OMA Video Editing and Publishing How-To Guide: Digital Storytelling in Museums Part Two

Introduction and Acknowledgements

Introduction

The guide is a follow-up to First Steps to Digital Storytelling in Museums, also available on the Professional Exchange website. It offers a step-by-step format outlining the processes necessary for museums to edit and publish video to the Web without exhausting available staff time and resources. It is intended for heritage/cultural workers, volunteers and students with beginner or intermediate level computer skills, who want to promote their institution through the use of digital storytelling.

Acknowledgements

The Ontario Museum Association (OMA) gratefully acknowledges the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) for supporting the creation of OMA Video Publication How-To Guide: Digital Storytelling in Museums Part Two and for investing in the Young Canada Works project assistant position.

The OMA also wishes to acknowledge the following Working Group members who reviewed the Step by Step guide, and whose generous sharing of time and assessment is greatly appreciated:

  • Devon Muhic, City of Toronto Museums (Scarborough Museum)
  • Samantha George, Curator, Parkwood Estate National Historic Site and Heritage Garden
  • Julian Kingston, Principal, Theoria Cultural Thinkers
  • Meredith Leonard, Curator/Marketing, Fort Erie Museum Services
  • Erin Panepinto, Program Assistant, Hutchison House Museum
  • Amanda Langis, Gallery Stratford

This guide was researched and written by Katie Shoemaker and Kathy Downs, OMA Special Projects Assistants (supported by Young Canada Works / CHIN), and edited by Pierre Bois, OMA Special Projects Manager. The document was reviewed by Mary Collier, OMA Professional Development Program Manager, Rhiannon Myers, Communications Assistant, and Marie Lalonde, OMA Executive Director. The OMA would like to recognize the support and expertise of its Council during the creation of the document.

Learning prerequisites

Before using this guide, it is strongly recommended to review OMA Video Production How-To Guide: First Steps to Digital Storytelling in Museums available on the Professional Exchange website to understand the preparation and shooting of a video. This first guide covers:

  • establishing the "Big Idea"
  • writing a video script
  • creating a storyboard and shot list
  • shooting the video using the storyboard and shot list

The above guide (part 1) and this guide (part 2) together cover the entire process of video making from preparation, production to editing and publishing a video.

You can also take a look at videos on YouTube and Vimeo published by similar institutions for ideas.

Six Issues to Consider Before Editing Video for the Web

Note: This section is not intended to be a substitute for legal counsel. Please consult with your institutional policies and counsel for questions concerning copyright and accessibility requirements.

Before creating video for the Web, familiarize yourself with the following: Accessibility, Copyright, Fair Dealing, Creative Commons licensing, video rights waivers, and video ownership.

1. Accessibility: Online videos increase museum accessibility

As servants to the public, museums must be accessible. One in seven people in Ontario has a disability and Ontario now has accessibility standards for businesses and organizations to follow (Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services). Videos are a good way to share information with those who cannot easily access the museum or gallery. In a historical house where wheelchair access may be limited, a virtual tour video of the rooms upstairs will allow visitors to experience the entire house regardless of their disability.

Use online videos to make the museum more accessible to people with visual or auditory impairments. Audio podcasts are a good way to share information with people with visual impairments. By providing subtitles or transcripts for videos and podcasts, people with auditory impairments gain access as well. See examples from the Royal Ontario Museum here: http://www.rom.on.ca/en/collections-research/rom-channel

For more information on Accessibility in Ontario visit: http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/index.aspx

2. Copyright and Digital Storytelling: Obtain permission from the rights holder

Copyright laws aim to protect the artist and the artists' work, whether it is music, images or video, from being used or copied without the artists' approval (Society of Composers, Authors, and Music Publishers of Canada [SOCAN]). When publishing video content to the Web, it is important to know about copyright laws and how to avoid copyright infringement. An original work is protected by copyright law as soon as it is created and fixed (SOCAN) (PDF). Using content in a video that is not your original work qualifies as copyright infringement, even if it is as simple as using music in the background of a video.

Copyright laws protect a work for the length of the author's life, the remainder of the calendar year in which they die, plus an additional 50 years. Using this general rule, the copyright of a work will expire on , 50 years after the death of the creator. If the work was authored by more than one person, the expiration date will be 50 years after the death of the last author. In a case of work where there is no known author, the copyright expires 50 years after the first publication or 75 years after the making of the work. For performances, sound recordings and communication signals, the copyright expires 50 years after they are performed, recorded or broadcasted.

After the copyright expires, the work enters the public domain, where it can be copied legally without infringing on the rights of the artist ( SOCAN ). If a piece of art is installed in a public place, the public is permitted to create and publish paintings, drawings, photographs or films including the art without infringing on copyright (Cullihall & Perry (PDF)). If you do not own the copyright to the artefact or artwork selected for your video, and cannot obtain permission from the rights holder, you should not use it. The same is true with music or video that does not belong to you or the museum. Royalty free sources online can be used in videos without a licensing fee or infringing copyright.

For the Copyright Act in Canada visit: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-42/

Get Technical
See Royalty-free music, video and image sources listed in the Supplementary Material Section.

3. Fair Dealing: A limited exception to the Copyright Act

An exception to copyright may apply (subject to restrictions) under Fair Dealing if the material in question has been copied for the purpose of research, private studies, news reporting, criticism, education, satire, or parody. This exception is similar to Fair Dealing clauses in other commonwealth countries, and is comparable to the American Fair Use policy. Fair Use in the United States and Fair Dealing in Canada are not the same however. In all cases of Fair Dealing, attribution to the source and (if available) the author, performer, maker or broadcaster are necessary. As of , the fair dealing exception in Canada now includes digital content.

Tip: It is important to check the latest version of the Copyright Act as it is reviewed often.

4. Recording people in video: Insist on written waiver

When including museum visitors, staff or volunteers in a video, remember to notify them about the use of the video and obtain their written consent. This consent should not be a verbal confirmation between the institution and the public but rather a written waiver or contract outlining the use of the video, e.g. published to the Web. The waiver should include in detail where the video will be published, such as on YouTube, Vimeo, or the museum website. It should also state how the video will be used, whether it is for promotional, educational, or training purposes. Post signs notifying people that they may be recorded at a workshop or a museum event. A parent or guardian will need to sign the waiver for any minors under the age of eighteen.

Get Technical
See an example Video Rights Waiver/Consent Form

5. Creative Commons Licensing: Six types flexible copyright

Creative Commons is a non-profit organization that addresses the middle ground between copyright and public domain. A Creative Commons license is a more flexible copyright that allows individuals to copy and use the work of others without the restrictions of normal copyright laws. Through a Creative Commons license, work can be used without infringing any copyright laws, as long as it follows the guidelines based on the specific creative commons license. The licenses are available in easy to read formats for people who are not familiar with the legal terminology.

There are six types of Creative Commons Licenses:

  • Non-Commercial: Allows you to copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work as long as you credit the author and only use it for non-commercial purposes.
  • Attribution: Allows you to copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work as long as credit is given to the author. Through this license the work can be used for commercial or non-commercial purposes.
  • Non-Commercial/No Derivatives: Allows you to copy, distribute, display and perform the work as long as it is used in the original format and attribution is given to the artist.
  • Non-Commercial/Share Alike: Allows you to copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work as long as it is for non-commercial purposes and the work that is created is available for sharing under the same license agreement.
  • Share Alike: Allows you to copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work for both commercial and non-commercial purposes. The work created using this content must be available for others to use under the same licensing terms that it was acquired.
  • No Derivatives: Allows you to copy, distribute, display and perform the work for commercial or non-commercial purposes as long as the entire work is in its original format.

