Call for proposals 2019: Settlement and Resettlement Assistance Programs funding guidelines

Deadline: April 12, 2019 5 pm PST

Table of contents

Foreword

Call for proposals 2019

Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) administers the Settlement Program and Resettlement Assistance Program to help newcomers settle and adapt to life in Canada, setting them on a path to integration and full citizenship. Through these programs, IRCC works with many partners to deliver a set of ongoing high-quality services to newcomers.

The purpose of this call for proposals (CFP) is to establish a comprehensive set of Settlement and Resettlement Assistance Program services across Canada. Funding for recommended projects will commence on April 1, 2020 and will be eligible for a duration of up to 5 years, ending no later than March 31, 2025. Applicants may apply to receive funding under the Settlement and/or Resettlement Assistance Programs but must submit separate applications for each program. These funding guidelines are a tool to help applicants develop their proposals. All applicants are responsible for reading the funding guidelines in full.

Applicants applying to receive Settlement Program funding can propose customized services to address specific gaps or current needs within their community or region (see Settlement Program application section for details). Customized Services are enhanced, refined or niche areas in which IRCC would like to see expansion, or customization, in response to emerging or specific client needs. The priorities outlined in these guidelines are based on valuable input gathered through extensive local consultations with settlement, resettlement, and other stakeholders across all regions.Footnote 1

The Settlement and Integration vision

Successful settlement and integration of newcomers benefits Canada by building a more inclusive, diverse and productive nation. This is achieved through a shared effort that helps all reach their economic and social potential.

Our vision is achieved through:

  • collaboration across all levels of government, civil society, and the private sector
  • building welcoming communities responsive to newcomers’ needs and receptive to their talents
  • programming that:
    • builds on the strengths of newcomers and the communities they now call home
    • facilitates learning Canada’s official languages to maximize newcomers’ participation and contribution
    • supports employment and entrepreneurship of newcomers to build a stronger economy
    • addresses barriers to full participation in our society and is responsive to the particular needs of the most vulnerable
    • catalyses strong community connections, including with Indigenous communities
    • is relevant to, and available in, both urban centres and small, rural, and northern communities
    • helps Francophone newcomers live and work in French, contributing to linguistic duality and the vitality of official language minority communities
  • services which maximize outcomes through:
    • a culture of continuous improvement and innovation
    • providing the right supports at the right time
    • fostering a professional settlement sector by investing in capacity and knowledge building
    • effective administrative practices that maximize the use of public funds

Settlement and Integration falls within the continuum of managed migration. This process begins with the selection of immigrants and refugees, and involves facilitating the arrival of all newcomers to maximize mutual contributions to Canada, and to foster a sense of belonging. The continuum is completed with the integration of newcomers as fully participating citizens in an inclusive society that provides equal opportunity for all.

Additional funding process (spring 2019)

A second funding process will launch in spring 2019 for select Settlement Program services not included in this Call for Proposals.

Funding for that process will be provided through a grant and/or contribution agreement. That process will not include the Resettlement Assistance Program. More information on how to apply for funding of these services will be posted on our website in spring 2019.

The full list of eligible services for the spring 2019 process are:

  • national fund projects that:
    • build or increase knowledge of settlement services through policy-relevant research and knowledge mobilization which can benefit the sector as a whole
    • strengthen the capacity of the sector to deliver outcomes-driven settlement services including support to the Francophone settlement sectorFootnote 2
    • create consistency and standardization of approaches across the country
  • Local Immigration Partnerships
  • Réseaux en immigration Francophone and national coordination and consultation in Francophone immigration;
  • umbrella organizations, including the National Settlement Council and the Newcomer Language Advisory Body
  • coordinating bodies

Local Immigration Partnerships and Réseaux en immigration Francophone build community-based partnerships and planning around newcomer needs. Applicants who want to become, or continue leading, a Local Immigration Partnership or Réseaux en immigration Francophone should apply to do this in the spring 2019 funding process.

Funding decisions for applications for this Call for Proposals and the spring 2019 funding process will be made at the same time.

1. Applying to CFP 2019

1.1 Using the GCS Portal

Once you have read through and understood these funding guidelines and web resources, you are ready to prepare and submit your application. Submitting your application is a simple 3 step process:

  1. Create your organization ID.
    If you do not yet have a Grants and Contributions System (GCS) Organization ID, access GCS and click on the “Create an Account” link to set up your account and obtain your Organization ID.
  2. Complete your Settlement or Resettlement Assistance Program application form.
    Log into your Grants and Contributions System account and create a new application. Complete each of the 7 sections of the application form by responding to the listed questions, and refer to these Funding Guidelines to shape your answer. The 7 application sections are as follows:
    • Section 1: Summary
    • Section 2: Goals and Services
    • Section 3: Activities
    • Section 4: Outreach and Outcomes
    • Section 5: Capacity
    • Section 6: Evaluation
    • Section 7: Budget

    In order to submit the application, you must complete all sections, attach all the mandatory documents and approve the executive declaration.

  3. Click on “submit” before April 12, 2019 5 pm PST.
    You must click the “submit” button on your application form before the April 12, 2019 5 pm PST deadline, in order for your application to be considered for funding. After submitting, you will not be able to modify your application form.

If you encounter any technical issues while completing the application form in the Grants and Contributions System, you are encouraged to contact the Help Desk.

1.2 Mandatory documents

As noted in section 1.1 of these Funding Guidelines, you must attach certain mandatory documents to your application. Different mandatory documents are required based on your applicant type. Applications missing mandatory documents will be considered incomplete and will be removed from the process; there will be no follow-up from IRCC to obtain missing information.

Applicant type - Public institutions (such as a school board) and any non-federal levels of government

  • Letter of support from each financial partner that is contributing funds toward the proposed project (if applicable)

Applicant type - Other organizations (including non-profits)

  • Most recent annual report
  • Full financial statements including comparative information for the last 2 fiscal years(audited preferred). If your organization is relatively new and lacks full financial statements for two full fiscal years, provide the information for the period of time the organization has been in existence
  • Names of persons on Board of Directors
  • Names of any former public servants associated with this application, if applicable
  • At least one of the following: constitution, by-law, letter of incorporation or similar instrument of governance
  • Letter of support from each financial partner that is contributing funds toward the proposed project (if applicable)

Applicant type - Individuals

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Proof of Canadian citizenship or permanent resident statusFootnote 3
  • Letter of support from each financial partner that is contributing funds toward the proposed project (if applicable)

1.3 Considerations

IRCC is under no obligation to fund any application submitted through this CFP or to fund the entire scope or duration of a proposed project. If a project is selected for possible funding, IRCC will notify the applicant in writing that the application has been approved in principle. Applicants must not assume that their application has been approved-in-principle, until notified by IRCC.

The funding envelope for the Settlement and Resettlement Assistance Programs includes both base and customized services. There is no fixed funding envelope for base services and customized services respectively. Proposed project budgets should be based on a realistic evaluation of expenses required to deliver proposed activities. All applicants should refer to IRCC’s budget guidance, located on our funding page in the resource section, for detailed information on eligible and ineligible items. The amount of funding and scope of activities that will be supported by IRCC will be contingent on the satisfactory negotiation of a contribution agreement.

Any expenditure incurred prior to the signing of the contribution agreement by IRCC or prior to IRCC’s approved project start date, or any costs related to the preparation of an application, will not be reimbursed.

Note: Successful applicants will be required to comply with Canadian privacy laws such as the applicable federal provincial/territorial privacy and access to information legislation and/or Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act. Applicants will also need to adhere to all physical and electronic security requirements, as stipulated in a signed contribution agreement. See the questions and answers section on our funding page for a list of security requirements.

1.4 Webinars

We know Funding Guidelines can raise questions. We want to address any uncertainty you may have. We will be hosting information webinars in both official languages during the application period to provide you with the opportunity to ask IRCC questions relating to this funding process.

Specific dates and times for each webinar can be found on our funding Page.

1.5 Web resources

You will find the following resources to assist you as you write your application on the IRCC funding page.

General

  • Budget Guidance - required budget information and list of eligible and ineligible items.
  • Grants and Contributions System Tutorials - a walkthrough on how to submit and review your application.
  • Frequently Asked Questions – commonly asked questions with answers regarding the call for proposals process and content.

Settlement-specific

  • Terms and Conditions - the requirements and standards that underpin all our Settlement contribution agreements.
  • Logic Model - new logic model that maps out the program’s base services and outcomes.

