, Tables 2.1 and 2.2 of PSRD2020-04. The estimated lifetime cancer risks for all assessed scenarios are below 1 × 10-5 (when workers are wearing a long-sleeved shirt, long pants and chemical-resistant gloves) and are considered acceptable. A label statement is proposed to indicate that the PPE required for workers involved in mixing/loading and application consists of a long-sleeved shirt, long pants and chemical-resistant gloves.

4.1.1.2.3 Cancer risk assessment for postapplication workers

For workers entering treated fields and greenhouses to conduct postapplication activities, dermal exposure is considered to be the primary route of exposure. Considering the low volatility of pymetrozine and assuming that at least 12 hours have passed before re-entry, inhalation exposure to pymetrozine is not expected to be of concern for postapplication workers re-entering treated sites (outdoor and indoor).

For workers re-entering a treated site, restricted-entry intervals (REIs) are calculated to determine the minimum length of time required before workers can enter after application. The REI is the duration of time that must elapse in order to allow residues to decline to a level where non-cancer and cancer risks are considered to be acceptable for postapplication worker activities.

Exposure to workers entering treated sites was estimated using activity-specific transfer coefficients (TCs) and dislodgeable foliar residue (DFR) values. The DFR refers to the amount of residue that can be dislodged or transferred from a surface, such as leaves of a plant. The TC is a measure of the relationship between exposure and DFRs for individuals engaged in a specific activity, and is calculated from data generated in field exposure studies. The TCs are specific to a given crop and activity combination and reflect standard agricultural work clothing worn by adult workers. The activity-specific TC from the Agricultural Re-Entry Task Force (ARTF) was used.
For cancer assessment, lifetime average daily dose (LADD) estimates were calculated assuming 30-day time-weighted average (TWA) DFR values, crop-specific TC values, an 8-hour work day, an average worker body weight of 80 kg, a dermal absorption factor of 7%, 30 days of exposure per year (unless otherwise stated), 40 year career duration, and a lifetime of 78 years. A maximum spray volume of 2000 L water/ha was assumed for the greenhouse risk assessments. In addition, a spray volume of 1000 L/ha was considered for the greenhouse cut flower assessment for refinement purposes. To obtain cancer risk estimates, the estimated LADD was multiplied by the q1*.

Outdoor uses

The postapplication cancer risk assessment for outdoor uses of pymetrozine is summarized in Appendix III, Table 3.1 of PSRD2020-04. The cancer risks to workers entering treated fields on day 0 (day of application) are considered acceptable for all outdoor uses except outdoor ornamentals grown for cut flowers. The cancer risk is not considered to be acceptable for workers involved in hand-harvesting, disbudding and hand-pruning of outdoor ornamentals grown for cut flowers. An REI of 1 day would be necessary to mitigate the postapplication exposure risk. However, as the outdoor uses are proposed for cancellation based on dietary risks of concern (see Section 4.2.5), the REI of one day is not included as part of the proposed risk management measures (Section 6.0).

Greenhouse uses

The postapplication cancer risk assessment for greenhouse uses of pymetrozine is summarized in Appendix III, Tables 3.2 and 3.3 of PSRD2020-04.

Cancer risk to greenhouse workers involved in postapplication activities in greenhouse vegetables and ornamentals are acceptable, except for workers involved in hand-harvesting, disbudding and hand-pruning of greenhouse ornamentals grown for cut flowers. Therefore, the following mitigation measures are proposed for greenhouse ornamentals grown for cut flowers:

  • A limit of 1000 L spray solution/ha and, a reduction of the maximum application rate from 10 g a.i./100 L to 8.5 g a.i./100 L

For greenhouse vegetables, the current product label only specifies a minimum spray volume of 1000 L water/ha, however a maximum spray volume is not specified. Therefore, a maximum spray volume of 2000 L/ha is proposed to be added for greenhouse vegetables for clarity.

The proposed label amendments are summarized in Appendix VII of PSRD2020-04.