Get Technical
See example Creative Commons Licenses

6. Non-Profit Organizations and Digital Storytelling: Further access to grants and donations

Videos published to the Web can help non-profit organizations by raising awareness for the organization and its cause. There are special features available on YouTube and Vimeo to assist non-profit organizations in publishing effective online videos. On YouTube non-profit organizations may request non-profit status to have their YouTube Channel listed on the non-profit section. The non-profit setting also grants to organizations a call-to-action overlay for campaigns, Google grants (Ad Works), and a donate button through a Google checkout. There are also tips and advice for non-profit organizations on the Citizen Tube blog: www.citizentube.com/2010/04/secrets-to-nonprofit-video-success.html. To check the eligibility of a non-profit organization for this program visit: www.google.com/nonprofits/eligibility.html. On Vimeo, there are non-profit groups which act like a mini-community for non-profit organizations to connect and share their work.

There are also programs such as TechSoup Canada Technology Donation Program that offers donated or discounted technology to registered non-profit organizations. Non-profit organizations must meet the eligibility of the individual donating partners as well as the overall TechSoup Canada criteria found at www.techsoupcanada.ca/eligibility. TechSoup Canada also offers resources and tools exclusively for digital storytelling found at http://www.techsoupcanada.ca/en/community/blog/techsoup-canada%E2%80%99s-round-up-of-awesome-storytelling-tools-and-resources. These offers include links to resources on digital storytelling, an annual digital storytelling challenge with prizes (donations from partners), learning opportunities online through webinars and Twitter chats, donated tools at affordable pricing for non-profit organizations (e.g.: Adobe Special Donation Program) and affordable digital video cameras for non-profit organizations.

Requirements for Transferring and Editing Video

a. Equipment Needs for Video Editing

Editing video requires investing in some basic equipment to get started. The following is a list of suggested equipment:

  • Desktop Computer (compatible with Windows Movie Maker)
    • Your computer should have enough RAM to support video editing. For basic video editing, it's recommended that you use a computer with Intel Core 2 Duo, 2 GB RAM, and 500 GB Hard Disk, or the equivalent
    • Older computers are less likely to support video editing, particularly if using high definition video footage. You may need to invest in new equipment if the hardware is lagging
  • External hard drive with a Firewire input and output for storing video footage (a USB port will work in place of Firewire, but USB is not as fast, which is more relevant when working with high definition). Some personal computers (PCs) now feature USB 3 which acts similar to Firewire
  • External microphone (Try: Blue Snowball Podcasting USB microphone: http://www.bluemic.com/snowball/

b. Editing Principles:

Familiarize yourself with the following editing principles before you begin editing your video project.

  1. Pacing refers to the rhythm and timing of the video. The pace will change depending on the part of the story being told. If the pace of the video is too slow, the audience will lose interest. If the pace of the video is too fast, the audience may not have the time to understand the content completely.
    Tip: Have a colleague who is not working on the project watch the video as a test-run to review its pacing.
  2. Juxtaposition refers to the placement of the elements within the video project. It is similar to planning exhibits in a museum, where you choose relevant artifacts and plan the layout of the exhibit. Using carefully placed images and video clips can suggest themes and conclusions within your video.
  3. Shot Sequencing refers to the shifting shots of the video project. The video should have varying shots and distances to make it more interesting and to help keep the pace of the video. Refer to the shot list that you created using the First Steps to Digital Storytelling in Museums for the established shot type. As stated in the first guide, it is easier to shoot all scenes in a location at once, even if they are out of sequence. The shots can be ordered into the proper timeline in the editing process. Using different shot types will establish the pace of the video and keep the audience watching.
  4. More common types of camera shots:
    • Long shot (full shot or wide shot): A shot taken from farther away displaying the object in its context and background. Example: a curator standing in front of a museum.
    • Medium shot (a waist shot): A shot taken closer showing more of the main content without a lot of background. This shot is sometimes referred to as a 'waist shot' because it can display a person from the waist up, allowing hand gestures and facial expressions to be viewed.
    • Close up: A shot that focuses on the important content of the video. A close up shot can be used to display an artifact and its details.

c. Editing Software - Windows Movie Maker 2.6:

There are different versions of Windows Movie Maker, the most recent being Windows Live Movie Maker. This version does not allow you to customize your video project via timeline mode. For this reason this guide will be based on Windows Movie Maker 2.6. Windows Movie Maker versions 2.6 (Vista/Windows 7) and 2.1 (Windows XP) can be downloaded free from the Windows downloads website http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/get-movie-maker

The Basics:

Windows Movie Maker 2.6 has the following features:

  • The menu bar (1): The menu is very similar to other Windows programs with a file, edit, view, tools, clip, play and help dropdown.
  • Tasks pane (2): The task pane is a list of tasks that can be performed when editing videos such as: importing files, editing and publishing the video.
    Screenshot of Windows Movie Maker, showing the locations of the Menu bar, the Tasks Pane, the Contents Pane, the Storyboard, and the Preview Screen.
    Screen capture of Windows Movie Maker
  • Timeline mode (3): The timeline view is a more detailed view of the storyboard and can be used to trim transitions, audio and video clips. The timeline is best used for editing video projects.
  • Storyboard mode (4): The storyboard is a basic view of the sequence and order of the clips and transitions in the video project. Audio is not shown in the storyboard mode.
  • Preview screen (5): The preview screen is the video player where clips and transitions can be previewed in Windows Movie Maker. The play/pause buttons and split clip button are located underneath the preview screen.
  • Contents pane (6): Any video clips, audio, music or images that are added to Windows Movie Maker can be found in this pane. From this pane the elements can be added to the video project in the timeline or storyboard pane.

Note: If these five features are not visible, go to the view menu and select the missing features.

Transferring Video From Recording Device to Computer

a. Types of Recording Devices:

There are various acceptable recording devices to capture video:

  • Digital camera with video feature (point and shoot, digital single-lens reflex cameras -dSLR)
  • Digital video camera
  • Analog camera with digital output
  • Camcorders
  • Web cameras (no internal storage)
  • Cellphone or media player with video feature

Note: The following transfer method does not work for web cameras or cameras that do not have internal storage or analog cameras without digital output.

b. Steps to Transferring Video from Recording Device to Computer:

  1. Step 1: Connect the camera and computer using a USB cable, firewire cable or memory card.
  2. Step 2: Go to Computer and click on the recording device located under Devices with removable storage.
  3. Step 3: Locate the images and video files in the camera folder.
  4. Step 4: Highlight the files that are needed for the video project and copy and paste them to a working folder on your desktop. Organize and name the files (appropriate to your project and file naming standards) so that they are easily retrievable when editing. Do not move or delete files once the editing process has begun.

Get Organized
See File Management Guidelines.

c. Converting Files to Compatible Formats:

There are a variety of popular video file formats such a WMV, AVI, mpeg, and mp4. Note that not all formats are compatible with Windows Movie Maker. For example, mp4 files are common but are not compatible with Windows Movie Maker and must be converted to either AVI or WMV file formats before editing.

Get Technical
See list of Windows Movie Maker Compatible File Formats.

To convert the mp4 video into a compatible file format download the free media converter Format Factory from www.formatoz.com. This program will convert any file into the Windows Movie Maker compatible format of WMV or AVI.

Get Technical
See File Format Conversion Instructions.

Windows Movie Maker Tutorial

Windows Movie Maker Video Editing Tutorial When editing your video remember to use the storyboard and script created using the First Steps to Digital Storytelling, as a reference for the video project. Open a new project in Windows Movie Maker and add content for the video project using the following steps:

a. Adding Content to Your Video Project

i. Adding video clips:

Video captivates the viewer and is becoming increasingly popular, especially with younger audiences.

To add a video clip:

  1. Step 1: Go to the Tasks pane.
  2. Step 2: Click on Capture Video to view the options: Import video, Import pictures and Import audio or music.
  3. Step 3: Click on Import video.
  4. Step 4: Select the videos.
  5. Step 5: Ensure that the Create clips for video files at the bottom of the Import File box is unchecked. If this box is checked then Windows Movie Maker will automatically split the video into smaller clips.
  6. Step 6: Click Import.

ii. Adding images:

Images can be an effective way to connect the audience with your story and to set the mood of your video. They can accompany an audio track such as music, oral history recording or an interview and can create impact when used in a timely manner. They are also an opportunity to repurpose content you may already have.

