Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit

Teacher Supplement for Activity Plan #2 (children): Make Each Serving and All Physical Activity Count

Return to: Activity Plan #2

Purpose

The Teacher Supplement complements the Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit's Activity Plans.  The Supplement includes:

  • Assessment tools: These tools will allow teachers to assess student work for completion and/or level of performance.  The assessment tools are based on the specific learning objectives in each activity plan. They are designed for teacher use but they can be adapted for students to use.
  • Extension activities: These activities will provide teachers with suggestions and the necessary information to align the Activity Plan's activities with various school subjects (cross-curricular).  Although activities are targeted to grade 4 to 6 students, teachers of various levels are encouraged to adapt the activities to best suit their needs.

Assessment Tools for Activity Plan #2 (children): Make Each Serving and All Physical Activity Count

Assessment Tool: Food Guide Servings and Physical Activity Recommendations

Food Guide Servings and Physical Activity Recommendations
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student participated during the lesson by answering questions.
The student demonstrated an understanding of the four food groups by identifying them and providing examples from each.
The student demonstrated an understanding of what a Food Guide Serving is and the recommended number of Food Guide Servings for each food group.
The student participated in the discussion of the recommended types, amounts, intensity and frequency of various physical activities based on Tips to Get Active.
The student demonstrated an understanding that physical activities can be accumulated throughout the day to obtain the total number of recommended activity.

Assessment Tool: A Day in the Life of Florence

Section: Activities > A Day in the Life of Florence

A Day in the Life of Florence
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student actively participated in the reading of A Day in the Life of Florence.
The student made connections between the healthy living choices that Florence made and the pictures on the Eat Well and Be Active Every Day poster.
The student identified the healthy living choices that Florence made (food choices and physical activities).
The student was able to make connections between Florence's daily healthy choices and their own.

Assessment Tool: Make Each Serving and All Activity Count

Make Each Serving and All Activity Count
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student participated in the activity by filling in Florence's Journal.
The student was able to find Florence's recommendations for healthy eating and physical activity by referring to Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active.
The student demonstrated an understanding of food groups and Food Guide Servings by correctly categorizing and counting Florence's food choices for the day.
The student demonstrated an understanding of why some foods do not fit in any of the food groups in Florence's Journal.
The student demonstrated an understanding of physical activity types and recommendations by correctly categorizing and counting Florence's activity choices.
The student was able to compare Florence's totals with recommendations from Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active.

Assessment Tool: Smart Choices Checklist

Section: Activities > Smart Choices Checklist

Smart Choices Checklist
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student was able to identify healthy living choices that Florence made.
The student participated by completing the Smart Choices Checklist.
The student participated by discussing ways that Florence can improve the quality and/or quantity of food and physical activity choices.
The student identified ways in which Florence could improve her healthy living choices and reflected on their own healthy living choices.

Extension Activities for Activity Plan #2 (children): Make Each Serving and All Physical Activity Count

Extension Activities: Food Guide Servings and Physical Activity Recommendations

  • Language Arts, Health Education, and Mathematics: Have students create a one day meal and physical activity plan. The plan must include meals, snacks and physical activities that reflect the recommendations in Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active. Once students have created their plan, ask them to choose a recipe for one of their meal choices.  Provide students with time to find a recipe or have students use recipe books. Ask the students to tally their daily Food Guide Servings and physical activities to ensure that they meet recommendations.
  • Social Studies and Health Education: Ask students to compare Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide - First Nations, Inuit and Métis and Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide to investigate different foods eaten by various cultural groups across Canada. Ask students to discuss how the food guides are tailored to the intended audience. Have each student choose a food they did not know about, and/or have not tried. Ask students to learn about the food by answering questions, such as: What food group does it fall into? What region of Canada is the food commonly eaten? How is the food eaten? It is associated with any holidays or special occasions? Etc.  
  • Social Studies and Health Education: Divide students into groups. Assign each group a country (i.e., China, Australia, etc.). Have students investigate their assigned country's healthy eating and physical activity recommendations. Have students complete a Venn diagram or a list of similarities and differences comparing Canada's Food Guide and physical activity recommendations to their assigned country's recommendations. Have students present their information in a creative way, such as creating a collage, advertisement, poster, or comic strip. Links to some countries' food guides are available below:
  • Drama, Language Arts, and Health Education: Divide students into groups. Have each group create a commercial for television, radio, or the internet that promotes Canada's Food Guide. Have students include what the Food Guide provides for Canadians and how following it is beneficial to their health. Student advertisements should also include:
    • what is being promoted,
    • who the intended audience is,
    • a phrase, theme or headline that will catch people's attention,
    • images that highlight the benefits of Canada's Food Guide,
    • interesting information (relevant to audience), and
    • a request for action from the audience (e.g. ACT NOW!!).
    Have students create a storyboard, prepare a script and practice their commercial prior to presenting it to the class.

