Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit

Teacher Supplement for Activity Plan #5 (children): Creating Supportive Environments for Physical Activity

Return to: Activity Plan #5

Purpose

The Teacher Supplement complements the Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit's Activity Plans.  The Supplement includes:

  • Assessment tools: These tools will allow teachers to assess student work for completion and/or level of performance.  The assessment tools are based on the specific learning objectives in each activity plan. They are designed for teacher use but they can be adapted for students to use.
  • Extension activities: These activities will provide teachers with suggestions and the necessary information to align the Activity Plan's activities with various school subjects (cross-curricular).  Although activities are targeted to grade 4 to 6 students, teachers of various levels are encouraged to adapt the activities to best suit their needs.

Note: Activity Plan #5 is focused on neighbourhoods; however, teachers can adjust the focus (for example, the schoolyard) to suit the needs of their students.

Assessment Tools for Activity Plan #5 (children): Creating Supportive Environments for Physical Activity

Assessment Tool: My Neighbourhood

Section: Activities > My Neighbourhood

My Neighbourhood
Checklist Student Names
The student demonstrated an understanding of different property uses (i.e., industrial, agricultural, commercial, residential, recreational, etc.) by identifying the areas in their neighbourhood.
The student participated in the discussion about their neighbourhood by answering posed questions.
The student demonstrated an understanding of the concept of "neighbourhood".

Assessment Tool: How and Where I am Active

Section: Activities > How and Where I am Active

How and Where I am Active
Checklist Student Names
The student participated in the discussion about various activities they engage in and where these activities take place.

Assessment Tool: Being Active in My Neighbourhood

Section: Activities > Being Active in My Neighbourhood

Being Active in My Neighbourhood
Checklist Student Names
The student participated by standing up or sitting down when identifying activities they are able to do in their community.
The student demonstrated an understanding of being active in the community by identifying where they can be active with their family.

Assessment Tool: Exploring new ways to be active

Section: Activities > Exploring new ways to be active

Exploring new ways to be active
Checklist Student Names
The student participated by answering questions to find more ways to be active in their neighbourhood.
The student demonstrated an understanding of the various activities that can be done in a variety of locations in their neighbourhood.
The student demonstrated an understanding that games are important for healthy development (becoming strong and healthy, developing reflexes, reaction time and hand eye coordination and that the basic movements in all activities help when playing sports and being active later in life).

Assessment Tool: Active Transportation

Section: Activities > Active Transportation

Active Transportation
Checklist Student Names
The student participated by identifying modes of active transportation in their neighbourhood.
The student identified various modes of active transportation in the summer and winter.
The student demonstrated an understanding that it is healthier for people and the environment to replace car trips with active transportation.

Extension Activities for Activity Plan #5 (children): Creating Supportive Environments for Physical Activity

Extension Activities: My Neighbourhood

Section: Activities > My Neighbourhood

  • Geography and Health Education: Have students draw maps of their neighbourhood. Make sure students have a scale, legend, title and appropriate labels. Have students label areas and buildings they are active in and identify the activities they participate in that area or building.  Discuss various safety considerations when being active in their neighbourhood. 
  • Visual Arts, Geography, and Health Education: Create a large map of the neighbourhood on a bulletin board and label areas such as the grocery store, park, school yard, etc. Have students draw a picture of themselves participating in an activity (such as, skateboarding) then have students put their picture on the map in an area where the activity can be safely done in their neighbourhood. Creating a map like this allows students to see where they can participate in activities in their neighbourhood. Alternatively, if the class has access to the outdoors, students can take pictures of each other participating in various activities. The pictures can then be printed and added to the class map.

