Welcome to Eat Well and Be Active presentation.

Speaking Notes

Welcome to the Eat Well and Be Active presentation.

We are going to talk about tips and tools to help you eat well and be active.

Note to presenter: Presentation for children

The Eat Well and Be Active presentation is a ready-to-use PowerPoint presentation for educators to review and use prior to using the Eat Well and Be Active Activity Plans. The presentation provides fundamental healthy eating and physical activity information in order to use the Toolkit efficiently.

You are encouraged to go through the presentation for children with your group in order to spark interest in healthy eating and physical activity and to encourage participants to access tips and tools to help them eat well and be active.

Throughout the presentation, there will be text and images that are hyperlinked. When in slideshow mode, click on the link to direct you to the webpage. If you do not have internet access, all links will be provided in the notes pages for reference.

Group discussion

  • Food / Nutritious
  • Energy / Strong / Healthy
  • Move / Active
  • Familyh / Friends

Speaking Notes

1) Questions to ask group (examples)

To discuss prior to the information on the slide

General: What are some words that come to mind when you see these images?

Being active: What activities come to mind when you think of being active? Do you do any of these activities? Which ones are your favourites?  Which ones do you like to do with friends and family?

Eating well: How would you describe eating well? What foods come to mind when you think of eating well? Do you enjoy eating these foods?

2) Group discussion

As a group, discuss some benefits for eating well and being physically active.

Notes to presenter

1) To encourage participation

You may want to offer what comes to your mind when you see these pictures. Some examples may include:

  • Eating well and being active can be fun and does not have to be done alone. Eating well and being active opens up doors to spend time with family and friends. Eating well and being active can benefit everyone - notice how you can enjoy healthy food or do fun activities with friends or family members. Encourage those around you to eat well and be active with you.
  • Being active is not limited to working out in the gym, it can also include recreational activities like skiing, rollerblading to school, playing in the park, gardening and shovelling the snow.

You can eat well and be active everyday in many ways!

2) Additional information

The Eat Well and Be Active Educational Toolkit helps educators promote healthy eating and physical activity to groups of children and adults. The sample selection of Eat Well and Be Active Images on the slide help portray that eating well and being physically active is for every one every day.

Hyperlinks

Guided Tour of My Food Guide

Speaking Notes

Today, we are going to take a tour of the My Food Guide tool so you learn about tips for eating well and being active that suit you!

So let us start having fun with eating well and being active!

Hyperlinks

Exploring my Food Guide online

  • Canada's Food Guide
  • Tips to Get Active
  • My Food Guide online

Speaking Notes

Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active are great resources to help you make healthy choices.  But, did you know that you can make your own personal version by using My Food Guide online?

By entering information, such as your age, your favourite foods from the four food groups and choosing types of physical activities that you like to do, you can create a tool that is just for you!

So today we are going to learn how to personalize information in Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active by using My Food Guide online.

Exploring My Food Guide Online

The number of Food Guide Servings you need every day from each food group depends on your age and sex.

Start by entering the following information:

  • Sex: Female or Male
  • 9 - 13 years

Speaking Notes

1) General- Personalisation of My Food Guide Online

My Food Guide online allows you to make a guide that will personalize Canada's Food Guide recommendations and Tips to Get Active just for you.

Creating your personalized guide takes about five minutes. You can then print it and stick it on your fridge for quick and easy reference!

Let's explore My Food Guide with an example...

2) Example

Meet Sam Inn, an 11 y.o. boy who loves being active. He enjoys skateboarding to school, the park and playing at his friend's house.

3) Questions to ask group

Do any of you enjoy skateboarding? Do any of you skateboard to school? What are some other active ways to get to school?

4) Activity

The number of Food Guide Servings you need every day from each food group depends on your age and gender. Let's complete My Food Guide for Sam.

Notes to presenter

Please visit www.healthcanada.gc.ca/myfoodguide to complete a My Food Guide customized for your group.

Encourage participants to visit My Food Guide online to create a personalised version for themselves after the group session.

Food Guide Servings of each food group

As an 11 year old boy, this is how many Food Guide Servings from each food group Sam needs every day:

Vegetables and Fruit:
6
Grain Products:
6
Milk and Alternatives:
3-4
Meat and Alternatives:
2

Speaking Notes

By entering Sam is a boy and his age, we get the information on this slide.