Resettlement Assistance Program-specific

  • Terms and Conditions - the requirements and standards that underpin all our Resettlement Assistance Program contribution agreements.
  • Existing Government Assisted Refugee Receiving Centres – a list of 33 communities outside of Quebec where Government-Assisted Refugees are destined in which Resettlement Assistance Program services are delivered upon arrival.
  • Resettlement Assistance Program Service Provider Handbook – describes the services that organizations funded under the program are expected to deliver to eligible clients.

2. Application assessment based on CORE

IRCC’s CORE PrinciplesFootnote 4 underpin all programming funded under the Settlement Program and the Resettlement Assistance Program. As funding applicants, you are expected to incorporate these principles in the design, implementation and evaluation of your proposed project(s), and articulate how you have done so in your application. IRCC’s assessment of your application will take these principles, along with obligations related to official languages, into consideration, as outlined below.

CORE – text version below

Client-centered

Programming that is tailored to meet specific client`s profiles. This includes ensuring Francophone services for those who want to live and work in French, and a focus on clients who are vulnerable, marginalized or face barriers.

Outcomes-driven

Programming that is driven by evidence, ensuring the best outcomes, both short and long term, for the client.

Responsive to need

Programming that meets the needs of not only the client, but of society itself, to best integrate newcomers and achieve the shared vision for Settlement and Integration.

Effective use of resources

Programming that is effective and efficient, utilizing partnerships, leveraging shared resources, and developing untapped community assets such as volunteers and local businesses.

2.1 Client-centered

Client-centered programming meets client needs by asking and listening to newcomers, to understand: their circumstances; their needs; their assets; what services are the most useful to them; and, how, when and in what language these services should be provided. Where feasible, services should be accessible at the time and location most effective for the client, including online or mobile ‘locations’. Programming should address barriers that might affect access to services, which can vary by client group. Service provision should also take into account the government-wide commitment to supporting the vitality of Francophone minority communities and official languages (see section 3). This should include providing services in the official language of the clients’ choice wherever possible, ensuring full awareness of, and referrals to, Francophone organizations.

2.2 Outcomes-driven

Outcomes-driven programming is based on evidence and data. It is designed to provide the best outcomes for clients from the beginning to the end of their resettlement and/or settlement journey. It means being able to track both project outputs and measure client outcomes to recognize success in the immediate, intermediate and long term.

Outputs vs. outcomes

  • Outputs are the result of activities you are proposing to undertake (for example, number of community connections services rendered, number of clients served).
  • Outcomes are what changed as a result of the delivered outputs (for the client, the community, employers, etc.) (for example, percentage of community connections clients who indicate that they increased their social networks as a result of participation in IRCC-funded services).
    • Outcomes are defined as immediate (within 1 year from participating in the service) focused on changes in knowledge, skills, and networks; intermediate (1 to 5 years since participating in services) focused on the use of acquired skills and knowledge to support independent decision making, participation in labour market or in society, and ultimate (beyond 5 years since participating in services) focused on integration within society.

2.3 Responsive to need

Resettlement and settlement programming seeks to meet the needs of as many eligible clients in a community as possible. It also helps host communities strengthen their capacity to welcome and retain newcomers. This includes addressing systemic barriers that hinder the integration of newcomers (including their opportunity to become Canadian citizens), and increasing involvement of specific sectors of the community to support multi-sector involvement in newcomer integration strategies for your geographic area.

It also encourages programming that creates meaningful dialogues and connections between newcomers and Canadian citizens, including Indigenous peoples, recognizing that cross-community interactions are an important part of the settlement and integration process for newcomers and their receiving communities. This includes addressing common barriers to citizenship or experiences of exclusion affecting different minority groups, and to identify what members of each community might do to support each other’s inclusion.

There should be a clear need for the project, supported by evidence and data. Project goals should be feasible, with clear links to one or more base and/or customized services. Programming should be adaptable to changing needs and circumstances of newcomers and their host community. Finally, applications will be looked upon favourably by IRCC if they articulate connections to strategic plans produced by Local Immigration Partnerships and/or Réseaux en immigration Francophone where possible.

Applicants should be maximizing current and emerging technological solutions so that programming is more effective, flexible, and accessible. IRCC is interested in programming that reduces barriers that may impact a client’s ability to use online or digital services (for example, lack of digital literacy and/or insufficient Internet, computer or mobile access, etc.).

For example:

  • Expansion of online and blendedFootnote 5 options for services to increase the ease of access; improving access to and the use of technology and mobile platforms to make settlement services more readily accessible regardless of the client’s location
  • Coordinated, collaborative promotional activities that leverage the use of social media to improve outreach to newcomers to increase awareness of services offered
  • Promotion of blended and online settlement services

Applicants should have the necessary capacity to deliver effective programming to newcomers. Staff must have sufficient knowledge and training to deliver effective services. IRCC encourages training to support projects submitted through this Call for Proposals. This includes tools and skills development that are tied directly to ensuring that direct settlement services within a proposed project can be delivered competently by frontline staff.

Applicants are encouraged to indicate any cost associated with staff training directly linked to the delivery of the specific project in their budget.

2.4 Effective use of resources

There are finite resources, and an ever-growing need for Settlement and Resettlement Assistance Program services. This means that programming must be as effective and efficient as possible.

Partnerships (both new partnerships and deepening of existing partnerships), the nature of the partnerships (for example financial or service delivery agreements between organizations), leveraging of shared community assets and resources, and other innovative approaches can help us achieve the same or greater outcomes together, within resource constraints. Programming can also harness untapped resources, such as relevant technologies, new volunteers and businesses.

IRCC encourages programming approaches that engage partners in service delivery, and discourages unhealthy competition between proponents. IRCC is keen on harnessing the collective skills and knowledge within the settlement, resettlement, and other sectors by working together to achieve better outcomes for newcomers. Partners and approaches could include:

  • community-wide division of labour with multiple service providers working on one project
  • partners outside the settlement sector
  • private sector and employers
  • faith communities
  • Indigenous peoples
  • ethnic communities

Applications will be looked upon favourably by IRCC:

  • If services are concentrated and consolidated in one agency on behalf of several where appropriate (for example one agency assessing clients and referring clients to the agencies who are best equipped) to provide services in a timely and effective manner
  • Where a coherent division of labour is presented by multiple agencies to ensure comprehensive coverage of services across a geographic community (for example where multiple agencies partner to ensure youth programming is available in schools across the community without duplication of effort)

Similarly, applications will be looked upon favourably where flexibility is demonstrated to serve more or fewer clients depending on fluctuating landings, client numbers by country of origin, etc.

3. Official languages obligations and the Francophone integration pathway

Under the Official Languages Act and the Immigration and Refugees Protection Act, IRCC has a responsibility to support the vitality of official language minority communities, satisfy the principle of substantive equality, and adapt its services to meet the needs of the official language minority population.Footnote 6

To support these obligations, IRCC is implementing a Francophone integration pathway to foster connections between newcomers, from all linguistic backgrounds, and Francophone and Acadian communities. This approach aims to ensure that French-speaking newcomers are aware of resettlement and settlement services available in French, by Francophone organizations, throughout their settlement and integration process, up until citizenship.

The Pathway is a major component of IRCC’s Francophone Immigration Strategy. The success of this strategy will require engagement and collaboration among the entire resettlement and settlement sectors, including IRCC and its regional offices, and non-Francophone and Francophone service provider organizations.

As a way to support the Francophone integration pathway, for applications including services in French, IRCC will give priority to Francophone services offered primarily by Francophone service providersFootnote 7 or through partnerships with Francophone organizations that respond to the needs identified by Francophone newcomers themselves and Francophone community stakeholders.

Projects should also demonstrate alignment with the following principles in support of the Francophone Integration Pathway:

Any proposals targeting French-speaking clients or services in French

  • Programming is tailored to meet the needs of French-speaking clients and explore delivery modes adapted to the Francophone minority context
  • Projects will be looked at favourably if they align with priorities identified by the Réseaux en immigration Francophone and/or identified through consultations with Francophone and Acadian community stakeholders, when applicable

All proposals

  • Project ensures that French-speaking newcomers are referred to Francophone services providers, depending on the client’s preference
  • Project raises awareness of the Francophone integration pathway in each region and ensures that all newcomers can make informed decisions by obtaining accurate and complete information on settlement services offered in French by Francophone organizations and on the presence of Francophone and Acadian communities

4. Assessment criteria

4.1. Below are the overarching assessment criteria, based on CORE Principles, against which all applications will be evaluated. Funding decisions are based on your proposal’s total assessment score, service provider history with IRCC (if applicable), service uniqueness in a given area to avoid duplication, geographic coverage and departmental priorities.