To add an image:

  1. Step 1: Go to the Tasks pane.
  2. Step 2: Click on Capture Video to view the options: Import video, Import pictures and Import audio or music.
  3. Step 3: Click on Import pictures.
  4. Step 4: Select the images.
  5. Step 5: Click Import.

Tip: You can also drag and drop files directly from a file folder into the contents pane in Windows Movie Maker.

iii. Adding music or audio:

Adding music to a video project can establish a particular mood and create a more memorable video.

To add music or audio files:

  1. Step 1: Go to the Tasks pane.
  2. Step 2: Click on Capture Video to view the options: Import video, Import pictures and Import audio or music.
  3. Step 3: Click on Import audio or music files.
  4. Step 4: Select the audio or music files.
  5. Step 5: Click Import.

b. Splitting and Trimming Clips:

i. Trim parts of a video or audio clip:

Trimming hides parts of a file or clip without deleting them from the original source. Files and clips (small segments of a larger video file) can be trimmed by adjusting the start or end trim points.

Note: When a video or audio clip is trimmed in the timeline, it does not change the source file or the file in the contents pane.

ii. How to trim a clip:

  1. Step 1: In timeline mode, select the clip to be trimmed.
  2. Step 2: Use the play and pause buttons or the playback indicator bar (the moveable vertical line in the timeline window) to locate the new start point, or where you want the clip to begin. We will be trimming the beginning by creating a new start trim point.
  3. Step 3: Pause where you would like to begin video (the new start point).
  4. Step 4: Select Clip from the top menu and choose the "set start trim point" option.
  5. Step 5: To trim the end of your video or clip, press play and pause to indicate where you would like to set your end point.
  6. Step 6: Select Clip from the top menu and choose the set end trim point option.

Tip: Dragging the trim handles of the clip can also set the beginning and end of the clip. To make more precise edits, zoom in on the track to be more accurate.

iii. How to undo trimmed clips:

To return the clip to the original settings and delete the changes made from trimming:

  1. Step 1: Select the clip in the Timeline mode.
  2. Step 2: Select Clear trim points from the clip menu. This will clear all trim points created.

iv. Splitting:

Splitting enables you to divide an audio or video clip into two clips and is especially useful in allowing you to remove unwanted portions. Splitting also allows you to add special effects such as subtitles, titles, images and animations to create a dynamic video.

Note: You can only restore the original clips by selecting the "undo" button. To avoid reversing changes to your video, be deliberate in your use of splits (refer to your storyboard, if available, for direction).

How to split an audio or video clip:

  1. Step 1: Select the clip to split either in the contents pane or the storyboard/timeline.
  2. Step 2: Play the selected clip in the preview screen.
  3. Step 3: Pause the playback indicator when it is at the time to split the video.

Alternatively, use the playback indicator bar to select the split location.

  1. Step 4: Select the split button located under the preview screen.
  2. Step 5: After splitting the clip to the preferred length, save the clip individually as a movie clip. You will then be able to import the smaller clips into the video project and continue editing.

Note: A split button is also located in the clip menu.

c. Adding Titles, Narration, Transitions and Visual Effects

i. Adding titles and credits:

Titles can be added anywhere in a video (e.g. at the beginning or end of video clip or image). Credits can be added to the end of the video. Titles can clarify the content in the video project by providing a description for a specific scene. Subtitles can be used to display important information such as employee titles, people's names and event dates mentioned in the video.

To add a title:

  1. Step 1: In the Tasks pane: click on Edit movie to open the options: Make titles or credits.
  2. Step 2: Choose the placement of the title in the video project using the indicator bar.
  3. Step 3: Type the title into the text box.
  4. Step 4: Select Add title to movie.
  5. Step 5: Customize the font, text colour and animation of the title by selecting Change the title animation and Change the text font and color located under the text box in More Options.

Note: Any changes made to the title will be played in the preview screen.

  1. Step 6: Select Done, add title to movie when title customization is complete.

Note: When a title has been added to the video project, it shows as a separate item in the timeline. This item can be edited and moved within the video project.

ii. Adding subtitles (Type of title animation):

To add subtitles to a video:

  1. Step 1: Select the video clip.
  2. Step 2: In the Tasks pane: click on Edit movie to view the options: Make titles or credits.
  3. Step 3: Select Add title on the selected clip in the timeline.
  4. Step 4: Insert the subtitle text into the textbox.
  5. Step 5: Under More Options: Select Change the title animation.
  6. Step 6: From the one line menu: select the Subtitle option from the titles. The title will be located at the bottom of the selected video clip.
  7. Step 7: Customize the font and text colour from More Options.
  8. Step 8: Select Done, add title to movie when customization is completed.

Note: Use a font and text colour that is easily seen on the video (high contrast). For example, avoid black font if the background of the video clip or image is dark.

iii. Using the narration tool:

Narration can be used to provide the audience with information and express the mood that is essential to the overall video project. The narration is added as a separate audio track in the video clip.

To use the narration tool:

  1. Step 1: In the Tools menu: select Narrate timeline.
  2. Step 2: Click on the Start narration button and read a prepared script.
  3. Step 3: Click Stop narration when done.
  4. Step 4: Save the file in the video project folder.
  5. Step 5: The narration will save as a WMA format and will be added to the Contents pane.

iv. Transitions:

Transitions control how one clip merges with another clip. Transitions can be added between two images, video clips or titles in the storyboard and timeline. Using transitions in a video project can help establish the pace of the video and unite elements. Transitions can also be used artistically to show the passage of time, different parts of the story or convey the mood or tone of the video. The use of transitions should be motivated, meaning they're used intentionally to serve a purpose and add to the overall effectiveness of the story.

There are different types of transitions:

  • Fade in/out: a clip fades in or out into black or white
  • Wipes: a clip replaces another clip
  • Dissolve: where a clip emerges from another clip
  • Straight cuts: when there is no transition between the clips so the first video clip ends and then the second video clip begins. This is generally used when there are two characters talking to each other.

Note: Using a small dissolve transition with the straight cut will create a softer cut.

1) Adding a Transition:
  1. Step 1: In storyboard/timeline pane, select the second video clip, title or image of the two clips being transitioned together.
  2. Step 2: In the Tools menu, select transitions.

Note: When the transition is added to the storyboard it appears as a transition cell. When it is added to the timeline it appears as a separate transition track.

  1. Step 3: In the Contents pane, select a transition. To preview the transition, double-click the transition.
  2. Step 4: Select either Add to storyboard or Add to timeline in the Clip menu.

Tip: When the collections menu is selected in the top menu, transitions can be dragged and dropped between two elements in the timeline or storyboard from the collections pane.

2) Removing a transition:
  • In storyboard mode: Select the transition cell and select delete from the Edit menu.
  • In timeline mode: Select the transition track and select delete from the Edit menu.
3) Editing the transition duration:
  1. Step 1: In Timeline mode, select the transition track.
  2. Step 2: To create a longer transition drag the beginning of the transition toward the beginning of the timeline. To create a shorter transition, drag the beginning of the transition toward the end of the timeline.

Tip: Moving the video clip to overlap the previous clip will automatically create a fade transition.

v. Adding visual effects:

Visual effects can be added to video clips, images or titles. Using visual effects can set the tone of the video and create a theme throughout the video. For example, if the video is set in the past, using the film age effect will make the video look older and suggest that it was filmed in the past. Use effects moderately to maintain a professional look to your video. Multiple effects may be used on one clip (small segment of a larger video file) (e.g. speed-up double and sepia tone).

  1. Step 1: Select a video clip, image or title in the storyboard/timeline pane.
  2. Step 2: Select Video effects from the Collections pane.
  3. Step 3: In the Contents pane, select an effect.
  4. Step 4: Select Add to timeline or add to storyboard from the Clip menu.