As an 11 year old boy, Sam needs 6 Food Guide Servings of Vegetables and Fruit, 6 Food Guide Servings of Grain Products, 3-4 Food Guide Servings of Milk and Alternatives, and 2 Food Guide Servings of Meat and Alternatives every day.

When you complete My Food Guide online for yourself, the table will show the number of Food Guide Servings of each food group that you should eat every day.

What is one Food Guide Serving

Vegetables and Fruit

  • Fresh, frozen or canned vegetables: 125 ml (1/2 cup)
  • Leafy vegetables: Cooked 125ml (1/2 cup); Raw: 250 ml (1 cup)
  • Fresh, frozen or canned fruits: 1 fruit or 125 ml (1/2 cup)
  • 100% Juice: 125 ml (1/2 cup)

Grain Products

  • Bread: 1 slice (35 g)
  • Bagel: 1/2 bagel (45 g)
  • Flat breads: 1/2 pita or tortilla (35 g)
  • Cooked rice, bulgur or quinoa: 125 ml (1/2 cup)
  • Cereal: Cold: 30 g; Hot: 175 ml (1/4 cup)
  • Cooked pasta or couscous: 125 ml (1/4 cup)

Milk and Alternatives

  • Milk or powdered milk (reconstituted): 250 ml (1 cup)
  • Canned milk (epavorated) 125 ml (1/2 cup)
  • Fortified soy beverage: 250 ml (1/2 cup)
  • Yogurt: 175 g (3/4 cup)
  • Kefir: 175 g (3/4 cup)
  • Cheese: 50 g ( 1 1/2 cup)

Meat and Alternatives

  • Cooked fish, shellfish, poultry, lean meat: 75 g ( 2 1/2 oz); 125 ml (1/2 cup)
  • Cooked legumes: 175 ml (3/4 cup)
  • Tofu: 150 g or 175 ml (3/4 cup)
  • Eggs: 2 eggs
  • Peanut or nut butters: 30 ml (2 tbsp)
  • Shelled nuts and seeds: 60 ml (1/4 cup)

Speaking Notes

1) General

Completing My Food Guide online is another way to help you learn what one Food Guide Serving is for the foods you eat most often.

Now that we know how many Food Guide Servings of each food group Sam should eat each day, let's discuss what one Food Guide Serving of each food group is

2) Questions to ask the group

Can you give me an example of what one Food Guide Serving is for each Food Group.

Let's start with Vegetables and Fruit...

Vegetables and Fruit

  • 125 mL (1/2 cup) fresh, frozen or canned vegetable or fruit or 100% juice
  • 250 mL (1 cup) leafy raw vegetables or salad
  • 1 piece of fruit

Grain Products

  • 1 slice (35 g) bread or 1/2 bagel (45 g)
  • 1/2 pita (35 g) or 1/2 tortilla (35 g)
  • 125 mL (1/2 cup) cooked rice, pasta, or couscous
  • 30 g cold cereal or 175 mL (¾ cup) hot cereal

Milk and Alternatives

  • 250 mL (1 cup) milk or fortified soy beverage
  • 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt
  • 50 g (1 1/2 oz.) cheese

Meat and Alternatives

  • 75 g (2 1/2 oz.)/125 mL (1/2 cup) cooked fish, shellfish, poultry or lean meat
  • 175 mL (¾ cup) cooked beans
  • 2 eggs
  • 30 mL (2 Tbsp) peanut butter

3) Next Steps

Now that we know how many Food Guide servings Sam needs each day and what is one Food Guide Serving, we can now help Sam choose examples of foods from each of the four food groups.

There are lots of foods to choose from in each food group. Let's use the recommendations in each food group to help guide our food choices.

Note to presenter

You may want to bring in measuring cups or sample foods (i.e. a sandwich) to provide visuals of serving sizes.  Often, one (1) Food Guide Serving is smaller than we think.

Hyperlinks

Choose 1 to 6 examples of vegetables and fruit.

  • Eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day.
  • Enjoy vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt.
  • Have vegetables and fruit more often than juice.

Vegetables and Fruit

The left side of the figure shows examples of dark green and orange vegetables that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys eating asparagus, carrots and zucchini. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these vegetables equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Vegetables and Fruit. 1 serving is equal to 125mL (½ cup or 6 spears) of asparagus, 125mL (½ cup or 1 large) of carrots or 125mL (1/2 cup) of zucchini.

The right side of the figure shows examples of fruit that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys eating apples and oranges. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these fruits equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Vegetables and Fruit.1 serving is equal to 1 medium sized apple or orange.