Client-centred (15%)

  • Strategy to engage target clients is sufficient and appropriate
  • Programming is client-informed with flexibility to meet the emerging needs of clients, especially where there are multiple client groups with multiple needs (for example programming tailored to French-speaking clients, youth, women, etc.)
  • Assets of the clients (skills, abilities, life experiences) are being leveraged
  • Applicants demonstrate that they have the capacity, experience, contextual knowledge, and appropriate partners (if applicable) to carry out the project
  • Project ensures newcomers are referred to service providers based on client’s official language of preference

Outcomes-driven (40%)

  • Project activities are geared towards and can directly lead to expected outcomes
  • Activities are relevant to outcomes and the completion of the project
  • Project outcomes align with one or more IRCC outcomes identified for the program. The link between the immediate and intermediate outcome(s) is logical
  • Each project outcome is measurable and the organization has a plan in place to ensure that they achieve successful outcomes
  • Each outcome is supported by a plan to monitor performance and evaluate results. Data collected will be used to assess, report and adjust programming

Responsive to need (20%)

  • The need for the project is clear and supported by evidence
  • There are feasible project goals with clear links to one or more base services and, if applicable, customized services
  • The community is being engaged to identify needs or gaps in the community and to support the success of the project, and/or the project aligns with priorities identified through community partnerships (for example Réseaux en immigration Francophone, Local Immigration Partnerships)
  • Project has processes in place to identify emerging needs and circumstances, and to adapt and adjust services accordingly
  • Project raises awareness of the Francophone integration pathway in each region and ensures that all newcomers can make informed decisions by obtaining accurate and complete information on settlement services offered in French by Francophone organizations and on the presence of Francophone and Acadian communities

Effective use of resources (25%)

  • Full range of community assets are being leveraged to avoid duplication (for example, building on existing resources and expertise from both within the settlement and resettlement sectors and through other partnerships)
  • Proposed budget is balanced. All costs and revenues related to the project have been itemized and explained
  • Project costs are in line with average costs for similar services in the same geographic area, where applicable
  • The applicant has demonstrated proper and responsible use of funds related to both administration and program delivery

5. Settlement Program application

The vision for settlement and integration in Canada requires a whole-of-society approach. The Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to newcomers’ experiences so that they can fully participate in social, cultural, civic and economic life in Canada and acquire citizenship. Your application should describe the outcomes, base services and customized services (if applicable) for which you are seeking funding.

To receive settlement funding, a project must:

  • target eligible clients as defined in section 5.2
  • align with at least one base service as defined in section 5.3.1
  • align with at least one immediate outcome as defined in Section 6.1
  • align with at least one intermediate outcomes as defined in Section 6.2

Base services are foundational services that remain relatively stable from year to year. Base programming is comprised of 6 Settlement Program areas:

  • Needs assessment and referrals
  • Information and orientation
  • Language training
  • Employment-related services
  • Support services
  • Building community connections.

“Customized services” are program enhancements, specialized services or niche areas in which IRCC would like to see expansion, customization or a particular focus, in response to emerging or specific client needs and/or ministerial and departmental priorities. These priorities were determined based on extensive consultations with stakeholders across all regions. While customized services represent emerging or specific client needs, the 6 broad program areas referred to above are intended to describe how we meet the ongoing needs of newcomers. “Customized services” will normally enhance or refine components of these program areas, rather than be separate from them.

The CORE principles apply to both base and customized services.

There are three approaches you can take in your proposal:

Option 1: One or more base services

You may not be interested in offering a customized service, in which case, your application will include the base Services you would like to offer and explain how the project will support one or more of the 6 program areas. For example, if you want to offer language training and information and orientation services, and no customized services, you would use this approach.

Option 2: One or more base services and one or more customized services

You may want to offer both a base service and a customized service, for example, providing language training up to Canadian Language Benchmark and/or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens 8 and informal language training tailored for seniors with an emphasis on social connections. In this case, language training up to Canadian Language Benchmark and/or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens 8 is a Base Service, while language training tailored for seniors falls under the 360° supports for clients with unique barriers customized service. Simply select the corresponding option under base services and the corresponding option under customized services and explain how your project applies to these 2 services.

Option 3: One or more customized services, linked to at least one base service

If you decide you only want to offer a Customized Service, it must link to or support at least one base service. Some customized services have a clear link to one of the base services while others could apply to several different base services. For example, mental health and well-being is a customized service that could link to or support several base services. IRCC is not prescriptive about which base service each customized service links to, but you will need to provide some information on how the two are connected. For example, if your project seeks to assist newcomers with mental health concerns in a group setting, you would choose the mental health and well-being customized service and you could select the building community connections base service and provide some information on how the two are connected.

5.1 Eligible applicants

For settlement services, eligible applicants are:

  • provincial, territorial or municipal governments
  • international organizations
  • not for profit organizations including non-governmental organizations, non-profit corporations, community groups, umbrella organizations, regulatory bodies and apprenticeship authorities
  • businesses, including those that provide indirect services (for example, employers hiring newcomers, private language schools, conference organizers, web or production firms for tool development)
  • educational institutions (including school boards, districts and divisions)
  • individuals

Restrictions:

  • For-profit organizations may be eligible for funding provided that the nature and the intent of the activity is non-commercial, not intended to generate profit, and supports IRCC program priorities and objectives

5.2 Eligible clients

Only the following persons are eligible to receive settlement services:

  • Permanent residents of Canada
  • Protected persons as defined in Section 95 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Individuals who have been selected, inside or outside Canada, to become permanent residents (pending verifications) and who have been informed, by a letter from IRCC
  • Convention refugees and protected persons outside Canada who have been selected for resettlement in Canada by IRCC
  • Temporary foreign workers who hold or received approval of a work permit under section 112 or received initial approval for permanent residence under section 113 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations

Additional information

  • Eligible persons include both the principal applicant and eligible dependants (spouse and children)
  • Non-permanent residents and foreign nationals who have been selected by employers under the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program (and their spouses and dependants) are deemed eligible persons for needs assessment and referrals and information and orientation as authorized by Ministerial Instructions (14.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act) for the duration of the pilot

Restrictions

  • To access language training, persons must be of legal school-leaving age within their applicable province or territory
  • Canadian citizens and non-permanent residents are not eligible persons. However, the Settlement Program provides opportunities for citizens and other residents of Canada to participate in the provision of settlement services to clients as volunteers

5.3 Eligible services

Base services are foundational services that remain relatively stable from year to year.

Customized services are program enhancements, specialized services or niche areas in which IRCC would like to see expansion, customization or a particular focus, in response to emerging or specific client needs and ministerial and departmental priorities.

5.3.1 Base services

Base programming refers to 6 broad categories of Settlement Program direct service delivery. These services remain relatively stable from year to year. Although applicants are encouraged to submit creative and innovative proposals that reflect the priorities of this intake process, all projects must ultimately align with the general activities identified in at least one of these six categories.

The 6 service types are:

  • Needs assessment and referrals
  • Information and orientation
  • Language training
  • Employment-related services
  • Support services
  • Building community connections

These program components all contribute to the achievement of immediate and intermediate outcomes outlined in the Settlement Program logic model, and are described in detail below.

Base service 1: Needs assessment and referrals

Assessment services should recognize and reflect both the needs and assetsFootnote 8 a newcomer brings with them. Assessments should result in timely and effective referrals to programming, offered in the client’s official language of preference within their chosen community. Assessments should evolve with the client as they move toward full integration. Consistent with the focus on partnerships, priority should be placed on referrals based on need and client service.