4.1.1.3 Non-occupational exposure and risk assessment

There are no registered domestic-class products containing pymetrozine; therefore, domestic handler exposure is not anticipated. However, the current commercial end-use product labels do not limit application to only commercial settings. For clarity, a label statement prohibiting the use of pymetrozine in residential settings is required. But, as the outdoor uses are proposed for cancellation (based on dietary risk - Section 4.2.5), the label statement prohibiting the use of pymetrozine in residential settings is not included as part of the proposed risk management measures (Section 6.0).

There is a potential for exposure to pymetrozine residues during agricultural applications of pymetrozine (bystander) and from contact with treated ornamentals (retail plants).

For bystanders, potential exposure to spray drift is expected to be significantly lower than the inhalation exposure of an applicator, for whom the potential cancer inhalation risks are considered to be acceptable under current conditions of use (see Section 4.1.1.2.2). In addition, current labels have statements to mitigate spray drift to residential areas. On this basis, the potential risk to bystanders is considered to be acceptable under the current conditions of use. No further risk mitigation measures are proposed.

For individuals exposed to pymetrozine residues on retail plants, potential exposure is expected to occur on an intermittent short-term basis and to be significantly lower than exposure of greenhouse workers. The cancer risks for postapplication greenhouse workers is considered to be acceptable with the proposed mitigation measures (Section 4.1.1.2.3). On this basis, the potential cancer risks from exposure to pymetrozine residues on retail plants is also considered acceptable with the proposed mitigation measures (Section 6.0).

4.1.1.4 Aggregate exposure and risk assessment

Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a single pesticide that may occur from food, drinking water, residential, and other non-occupational sources from all known or plausible exposure routes (oral, dermal, and inhalation).

There are no residential uses registered, thus there is no direct exposure expected.

All outdoor uses of pymetrozine are proposed for cancellation to mitigate the cancer dietary risk (Section 6.0). Bystander exposure is not expected from greenhouse uses. Aggregate risk from food and water is considered acceptable for greenhouse uses.

For individuals handling treated retail plants, only greenhouse uses were considered in the aggregate risk assessment. Given the intermittent nature of exposure, potential exposure to pymetrozine residues on retail plants is not expected to make a significant contribution to overall exposure. On this basis, the aggregate cancer risks for individuals coming in contact with treated retail plants is considered to be acceptable provided that all outdoor uses are cancelled (Section 6.0).

4.1.1.5 Cumulative exposure and risk assessment

The Pest Control Products Act requires that Health Canada consider the cumulative exposure to pesticides with a common mechanism of toxicity according to SPN2018-02, Cumulative Health Risk Assessment Framework.

Pymetrozine is a 1,2,4-triazine. Health Canada will be conducting a cumulative health risk assessment for the triazine group of pesticides in the future.

Overall conclusion for the special review of pymetrozine under subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act:

Based on the available information, the assessment of the aspect of concern (potential carcionogenicity of pymetrozine) indicated that:

In addition, specify the maximum spray volume of 2000 L/ha for greenhouse vegetables for clarity.

4.2 Evaluation of the aspect of concern under subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act: potential cancer risk from pymetrozine and its metabolites through drinking water exposure

Potential carcinogenicity of pymetrozine and its metabolites is described under Section 4.1.

4.2.1 Environmental fate and behaviour of pymetrozine and its transformation products in the environment

Pymetrozine is stable to hydrolysis at pH 7 but undergoes hydrolysis under acidic conditions resulting in two major transformation products, CGA 215525 and CGA 300407.

In soil, phototransformation of pymetrozine is not expected to be a major route of transformation (half-lives ranged between 1.9 and 6.2 days). Aerobic biotransformation of pymetrozine exhibited a biphasic pattern with DT50 values between 5 to 527 days. Major transformation products were CGA 359009, CGA 363431, CGA 180777 and CGA 294849. Although CGA 363430, CGA 300407 and CGA 255548 residues were observed to exceed 10% of the parent, they were considered to be transitional in nature as quantities of these residues rapidly decreased.