Screen Shot

Speaking Notes

1) General

There are lots of foods to choose from the Vegetables and Fruit food group. Let us use the recommendations in the Vegetable and Fruit food group to help guide Sam's food choices.

2) Question to ask group

Does anyone remember how many servings of Vegetable and Fruit Sam needs? (Answer: 6)

Sam enjoys eating asparagus, carrots, zucchini, apples, and oranges. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these vegetables and fruits equal to 1 Food Guide serving of Vegetables and Fruit. This will help him reach his suggested 6 servings of Vegetables and Fruit per day.

Note:

Repeat the amounts so children learn what 1 Food Guide serving of Vegetables and Fruit corresponds to.

Do you have any favorite vegetables and fruit that you add to your plate?

3) Food Guide Guidance

When choosing vegetables and fruit, what should you remember?

  • Eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day.
  • Enjoy vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt.
  • Have vegetables and fruit more often than juice.

4) Next Steps

There are so many good choices, let's discuss other tips for adding vegetables and fruit to your day.   

Vegetables and Fruit Tips

  • Add crunch and colour to salads. Try apples, grapes, strawberries or blueberries.
  • Try adding a vegetable or fruit to every meal (for example: tomato or cucumber to your favourite sandwich).
  • Choose a baked potato, sweet potato, or salad instead of French fries, poutine or other deep-fried vegetables.
  • Enjoy peaches, mangoes or berries in smoothies or with yogurt.
  • ...More tips

Speaking Notes

General information

To discuss before making text appear on the slide

Look at Canada's Food Guide (hold one in your hand). Can you see that Vegetables and Fruit make up the largest arc of Canada's Food Guide rainbow?

Having at least one vegetable or fruit at every meal and as a snack will help you get the amount of vegetables and fruit you need each day. Explore the variety of colors', tastes and textures this food group offers.

2) Group discussion

Let's brainstorm some fun ideas to add this food group to your day.

Question to ask group

What are some of your favourite ways to eat more vegetables and fruit?

3) Tips

Refer to tips on the slide

Here are a few tips:

  • Add crunch and colour to your salads. Try apples, grapes, strawberries, or blueberries.
  • Try adding a vegetable or fruit at every meal (for example: tomato or cucumber to your favourite sandwich).
  • Choose a baked potato, sweet potato, or salad instead of French fries, poutine or other deep-fried vegetables.
  • Enjoy peaches, mangoes or berries in smoothies, with yogurt or in fruit compotes soups.

For even more tips, visit Canada's Food Guide webpage.

4) Next Steps

Let's go back to completing Sam's My Food Guide choices for Grain ProductsHyperlinks

Choose 1 to 6 examples of grain products

  • Make at least half your grains whole grain each day.
  • Choose grains that are lower in fat, sugar or salt.

Grain Products

The left side of the figure shows examples of whole grain food items that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys eating whole grain bread, whole grain pasta/noodles and brown rice. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these whole grain products equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Grain Products. 1 serving is equal to 1 slice (35g) of whole grain bread, 125mL (½ cup) cooked whole grain pasta/noodles or 125mL (½ cup) cooked rice.

The right side of the figures shows examples of non-whole grain food items that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys eating cold cereal and corn tortillas. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these non-whole grain products equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Grain Products. 1 serving is equal to 30g of cold cereal or ½ piece (35g) of a corn tortilla.

Screen Shot

Speaking Notes

1) General

There are lots of foods to choose from in the Grain Products food group. Let us use the recommendations in the Grain Products food group to help guide Sam's food choices.

2) Question to ask group

Does anyone remember how many serving of Grain Products Sam needs? (Answer: 6)

Sam enjoys eating bread, pasta, rice, cereal and tortilla. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these grain product equal to 1 Food Guide serving of Grain Products. This will help him reach his 6 suggested servings of Grain Products per day.

Note:

Repeat the amounts so children learn what 1 Food Guide serving of Grain Products corresponds to.

Do you know examples from the Grain Products food group? Can you name some?  What grain products do you eat?

3) Food Guide Guidance

When choosing grain products, what should you remember?

  • Make at least half your grain products whole grain each day.
  • Choose grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt.

4) Next Steps

Let's discuss other tips for choosing grain products.