Examples of eligible needs assessment and referral activities (not exhaustive):

  • Comprehensive assessment of a client across a broad spectrum of settlement and integration areas, for the purpose of referral to: available official languages learning, orientation and employment services; services that connect newcomers and the community; Francophone services; mental and physical health services; services and referrals to address family and gender-based violence; and/or other services that may benefit the newcomer’s settlement journey
    • The assessment process should result in the development of a personalized settlement plan to guide each newcomer client along their settlement pathway. A copy of the plan should be provided to clients for their personal records, and to support their autonomy in their settlement journey
  • Services delivered through a holistic case management approach for multi-barriered clients, delivered on an individual or familial basis, with regular progress monitoring over 12 to 18 months
  • Tool development and training for frontline settlement workers to deliver services to refugee clients using a case management approach, together with the coordination of this case management delivery approach
  • Interventions that facilitate increased uptake of settlement services
  • Services that facilitate the creation of sustainable connections between Francophone immigrants and the local and regional Francophone communities.
Base service 2: Information and orientation services

Knowledge of life in Canada is essential to full settlement and integration, including becoming a Canadian citizen. IRCC supports programming that emphasizes collaboration amongst stakeholders, and incorporates the perspectives of newcomers, Canadians, and Indigenous peoples, and provides clients with a well-rounded understanding of life in Canada and within their community.

Examples of eligible information and orientation activities (not exhaustive):

  • National, regional or local level settlement information. This includes the provision of information and awareness raising on topics such as housing, employment, healthcare, well-being, Canada’s legal system, banking and financial management, and how to become a Canadian citizen, including the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Information can be disseminated through various approaches such as: online, print, in person (including, port of entry services, counselling/consultation), orientation sessions (for individuals, families or groups), and through information referrals and should be consistent with and complementary to the national level settlement information provided in Welcome to Canada and other settlement products developed by IRCC
  • Delivery of standardized orientation sessions, consistent with and complimentary to Orientation to Canada fact sheets (or in the Case of Ontario), Orientation to Ontario resources, complemented by relevant provincial/territorial/local information
  • Promotion and outreach to increase accessibility, knowledge and uptake of settlement services, especially those that are cost-effective, complementary and coordinated at the community level or issue-based (for example, gender-based violence)
Base service 3: Language training services

Programming that: provides the newcomer with opportunities to improve their official language skills for successful social and economic integration; is offered in a variety of formats; is delivered by qualified instructors; and features joint initiatives between language providers and employers and partnerships with provinces and territories.

Examples of eligible language training activities (not exhaustive):

  • Language placement assessments (in English or French) delivered in person or remotely/online, and centralized where possible, that lead to appropriate referrals to language training options suited to clients’ needs
  • As a priority, formal language training at basic levels (from literacy to Canadian Language Benchmarks and/or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens 4) targeted at supporting newcomer engagement in basic social interactions and acquisition of Canadian citizenship:
    • services should be flexible (that is: full-time and part-time services in the evenings and week-ends), accessible (that is: support service options) and delivered in person, online or a combination of the two
    • services that are responsive and adaptable to fluctuations in demand
    • services that can provide year-round enrolment
  • Language training that supports employability up to Canadian Language Benchmarks and/or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens 8, including workplace-based instruction, that emphasizes Canadian workplace language, culture, and practices
  • Digital literacy training for newcomers to enable their participation in blended and online language learning opportunities
Base service 4: Employment-related services

Employment-related services that prepare newcomers for working in Canada and support their access to the labour market (for example, pre-employment services, mentorship) should complement labour market services funded by provinces/territories, other federal departments or other funders. Coordination, referrals, knowledge-sharing, and co-location among service providers should be in place where possible. The goal is to provide meaningful employment for newcomers, through high quality and effective employment interventions, as they progress through their settlement journey.

Examples of eligible employment-related activities (not exhaustive):

  • Enhancing clients’ resume/cover letter writing skills, interview skills, and job search skills, as well as direct one-to-one counselling on pathways to employment (for example, transferable skills)
  • Increase client employability in their intended area of employment via non-technical/non-academic skillsFootnote 9 (for example, essential skills)
  • Services or support to assist newcomers to overcome the barriers associated with the credential recognition and/or licensure process
  • Opportunities to acquire Canadian work experience and develop soft skills (for example, help accessing paidFootnote 10 and unpaid work placementsFootnote 11, resume screening and referral services, job matching, learning about Canadian workplace culture and workplace well-being)
  • Opportunities for newcomers to connect with professionals and employers in their field (for example, community-wide job fairs, networking opportunities, professional mentoring)
  • Assistance to employers to connect with newcomers and to recognize opportunities in hiring and retaining newcomers and to recognize the benefits of creating a more inclusive workforce and to capitalize on these opportunities. This could also include information sessions for employers in Francophone and Acadian communities and connecting them with newcomers who want to live and work in French
Base service 5: Support services for newcomers

Individual newcomers have had unique life experiences and face unique obstacles. Support services are designed to eliminate barriers and ensure equitable access to all IRCC settlement services. IRCC supports collaborative efforts between service providers and the community at large as a means of providing the best supports for service access (for example, child care; translation and interpretation services; transportation support; short-term counsellingFootnote 12; accessibility supports for clients with mobility limitations and disabilities).

Examples of eligible support services:

  • Care for newcomer children or licensed child care options, including long-term child care (supporting ongoing programming such as language training) and short-term child care (supporting occasional activities such as group orientations and individual settlement service appointments)
  • Translation and interpretation services
  • Transportation support
  • Short-term counselling (previously known as crisis counselling)
  • Provisions for addressing mobility limitations and disabilities to facilitate access to settlement services
Base service 6: Building community connections

Community connections programming builds bridges between newcomers and host communities, creating meaningful relationships and understanding among newcomers and Canadians, including Indigenous peoples, with the aim of creating a welcoming environment, enhancing a sense of belonging, social cohesion, employment readiness, and informal language learning. Activities that promote social integration and well-being are encouraged, as well as those that provide opportunities for newcomers to integrate and contribute to their new community (for example volunteering), and serve in leadership roles.

Examples of eligible community connections activities (not exhaustive):

  • Settlement services in schools, libraries and other locations that facilitate newcomers’ access to and navigation of community services; that is settlement workers in schools and Library Settlement Partnerships
  • Activities that support connections to Francophone Minority Communities such as settlement workers in Francophone public institutions, and between Francophone service providers and the settlement sector
  • Informal approaches to language learning (for example: conversation circles)
  • Citizenship education on the rights and privileges of citizenship
  • Providing opportunities and developing materials and tools for active citizenship (for example, volunteering, and civic engagement) and bringing together newcomers, Indigenous peoples, and Canadians
  • Partnerships between service provider organizations and partners outside the settlement sector (including private businesses), to help newcomers build social capital and to promote cross-cultural exchanges
  • The “Canada Connects” initiative: Canadians and the whole of society engage in settlement and integration. This is through volunteer one-on-one, peer, and group matching between newcomers and established members of the community with common interests and characteristics, to create a more welcoming local community environment for newcomers (that is, visits to public institutions and historical/cultural sites, recreational sports, arts.)Footnote 13. Also, community-wide coordination activities harness newcomers as active contributors and equals participating in activities that mutually benefit newcomers and the host community
  • Working with public institutions, the private sector and community organizations to connect them with newcomers and to offer training, tools and skills development to foster welcoming communities and workplaces and enhance newcomers’ sense of belonging
  • Understanding that newcomers and Indigenous peoples may face similar barriers to a sense of belonging and inclusion in Canadian society, create linkages between newcomers and Indigenous community groups to inform better programming and to dispel myths about Indigenous peoples and cultures
  • Newcomer-Canadian-Indigenous Peoples dialogue to build understanding of rights and responsibilities of being Canadian, including stewardship of the land, participation in defining and building an inclusive society, volunteerism and civic engagement
  • Promoting newcomer-Canadian dialogue to counter anti-immigrant sentiment and to build inclusive communities
  • Mobilizing other community organizations outside of the settlement sector; communications capacity and public engagement strategy to engage local host communities, counter rising anti-immigrant sentiment, anti-rumour campaigns, etc.

5.3.2 Customized services

Customized services represent areas where IRCC would particularly like to see expansion or customization of services to respond to emerging or specific client needs. The 6 broad program areas referred to under base services are intended to describe how we meet the ongoing needs of newcomers. “customized services” will normally enhance or refine components of these program areas, rather than be separate from them.

The activities described under each area are provided as examples. IRCC is receptive to a range of new or enhanced programming that falls within the description.

Customized service 1: 360° Supports for clients with unique barriers

Projects or activities that are tailored to meet the needs of specific client groups. Recognizing that clients may have multiple characteristics that intersect (for example age, race, gender), programming should ensure that: services are tailored to meet the specific needs of client groups facing multiple barriers to settlement and integration.