Extension Activities: A Day in the Life of Florence

Section: Activities > A Day in the Life of Florence

  • Drama and Health Education: Provide each student with a copy of a sentence (or a few sentences depending on the number of students in the class) from A Day in the Life of Florence. Have each student read their sentence and put actions to it. Once each student is given time to practice their sentence, ask students to arrange themselves in order of the sentences in a large circle. As the teacher reads the story, each student will act out the sentence.
  • Social Studies, Drama, and Health Education: Students will be investigating the daily life of various First Nations groups of Canada, pre-European contact, to understand how the environment affected daily practices (food, transportation, shelter, clothing). Divide students into groups. Each group will research (geographic area, daily life, clothing, transportation, food, and shelter) a different First Nations group of Canada (Mi'kmaq, James Bay Cree, etc.) and/or Inuit.  Ask the students to create a skit that demonstrates the day in the life of their selected First Nations/Inuit group. Make sure students include physical activities and food choices in their presentation.
  • Visual Arts, Drama, and Health Education: Provide students with different identities to role play (i.e. a 65 year old active woman, an 18 year old teenage boy, etc.). Have students create a storyboard based on the day in the life of their role play identity. For example, if students are role playing a 65 year old active woman, students should outline what that person participates in a day. For example, the first frame of the storyboard could be, "I get up at 7 am and go for a walk around the block" (with an illustration of the sentence). Have students include the recommended daily servings and recommended daily physical activity in their storyboard.

Extension Activities: Make Each Serving and All Activity Count

  • Visual Arts, Language Arts and Health Education: Have students create a storyboard that illustrates a day in their life. Ask students to include typical foods that they eat and the physical activities they do from the time they wake up to the time they go to sleep.
  • Science and Technology and Health Education: Provide students with time to investigate a physical activity. Students may choose one of the activities Florence participates in or one they participate in or find interesting.  Have students research how the activity affects their body: What muscles are used? Why the activity benefits your body? Which of the physical activity categories does the activity fall under?  Once students complete their research, have them present their information in a creative way (i.e., labeling a partner to identify the muscles, poster, mobile, etc.).

Extension Activities: Smart Choices Checklist

Section: Activities > Smart Choices Checklist

  • Language Arts and Physical Education: Challenge students to participate in a new physical activity or active game daily/weekly. As students try a new physical activity, have them write a journal entry describing what the activity was, if they enjoyed the activity, what they would change about the activity, if they would participate in the activity again, etc. Every time a student participates in a new activity, have them write the name of the activity on an activity wall in the classroom. As a class, choose an activity to do from the activity wall each week.
  • Science and Technology, Mathematics, Language Arts and Health Education: Divide students into groups and have them create a survey for the class that asks students to rate a list of activities/sports. Use a rating scale of 0 (never played the activity/sport), 1 (played and did not enjoy), and 2 (played and enjoyed). Have students create and distribute the survey, and collect and represent the data in an appropriate chart or graph (i.e., pie chart, bar graph, etc.). Have students analyze the data determining what activities/sports are most popular, least popular and have never been played. Once completed, have each group write a summary of their findings. *Note: Have students complete the same activity, but instead of rating activities/sports have students rate food.
  • Visual Arts, Language Arts and Health Education: Challenge students to try a new food weekly. Once a student has tried a new food have them reflect on the taste, how it was prepared, if they enjoyed it, and if they would try it again. Along with their written reflection, have students find or draw a picture of the new food. On a bulletin board on the classroom or hallway, create a wall for students to post their reflections. Creating a display of new foods for students will help to encourage them to try new things they may enjoy.
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