Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit

Teacher Supplement for Activity Plan #1: (children) Benefits of Eating Well and Being Physically Active

Return to: Activity Plan #1

Purpose

The Teacher Supplement complements the Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit's Activity Plans. The Supplement includes:

  • Assessment tools: These tools will allow teachers to assess student work for completion and/or level of performance. The assessment tools are based on the specific learning objectives in each activity plan. They are designed for teacher use but they can be adapted for students to use.
  • Extension activities: These activities will provide teachers with suggestions and the necessary information to align the Activity Plan's activities with various school subjects (cross-curricular). Although activities are targeted to grade 4 to 6 students, teachers of various levels are encouraged to adapt the activities to best suit their needs.

Assessment Tools for Activity Plan #1: Benefits of Eating Well and Being Physically Active

Assessment Tool: Benefits

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > Benefits

Benefits
Checklist Student Names
The student participated in the brainstorming activity.
The student explained how he or she thinks the people in the images are feeling.
The student provided an explanation as to why he or she thinks the people in the images are feeling happy, healthy, friendly, energized, etc.
The student made connections between the activity and how the person feels, i.e. the benefits of the activity.
The student participated in creating a list of benefits or reasons for eating well and being active.
The student demonstrated an understanding by identifying the benefits of eating well and being active.
The student worked well with others throughout the discussions.

Assessment Tool: The Four Food Groups and Key Activity Groups

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > The Four Food Groups and Key Activity Groups

The Four Food Groups and Key Activity Groups
Checklist Student Names
The student participated in discussions.
The student provided examples for each food group and each type of physical activity.
The student demonstrated an understanding by identifying images that represent the four food groups and the different types of physical activities.
The student was able to discuss a healthy eating and/or physical activity message that is being illustrated by selected images.
The student demonstrated an understanding of the frequency and intensity of different types of physical activities.

Assessment Tool: My Foods and Activities

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > My Foods and Activities

My Foods and Activities
Checklist Student Names
The student participated by listing activities they have tried and enjoyed.
The student demonstrated an understanding of different types of physical activities by accurately categorizing activities they have tried and enjoyed.
The student demonstrated an understanding of Canada's Food Guide food groups by accurately categorizing foods they have tried and enjoyed.
The student participated in the discussion about the variety of healthy and enjoyable foods and activities.

Assessment Tool: Personal Reflection

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > Personal Reflection

Personal Reflection
Checklist Student Names
The student identified patterns (at least one pattern) in their eating and/or physical activity behaviours.
The student participated in brainstorming factors that affect food and physical activity choices.
The student reflected on their own food and physical activity choices in relation to recommendations in Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active.
The student participated by trying a new food and physical activity.
The student described their experience in trying a new food and physical activity.
The student reflected how trying new food and physical activities benefited him or her.

Extension Activities for Activity Plan #1: Benefits of Eating Well and Being Physically Active

Extension Activities: Benefits

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > Benefits

  • Visual Arts, Language Arts and Health Education: Using the list developed during the Benefits activity (section: Activities > Children's Activities > Benefits), ask students to pick one benefit or reason from the list. Ask students to create a poster to represent their selected benefit or reason and provide a written explanation.
  • Physical Education and Mathematics: Have students participate in "Moving and Math"Footnote 1, an activity involving solving math equations by providing answers by completing a multiple of a physical tasks (for example, 4x2=8 > complete 8 jumping jacks). Afterwards, ask the class to discuss how they benefit together and individually from the "Moving and Math" activity.

Extension Activities:The Four Food Groups and Key Activity Groups

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > The Four Food Groups and Key Activity Groups

  • Visual Arts and Health Education: Provide students with a paper plate. Ask students to create a balanced meal using foods from the four food groups from Canada's Food Guide. Students can create their meal by drawing, pasting Eat Well and Be Active Images or using modeling clay.
  • Physical Education, Science and Technology, and Social Studies: Provide students with time to learn about physical activities that are popular in various countries (for example, Brazil and soccer). Ask the class to share their findings and choose an activity to try together.

Extension Activities: My Foods and Activities

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > My Foods and Activities

  • Science and Technology and Health Education: Using their rainbow developed during the My Foods and Activities activity (section: Activities > Children's Activities > My Foods and Activities), ask students to pick one food group or type of physical activity and learn about its specific benefits. Using the Jigsaw method (see below for short description of this method), ask students to share their findings by creating a mural that uses pictures and words to explain each section.

    Educator Tip: The Jigsaw method is a cooperative learning technique in which students work in small groups. It is primarily used for the acquisition and presentation of new material, review, or informed debate. In this method, each group member is assigned to become an "expert" on some aspect of a unit of study. After reading about their area of expertise, the experts from different groups meet to discuss their topic, and then return to their groups and take turns teaching their topics to their group mates.

  • Mathematics and Health Education: Divide students into even groups depending on your class size (i.e., for a class of 20 divide students into 5 groups of 4). Have each group of students prepare a survey that asks if participants have tried each of the foods from a list of ten different foods from Canada's Food Guide. Once each group has created their survey, have students pass out their survey to the rest of the class. Once each group has collected their data, ask students to create a graph illustrating the results. Have students create at least two different graphs (i.e., pie chart, bar graph) that best represent the information.

Extension Activities: Personal Reflection

Section: Activities > Children's Activities > Personal Reflection

  • Visual Arts and Health Education: Ask students to create mobiles or collages using images of foods and physical activities that they like to do. Display the mobiles in the classroom or at home as a reminder to choose a variety of foods and physical activities. Challenge students to try a new food or activity each week and have them add an image to their mobile or collage at the end of each week. At the end of each week students can get into groups and discuss the new food or activity: What they enjoyed about it? What they did not enjoy about it? Would they try it again? etc.
  • Geography, Science and Technology, and Health Education: Ask students to choose a vegetable or fruit that they have not tried or had recently. Have each student complete a research project on the vegetable/fruit they have chosen. The students should answer the following questions: Where the vegetable/fruit is grown? What conditions are necessary for the fruit/vegetable to grow? What are the stages of growth? What part of the plant is the vegetable/fruit (root, shoot, fruit, etc.)? What nutrients does the vegetable/fruit contains? Why the vegetable/fruit is a healthy choice? How it is eaten or prepared? Ask students to present the information in a creative way (such as, PowerPoint presentation, information poster, cooking show, interview, have students be the vegetable/fruit and present in first person, or doing something active). At the end of the presentations there will be a world map highlighting where the different vegetables and fruits are grown.
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