Tip: Also drag and drop a video effect onto the clip in timeline/storyboard mode, or right click the clip and select the video effects from the menu.

Considerations Before Saving the Video

a. Saving the video as a work file:

In Windows Movie Maker, the video project can be saved as a work file or as a movie file. The video project will be saved as a work file when you are editing the video in Windows Movie Maker and need to continue to make revisions. When saving a project as a work file, it will be saved as an .MSWMM file which can be opened in Windows Movie Maker for further editing.

Note: Saving video in Windows Movie Maker 2.6 will not be compatible with other versions of Windows Movie Maker.

To save the video as a work file:

  1. Step 1: In the File menu, select Save project as.
  2. Step 2: Choose the save location on your computer.

Tip: Save the video project in successive files so that there will be copies of the different stages of the project. Example: VideoProject_1, VideoProject_2, etc.

b. End Use of Video:

The file format you select to save your video will depend on what the intended use.

  • Publishing a video to YouTube or Vimeo: a high definition WMV format measuring 1280 pixels by 720 pixels is suggested.
  • Publishing a video cast (vidcast) to iTunes: mp4 format is suggested.
  • Showing the video on a high definition monitor in a gallery, 1920 pixels by 1080 pixels is recommended.

Note: Source Files - Keep the elements used in the video in the same location and do not move or delete them. For example, if an image is used in a video and then moved to another folder on the same computer, the work file will not be able to locate the image and the video project will not have the relocated image

c. Saving in High Definition (HD):

Whenever possible, saving in high definition is recommended; the video will be clearer and of higher quality when published to the Web. Windows Movie Maker 2.1 for Windows XP does not have the HD feature, but a HD patch can be downloaded free at http://www.papajohn.org/MM2-WMV-HD.html

Get Technical
See HD patch download instructions for Windows XP

Note: Saving video at a higher resolution will not improve the resolution of the original video file captured by your camera.

d. Saving the video as a movie file:

When the video project is complete and ready to publish to the Web, it can be saved as a movie file:

  1. Step 1: In the File menu, select Save as movie.
  2. Step 2: Choose the movie location, My computer. Select next.
  3. Step 3: Enter a descriptive file name for the movie.
  4. Step 4: Choose a place to save the movie by browsing the computer. Select next.
  5. Step 5: Select other settings and use the dropdown menu to select the file format (e.g. WMV, mp4) and the resolution (i.e. 1280 pixels by 720 pixels).
  6. Step 6: Select next to save the video.
  7. Step 7: Once the video is saved, select finish.

Note: Because videos can take up a lot of space - store and back up finished videos on an external hard-drive.

Note: You can return to your working file (even after you have saved the movie file) to make changes as needed.

Get Technical
See Troubleshooting: Saving Movies in Movie Maker

Creating Basic Animations Using Microsoft Publisher

Using the procedures outlined in this section, you can easily create dynamic animations using Microsoft Publisher and Windows Movie Maker (other publishing programs may also be used). Animations can give videos a professional and vibrant look by introducing or concluding your story. They can also be an important way to communicate your brand (i.e. by including a logo).

For an example of an outro animation, see this OMA video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VKLayzz9Yo&feature=youtu.be

a. Step by step process for creating an animation for an HD video:

  1. Step 1: Open a blank 11" x 8.5" template in Microsoft Publisher.
  2. Step 2: From the File menu select Options.
  3. Step 3: In the Advanced settings under the display heading change the show measurements in units of from centimeters to pixels using the dropdown box.
  4. Step 4: Select OK to accept this change.
  5. Step 5: In the Page design menu (top centre), select the size dropdown box and select page setup.
  6. Step 6: Change the width to 1280px and the height to 720px.

Before you start: Refer to the storyboard from the First Steps to Digital Storytelling to plan your animation.

  1. Step 7: Create a background to the animation, by inserting a rectangular shape. In the Insert menu, select shapes and click rectangle. Create a rectangle that is the size of the canvas.
  2. Step 8: Select the preferred shape fill from the Format menu under Drawing Tools. This will be the colour of the background for the animation.

    In the OMA Conference video, the background colour is white.

  3. Step 9: Add all of the elements that will be included in the animation. Elements could include: titles, clip art, and/or images. It is important to get the exact placement of the elements for this frame right as it will be used as a template for the rest of the frames.

    For the OMA Conference video, the last frame included the conference logo, the date and location, and the tagline "Attracting visitors, transforming lives".

  4. Step 10: Once the layout for the frame is set, select all elements, including the background and select group located in the Drawing Tools menu. This merges the elements together and it can be saved as an image.
  5. Step 11: This frame will be the final frame of the animation. Save the document as a publisher file labeled "final frame".
  6. Step 12: Also save the frame as an image by right clicking the grouped elements and select Save as picture. Save the file type as a Tag Image File Format (TIFF) and change the resolution to 300 dpi.

Note: It is important to have all of the elements grouped together when saving as a picture. Do not click and select an element before right clicking and saving or it will just save the selected image only.

Tip: It may be helpful to print off the final frame and number the elements in order of appearance in the animation on the paper copy.

  1. Step 13: Once the order of animation is established: Use the final frame publisher file, select the grouped image and select ungroup from the Drawing Tools menu. Delete the last component to be animated. Do not use the save button. Remember to save as a new publisher file.

    In the OMA conference video, the date is the last element animated, so this would be the first element deleted.

  2. Step 14: Group all elements together and then save the frame as a TIFF image.
  3. Step 15: Continue deleting the animated elements one at a time in reverse order of animation and saving as a TIFF image and publisher file for all frames.

    For the OMA Conference video, the next element to be deleted would be the tagline, "Attracting visitors, transforming lives".

  4. Step 16: The last step is the first frame; it will be the first animated element that is viewed in the animation. Delete the last animated element, leaving the background created in step 7 and save as the first frame.

    For the OMA conference video, the conference logo is the first animated image and would be the last element deleted leaving the first frame as the white background.

Get Technical
See Microsoft Publisher Tip Sheet.

b. Creating a basic animation with your Frames using Windows Movie Maker:

Now that the animation frames are saved as TIFF images, create the video component following these steps:

  1. Step 1: Import the frames to the Contents pane in Windows Movie Maker 2.6.
  2. Step 2: Drag the frames to the timeline pane in the order of sequence.
  3. Step 3: When the frames are in the correct order, add the fade transition in between all of the frames.
  4. Step 4: Adjust the duration of the fade transition to change the speed of the animation.

Saving the animation:

  1. Step 1: Save the animation as a high-definition WMV video (resolution set at 720 pixels).
  2. Step 2: Import the animation into the video project as a video.

Video Publishing on the Web

Tip: Refer to copyright laws and ownership rights before publishing content on the Web.

There are a number of websites to choose from when publishing video to the Web. YouTube is a good website for reaching a wide number of potential visitors, while Vimeo may be a better source for sharing with other professionals.

Get the Facts
See list of video publishing and sharing websites and the features.

Uploading videos to the Web

a. Video Ownership on the Web:

When uploading videos to the Web, it is important to understand the terms of the website hosting the uploaded video. Read the Terms of Service agreements and the standard licensing before uploading any videos to the Web. Most websites allow the up-loader to retain ownership of the video but grants the website license to use, reproduce and distribute the video as well as derivatives of the video on their website.

Since YouTube is owned by Google look at their privacy policy as well as their terms of agreement.

When creating social media accounts, review the rights and responsibilities that are maintained on that website.

b. YouTube:

Log into www.youtube.com using a YouTube account or a Google account:

  1. Step 1: Click on Upload in the top right corner.
  2. Step 2: Select Files from your computer and find the WMV video to upload. To upload more than one video file select Upload multiple files and highlight multiple videos.
  3. Step 3: Click Open to begin the upload.
  4. Step 4: While the video is loading use the text boxes to create a title, description, tags and category.

Tip: Choose a catchy title that describes the video. Use as many relevant tags as you like that describe the video content. The tags and category descriptions will group the video with similar videos when searching YouTube and will increase its views.