  • Where possible, programming should be co-designed, developed and evaluated with clients to ensure their voices are included to improve their settlement experiences and outcomes
  • Projects can apply a variety of formats, including: the use of individualized or family-centred supports over a specified period of time; programming that empowers at-risk vulnerable groups/individuals, including peer support; addressing the needs of groups most likely to face barriers in acquiring official language skills and Canadian citizenship; and interventions to support the labour market attachment and job-retention of various client sub-groups. Place-based services may be considered (that is services delivered in homes, community centres, and other locations where newcomers may feel more comfortable.)
  • Using a ‘no wrong door’ approach, service providers should work together, with community groups who have expertise on various population groups (for example, Youth, LGBTQ2+) and other non-traditional stakeholders (private sector/employer groups, Indigenous communities, faith communities and ethnic communities), to improve service delivery and maximize the outcomes for both newcomers and their receiving communities

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive)

For vulnerable youth: Youth-specific content that includes gender-segregated and mixed-gender activities; after-school programming; tailored mental health supports and outreach for school-aged children (for example, through extracurricular programs such as sports clubs and art classes); leadership/peer mentoring activities; bridging supports (including for older youth) to facilitate transitions from high-school to post-secondary education and the labour force (for example, accessing scholarships/grants, informal language training, pre-employment workshops, career planning); settlement support for youth outside the school system. Programming to build linkages in the community, enhance a sense of belonging and foster active citizenship (for example, volunteering, community involvement, encouraging political participation and civic engagement).

Gender specific programming, including programming for women: Flexible scheduling of activities; place-based services (for example in the home, Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters) and integrated support services (for example, childcare); leadership and wellness; support for victims of gender based violence, and offering information on the legal system in Canada (for example gender equality), and services using recreational activities (for example, music, reading clubs, sports) to create non-stigmatizing opportunities for dialogue on sensitive topics and develop healthy perspectives on gender roles and relationships.

For seniors: Programming that strengthens social connections with local communities (for example, informal language training with an emphasis on social connections; building connections with existing seniors centres); linking newcomer seniors with volunteers; engaging newcomer seniors as volunteers in the local community; and providing employment supports geared towards newcomer seniors.

For refugees: Programming should enhance the connection to community-based supports (for example, to help access health and mental health services, including trauma-informed care). Programming to use a case management approach; appropriate ESL/FSL literacy and basic language training; to ensure a seamless continuum of services from Resettlement Assistance Program to Settlement Program needs assessments and referrals, or information and orientation sessions.

For LGBTQ2+: Services that recognize the unique challenges faced by these groups both within their new home and their diaspora as well as country of origin; peer-led supports; conversations on LGBTQ2+ topics with all newcomer clients to foster a greater understanding of LGBTQ2+ rights and responsibilities in a multicultural context.

For clients with disabilities: Ensure services are accessible for newcomers with various types of disabilities (including physical, intellectual and communicationFootnote 14); including specialized language programming for learners with special learning needs; ensure staff are trained to respond to specific needs of these clients; developing strong connections and referral pathways to existing organizations and services for persons with disabilities; and fostering connections between newcomers and Canadians living with disabilities.

Customized service 2: Language and employment

Programming that expands opportunities for workplace-based instruction to help newcomers improve their communication and job-related skills in line with employer needs while fostering welcoming and diverse workplaces

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive):

  • Workplace based language instruction that supports employed newcomers with improving their workplace communication and functional language skills, job retention and career advancement
  • Targeted and or short duration services that focus on interactions with co-workers, supervisors management/HR and the community, as well as cultural skills and employment connections
  • Working with partners such as employers and industry associations to connect them with newcomers and develop training curricula and content tailored to their employment context and identified needs
Customized service 3: Programming that engages employers

Programming which complement the services (for example provincial/territorial, other federal departments) to build relationships with employers and seeks to strengthen the responsiveness of the settlement sector to employers’ needs and the responsiveness of employers to newcomers’ needs.

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive):

  • Combinations of settlement services, including services that engage employers, for newcomers (including Government Assisted Refugees) to ensure a full suite of programming (for example job bridging) to facilitate newcomer entry into the labour market and gain meaningful employment
  • Programming that is adapted to the unique challenges associated with engaging the breadth of Canadian employers (for example, small-medium sized enterprises versus larger organizations)
  • Services that acknowledge employers as partners and help them access and leverage international skills and work experience of immigrants while overcoming hiring and retention challenges, such as training about the business benefits of a diverse workforce and develop tools to evaluate international work experience
  • Services that focus on helping newcomers overcome barriers to advancement in their careers, and help employers retain newcomer talent
  • Approaches to engage employers to promote hiring newcomers and participation of newcomers in settlement services, including for French-speaking and bilingual newcomers
  • Collaborative initiatives with the private sector to achieve better employment and settlement outcomes for newcomers
Customized service 4: Consolidating a Francophone Integration Pathway

The Francophone Integration Pathway is an overarching priority that guides our continued efforts to strengthen the resettlement, settlement and integration of French-speaking newcomers and to foster lasting ties between them and Francophone and Acadian communities outside Quebec. Services adapted for French-speaking newcomers are coordinated and integrated by Francophone and Acadian communities.

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive):

  • Promotion and outreach to increase accessibility, knowledge and uptake of Francophone settlement services, including awareness building and referrals to language services available in French
  • Settlement services available in French and adapted to the specific needs of newcomers settling in Francophone minority communities such as refugees, women, youth, seniors, and LGBTQ2+ families
  • Support for projects identified by the Francophone community and aimed at consolidating service delivery around a targeted region (for example a French-speaking welcoming centre where settlement services are centralized to facilitate client’s pathway and follow-up)
  • Innovative approaches and/or partnerships between Francophone and non-Francophone organizations to ensure smooth and seamless integration, service delivery in rural/remote, or northern areas, or tailored services (for example mobile services)
  • Language placement assessments and training in English and/or French that are adapted to the needs of French speaking clients and support the Francophone Integration Pathway
  • Services that facilitate the creation of sustainable connections between Francophone immigrants and the local as well as the regional Francophone community. These services provide an initial point of contact, a needs assessment and a continuous link between immigrants and the services offered in French along the Integration Pathway (for example Arrimages Francophones)
  • Francophone settlement workers in Francophone public institutions
  • Targeted and specialized services facilitating the economic integration of French-speaking immigrants in the Canadian job market in a minority-context and/or fostering immigrant entrepreneurship
  • National and/or regional approach to raise awareness and engage employers to foster the hiring of French-speaking and bilingual immigrant workers living in Canada and abroad

The government is committed to building the Francophone sector’s capacity to deliver settlement services. As such, applicants are encouraged to indicate in their budget any cost associated with staff training directly linked to the delivery of the project.

Customized service 5: Fostering the entrepreneurial spirit of newcomers

Interventions designed to reduce barriers and help newcomers successfully start and purchase businesses in Canada. This includes providing information and referrals (for example financing options) and making professional connections that focus on newcomer-specific barriers to entrepreneurial activity.

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive):

  • Services that assist potential newcomer entrepreneurs to make key business contacts and learn about Canadian markets, laws, and business culture
  • Interventions such as mentoring by established entrepreneurs, in-class instruction, and accessing work placements that support the newcomer as they acquire the knowledge required to run a business
  • Engagement of entrepreneurial communities, including existing entrepreneurs and business owners, to promote opportunities in supporting newcomer entrepreneurship
  • Partnerships and service coordination activities to facilitate client access to existing tools and resources
Customized service 6: Mental health and well-being

Programming that addresses the growing need for newcomer mental health and well-being support; and service providers’ need for capacity-building that, firstly, helps them identify mental health issues and make appropriate community referrals and, secondly, acknowledges and responds to the emotional hardships newcomers experience as part of the migration, resettlement and settlement experience.