In water, phototransformation of pymetrozine is a major route of transformation with a half-life of 2.1 days. Major aqueous phototransformation products were CGA 215525 and CGA 249257. CGA 359009 was the only major transformation product seen in aerobic aqueous biotransformation studies. Aerobic aqueous biotransformation followed a biphasic pattern (DT50 values: 7.6 to 527 days). Major transformation products found in anaerobic aqueous biotransformation studies were CGA 249257, GS 23199 and CGA 180777. The DT50 under anaerobic aqueous conditions was 74 to 109 days.

Pymetrozine is moderately mobile to immobile in soil, while its transformation products are moderately to very highly mobile in soil (Appendix IV, Table 4.1 of PSRD2020-04).

4.2.2 Exposure to the general public from treated wood

The residue definition in drinking water includes the parent (pymetrozine) and the following major transformation products, identified in environmental fate studies: CGA 215525, CGA 359009, CGA 249257, CGA 294849, CGA 363431 and GS 23199.

Although CGA 180777 (also known as niacin, a form of vitamin B12) was identified as a major transformation product in environmental fate studies (see Section 4.2.1 above), it was not included in the residue definition for drinking water as it is an essential nutrient, is ubiquitous in the environment and is not of toxicological concern.

The potential toxicity of the metabolites of pymetrozine and their impact on the residue definition were examined. It was concluded that there was insufficient evidence, based on the available information, to suggest that any of the metabolites (other than CGA 128632) were less toxic than pymetrozine and that they should be excluded from the residue definition on the basis of toxicity considerations.

4.2.3    Drinking water modelling

Level 2 Estimated Environmental Concentrations (EECs) for the combined residue of pymetrozine and six transformation products - CGA 215525, CGA 359009, CGA 249257, CGA 294849, CGA 363431, and GS 23199 expressed as parent equivalents - in potential sources of drinking water were calculated using the Pesticides in Water Calculator (PWC V 1.52) model. Modelling for surface water included a small reservoir adjacent to an agricultural field, and used scenarios representing different crops and regions across Canada. Modelling for groundwater used scenarios representing different regions of Canada. The reported EECs were the highest from across these scenarios. All scenarios were run for 50 years. The results are presented in Appendix V, Table 5.1 of PSRD2020-04. Environmental fate data used in the modelling are summarized in Appendix V, Tables 5.2 and 5.3 of PSRD2020-04.

4.2.4    Drinking water monitoring

A search for Canadian monitoring data (from the years 2000 to present) on pymetrozine in groundwater and surface water was undertaken as part of the special review. Limited Canadian data are available (surface water, Alberta only). American databases and reports were also searched for pymetrozine water monitoring data. The American databases searched included the California’s Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) database and the Water Quality Portal, which encompasses data from the United States Geological Survey’s National Water Quality Assessment program (NAWQA), and the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s STORET data warehouse. Annual Reports from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Pesticide Data Program were also included in the search.

No monitoring data were available for pymetrozine in groundwater from Canada. American monitoring data for pymetrozine in groundwater were rare (1 detection out of 845 samples), with the maximum concentration of pymetrozine detected in groundwater being 0.016 µg/L.

Detection of pymetrozine in Canadian and American surface water were rare (1 detection out of 2490 samples or 0.04% of samples), with the maximum concentration of pymetrozine being 0.0032 µg/L. Very little Canadian data is available and sampling is limited to Alberta. Therefore, EECs from water modeling were used in the drinking water risk assessment.

4.2.5    Dietary exposure assessment

The dietary exposure assessment was conducted using the Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model - Food Commodity Intake Database™ (DEEM-FCID™, Version 4.02, 05-10-c) program which incorporates food consumption data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, What We Eat in America (NHANES/ WWEIA) dietary survey for the years 2005-2010 available through CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The refined chronic cancer risk assessment was conducted using median residues from Canadian and/or American field trials, experimental processing factors and/or anticipated residues for processed commodities, and percent crop treated data. Levels in potential sources of drinking water were estimated based on Level 2 modelling for the combined residue of pymetrozine and six metabolites – CGA 215525, CGA 359009, CGA 249257, CGA 294849, CGA 363431 and GS 23199 expressed as parent equivalents. EECs in surface water (yearly EECs ranging from 1.7 to 4.2 µg a.i./L) and in groundwater (yearly EEC = 45 µg a.i./L) were calculated using the Pesticide Water Calculator model (PWC, version 1.52) based on the modelled outdoor uses (for details refer to Section 4.2.3).