  1. Step 5: Make the video public. If the video is set to private, only the up-loader and up to 50 other users whom the up-loader invites to view the video will see it.

c. Vimeo:

Log into www.vimeo.com using a Vimeo account or a Facebook account:

  1. Step 1: Click on the Upload menu in the top right corner.
  2. Step 2: Select Choose a file to upload and find the WMV video.
  3. Step 3: While the video is loading, select Edit information from the menu located on the left side and set the privacy settings to public.
  4. Step 4: Select Basic info to create a title, description, and tags describing the video in the text boxes.

Note: Remember to select save changes after every change made.

Sharing Videos on the Web

Once the videos are published to the Web, there are a number of ways to share videos with the general public and other professionals, including:

Social Media:

To promote and share videos published to the Web with the public, use social media such as Facebook and Twitter.

Note: A share button is located under the published video on YouTube and Vimeo for quick sharing to social media sites.

i. Facebook:

Connect with visitors and share information regarding your institution on a Facebook page. On the museums' Facebook page, post video links or share videos through apps that link the YouTube or Vimeo pages directly to the Facebook page. An example of the YouTube app can be found on the Bata Shoe Museum Facebook page
www.facebook.com/batashoemuseum?sk=app_106966931352.

ii. Twitter:

Twitter is a social media site where an individual can post short messages of 140 characters or less. On the museums' Twitter page, share video links through the online Twitter website or by downloading Twitter clients, such as Tweetdeck (www.tweetdeck.com) that allow you to access Twitter in a program on your computer.

iii. Widgets:

Share your YouTube or Vimeo video channels by linking to them on the official museum website using widgets. Widgets are applications that are embedded into a third party website such as a blog, webpage or a social media profile page. Widgets make it possible to share videos on other websites, by either linking to the video channel or by playing the video right on the other webpage. Vimeo has three different widgets in the tools menu, available to download and use on your official website.

Get Technical
See list of Vimeo widgets.

To create widgets for YouTube and other social media sites like Twitter and Facebook use a widget creation website like www.widgetbox.com. This website has free widgets that are ad-supported with limited customization.

Glossary of Video and Editing Terms

Bandwidth:
A network's capacity for transferring an amount of data in a given time.
Bit rate:
The number of bits transferred per second.
Clip:
Small segment of a larger video file.
Compression:
A process for removing redundant data from a digital media file or stream to reduce its size or the bandwidth used.
Copyright:
Literally the right to copy. " Copyright is the basic principle that determines who is the first owner of all rights in original musical, literary, dramatic and artistic works, and is set out in Canada under the terms of the Copyright Act." ( https://www.socan.ca/pdf/en/pub/Copyright2006Brochure-En.pdf) ( PDF)
Creative Commons Licensing:
A type of licensing that allow people to copy and distribute work provided they give the artist credit and the artist keeps the copyright. ( http://creativecommons.org/)
DPI:
Dots per inch.
Frame:
One of many sequential images that make up video.
High-Definition:
A higher resolution copy of video.
Metadata:
" Structured information that describes, explains, locates, or otherwise makes it easier to retrieve, use, or manage an information resource." In use of a Podcast feed, essentially is the information that iTunes uses to upload a podcast and the information about the podcast. ( http://www.niso.org/publications/press/UnderstandingMetadata.pdf) ( PDF)
MOCCA:
Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art
OMA:
Ontario Museum Association
Podcasts:
" A podcast is an episodic program delivered via the Internet using an XML protocol called RSS. Podcast episodes can be audio files, video files, documents, or any combination of the three. The publisher or broadcaster podcasts the program by posting the episodes and the XML document to a Web server. The consumer subscribes to the podcast using a client application, such as iTunes, which regularly reads the XML file and downloads new episodes."
( http://www.apple.com/itunes/podcasts/fanfaq.html)
Public Domain:
Media that can be used by anyone for commercial or non-commercial purposes as long as there is no copyright or patent existing. Some work enters the public domain when the copyright and/or patent expire.
Royalty Free Music:
" Music that has a single, or one time licensing fee."
( http://www.licensequote.com/blog/index.php/2011/05/royalty-free-music-definition-and-common-usage/)
Source:
Audio and video content that can be captured and encoded from devices installed on your computer or from a file.
SOCAN:
Society of Composers, Authors, and Music Publishers of Canada
Split:
To divide an audio or video clip into two clips.
Storyboard:
A view of the workspace that displays the sequence of your clips.
Timeline:
The area of the user interface that shows the timing and arrangement of files or clips that make up a project.
Trim:
To hide parts of a file or clip without deleting them from the original source. Files and clips can be trimmed by adjusting the start or end trim points.
Widget:
Widgets are a small application that has specific information that can be installed to a web page.
Workspace:
The area of Windows Movie Maker in which you create your movies. It consists of two views: storyboard and timeline, which act as a container for work in progress.
.WMV:
windows media video

Units to measure Digital Information

  • 1 Kilobyte = 1024 bytes
  • 1 Megabyte = 1024 Kilobytes
  • 1 Gigabyte = 1024 Megabytes

List of Examples of Videos and Channels from Museums

Videos can help promote upcoming exhibits, inform the public about a museum's collection, educate the public on certain topics, or provide information to other museum professionals.