Extension Activities: How And Where I am Active

Section: Activities > How and Where I am Active

  • Drama, Media Literacy, and Health Education: Have students create a T-chart in the classroom (on a bulletin board, or chart paper) that defines moderate-intensity activities and vigorous-intensity activities. Divide students into groups of three or four. Have each group create tableaus of several activities. When each group is performing their tableaus have a student take a picture. Once each group has finished performing their tableaus for various activities print the photographs and have students categorize them as a moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity activity. 
  • Language Arts and Health Education: Have students create a story that outlines a character's actions and interactions with their environment.
  • Language Arts, Technology and Health Education: Have students investigate different gaming technologies (i.e., Wii, DS, 3DS, Playstation, etc.) and compare a sedentary video game to an active video game (i.e., DS verses Wii). Have students answer questions such as: Are there health benefits to active video games? What physical skills are developed when using video games (i.e., hand-eye coordination, etc.)? Are different types of physical activities represented (i.e., vigorous, moderate, etc.)? Once students have completed their investigation, have students present the information in a creative way (skit, tableau, SMART board activity, etc.).

Extension Activities: Being Active in My Neighbourhood

Section: Activities > Being Active in My Neighbourhood

  • Mathematics and Health Education: Have students brainstorm areas, facilities, and other places they can be active in their community. Then allow students to investigate if there is a cost associated with each place (i.e. the local gym has a cost associated with using their facilities while you can use the school park for free). Once students have investigated the different areas they can be active and the cost associated with these places, create a chart in the classroom that distinguishes free and costly activities. Provide each student with a mock-budget they can spend on physical activity for one month. Have them plan their daily activities around the budget and the recommended amounts and types of physical activity. Teachers can challenge students to use computer programs to display their budget and determine cost-effective strategies.
  • Social Studies and Physical Education: Have students investigate a popular activity in each province and/or territory. On a map of Canada, have students draw a picture of the activity or act out the activity and take a picture.  Ask the students to include the season, location, the rules and regulations and identify if it is a major sport across Canada in their drawing. Once students have determined and investigated the activity for each province and/or territory, have them play different sports/activities over the next few weeks.
  • Language Arts, Drama, and Health Education: Have students create a dramatic presentation that depicts a day in the life of a student. Have students specifically express their daily activities and the setting for each activity. Students can work in partners so one student can act out their day while the other narrates. Alternatively, students can investigate a day in the life of an occupation (i.e., hockey player, farmer, accountant, teacher, etc.) to demonstrate where that person would be active in their life (i.e., a farmer moves bales of hay, etc.).

Extension Activities: Exploring new ways to be active

Section: Activities > Exploring new ways to be active

  • Language Arts, Geography, and Physical Education: Create a student challenge for the class. Have students go to different areas of their neighbourhood and/or playground and try a new activity in each place. Once students have tried a new activity have them create a journal entry describing the activity they did and where they did the activity. Have students create a map of their community depicting what sport or activity they played and where they played it. Have students add to the map every time they participate in a new activity.
  • Social Studies, Language Arts, Drama, and Health Education: Explore Canada through the decades by looking at the sports and/or activities that were most popular during each decade. Divide students into groups of three. Assign each group a decade starting from 1900. Have each group explain different activities children would participate in daily, if there was a professional sports team started (i.e., Toronto Blue Jays first season was 1976) at that time, any influential athletes of that decade, etc. Once groups have completed their investigation have them create a play depicting the information they gathered. Or, students can each take on the role of an athlete from each decade and have a live museum day where students dress, act and be their athlete for the day. Alternatively, the class can work together to create a timeline mural outlining their information.

Extension Activities: Active Transportation

Section: Activities > Active Transportation

  • Mathematics, Language Arts, and Health Education: Divide students into groups. Have each group create a survey about how students get to and from school. Designate each group a grade within the school that they will give their survey to. Have students graph the data by class and for the whole school. Have students identify factors that would affect students from using active transportation, such as where they live, the weather, etc.
  • Language Arts, Health Education, and Physical Education: Challenge students to use active modes of transportation daily. Have a chart paper in the classroom that has each student's name on it and a space for students to document what they participate in. At the end of the week, ask students to graph what modes of transportation were most commonly used using a variety of graphs (i.e., pie chart, bar graph, line graph, etc.). Have the students note changes in the graphs and charts from week to week and discuss as a class.
  • Science and Technology and Health Education: Have students investigate short term and long term benefits of an alternative active mode of transportation. Have students choose an active mode of transportation to investigate, such as walking, biking, running, roller blading, skiing and snowshoeing. Once students have thoroughly investigated their mode of transportation have students set SMART goals to use active transportation.
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Privacy statement

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: