Web, interactive and mobile technologies

Discover resources on interactive technologies including QR codes, podcasting, augmented reality and more. Learn about these tools, many of which are enabled on mobile devices, and how you can use them to engage visitors.

TitleSource
2004 Survey of Visitors to Museums' Web Space and Physical Space: Survey Documentation and Findings Archived

In 2004, Canadian museums had a growing presence on the internet. Although most museums felt the internet was a valuable tool to reach potential and actual visitors, not much was known in terms of what people were looking for from a museum's web space. To attempt to answer part of this question, the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) decided to undertake an evaluation of people's use of and expectations of museums' web spaces. This study was done in collaboration with various museums across Canada.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
3D Pilot Project - Complementary Physical and Virtual Experiences with 3D Objects

Report on the pilot project in collaboration with the McCord Museum of Canadian History, the Canadian Space Agency, the Canadian Museum of Nature, the National Research Council Canada, and the Canadian Heritage Information Network. Lessons learned with regard to digitization processes, user-friendliness and the benefits associated with viewing 3D objects at the interactive station set up at the McCord and on the project website.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Arts Organizations and Digital Technologies

A Pew Research Center report and survey questions about the impact of digital technologies on arts organizations. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Augmented Reality

Augmented reality (AR) layers digital information onto a physical environment viewed through a device such as a smart phone. This document introduces what AR does and how it can be used in museums.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Australian Museum Audience Research Unit

The Australian Museum Audience Research Unit undertakes research into visitor experiences and learning issues and feeds information into program development, policy and planning. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Choosing the Right Social Media For Your Institution

Social media takes a lot of time and effort on the part of the provider, it's a long and ongoing project, and many Internet gurus recommend using a wide range of social media platforms. While multiple platforms do offer some advantages, social media thrives on the quality of its content, not the quantity. This article aims to help you decide what types of social media are best for your organisation by describing five common forms (blogs, social networking platforms, microblogs, photo sharing platforms, and video sharing platforms) and by outlining what media consumers expect from your organisation, the benefits of using each platform, and the activities and resources an organisation will need to be successful on each of these.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Digitizing Intangible Cultural Heritage: A How-To Guide

This guide outlines basic steps required to digitize the cultural practices of our communities. It provides detailed steps for using Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) technology that is typically available to small and medium-sized museums, including the digitization of new and existing audio recordings, new and existing video, and the scanning of existing photographs, and ephemera. The guide also includes a case study, outlining the results produced by Memorial University's Digital Archive Initiative (DAI). This resource was produced for the Canadian Heritage Information Network by the Museum Association of Newfoundland and Labrador in cooperation with Memorial University.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Listserv (Email Discussion Group) Canmuse-L

This bilingual list provides an opportunity for discussion, information requests, and dissemination of information of interest to heritage professionals in Canada. All museum-related topics are welcome. Canmuse-L is the largest list of its kind in Canada and one of the largest in the world.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Listserv (Email Discussion Group) Fireweed-L

This electronic mailing list provides a forum for discussion, information requests, and dissemination of information of interest among Yukon heritage professionals. Created in 2003, this discussion group is provided as a free service to the Yukon museum community by the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN).

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Listserv (Email Discussion Group) Onmuse-L

This list is reserved for members of the Ontario Museum Association (OMA). The OMA gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) for launching this Listserv on its server.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Location-Based Services

Location-based services are a range of services that can deliver content to users at a specific location at a specific time. This brief document examines what these services do and how museums can use them.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Making Digital Work: Digital Toolkit for Arts and Culture

This toolkit is a suite of downloadable resources, tips and articles aimed at arts and culture organizations wishing to improve existing digital products and services or develop new ones. The toolkit takes you through the why, who, what and how of digital product development. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Museums & Society 2034: Trends and Potential Futures

The Center for the Future of Museums (CFM) commissioned this discussion paper on social and cultural trends and their potential effect on museums.