Some examples of videos produced by museums are:
Type of Video Institution Video URL
"A Museum to Discover: Personal Views" Series Canadian War Museum www.youtube.com/watch
?v=kJYVxinzaB8&list=PLE42131EA8EC5AB24&index=1&feature=plpp_video
Artist's Talk Burlington Art Centre www.youtube.com/watch
?v=kWGp5_emw4E&context=C3a94318ADOEgsToPDskKMvxya_och-LWGXyZQ9KNL
Artifact "Vlogging" Niagara Falls Museums www.youtube.com/watch
?v=yCuYfGDtavs&feature=plcp&context=C22966UDOEgsToPDskLEl2Hv8Dy6O1MInR6SkYyT
"Behind the Scenes" Royal BC Museum www.vimeo.com/28087228
  National Gallery of Canada www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaR3OsXlBwk&lr=1
Call to action OMA www.youtube.com/watch
?v=7VKLayzz9Yo&feature=plcp&context=C313978aUDOEgsToPDskLY_2jOHiIFS3lvLuv4eSeA
Contests and Challenges Huronia Museum www.youtube.com/watch
?v=Twp_PygvXQo&list=UUemiu0UpqNqANaQOIOw6hnA&feature=plcp
Crafts Royal Ontario Museum www.youtube.com/watch
?v=up4Wee8ZZAo&feature=g-all
  Museum London www.youtube.com/watch
?v=zvDQSuWC5PA&list=UUAY-60WkNvNktmR4lvWPKWQ&index=2&feature=plcp
Demonstrations Canadian Agricultural Museum www.youtube.com/watch
?v=71eRsIl3KgE&list=PL78B1E524DCFE305D
&context=C3a422b7ADOEgsToPDskI059J2euREa_1f9z1lpZ-n
  Museum of Health Care www.vimeo.com/30434229
Educational Videos Science North www.youtube.com/user/sciencenorth?feature+mhum#p/u/6/lzyV4AirQrk
Event recap Casa Loma www.youtube.com/watch
?v=2oj52n1mgiQ&feature=plcp
&context=C3d840e7UDOEgsToPDskKn5czNhB_ttYFkHTnSntfa
Fun Facts Series Museum of Health Care www.vimeo.com/6384100
"How it Works" Canadian Museum of Nature www.youtube.com/watch
?v=UHNTVLqjCEM&feature=plcp
&context=C3ce8695UDOEgsToPDskIDUzo44H_DMBRTkMK8Jv9Z
Installation Videos National Gallery of Canada www.youtube.com/watch
?v=rElZ-Eh1ct8&feature=g-all-u
&context=G2390f15FAAAAAAAABAA
Media Statements Canadian Air and Space Museum www.youtube.com/watch
?v=ES-yWATam9A&feature=plcp
&context=C3341267UDOEgsToPDskKyEeA5PxwMYq4mGhvL4fa5
New Online Content promotion Museum of HealthCare www.youtube.com/watch
?v=k1Ke5a4HO3I&feature=g-all-u
&context=G2e335bdFAAAAAAAAKAA
Plays Canadian Museum of Civilization www.youtube.com/watch
?v=FkLBbb6wAgg&feature=context
&context=C3c71f52UDOEgsToPDskIlinPMrYm5oL25vg_8mtpL
Podcasts Bata Shoe Museum www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Zbdtj2yhU0&feature=plcp
&context=C33dfd21UDOEgsToPDskLrcoluVVTj1ouPeiPndrlq
Promotional video for General Visits Waterloo Region Museum www.youtube.com/user/waterlooregionmuseum#p/u/4/gA1Q7-hFiXE
  Canadian Nature Museum www.youtube.com/user/canadanaturemuseum
Promotional video for specific Events Brant Historical Society www.youtube.com/user/branthistorical#p/a/u/0/YAl_dEgWdHI
Promotional video for specific Exhibits Royal Ontario Museum www.youtube.com/user/RoyalOntarioMuseum#p/u/1/7D8UgnCdNrg
  National Gallery of Canada www.youtube.com/user/ngcmedia#p/u/20/p48blOvMpbA
Reaction Videos Art Gallery of Ontario www.youtube.com/user/artgalleryofontario#p/u/57/SyVlwJK8zkM
Recap of the museum's activities THEMUSEUM www.youtube.com/user/THEMUSEUMtv
?ob=5#p/u/0/ST54gqOogLE
Showcases on art Gardiner Museum www.youtube.com/watch
?v=EAjX7wgEgto&feature=plcp
&context=C34ee162UDOEgsToPDskKAvJmXI_sxo7w9-_pQj0UG
  Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA) www.youtube.com/watch
?v=4PbQptXMCDQ&feature=plcp
&context=C3b99153UDOEgsToPDskJQydhwrbBA6P4QfsDMfR4S
Talks with Artists and Curators Art Gallery of Ontario www.youtube.com/user/artgalleryofontario
#p/u/67/0H9ifkp2jJ4
  Canadian Nature Museum www.youtube.com/user/canadanaturemuseum
#p/u/20/eGy_Nsmq_0M
  Museum of Health Care
(Answering questions from Twitter)
www.vimeo.com/24482809
Trivia Ontario Science Centre www.youtube.com/watch
?v=WC7D4pRn-1I&list=UUEnpI0loH4L8FFBRmKs_YJw&index=3&feature=plcp
Virtual Tours Museum North www.youtube.com/watch
?v=HeaTSG1ujqQ&list=UU5agdSliafUBVz6JnuyzKsA
&feature=plcp
Volunteer Recognition Art Gallery of Hamilton www.youtube.com/watch
?v=-ksvW6Zwvg8&feature=plcp
&context=C33fe83bUDOEgsToPDskKMSjijO5RLH5e2x9BFcLKf

List of YouTube channels from some of Ontario's leading museums and galleries:

Royalty-Free Music, Images and Video

Royalty free music, images and video can be used in your video without the need of a licence. The following websites are some online resources that have royalty free music, images and video for free or purchase:

Music

Table showing four music websites (mobygratis.com, danosongs.com, freemusicarchive.org, vimeo.com/musicstore) and for each site, a description, its features, conditions for using music on the site, and what attribution should be given when the music is used.
Website www.mobygratis.com www.danosongs.com www.freemusicarchive.org www.vimeo.com/musicstore
Description
  • Create a user account to browse free music to download for use in video projects by non-profit organizations.
  • Royalty free music available to download for personal or commercial use.
  • Free music available for download.
  • Some copyright restrictions apply.
  • Some music is in the public domain.
  • Free music provided by Audiosocket and Free Music Archive with Creative Commons licensing.
  • Also music available for purchase.
Features
  • Previews of songs available.
  • Account required.
  • Listed by genre and description.
  • No account required.
  • MP3 format.
  • Preview songs.
  • Browse by curator or genre.
  • No account required.
  • MP3 format.
  • Search the Music Store by genre, tempo, theme, mood, or instrument. (Advanced search available).
  • No account required.
  • Preview Songs.
  • MP3 format.
Conditions
  • Free music as long as it is used in a non-commercial or non-profit video.
  • Donations recommended if attribution to website is not given.
Attribution
  • Not required.
  • Required.
  • Link to the site, or credit "Free Royalty Free Music by DanoSongs.com".
  • Attribution photos, banners, videos or sound.mp3 available on website.
  • Required with every creative commons license.
    (Other licensing terms may apply).
  • Required with every creative commons license.
    (Other licensing terms may apply).

Images

Table showing four digital photo sites (istockphotos.com, freedigitalphotos.net, sxc.hu, gettyimages.com), and for each site, a description, its features, conditions for using music on the site, and what attribution should be given when an image is used.
Website www.istockphoto.com www.freedigitalphotos.net www.sxc.hu www.gettyimages.com
Description
  • Images available for purchase.
  • Download free royalty-free photographs.
  • Free images for download.
  • Royalty free images available for purchase. (Also video and music available).
Features
  • Account required.
  • Download any size and resolution.
  • Free photographs are a smaller size.
  • Larger sizes of photographs can be purchased.
  • Account required.
  • No account required.
Conditions
  • Pay for credits and use the credits to download the images.
  • Cannot be used in company logos.
  • Different licenses depending on image.
  • Different licenses depending on image.
Attribution
  • Not Required.
  • Not required.
  • Required - based on agreement.
  • Required - based on agreement.

Websites like Flickr also use creative commons licensing for some of their images:
www.flickr.com/creativecommons/

Video Rights Waiver/Consent Form

Note: This form is an example and is not a legally binding document.

Youth Video Waiver / Media Consent

I hereby authorize any images or video footage taken of my youth (under 18 years of age), in whole or in part, individually or in conjunction with other images and video footage, to be displayed on the (institution name) Website and other official channels, and to be used for media purposes including promotional presentations and marketing campaigns. I also authorize the display and use of any media material created by my youth within the (institution name).

I waive rights to privacy and compensation, which I may have in connection with such use of my youth's name and likeness, including rights to be written copy that may be created in connection with video production, editing and promotion therewith.

I am over 19 years-of-age and the parent or legal guardian of the youth, and I have read this waiver and am familiar with its content.

Parent / Guardian Name (Please Print):
Signature:
Youth's Name:
Date:

Adult Video Waiver / Media Consent

I hereby authorize any images or video footage taken of myself, in whole or in part, individually or in conjunction with other images and video footage, to be displayed on the (institution name) Website and other official channels, and to be used for media purposes including promotional presentations and marketing campaigns. I also authorize any media material created by myself within the (institution name).

I waive rights to privacy and compensation, which I may have in connection with such use of my name and likeness, including rights to be written copy that may be created in connection with video production, editing and promotion therewith.

Name (Please Print):
Signature:
Date:

Creative Commons Licences

Every creative commons licence requires attribution for the artist; there are six different types of agreements:

Table showing types of creative commons licenses (non-commercial, Attribution, Non-commercial No Derivatives, Non-commercial Share Alike, Share Alike, and No Derivatives), as well as was is allowed and what conditions apply for each type.
License type: Allows: Conditions:
Non-Commercial
Copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work. Attribution is given and work is only used for non-commercial purposes.
Attribution
Copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work. (For commercial or non-commercial purposes.) Attribution is given.
Non-Commercial - No Derivative
Copy, distribute, display and perform the work. Attribution is given, it is for a non-commercial use and there is no derivative works.
Non-Commercial - Share Alike
Copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work. Attribution is given, it is used for non-commercial purposes and the work that is created is available for sharing under same license agreement.
Share Alike
Copy, distribute, display, perform and create derivatives of the work. (For commercial or non-commercial purposes.) If the work is used in a derivative format, it must be available for others to use under the same terms that it was acquired.
No Derivatives
Copy, distribute, display, and perform. (For commercial or non-commercial purposes.) Must use the entire work in its original format. Example: Cannot remix or add to the original song.