  • This includes programming that embeds mental health, well-being, and general counselling activities into direct programming streams of the Settlement Program (for example, needs assessment and referral, information and orientation, employment-related services, etc.)
  • A form of short-term counselling will continue through support services to provide limited, immediate counselling supports to remove a barrier to accessing other settlement programming (see also: base programming – support services)

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive):

  • Settlement programming that reduces barriers and increases newcomers’ awareness of and access to mainstream physical and mental health services (for example, health systems navigator)
  • Complementing the health services offered by provinces and territories, encouraging health promotion activities based on existing resource materials (for example, early screening and vaccinations in partnership with local health authorities, healthy lifestyle and well-being) and health-related referrals to existing community health resources (for example, mental health)
  • Coordinated resources and referrals for victims of family and gender-based violence
  • Coordinated resources and referrals for victims of trauma, resulting from war, conflict or persecution
  • Early outreach and interventions for hard-to-reach clients before they reach a level of crisis
  • Projects with enhanced partnerships between levels of government and community service providers for delivery of short-term counselling/mental health support
  • Support for staff with vicarious traumaFootnote 15 and compassion fatigue, ensuring that staff have the right tools to properly guide and refer clients while managing their own personal well-being
  • Services that provide supports with the intention of augmenting newcomer well-being and dignity
Customized service 7: Small-centre, remote, northern and pan-northernFootnote 16 services

Flexible programming and services adapted to meet the needs of clients in communities with limited resources (for example, local service coverage or service delivery capacity) and/or significant barriers to accessing services (for example, geographic obstacles to in-person services, limited broadband Internet for online services, etc.).

Examples of eligible activities (not exhaustive):

  • Projects that help organizations build capacity and maximize resources through centralized coordination, sharing of information and tools, and pooling of functions (for example, use of technology or traditional communication methods, an Integrated Services Centre)
  • Projects that enhance flexible, itinerant, satellite, and online service delivery to facilitate client access (for example, flexible approaches to provide better access to language placement assessments and language courses)
  • Projects that enhance community readiness and social inclusion in small centre/rural/northern areas
  • Responding to needs of Francophone immigrants in small centres
  • Enhancing choice for newcomers by providing information about life in small-centres/remote/northern communities, and facilitating referrals to services in those areas
  • Creating opportunities for active citizenship (for example, volunteering, community involvement, encouraging political participation and civic engagement)
  • Innovative programming in communities experiencing a surge in eligible clients

6. Settlement Program outcomes

Based on the CORE principles, your application will need to identify one or more of the Settlement Program immediate and intermediate outcomes described below and demonstrate how your project aligns with and supports the selected program outcomes.

Once projects are funded, outputs are collected in an online system called the Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment. This system tracks the number of clients and services provided and the service type. This also allows for measurement of outcomes as Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment Information is linked to IRCC’s annual client outcome survey.

The indicators listed below are mandatory measures that projects must collect and report on. You are welcome to identify and work towards additional outcomes, but any additional outcomes and indicators should be in addition to the mandatory indicators listed here.

6.1 Immediate outcomes

Applications must address at least one Immediate Outcome. The Settlement Program’s immediate outcomes should occur within the first year of providing services. In all cases, when describing the outcome, show how it is relevant to your clients.

Immediate outcome 1: Access to IRCC-funded settlement services is facilitated

IRCC aims to remove barriers to accessing settlement services by providing support services, such as care for newcomer children, interpretation or translation services, transportation, short-term counselling or provisions for clients with disabilities.

IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients using support services, by settlement service
  • Number and percentage of clients who identified a support service need and received that support services
  • Number and percentage of clients put on a waitlist for a settlement service due to lack of support services
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicated the support services they received met their needs
  • Number and percentage of clients who received services in their official language of preference
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicated challenges getting services they needed due to lack of support services

Your application should describe:

  • how support services included in the proposal will facilitate access to settlement services for clients; with a variety of support needs
  • how you will measure the achievement of this outcome by your clients
  • any partnerships that will support the achievement of this outcome

Immediate outcome 2: Increase understanding of client settlement needs and appropriate linkages to other services

IRCC aims to understand clients’ needs and assets and ensure that clients receive or are referred to the most appropriate internal or external services.

IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients who identified needs (by type of need)
  • Number and percentage of clients who received a settlement plan
  • Number and percentage of clients who received a referral as a result of a Language Assessment
  • Number and percentage of clients receiving referrals/ linkages by topic
  • Alignment of identified needs, referrals and services received
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicated referrals helped address their needs

Your application should describe how you will:

  • ensure that clients’ needs are identified
  • ensure that clients who would like to be served by Francophone organizations will be connected to those organizations
  • develop linkages with local organizations to help you provide appropriate client referrals
  • provide effective referrals to programs in your organization, other IRCC-funded organizations, and non-IRCC funded services
  • measure the achievement of this outcome

Immediate outcome 3: Clients increase knowledge of life in Canada

IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients receiving information, by topic
  • Percentage of information clients who indicated that their knowledge of life in Canada changed as a result of IRCC-funded services, by topic and overall

IRCC aims to help clients by providing them with information about Canada on a variety of topics, such as educational opportunities in Canada, transportation, finance management, rights and responsibilities and knowledge about their community, including assisting French-speaking clients to learn about Francophone minority communities. Services help clients develop the knowledge they need to integrate as well as prepare for Canadian citizenship.

Your application should describe:

  • how the activities/services included in your application will increase newcomers’ knowledge on a variety of topics
  • how you will measure the achievement of this outcome by your clients
  • any local partnerships that will be helpful in supporting the achievement of this outcome

Immediate outcome 4: Clients improve official language skills

IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients who reached language levels necessary for citizenship
  • Number and percentage of language training clients who advanced to the next level
  • Number and percentage of clients who received informal language training
  • Percentage of clients (formal and informal) who indicate language learning gains

IRCC aims to decrease barriers to integration due to lack of official language knowledge and to provide formal and informal language training (such as through in classroom training, involvement of Canadians in conversation circles or in tutoring matches of newcomers with Canadians).

Your application should describe:

  • how the activities/services included in your application will improve official languages skills of your clients
  • how will you measure the achievement of this outcome by your clients
  • if relevant, describe any local partnerships that will be used to support the achievement of this outcome

Immediate outcome 5: Clients acquire knowledge, skills and connections to prepare for the Canadian labour market

IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients receiving an employment related services by type
  • Percentage of clients who received employment related services who indicated changes in knowledge, skills, and connections obtained related to the Canadian work environment

IRCC aims to increase clients’ knowledge about the Canadian labour market, conditions of employment, rights and responsibilities of employers and employees, job search skills, services to improve connections to employment, including through entrepreneurship, networking, or client-mentor matching.

Your application should describe:

  • how the activities/services included in your application will improve clients’ knowledge about a variety of employment-related topics, their job search skills and development of professional networks
  • how you will measure the achievement of this outcome by your clients
  • any partnerships that will support the achievement of this outcome

Immediate outcome 6: Clients increase their participation in communities and social networks

IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients receiving Community Connections services by type and main focus
  • Number and percentage of community connections clients who indicate they have participated in at least one type of organization once or twice a year
  • Percentage of community connections clients who indicate that they increased their social network as a result of participation in IRCC-funded services

IRCC aims to support newcomers to build connections to the communities where they settle, to develop connections to organizations and increase their social networks. This aims to develop newcomers’ social capital, which is crucial for increasing the potential of success in their new society.

Your application should describe:

  • how the activities/services included in your application will improve clients’ participation in local communities or strengthen their social networks
  • how you will measure the achievement of this outcome by your clients
  • any partnerships that will support the achievement of this outcome, including involvement of volunteers

Immediate outcome 7: Partners deliver responsive and coordinated settlement and community services

IRCC measures this settlement program outcome based on information provided through the Annual Project Performance Reports:

  • Professional development of organizational staff in a variety of areas
  • Leveraging additional resources by project:
    • Volunteers and their contribution to projects
    • Partners and their contribution to projects
  • Number and variety of partners involved
  • Number of employers offering mentorships

IRCC also provides funding for various community partnership initiatives and capacity building. The expected outcome is for settlement service provider organizations and partners to deliver responsive and coordinated settlement services.

Your application should describe:

  • how any indirect activities (for example training) that are tied to your direct service will support efficient project delivery
  • how partner involvement improves coordination of newcomer settlement and other services in your community

6.2 Intermediate outcomes

Applications must also address at least one intermediate outcome.

The intermediate outcomes of the Settlement Program focus on the adaptation stage of the integration continuum and have a time period of between one and five years from the time a client first accessed an IRCC-funded service.

In your application, identify at least one of the intermediate outcomes and describe the following:

  • How progress on the outcomes will be measured, including performance indicators, data collection tools, project review and evaluation approaches. If relevant, describe any partnerships with other organizations, including academics, to assist you with measuring outcomes
  • How performance information will be used to report on and adjust project delivery

The description of Settlement Program intermediate outcomes and corresponding indicators provided below is meant to facilitate your application development. For your information, the data to measure these indicators is collected through IRCC’s annual client outcome survey. You must align your indicators with those included in the description. You may choose additional indicators to measure progress against outcomes. Any of the project immediate outcomes may lead to any of the intermediate outcomes.