Other
Near Field Communication

Near field Communication (NFC) is a wireless means of communication that allows sharing of information either through two NFC-enabled devices or with one NFC-enabled device and an NFC tag at close range. This document introduces what NFC does, and how it can be used in museums.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
New Technologies and Museums: Glossary by the Canadian Heritage Information Network

New technology evolves fast, and we often don't know how to translate a term in the other official language. This glossary provides a list of new terms with their French equivalent. For example, do you know how to translate "to create a buzz online" in French? "Provoquer une réaction virale sur le Net" renders the meaning, but also "créer une vague en ligne". For more terms, consult this new bilingual CHIN Glossary.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
OMA Video Production How-To Guide: First Steps to Digital Storytelling in Museums

Online video provides users with a rich experience that cannot be obtained through flat text or images. This medium continues to grow in popularity and currently represents the bulk of all online traffic. While it is becoming increasingly easier to produce and publish videos online, there are some key considerations that should be taken into account.
This step-by-step guide, developed by the Ontario Museum Association for CHIN's Professional Exchange website, provides museums with a clear roadmap to video production, including detailed information on creating a video script, storyboarding, and shooting. Further consideration is given to editing and online publishing.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
OMA Video Editing and Publishing How-To Guide: Digital Storytelling in Museums Part Two

Using online videos as a media for digital storytelling is an excellent way of promoting cultural institutions. In order to use this media, it is essential to understand how to effectively edit, save, and share video on the Internet. When publishing video on the Internet, it is important that museums consider key factors such as accessibility, copyright, fair dealing, Creative Commons licensing, and ownership.
This step by step guide, developed by the Ontario Museum Association for CHIN's Professional Exchange website, complements the OMA Video Production How-To Guide: First Steps to Digital Storytelling in Museums by providing information on editing and publishing videos online at a beginner to intermediate computer skill level. Topics include transferring video from a recording device to a computer, editing, publishing online, and sharing videos on the Web.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
OpenURL Standard

The OpenURL Framework Standard defines an architecture for creating OpenURL Framework Applications. An OpenURL Framework Application is a networked service environment, in which packages of information are transported over a network. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Podcasting for Small Museums: A How-to-Guide

Podcasts can enrich museum visits by providing audio tours of exhibits, and by offering detailed descriptions and behind-the-scenes information about artefacts. Podcasts can also engage your museum's potential visitors by announcing museum news, new exhibits, and other current events. This guide provides detailed steps for making, editing, and publishing audio podcasts for museums. It was produced for the Canadian Heritage Information Network by the Community Museums Association of Prince Edward Island.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
QR Code How-To Guide

Quick Response (QR) codes provide a new way in which museums can interpret their exhibits through the use of technology. These codes are two dimensional images that can be produced by any printer (or computer display) and are readable by several hand-held devices such as smart phones. The information in the code can link device owners to websites, videos, and other online content, providing the visitor with a rich, interactive experience. This guide, developed by the Association of Nova Scotia Museums for CHIN's Professional Exchange website, shows staff having only basic computing skills how to use QR codes in their own exhibits, and provides tips on producing the content to be accessed by these codes, tracking users' activity, and other considerations relevant to the use of this technology.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T)

The Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T) is a professional international organization dedicated to keeping members and others apprised of the latest scientific and technological developments in the field of imaging through conferences, educational programs, publications, and its website. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Synchronized Multimedia Implementation Language (SMIL)

The Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language enables simple authoring of interactive audiovisual presentations. SMIL is typically used for "rich media"/multimedia presentations which integrate streaming audio and video with images, text or any other media type. (Description taken from the website)

Other
TechSoup

TechSoup provides both the digital platforms and in-person experiences that enable people to work together toward a more equitable world. Whether you have resources to give or solutions you need to get, TechSoup facilitates the exchange. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Tips and Tools for Optimized Web Writing

This resource presents principles on writing effective communications and on journalistic style that will help you optimize your Web page's central idea. Good writing is at the heart of Web page optimization. Discover simple tips to write powerful texts for the Web.

Canadian Heritage Information Network
Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)

The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI), in coordination with organizations around the world, pursues accessibility of the Web through five primary areas of work: technology, guidelines, tools, education and outreach, and research and development. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (WCAG 2.0) covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech difficulties, photosensitivity and combinations of these. (Description taken from the website)

Other
Wireless Access Point Tip Sheet for Museums

Wireless access points are locations where public can access the internet through their own wireless devices, and there is evidence that visitors expect these access points to be available as part of their museum experience. If you have not yet installed wireless access in your museum and are considering doing so, this tip sheet will help you consider the various issues associated with your project.

Canadian Heritage Information Network

Contact information for this web page

This resource was published by the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN). For comments or questions regarding this content, please contact CHIN directly. To find other online resources for museum professionals, visit the CHIN homepage or the Museology and conservation topic page on Canada.ca.

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