The cancer risk is determined by multiplying the lifetime average daily dose (LADD) by the cancer potency factor (q1*) to obtain a lifetime cancer risk estimate, which is a measurement of probability. A lifetime cancer risk that is equal to or below 1 × 10-6 (one-in-a-million) usually indicates acceptable risk for the general population.

The lifetime cancer risk from exposure to pymetrozine in food and drinking water (EEC value = 45 µg a.i./L, Level 2, ground water) was estimated to be 1 × 10-5 for the general population, which is above 1 × 10-6. A critical commodity contribution analysis indicates that drinking water is the largest contributor to the cancer risk (95.72% of total exposure; cancer risk of 1 × 10-5). The lifetime cancer risk from exposure to pymetrozine in food only was estimated to be 5 × 10-7 for the general population, which is considered acceptable (Appendix VI, Table 6.1 of PSRD2020-04).

Based on the risk assessment, the cancer dietary (food plus drinking water) risk is not considered acceptable under current conditions of use. To mitigate potential dietary risks, all outdoor uses of pymetrozine are proposed for cancellation.

The modelled residues of pymetrozine and its metabolites in drinking water are based on the outdoor use scenarios. While effluent from greenhouses may be a potential route of contamination of surface drinking water sources, the current end-use product labels include use directions prohibiting the discharge of effluent, waste and drainage water containing pymetrozine into aquatic systems. The potential for indirect contamination of surface drinking water is expected to be minimal following applications of pymetrozine in greenhouses. Based on the above, the potential cancer dietary risk resulting from greenhouse applications of pymetrozine is considered to be acceptable.

A label statement prohibiting the discharge of greenhouse effluent into aquatic systems is proposed to be added for the ENDEAVOR® 50WG Insecticide product label (Reg. No. 27273) as per current standard label practice. The proposed label amendments are summarized in Appendix VII of PSRD2020-04.

Overall conclusion for the special review of pymetrozine under subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act:

Based on the available information, the assessment of the aspect of concern (potential cancer risk from pymetrozine and its metabolites through drinking water exposure) indicated that:

5.0 Incident reports

As of 23 June 2020, there were no Canadian incident reports relating to the aspects of concern identified above. Four scientific studies involving pymetrozine have been reported to the Incident Reporting Program and were considered for this special review.

6.0 Proposed special review decision for pymetrozine

Special review under subsection 17(1) of the Pest Control Products Act

Evaluation of available scientific information related to the aspect of concern (potential cancer risk from pymetrozine and its metabolites through drinking water exposure) found that the potential dietary cancer risk of pymetrozine is considered to be acceptable with the following proposed risk mitigation measures:

Special review under subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act

Evaluation of available scientific information related to the aspect of concern (potential carcinogenicity of pymetrozine) found that:

As the outdoor uses are proposed for cancellation, the following risk mitigation measures are not included as part of the proposed risk management measures at this time:

Based on the assessment of the aspects of concern under subsection 17(1) and subsection 17(2) of the Pest Control Products Act, Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency, under the authority of the Pest Control Products Act, is proposing to confirm the current registration of pymetrozine products for sale and use in Canada with the proposed risk mitigation measures (Appendix VII of PSRD2020-04) pursuant to subsection 21(1) of the Pest Control Products Act.

These proposed special review decisions are a consultation document.Footnote 1 Health Canada will accept written comments on PSRD2020-04 up to 45 days from the date of its publication. Please forward all comments to Publications.

7.0 Next steps

Before making a special review decision on pymetrozine, Health Canada will consider all comments received from the public in response to PSRD2020-04. A science-based approach will be applied in making a final decision on pymetrozine. Health Canada will then publish a special review decision document, which will include the decision, the reasons for it, a summary of the comments received on the proposed decision, and Health Canada’s response to these comments.

Footnote 1

“Consultation statement” as required by subsection 28(2) of the Pest Control Products Act.

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