Intermediate outcome 1: Clients access services that meet their needs

Through the Settlement Program, clients are provided with a variety of services to address their needs by service provider organizations or their partners through referrals. IRCC is interested to know if the services provided met the needs specified by the client. This includes provision of services in clients’ preferred official language.

For your information, IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients who indicated the support services they received met their needs
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicated challenges getting services they needed due to lack of support services
  • Number and percentage of clients who received services in their official language of preference
  • Alignment of identified needs, referrals and services received
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicated referrals received helped address their needs

Your application should describe:

  • the indicators you will use to measure if services or referrals provided were helpful to the clients in addressing their needs
  • a strategy for reaching clients in the 1-5 year timeframe since first receiving an IRCC-funded settlement service.

Intermediate outcome 2: Clients make informed decisions about life in Canada

For your information, IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicator:

  • Percentage of clients who indicate they are comfortable making informed decisions about life in Canada, by topic

As clients gain knowledge about Canada, they are empowered to make independent decisions in a variety of areas of their life, for instance enrolling their children in schools, pursuing education, addressing emergencies, conducting their own financial management activities.

Your application should describe:

  • the indicators you’ll use to measure clients’ ability to make ongoing independent decisions in a variety of areas
  • a strategy for reaching clients in the 1-5 year timeframe since first receiving an IRCC-funded settlement service.

Intermediate outcome 3: Clients use an official language to function in Canadian society

For your information, IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Percentage of clients who indicate they are comfortable using an official language without help in daily life situations, broken down by area and official language
  • Changes of the indicated comfort level with time (2-5 years)

Teaching official languages aims to enable clients to fully participate in the labour market, society and cultural life of Canada.

Your application should describe:

  • the indicators you’ll use to measure clients’ ability to use official languages in their everyday life, in their work environment, and in social situations
  • a strategy for reaching clients in the 1-5 year timeframe since first receiving an IRCC-funded settlement service.

Intermediate outcome 4: Clients participate in the Canadian labour market

For your information, IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients by employment status (as indicated by client) (working, have worked but not currently, looking for work)
  • Incidence of employment earnings for clients for years 1 through 5 since landing

IRCC aims to facilitate newcomers’ participation in the labour market, including creating self-employment opportunities, to help clients contribute to the Canadian economy and achieve a good standard of living. Labour market participation may include working, looking for work as well as pursuing further education to improve clients’ future employment opportunities.

Your application should describe:

  • the indicators you’ll use to measure clients’ labour market participation; and
  • a strategy for reaching clients in the 1-5 year timeframe since first receiving an IRCC-funded settlement service.

Intermediate outcome 5: Clients are connected to communities and institutions

For your information, IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Number and percentage of clients who indicate they have a high degree of trust in public institutions
  • Number and percentage of clients who have a strong sense of belonging (to Canada, province, community, country of origin)
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicate they have friends who can support them

The aim of this outcome is for clients to create social capital to help them cope with new challenges in their new society. It includes having a sense of belonging, including a sense of belonging to Francophone communities, reasonable trust in public institutions so that they feel they can turn toward them in case of need. Clients will create linkages with other newcomers and existing Canadians to increase their community connections.

Your application should describe:

  • the indicators you’ll use to measure clients’ ongoing changes in their independent participation in local organizations, development of their social networks, as well as their sense of belonging to the community, and trust in public institutions
  • a strategy for reaching clients in the 1-5 year timeframe since first receiving an IRCC-funded settlement service.

Intermediate outcome 6: Communities foster welcoming environments for immigrants

For your information, IRCC measures this outcome using the following indicators:

  • Partners report changes in understanding of immigrant and refugee needs, deliver services in a more appropriate manner, improve inclusiveness, etc.
  • Number and percentage of clients who indicate that they feel accepted in Canada

IRCC encourages service provider organizations to involve partners in the provision of services to clients. The aim is also to ensure that partners better understand the needs of newcomers and are able to tailor their services to newcomers’ needs, are more inclusive and that newcomers feel accepted in Canada.

Your application should describe:

  • the indicators you’ll use to measure the effect of partner involvement, partners’ understanding of newcomers’ needs, and their ability to adjust their own services to meet the needs of their newcomer clients. In addition, a client’s perception of their acceptance by the community could also be measured
  • a strategy for reaching your partners and other participants (for example, volunteers)

7. Resettlement Assistance Program application

The Resettlement Assistance Program is a funding program operating in all provinces outside of Quebec that supports Government-assisted refugees and other eligible clients upon arrival in Canada by providing them with direct financial support and funding service provider organizations to deliver immediate and essential services. Resettlement Assistance Program services include reception at the airport, provision of temporary accommodation and assistance finding permanent housing, orientation to life in Canada, and registration and referrals to other government and community services. IRCC also funds a limited number of national projects that indirectly support refugee resettlement, for example by enhancing the capacity of refugee sponsorship groups to deliver services to privately sponsored and Blended Visa Office Referred refugees.

Resettlement Assistance Program services are currently delivered to eligible clients by a network of service providers in 33 communities across Canada outside of Quebec.

IRCC is inviting eligible applicants to submit applications to deliver Resettlement Assistance Program services in support of refugee resettlement.

To support IRCC’s commitment to build the vitality of Francophone minority communities, the Department welcomes applications received from Francophone settlement service provider organizations that can demonstrate capacity to welcome resettled refugees of all linguistic backgrounds.

To receive Resettlement Assistance Program funding, a project must:

  • target clients that are eligible under the Resettlement Assistance Program as defined in Section 7.2
  • align with at least one Base Service as defined in Section 7.3
  • align with Immediate Outcomes and Intermediate Outcomes as defined in Section 7.4
  • demonstrate organizational and community capacity as outlined in Section 7.5

7.1 Eligible applicants

Applications for Resettlement Assistance Program funding will be accepted from:

  • Not-for-profit organizations and associations, including non-governmental organizations
  • Intergovernmental and international organizations
  • Businesses
  • Canadian educational institutions (including boards, districts and divisions)
  • Provincial, territorial or municipal governments
  • Individual Canadian citizens

Note: For contribution agreements with international organizations and provincial governments, the approval of an order-in-council will be required.

7.2 Eligible clients

Resettlement Assistance Program funding is intended to support services to the following clients:

  • Permanent residents admitted to Canada or temporary residents who are issued a permit under section 24 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act(IRPA) who, respectively, have been determined to be or who initially applied for admission to Canada as members of the Convention Refugees Abroad class or the humanitarian protected persons abroad class where one of the following applies:
    • Selected on the basis that assistance will be provided by a government Resettlement Assistance Program; or
    • Selected as part of the Joint Assistance Sponsorship program
  • Persons who were members of the protected temporary resident class who become permanent residents under section 151.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations
  • Permanent residents admitted to Canada who were granted permanent residence under section 25.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act on humanitarian and compassionate grounds
  • Permanent residents admitted to Canada who were granted permanent residence under section 25.2 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act as part of a group under public policy established by the Minister on unique and compelling humanitarian situations and where no other means of financial support is available
  • Permanent and temporary residents admitted to Canada who applied for admission to Canada as members of any future humanitarian protected person abroad class

Note: Privately sponsored refugees and Blended Visa Office-Referred Refugees typically only receive limited port of entry services.

7.3 Base services

To receive Resettlement Assistance Program funding, projects must correspond to at least one of the base services listed below:

Resettlement Assistance Program base service 1: Port of entry airport services

Provision of timely and effective port of entry airport services includes receiving newcomers where they enter Canada (that is, the airport at which their flight first lands in Canada). Responsibilities include: meeting and greeting the newcomers as they disembark, assisting them with immigration and customs procedures, providing winter clothing if required, addressing any immediate and in-transit needs, and helping newcomers get transportation to their temporary accommodation if the port of entry city is their final destination, or onward ground or air transportation to their final destination.

Resettlement Assistance Program base service 2: Immediate and essential services

Direct delivery of timely, effective and client-focused resettlement assistance programming during the first 4 to 6weeks following a client’s arrival in Canada.