For more information on the Creative Commons Licensing: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/

It is easy to search for work that uses Creative Commons licensing through Google's advanced search, Flickr (www.flickr.com/creativecommons), YouTube's video editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor), Vimeo (www.vimeo.com/creativecommons) and Jamendo (http://www.jamendo.com/en/list/p149219/jamendo-creative-commons).

File Management Guidelines

Note: This section is not intended to substitute your own institutional policies concerning digital asset management. When initiating a new video project, please consult with your institution to identify acceptable standards for file management (i.e. maintaining an archive folder for raw footage). As with other museum technology and digitization projects, you may choose to draft a formal policy to create consistency in file management practices.

Organizing the media files into folders makes it easier to find the media when importing into the video project. It is suggested to have six folders for a video project:

Raw - MP4 Folder: This folder contains the video content imported from your recording device. This will be the original files that you will be converting to compatible WMV format using Format Factory.

*Note: If your recording device saves the recorded content in compatible file formats, you will not need to convert these files. However, it is recommended that you create duplicates of the original files (saved as "Derivatives") to work from, and save the original files in an Archive file to avoid making changes to the original files.

Converted - WMV Folder: This folder contains the raw files that have been converted into a compatible WMV format. (You can use other compatible file formats, but WMV format is suggested.)

Clips Folder: This folder contains the individual movie clips created in Windows Movie Maker by trimming or splitting the larger WMV files.

Related Media Folder: This folder contains the related media necessary for your video project. It contains separate sub-folders for each of the specific media types:

  • Audio/Music
  • Animations
  • Narrations
  • Images

Working Files Folder: This folder contains the Windows Movie Maker working files (file format: MSWMM). These files can be opened and edited in Windows Movie Maker.

Windows Movie Maker Compatible File Formats

The following is a list of compatible file formats for editing in Windows Movie Maker as well as the suggested file format.

Video files:
  • .asf
  • .avi
  • .dvr-ms
  • .m1v
  • .mp2
  • .mp2v
  • .mpe
  • .mpeg
  • .mpg
  • .mpv2
  • .wm
  • .wmv

The suggested formats for video files are: .avi and .wmv.

Audio files:
  • .aif
  • .aifc
  • .aiff
  • .asf
  • .au
  • .mp2
  • .mp3
  • .mpa
  • .snd
  • .wav
  • .wma

The suggested formats for audio files are: .mp3, .wav and .wma.

Image files:
  • .bmp
  • .dib
  • .emf
  • .gif
  • .jfif
  • .jpe
  • .jpeg
  • .jpg
  • .png
  • .tif
  • .tiff
  • .wmf

The suggested format for images is: .tiff or .jpeg.

Conversion Instructions

These instructions can be used to convert video files of various formats to a single format.

Go to www.formatoz.com and download the latest version of Format Factory (Version 2.90 will be referred to here).

Once the program is installed, open Format Factory:

  1. Step 1: Select the Video menu from the left side-bar.
  2. Step 2: Select All to WMV
  3. Step 3: Click the Output Setting button to check settings:
    • Type: WMV
    • High Quality and Size is selected in top dropdown menu
  4. Step 4: The Output Folder is the location where the converted video will be saved. Choose the location from the dropdown menu or by using the browse button.
  5. Step 5: Select Add File button and select the video to be converted.
  6. Step 6: Select OK
  7. Step 7: The video is now added to conversion queue in the main page of Format Factory.

Note: Multiple videos can be added to the conversion queue and to be converted at the same time.

  1. Step 8: Select Start from the toolbar at the top of the screen. You can pause and stop conversion using the corresponding buttons in the toolbar.
  2. Step 9: Once the conversion has been completed, use the Remove or Clear list buttons to delete the videos from the conversion queue.

Features:

  • Add subtitles and watermarks to videos by uploading separate files to the video settings.
  • Converts audio, video and images to various formats (including, mobile phone settings such as Blackberry and iPhone).
  • Supported in 60 languages. (Select from Language menu.)
  • Compatible with Windows 7/XP/Vista.

Obtaining the HD patch for Windows XP Users

Saving as a high definition (HD) video is suggested when publishing to the Web to offer the highest possible video quality. However, if the original (raw) footage was not shot in high definition, the video quality will not be significantly improved by saving in HD. In Windows Movie Maker for Windows XP, there is no option to save as a HD video, so an HD patch must be downloaded.

To save videos in high-definition in Windows Movie Maker for Windows XP, a HD patch will need to be downloaded using the following process:

  1. Step 1: Visit the website: www.papajohn.org
  2. Step 2: On the left sidebar, locate and select the folder that says WMV-HD.
  3. Step 3: Click on the Introduction subfolder icon.
  4. Step 4: Download the four different files that are located on the webpage under Downloadable profiles. (4:3 Standard aspect ratios: 960x720 and 1440x1080, 16:9 widescreen - 1280x720 and 1920x1080)
  5. Step 5: Save these four files to a folder titled Profiles folder located in a folder titled Shared folder in the Windows Movie Maker file.

Note: Create these file folders if they do not exist in the Windows Movie Maker folder.

  1. Step 6: Now when a video is saved in Windows Movie Maker 2.6 the option of saving it as a WMV-HD file will be available in the four different sizes: 960x720, 1440x1080, 1280x720, and 1920x1080.

Troubleshooting - Saving as a Movie in Windows Movie Maker 2.6

Sometimes there are problems when saving as a movie in Windows Movie Maker 2.6. If you receive an Error Message: "Windows Movie Maker cannot save the movie to the specified location. Verify that the original source files used in your movie are still available, that the saving location is still available, and that there is enough free disk space available, and then try again."

Reasons why this error may occur and the solutions:

  1. The source files have been moved or deleted from their original location.

    Solution: Locate the files in their new location and either:

    1. Move them to the original location. (All files will be added to your video project again.)

    2. Import them into Windows Movie Maker from their new location
      Note: You will have to add them to the video project again if you choose to import them again.

  2. There is not enough space for the movie file in the saving location.

    Solution One: Locate another save location that has enough space for the movie.

    Note: You can find out how much space the movie will take when saving:

    1. In the File menu, select Save as movie.
    2. Choose the movie location, My computer. Select next.
    3. Enter a descriptive file name for the movie.
    4. Choose a place to save the movie by browsing the computer. Select next.
    5. Select other settings and use the dropdown menu to select the file format (e.g. wmv, mp4).
    6. Before selecting next to save the video, notice the Movie File Size information in the bottom right corner.
    7. Once the video is saved, select finish.

    Solution Two: Change the size of the video project by choosing a lower quality movie setting when saving as a movie file.

  3. There is not enough computer memory to save the project to your computer.

    Solution One: If there is not enough space on the computer and you can make more space by:

    1. Deleting unnecessary files.
    2. Using external hard-drives or USB drives to store or save files (keep in mind that transferring video files using USB can be very slow. Using Firewire can significantly improve the flow of data).

    Solution Two: Increase the size of the paging file on the computer which will allow for more memory to be used to save the movie file.

    1. Open up the Movie File Size.
    2. Select System and Security.
    3. Select System and click Remote Settings in the left side menu.
    4. Click the Advanced Tab.
    5. Select Settings under Performance heading.
    6. Select the Advanced Tab.
    7. Select the Change button under Virtual Memory.
    8. Deselect Automatically manage paging file size for all drives.
    9. Select Custom Size and fill in the Initial Size* (MB) and Maximum size** (MB).
      *For the Initial Size: Use the minimum allowed (found at the bottom of the page).
      **For the Maximum size use the recommended file size (found at the bottom of the page).
  4. The video project is too complex (For example, the video is too long or has too many elements.

    Note: If you have split or trimmed a clip and did not save as a separate video clip to be imported into the video project, then the deleted portion of video could still be associated with the clip and therefore the clip seems larger than it appears in Windows Movie Maker.