Grain Products - Tips

  • Have whole grain toast or bagels for breakfast instead of croissants, doughnuts or pastries.
  • Keep cookies, cakes, pastries and pies for special occasions.
  • Be adventurous! Encourage your family to eat a variety of whole grains such as barley, brown rice, oats, quinoa, and wild rice.
  • Choose whole wheat, multi-grain or pumpernickel bread, bagels, pita bread and tortillas for your sandwiches.
  • ...More tips

Speaking Notes

1) General

To discuss before making the text appear on slide

Did you know that foods from the Grain Products food group are a great source of vitamins and minerals and gives you energy for school and other activities?

2) Group discussion

Let's brainstorm some ideas to help choose grain products.

Question to ask group

What are some healthy tips for choosing grain products?

3) Tips

Refer to tips on the slide

Here are a few tips

  • Have whole grain toast or bagels for breakfast instead of croissants, doughnuts or pastries.
  • Keep cookies, cakes, pastries and pies for special occasions.
  • Be adventurous! Encourage your family to eat a variety of whole grains such as barley, brown rice, oats, quinoa, and wild rice.
  • Choose whole wheat, multi-grain or pumpernickel bread, bagels, pita bread and tortillas for your sandwiches.

For more tips, visit Canada's Food Guide webpage.

4) Next steps

Let's go back to completing Sam's My Food Guide choices for Milk and Alternatives.

Hyperlinks

Choose 1 to 6 examples of milk and alternatives

  • Drink skim, 1%, or 2% milk each day.
  • Drink fortified soy beverages if you do not drink milk.
  • Select lower fat milk alternatives.

Milk and Alternatives

The left side of the figure shows an example of milk that Sam enjoys drinking. Sam picks this option from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much milk equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Milk and Alternatives. 1 serving is equal to 250mL (1 cup) of 1%, 2% or skim milk.

The right side of the figure shows examples of milk alternatives that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys cottage cheese or quark and yogurt (plain and flavoured). Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these Milk Alternatives equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Milk Alternatives. 1 serving is equal to 250mL (1 cup) of cottage or quark cheese or 175g (3/4 cup) of yogurt (plain or flavoured).

Speaking Notes

1) General

There are lots of foods to choose foods from the Milk and Alternatives food group. Let us use the recommendations in the Milk and Alternatives food group to help guide Sam's food choices.

2) Question to ask group

Does anyone remember how many servings of Milk and Alternatives Sam needs per day? (Answer 3-4)

Sam enjoys milk, cottage cheese and yogurt. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these milk and alternatives equal to 1 Food Guide serving of Milk and Alternatives. This will help him reach his 3-4 suggested servings of Milk and Alternatives per day.

Note: Repeat the amounts so children learn what 1 Food Guide serving of Milk and Alternatives corresponds to.

3) Food Guide Guidance

Do you know what you should remember when choosing milk and alternatives?

  • Drink skim, 1%, or 2% milk each day.
  • Drink fortified soy beverages if you do not drink milk.
  • Select lower fat milk alternatives (such as lower fat cheeses and yogurt).

What kind of milk do your parents bring home? Skim, 1%, 2%, 3.25% (whole) or fortified soy beverage?

4) Next Steps

Let's discuss other tips on choosing milk and alternatives.

Milk and Alternatives - Tips

  • Create your own smoothie. Blend milk or a fortified soy beverage with fresh or frozen fruits. You can always turn this into family time and prepare your smoothies together! See which one your like best.
  • Have a glass of milk with some fruit as a great afterschool snack.
  • Enjoy yogurt on its own or mix  with fruit and cereal.
  • Keep ice cream for special occasions.
  • ...More tips

Speaking Notes

1) General information

To discuss before making the text appear on slide

Did you know that Milk and Alternatives contain important nutrients that are good for your bones and teeth? Having milk or fortified soy beverages every day provides the nutrients that you need for healthy bones and good health

2) Group discussion

What are some fun ways to enjoy Milk and Alternatives in your day?

Question to ask group

What are some tips to consider when choosing and using milk and alternatives?

3) Tips

Refer to tips on the slide

Here are a few tips:

  • Create your own smoothie. Blend milk or a fortified soy beverage with fresh or frozen fruits. You can always turn this into family time and prepare your smoothies together! See which one your like best.
  • Have a glass of milk with some fruit as a great afterschool snack.
  • Enjoy yogurt on its own or mix with fruit and cereal.
  • Keep ice cream for special occasions

For more tips, visit Canada's Food Guide webpage.

4) Next steps

Let's go back to completing Sam's My Food Guide choices for Meat and Alternatives.

Hyperlinks

Choose 1 to 6 examples of meat and alternatives

  • Have meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu often.
  • Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week.
  • Select lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt.

Meat and Alternatives

The left side of the figure shows an example of meat alternatives that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys eating eggs, lentils and nuts (shelled). He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these meat alternatives equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Meat and Alternatives. 1 serving is equal to 2 eggs or 175mL (3/4 cup) of lentils or 60mL (1/4 cup) of nuts (shelled).

The right side of the figures shows examples of meat, fish, shellfish and poultry that Sam enjoys eating. Sam enjoys eating chicken and fish (fresh or frozen such as herring, mackerel, trout, salmon, sardines, squid and tuna). Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these equals to 1 Food Guide serving of Meat and Alternatives. 1 serving is equal to 75g (2 ½ oz, 125mL or ½ cup) of chicken or fish (fresh or frozen).

Speaking Notes

1) General

There are lots of foods to choose foods from the Meat and Alternatives food group. Let us use the recommendations in the Meat and Alternatives food group to help guide Sam's food choices.

2) Question to ask group

Does anyone remember how many servings of Meat and Alternatives Sam needs? (Answer: 2)

Sam enjoys eating eggs, lentils, nuts, chicken and fish. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide. Now Sam can learn exactly how much of each of these meat and alternatives equal to 1 Food Guide serving of Meat and alternatives. This will help him reach his 2 suggested servings of Meat and Alternatives per day.

What are some other examples of Meat and Alternatives

Note: Repeat the amounts so children learn what 1 Food Guide serving of Meat and Alternatives corresponds to.

3) Food Guide Guidance

When choosing meat and alternatives, what should you remember?

  • Have meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu often.
  • Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week.
  • Select lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt.

4) Next Steps

Let's discuss other tips for choosing meat and alternatives.

Meat and Alternatives - Tips

  • Make your own trail mix. Combine your favorite cereal and dried fruit with a handful of unsalted nuts and sunflower seeds.
  • Try peanut butter on celery sticks as a tasty afterschool snack.
  • Help prepare a new salad to enjoy with your family. Top it with beans, lentils, chick peas, a hard boiled egg, nuts or seeds.
  • ...More tips

Speaking Notes

1) General information

To discuss before making text appear on slide

Did you know that Meat and Alternatives provide important nutrients to help make you strong? You don't need to eat large amounts from this group to meet your needs.

2) Group discussion

What are some tips for choosing meat and alternatives?

3) Tips

Refer to tips on the slide

Here are a few tips:

  • Make your own trail mix. Combine your favorite cereal and dried fruit with a handful of unsalted nuts and sunflower seeds.
  • Try peanut butter on celery sticks as a tasty afterschool snack.
  • Help prepare a new salad to enjoy with your family. Top it with beans, lentils, chick peas, a hard boiled egg, nuts or seeds.

For more tips, visit Canada's Food Guide webpage.

Hyperlinks

Oils and Fats

Include 30 to 45 mL (2 to 3 Tbsp) of unsaturated oil each day.

This includes oils used in cooking, salad dressings, margarine and mayonnaise.

Speaking Notes

1) General

Sam has now finished selecting items from each food group using My Food Guide. He is so proud of the variety he has chosen...He shows his sister, Amanda the great job he has done!

Amanda told him not to forget that Canada's Food Guide also recommends a small amount (30 to 45 mL or 2 to 3 Tbsp.) of added oils & fats each day.  This includes oils used in cooking, salad dressings, margarine and mayonnaise.

She reminded him to stay away from saturated fat like butter, shortening, lard,...etc.

To show Sam what she meant, Amanda helped Sam make home-made salad dressing using olive oil, balsamic vinegar,  garlic and pepper.  While preparing the dressing, Amanda showed her brother that olive oil is an example of an unsaturated fat - a healthy type of fat.

2) Group discussion

You may want to check your cupboard at home to see the type of oil you have.  Other examples of unsaturated fats include: canola, soybean, corn, peanut, sunflower, etc.  These are all healthy types of fats... but remember, you only need a little (2 to 3 Tbsp.).

Here's what 30 mL (2 Tbsp.) of unsaturated fat looks like in a sample day of eating

Note to speaker: Bring visuals of spoons

Breakfast

  • 5 mL (1 tsp) of soft non-hydrogenated margarine on your toast or bread
  • 5 mL (1 tsp) of canola oil in your pan to make scrambled eggs

Lunch

  • 15 mL (1 Tbsp) of vinegar and oil type salad dressing (e.g. Balsamic, Italian, raspberry vinaigrette) on your salad.

Dinner

  • 5 mL (1 tsp) of canola or olive oil used to cook your stir-fry.

Hyperlink

Beverages

  • Make water your beverage of choice.
  • Milk, fortified soy beverages and 100% juice are also healthy options.
  • Make them part of your recommended number of Food Guide Servings each day.
  • Limit soft drinks, sports drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks, punches, and sweetened hot and cold beverages.

Questions to ask group

  • When you are really thirsty, how do you satisfy your thirst? Do you know what the best beverage of all-time is? Water!

Speaking Notes

1) General

Amanda asks Sam if Canada's Food Guide provides suggestions on choosing beverages.  Sam remembers that even though 100% vegetable and fruit juices and milk count as Food Guide Servings, Canada's Food Guide recommends drinking water regularly as a calorie-free way to quench thirst.

2) Next Steps

After eating lunch with his sister, Sam started selecting examples of physical activity in My Food Guide. Let's help Sam finish his My Food Guide.

Hyperlinks

Choose 1 to 6 examples of physical activity

  • Basketball
  • Cycling
  • Skateboarding
  • Stair climbing
  • Walking

One hour of physical activity every day - at home, at school, at play.

Every step counts!

Examples of physical activity

This figure shows examples of physical activities Sam enjoys doing. Sam enjoys basketball, cycling, skateboarding, stair climbing and walking. He picks these options from the list in the My Food Guide.

Speaking Notes

1) General

To discuss without the information on the slide

Now, back to Sam's My Food Guide. Let's take a look at Sam's physical activity recommendations and choices.

2) Tips to Get Active

Tips to Get Active provide the most current recommendations for physical activity. It is recommended that adults accumulate at least 2 1/2 hours of moderate to vigorous physical activity each week.

You don't have to do it all at once. Choose a variety of activities spread throughout the week. Start slowly and build up.

3) Questions to ask the group

Tips to Get Active recommends that you accumulate at least 1 hour of moderate to vigourous intensity physical activity each day.

You don't have to do it all at once. Choose a variety of activities spread throughout the week. Start slowly and build up.

Question to ask group:

What are some activities Sam can do?

Note: Discuss with the information on the slide

Using the recommendations in Tips to Get Active, Sam Inn chooses:

  • Basketball
  • Cycling
  • Stair climbing
  • Skateboarding
  • Walking

3) Group discussion

Do you think you get at least 2 ½ hours of physical activity each week? What are some ways we can increase the amount of physical activity we do?

Remember, you don't have to do it all at once. Choose a variety of activities spread throughout the week. Start slowly and build up.

Tips to Get Active #1

Moderate-intensity activity makes you breathe harder and your heart beat faster.

  • Examples include walking quickly, skating and bicycling

Vigorous-intensity activity makes your heart rate increase quite a bit; you won't be able to say more than a few words without needing to catch your breath.

  • Examples include running, soccer and cross-country skiing

Get at least 1 hour of  moderate to vigorous aerobic activity every day.  More is even better!

Speaking Notes

1) General

Boys and girls should get at least 1 hour of  moderate to vigorous aerobic activity every day.

2) Group discussion

Let's see if Sam meets this recommendation:

  • Sam loves skateboarding; it takes him 15 minutes to get to school from home. He does that Monday-Friday...so he does 30 minutes /day.
  • Sam takes his dog for a 20 minute walk before dinner every day.
  • At recess and on weekends Sam plays basketball with his friends for about 20-30 min.

Question to ask group

How much physical activity does Sam get every day? (Answer: Weekday between 70-80min, Weekends 40-50min)

Wow! On average, that's more than one hour each day. It can really add up quickly... and that doesn't even include all the walking and stair climbing that Sam does as part of his daily routine.

Hyperlink

Tips to Get Active #2

  • Walk to school and get active as a family
  • Walk the dog with your parents / family
  • Dance to your favorite music
  • Get enrolled in team activities like soccer, hockey...etc.
  • Limit the time you spend watching TV or sitting in front of a computer during leisure time

Spread your activities throughout the week. Do at least 1 hour/day.

Speaking Notes

1) General

To discuss without tips on slide

Sam also enjoys activities such as hockey, basketball, cycling and many others.  These activities keep him feeling good and limits the time he spends watching TV.

