Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit

Teacher Supplement for Activity Plan #3 (children): Setting SMART Goals

Return to: Activity Plan #3

Purpose

The Teacher Supplement complements the Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit's Activity Plans.  The Supplement includes:

  • Assessment tools: These tools will allow teachers to assess student work for completion and/or level of performance.  The assessment tools are based on the specific learning objectives in each activity plan. They are designed for teacher use but they can be adapted for students to use.
  • Extension activities: These activities will provide teachers with suggestions and the necessary information to align the Activity Plan's activities with various school subjects (cross-curricular).  Although activities are targeted to grade 4 to 6 students, teachers of various levels are encouraged to adapt the activities to best suit their needs.

Assessment Tools for Activity Plan #3 (children): Setting SMART Goals

Assessment Tool: How does eating well and being physically active make a difference?

How does eating well and being physically active make a difference?
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student actively participated in the discussion of how healthy living can make a difference in their lives.
The student participated in recalling the benefits of healthy living.
The student demonstrated an understanding of what healthy living means.
The student successfully related the benefits of healthy living to their lives.

Assessment Tool: What do I need to do to live healthy?

What do I need to do to live healthy?
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student participated by sharing a goal or success they have achieved.
The student identified the steps to achieve their past goal.
The student participated in the discussion of the steps involved in setting goals.
The student demonstrated an understanding of the steps involved in successfully completing a goal.
The student identified barriers that could prevent the success of the goal.
The student participated in brainstorming barriers and solutions.

Assessment Tool: Writing Your SMART Goal

Section: Activities > Writing Your SMART Goal

Writing Your SMART Goal
Checklist Student Names
                   
a. SMART Goal Setting
The student participated in the discussion of what "SMART" represents.
b. SMART Ideas
The student participated in brainstorming an example of a healthy eating goal and a physical activity goal.
The student identified examples of healthy living goals through a class brainstorm or by finding images.
c. Writing SMART Goals
The student demonstrated an understanding by completing the Set My SMART Goal! Worksheet.
The student successfully wrote a healthy eating SMART goal.
The student successfully wrote a physical activity SMART goal.
The student identified a barrier they did or could face in achieving their goal.
The student identified a solution to a barrier they did or could face in achieving their goal.
d. SMART Tracking Chart
The student completed the Tracking Chart.
The student reported on their progress (referring to the Tracking Chart).

Assessment Tool: Achieving Your Goal

Section: Activities > Achieving Your Goal

Achieving Your Goal
Checklist Student Names
                   
The student participated by discussing how short term goals can help achieve long term goals.
The student demonstrated an understanding of the difference between short term and long term goals.

Extension Activities for Activity Plan #3 (children): Setting SMART Goals

Extension Activities: How does eating well and being physically active make a difference?

  • Language Arts, Health Education, and Physical Education: Before going to gym class, have each student write down their mood and attitude. Have students participate in a vigorous activity (or sport). Following the activity, ask students to write a reflection on how they felt during the physical activity and after being physically active.
  • Music, Language Arts, and Health Education: Divide students into small groups to write a song. Have students write a song that outlines benefits of healthy eating and physical activity. Students can either create their own melody or use an existing one. Have groups present their songs once they have practiced.
  • Language Arts, Mathematics, Health Education, and Physical Education: Divide students into small groups. Have each group create survey questions that address how their peers feel before, during and after physical activity. Groups should come up with at least two questions for each category. Once each group has come up with their survey questions, combine all of the surveys to create one class survey (be sure to remove any duplicate questions). Using the data collected from the survey, have each group chart the data to demonstrate a correlation between physical activity and a person's attitude. This activity could also be used to collect data on how students feel when they eat different foods.

Extension Activities: What do I need to do to live healthy?

  • Visual Arts, Media Literacy, and Health Education: Have students create an advertisement that outlines a barrier to making healthy choices and identifies at least three possible solutions. For example, there isn't enough time to make a healthy lunch for school. Different solutions could be: preparing lunch the night before, going shopping with the people they live with to choose healthier snacks, separating foods into snack sizes for the week, or planning their lunches at the beginning of the week. Students can create the advertisement in any form of media (i.e., poster, commercial (video taped, or live), etc.) to present the barrier and the solutions.
  • Language Arts and Health Education: Have students write a fictional story. Review the parts of a good story: setting (place, time, weather conditions, social conditions, mood), plot (introduction, rising action, climax, falling action), conflict (external, or internal conflict), characters, and point of view. Have students create a story where the main character is presented with one or more barriers that make it difficult to achieve a goal and how they overcame the barrier(s).
  • Visual Arts and Health Education: Provide students with mural paper. Designate each section of the mural to a group of three students. Have each group plan, design and paint a portrait of healthy living. Ensure students include healthy eating and physical activity in their portrait. Post the mural in the hall for other students to see.

Extension Activities: Writing Your SMART Goal

Section: Activities > Writing Your SMART Goal

  • Language Arts and Mathematics: Have students set a goal for another area of their life such as math. Ask students to review tests and assignments they have completed until this point in the year and create a SMART goal for areas they could improve, or further succeed in. For example, I will practice my multiplication table after school for 15 minutes at least three days a week. Once SMART goals are set have students share and have a peer evaluate them to ensure all parts (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely) are included.
  • Science and Technology and Language Arts: When starting a new unit in science (light, sound, ecosystems, etc.) have students identify what they know, and what they want to know about the subject. Have students set a SMART goal when they are going between two units. For example, I will review my science notes after school twice a week for 30 minutes to ensure I understand the new material. Once SMART goals are set have students share and have a peer evaluate them to ensure all parts (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely) are included.
  • Social Studies and Language Arts: Once students have learned about first contact in Canada (settlers). Have students identify goals the settlers would have made before coming to Canada, and after they came to Canada. Have students write an opinion piece outlining the goals and why they think those goals were necessary.
  • Drama and Health Education: Have students get into groups. Have each group play a game of charades. Provide each group with a bag that contains different activities and/or sports on individual pieces of paper, and have each student in the group take turns acting. Participating in charades will help students identify different activities they can participate in and assist with writing their SMART goal.
  • Language Arts: Provide students time to investigate a person they admire (i.e., hockey player, scientists, ballerina, political figure, parent, etc.) to learn more about his/her achievements. Have students design a plan (including SMART goals) to assist them in attaining a similar achievement to the person they admire. For example, if Wayne Gretzky was chosen then the student would make long and short term plans which could include a SMART goal such as: I will practice hockey stick handling after school for two hours at least four nights a week.
  • Language Arts and Health Education: Have students set a SMART goal based on eating well and/or healthy living. For example, for a student that does not enjoy green foods they could make a SMART goal such as: I will eat one green vegetable every day. For a student who does little physical activity they could make a SMART goal such as: I will go to the park with my family three times each week.

Extension Activities: Achieving Your Goal

Section: Activities > Achieving Your Goal

  • Language Arts: Have students interview a person of their choice about the short term goals they set to achieve a long term goal. Have students prepare for the interview by creating questions. Once students have completed the interview, have them write a report that outlines the person's goals, achievements, barriers and solutions.
  • Language Arts: Have each student set a long term goal and identify SMART goals that will contribute to the success of their long term goal. Once students have achieved a SMART goal have a celebration by putting the goal on an achievement wall in the classroom.
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