    Solution: Split the video project into smaller sections and save as movie clips. If the movie you are trying to save is five minutes in length, split it into 5 one minute segments and save as movie clips. In a new video project, import the five new movie clips and save as a movie file.

    Note: This may be a compatibility issue with Windows 7 and Windows Movie Maker since the error seems to occur more with Windows 7 then with Windows Vista. Another solution is: to save the video projects as smaller movie clips and then use Windows Live Movie Maker to save the movie as a whole. (*Windows Live Movie Maker is available for free to download from http://windows.microsoft.com/en-CA/windows-live/movie-maker-get-started)

  5. The media used in the video project are not in a compatible file format.

    Solution: Confirm that all media being used in the video project are compatible with Windows Movie Maker. See Windows Movie Maker Compatible File Formats in Supplementary Material for full list of compatible file formats.

  6. Computer is overheating. (This happens if you are doing a lot of editing in Windows Movie Maker and the computer does not get a break from being used.)

    Solution: Save the video project and try saving as a movie at a later time.

Some general solutions would be:

  • Solution: Ensure that all programs are closed and that there are no other major processes running.

    1. Select Ctrl, Alt and Del to open Task Manager.
    2. Select Start Task Manager.
    3. In the Processes Tab, note any programs that are using a lot of data in the CPU column.
    4. End processes that are using too much CPU.
      Note: If you are unsure of what the processes are, do not end the process.
  • Solution: Restart the computer and start Windows Movie Maker and try saving the project as a movie again.

For more troubleshooting visit these websites:

Microsoft Publisher Tip Sheet

The Basics - Microsoft Publisher

Microsoft Publisher is a software program used to create publications, such as brochures, greeting cards, flyers, catalogs and email newsletters, and generally comes installed free with the Windows operating system. There are different versions of Microsoft Publisher; this tip sheet is for the newest Microsoft Publisher 2010. There are features that appear in Microsoft Office that will not transfer to an older version of the program, but the file can still be opened in other versions.

Relevant Features

  • Edit images by cutting, cropping and resizing

The Menus:

  • File: Open, save and print options.
  • Home: Font, paragraph, add objects, and arrange objects options.
  • Insert: Adding objects to publication. (Charts, pictures, clip art, shapes, page parts, borders, text boxes, and word art.)
  • Page Design: Editing the basic template and page settings.
  • Mailings: Mail and email merge options.
  • Review: Spelling check, thesaurus, and translate language.
  • View: Customize the view of the publication.

When an object is added into a publication, another tab will appear for editing specific to that object.

Saving projects:

A project can be saved as a publication file that can be opened and edited in Microsoft Publisher, or as an image file that can be opened with other image viewing programs. When saving the publication as an image, save it in the TIFF format with the highest resolution (300 dpi).

Try a free trial of Microsoft Publisher at https://products.office.com/en-ca/try?legRedir=true&CorrelationId=c3668434-1751-466b-ba05-59861db62688. Or purchase Microsoft Publisher separately at:
www.microsoftstore.com/store/msstore/en_US/pd/productID.216573300

Video Share Websites

YouTube
Account Settings
  • Free - use a free YouTube account or an existing Gmail account
Uploading
  • Unlimited uploading
  • Up to 12 videos can be uploaded at the same time
Features
  • Create Playlists (curate your own playlists based on selected themes or topics)
  • HD video available
  • Control over comments (i.e.: delete, block, disable, report a problem)
  • Comments and content also monitored by YouTube
Size of Files
  • Less than 2GB
  • 10 minute video maximum (*To increase video limit to 15 minutes see below.)
Acceptable File Formats
  • .mpeg4, .3gpp, .mov, .avi, .mpegps, .wmv and .flv
Compatibility with Websites
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google (plus)
Mobile Applications
  • Available -
    iPhone, android
  • Mobile Version available
Exclusives
  • YouTube for Non-profits, YouTube Live, and YouTube for Schools

*Increase Length of YouTube Video

There are certain restrictions in the size of video that can be uploaded to YouTube: smaller than 2GB and no more than 10 minutes in length. To increase the limit from 10 minutes to 15 minutes for a length of a video, register a phone number with the YouTube account. The YouTube account must be in good standing for the limit to be increased.

Video Preview Image

When the video has been uploaded, YouTube will automatically assign an image from the video to be the preview image for the video on the YouTube channel. After the video is uploaded, three images will be pulled from the video and can be selected to represent the video on the YouTube channel. If a thumbnail image is not selected from these three options, a default image from the video will be placed to represent the video.

Vimeo
Account Settings
  • Free. Also available: Pro and Plus accounts for between $60 -$200 USD
Uploading
  • Up to 500 MB a week (with a max of 10 files per day)
  • Up to 5 uploads at a time. (Depending on the version of Vimeo)
Features
  • Couch Mode (plays all videos in succession)
  • Create albums of videos
  • HD video available (1 HD video upload/week)
  • Control over comments (i.e.: delete, block, disable, report a problem)
  • Content and comments monitored by Vimeo
Size of Files
  • At least 200 KB in size
Acceptable File Formats
  • .asf, .asx, .avi, .divx, .dv, .dvx, .m4v, .mov, .mp4, .mpeg, .mpg, .qt, .wmv, .3g2, .3gp, .3ivx and .3vx
Compatibility with Websites
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Flickr
  • Del.icio.us
  • Stumble Upon
  • MySpace
  • Digg
Mobile Applications
  • Available - iPhone and android phones
  • Available on streaming players and TVs like Apple TV, Google TV, Roku, SmartTV, Samsung Blu-Ray players, Boxee, WD TV media players and HDTVs with Viera Connect.
  • Mobile Version available for Plus accounts (videos can be made into mobile versions for easier viewing on a mobile)
Exclusives
  • If there is an issue with uploading video, alternative flash based up-loader is available
  • Music Store - free royalty-free music (can also purchase music)
  • Videos must be non-commercial with the exceptions of: independent production companies, authors, artists, musicians, non-profits and actors promoting the work they have created.

iTunes
Account Settings
  • Free - with a free iTunes store account
Uploading
  • Unlimited uploading
  • Audio, video or text documents
Features
  • Uploaded order (episode format)
  • HD video available (not compatible for iPods)
  • Reviews of podcasts are monitored by iTunes staff (User can report a concern)
Size of Files
  • No limit (but suggested to be less than 1GB)
Acceptable File Formats
  • .m4a, .mp3, .mov, .mp4, .m4v, .pdf and .epub
Compatibility with Websites
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
Mobile Applications
  • Available - iPhone
Exclusives
  • Uses RSS feeds

Vimeo Widgets

  Hubnut Montage Blog Badges
The Look
  • TV-style viewing
  • Visual montage of videos
  • Vimeo icons or "badges"
Number of videos
  • Publish and watch all videos on a different site
  • Choose a number of videos (up to 9) to be viewed in the montage
  • Icons that link to your Vimeo profile
Features
  • Only plays standard videos
  • Publish up to 100 videos
  • Choose dimensions
  • Choose how many videos
  • URL can be changed
  • our different icons of varying sizes
Process
  1. Choose video-stream from dropdown menu
  2. Select slideshow, video title, video byline options from corresponding dropdown menus
  3. Choose highlight and background colours from the dropdown menus
  4. Copy the code from the textbox below the hubnut preview and paste to website
  1. Choose video-stream from dropdown menu
  2. Layout: horizontal or vertical
  3. Choose the number of videos to include (1-9)
  4. Select video titles options
  5. Select size of videos (small, medium, large and huge)
  6. Copy the code from below the montage preview and paste to website
  1. Choose the badge from the four options
  2. Copy the code from the textbox below the image and paste it to a website or blog.

Contact information for this web page

This resource was published by the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN). For comments or questions regarding this content, please contact CHIN directly. To find other online resources for museum professionals, visit the CHIN homepage or the Museology and conservation topic page on Canada.ca.

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