2) Questions to ask group

What about you?  What activities do you enjoy?  How much screen time (TV, computer, mobile phone) do you spend/day?  What are some ways you incorporate physical activity into your routine?

3) Tips

To discuss with tips on slide

  • Walk to school and get active as a family
  • Walk the dog with your parents / family
  • Dance to your favorite music
  • Get enrolled in team activities like soccer, hockey...etc.
  • Limit the time you spend watching TV or sitting in front of a computer during leisure time

Sam Inn's My Food Guide

Sam Inn's My Food Guide

This figure shows what Sam's final My Food Guide looks like based on the food and physical activity choices he made.

The left hand side shows Sam's number of recommended food guide servings per day for each of the four food groups. The right hand side shows examples of 1 Food Guide Serving from each of the four food groups. These are the foods Sam enjoys eating and selected when completing My Food Guide online.

It is recommended Sam eats 6 servings of Vegetables and Fruit per day. Examples of Vegetables and Fruits Sam enjoys are asparagus, carrots, zucchini, apple and orange. 1 Food Guide serving of Vegetables and Fruit is equal to 125mL (½ cup or 6 spears) of asparagus, 125mL (½ cup or 1 large) of carrots, 125mL (1/2 cup) of zucchini or 1 medium sized apple or orange.

It is recommended Sam eats 6 servings of Grain Products per day. Examples of Grain Products Sam enjoys are whole grain bread, whole grain pasta/noodles, brown rice, cold cereal and corn tortilla. 1 Food Guide serving of Grain Products is equal 1 slice (35g) of whole grain bread, 125mL (½ cup) cooked whole grain pasta/noodles, 125mL (½ cup) cooked rice, 30g of cold cereal or ½ piece (35g) of a corn tortilla.

It is recommended Sam eats 3-4 servings of Milk and Alternatives per day. Examples of Milk and Alternatives Sam enjoys are milk, cottage cheese or quark and yogurt. 1 Food Guide serving of Milk and Alternatives is equal to 250mL (1 cup) of milk, 250mL (1 cup) of cottage cheese or 175g (3/4 cup) of yogurt.

It is recommended Sam eats 2 servings of Meat and Alternatives per day. Examples of Meat and Alternatives Sam enjoys are eggs, lentils, nuts (shelled), chicken and fish shellfish. 1 Food Guide serving of Meat and Alternatives is equal to 2 eggs, 175mL (3/4 cup) lentils, 60g (1/4 cup) nuts (shelled) or 75g (2 ½ oz, 125mL or ½ cup) of chicken or fish.

The bottom of the image shows the physical activity examples Sam enjoys doing and chose. He chose basketball, cycling, skateboarding, stair climbing and walking.

Speaking Notes

Let's go back to Sam Inn's My Food Guide.

Here is what his final My Food Guide looks like.

In 9 simple steps, he has created his very own tool to help him eat well and be active.  Sam can post his My Food Guide on the refrigerator or kitchen cabinet for a daily reminder of how to eat well and be active.

My Recommended Food Guide Servings per day

My Recommended Food Guide Servings per day

This slide invites you to visit My Food Guide online at www.healthcanada.gc.ca/mygoodguide.It is your turn to select various items from the four food groups and choose different types of physical activities to create a tool that is customized just for you.

Speaking Notes

By visiting My Food Guide online and selecting various items from the four food groups and choosing different types of physical activities, you can create a tool that is customized just for you as well.

As you have seen, there are lots of foods to choose from in each of the four food groups and a variety of suggestions to be active, so be sure to try different combinations when creating this tool to help you follow Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active. You can even do it with your friends and plan to eat well and get active together.

Remember to save and print your completed version of My Food Guide.

Where will you post it?

Thank you.

Other Ways to Eat Well and Be Active

Speaking Notes

Here are some more fun ways to Eat Well and Be Active

1) Eat Well and Be Active poster

Have you seen the Eat Well and Be Active poster?  It is a poster to show you many ways that you can live healthy every day.  It can help you follow Canada's Food Guide and Tips to Get Active.

2) Canada's Food Guide

Canada's Food Guide can help you eat well by showing you the foods you need to have the energy and health to do the things you love.

3) Tips to Get Active

Tips to Get Active gives you ideas for building physical activity into your daily routine.

Be sure to check them out!

Use full links

Note to presenter

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