These services must include:

Accommodations

Provision of these services includes providing temporary accommodation to ensure that Resettlement Assistance Program clients are safe and secure during their initial days in Canada. The stay in temporary accommodation also allows clients to receive orientation and other services to help them live safely and independently afterwards. Service providers also provide housing orientation, and assist clients in locating and moving into permanent accommodation, ensuring that the best possible accommodation is found. Typically, temporary accommodation is provided for up to 2 weeks.

Canadian life skills training is delivered to high needs Resettlement Assistance Program clients, who may require more guidance and support in order to become independent, even after receiving the basic suite of Resettlement Assistance Program services. It is provided to them after they have moved into their permanent accommodation.

This intensive, short-term training and support is meant to build on clients’ current skill sets, and assist them in acquiring the specific knowledge and skills required for living in Canada.

Needs assessments and referrals

These services aim to assess clients’ immediate and essential needs and potential barriers to learning so that Resettlement Assistance Program service delivery can be tailored to meet client needs. They also aim to develop a client resettlement referral plan to settlement and broader-based community services, which will support integration into Canadian society, including settlement services. Before the end of the Resettlement Assistance Program service delivery period, service providers must carry out an exit assessment to ensure that all Resettlement Assistance Program services have been received, and to identify any remaining immediate and essential need that the Resettlement Assistance Program service providers can address through their own services, or further referrals to settlement or broader-based community services.

Orientation and links to essential federal/provincial programs and services

Orienting and linking clients to federal and provincial programs ensures they can access public services similarly to all permanent residents and Canadian citizens. Clients are to be registered for all appropriate essential federal and provincial programs, and oriented on each program’s purpose and on how to access them. Most of these orientations and links are to be made in advance of the client’s move to permanent accommodation. These include: social insurance number applications; Canada Child Benefit applications; ensuring clients have their Interim Federal Health Program certificates; provincial health-care insurance applications; and school registrations for children.

Immediate and essential orientation

These services help Resettlement Assistance Program clients acquire the knowledge and/or skills to live safely and independently in Canada. Orientation should generally be provided while clients are in temporary accommodation, should be tailored to the needs of each individual or client group, and should address any immediate needs to prepare them for their move from temporary to permanent accommodation. Clients must be informed about Resettlement Assistance Program income support and their financial responsibilities, as well as the key entitlements of their income support budget and their financial responsibilities as outlined in the Resettlement Assistance Program Agreement for Income Support Recipients. Orientation should also be provided on communication and media; household management; Canadian banking system and personal finance, such as topics on budgeting, credit and immigration loans; public transportation and their local community; Canadian weather; Canadian law and justice, including family law and rights and responsibilities; and cultural norms and expectations, including culture shock and cultural adaptation.

All Resettlement Assistance Program clients need to be adequately informed about the possibility of settling in Canada in both official languages, that they may do so in the languages of their choice, and, if interested, referred to local Francophone or Acadian community organizations and Francophone or Acadian service providers. LGBTQ2+ clients also need to be adequately informed about settling in Canada as a member of local LGBTQ2+ communities. Clients should be referred or connected, whenever possible, to different aspects of the local LGBTQ2+ community, including organizations that are adequately tooled to provide psychosocial support to this clientele. Ideally, initial information on this topic should be delivered by, or in collaboration with, members of the local LGBTQ2+ community.

Support services

Interpretation and translation services may be delivered under the Resettlement Assistance Program to ensure that clients have full access to and benefit from Resettlement Assistance Program immediate and essential services.

Short-term child care services (or care for newcomer children), while parents are on-site, may be delivered under the Resettlement Assistance Program to reduce barriers to access and enable participation of clients in Resettlement Assistance Program services.

Note: All the immediate and essential services noted above should be culturally appropriate, gender-sensitive and delivered either in the client’s own language or with appropriate translation and interpretation services.

Resettlement Assistance Program base service 3: Knowledge development / National projects

Knowledge development/National projects refer to any project that would support the objectives of the Resettlement Assistance Program (see Resettlement Assistance Program Terms and Conditions), as well as initiatives intended to support and improve the program. This also includes support to the Privately Sponsored Refugees program.

List of eligible projects
  • Indirect initiatives (for example, projects, workshops) that aim to enhance capacity among service provider organizations and improve the quality and delivery of Resettlement Assistance Program services.
  • Development of information and orientation materials for resettled refugees. This may include:
    • Print or online materials for all resettled refugees, to complement immediate and essential orientation that clients receive from service providers or their sponsors during their first few weeks or months in Canada. These materials should be translated in the top refugee languages (listed in the Resettlement Assistance Program Service Provider Handbook).
    • Videos to complement Resettlement Assistance Program service providers or sponsors’ immediate and essential orientation for resettled refugees.
    • The materials developed should be aligned to the Resettlement Assistance Program Service Provider Handbook and Welcome to Canada content. Developed materials should include content that is relevant to all categories of resettled refugees, as well as content that is specific to each Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program stream (newcomers resettled as Government-assisted refugees, Blended Visa Office Referred refugees, or Privately Sponsored Refugees).
  • Provision of information and training to refugee sponsorship groups in both official languages.

7.4 Resettlement Assistance Program outcomes

To receive funding, applicants must detail how their projects align with all immediate and intermediate outcomes. As per the table below, the outcomes that must be addressed are dependent on which base service(s) you plan to provide.

Base service: Port of entry services and immediate and essential services

Project must address all of the following immediate and intermediate outcomes:

Immediate outcomes
  • Immediate and essential needs of resettled refugees met
  • Resettlement assistance is timely, accessible, useful and client-focused
Intermediate outcome

Resettled refugees have the tools to live independently in Canadian society.

Base service: Knowledge development/National projectsFootnote 17

Project must address at least one of the immediate outcomes and address the intermediate outcome:

Immediate outcomes
  • Immediate and essential needs of resettled refugees met
  • Capacity of service provider organizations and the refugee sponsoring community to support refugees is enhanced
Intermediate outcome

Resettled refugees have the tools to live independently in Canadian society.

7.5 Organizational and community capacity

IRCC will be seeking evidence that organizations applying to deliver the Resettlement Assistance Program have, or are actively working towards having, the following in place:

  • Organizational capacity to deliver Resettlement Assistance Program services
  • Capacity to resettle Resettlement Assistance Program clients regardless of the linguistic background (Francophone, Anglophone and Allophone) in both the Francophone minority community and broader English community, depending on the client’s informed choice
  • Need for current or additional Resettlement Assistance Program base services in the community
  • Availability of settlement services in the community that are specifically relevant to refugees:
    • Literacy and basic level language training (Canadian Language Benchmarks and/or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens 1 to 4)
    • Community Connections initiatives, including volunteer matching and English or French conversation circles
    • Settlement support services, including child care and short-term counseling
    • Local Immigration Partnerships or equivalent
    • Settlement Workers in Schools in the grade schools and high schools that Resettlement Assistance Program clients will attend
    • Services delivered through a case-management approach for multi-barriered clients.
  • Availability of interpretation services in the community in the languages most spoken by refugees resettled in Canada
  • Availability of suitable permanent accommodation for resettled refugee families (for example, rental housing)
  • Availability of other relevant specialized supports, including specialized medical care, mental health services, education system supports, public transportation and accessibility for persons with a disability
  • Availability of services for LGBTQ2+ clients
  • Effective partnerships to ensure client-focused delivery. This includes partnerships with other immigrant serving organizations to support the provision of:
    • information to clients on the local Francophone minority community, applicants should demonstrate that they have effective partnerships in place with the local Francophone minority communities including Francophone service provider organizations as well as other relevant Francophone stakeholders)
    • information and services to LGBTQ2+ clients, applicants should demonstrate that they have effective partnerships in place with the local LGBTQ2+ community, including organizations that are adequately tooled to provide psychosocial support to this clientele

8. Timelines

You have until April 12, 2019 5 pm PST to submit your application for CFP 2019.

Below is a timeline of the next steps you can expect once your application has been submitted:

Timeline Milestones Date
Acknowledgement Automatic upon submission
Application Assessment April to August 2019
Final Funding Decision August 30, 2019
Contribution Agreement Negotiation November 2019 to February 2020
Contribution Agreement Signing March 2020
CFP 2019 Projects Begin April 1, 2020

Funding decisions are final; there is no appeal process. Funding decisions for applications for this CFP and the spring intake process will be made at the same time.

9. Contact IRCC

For questions or clarifications related to the call for proposals, contact the Call for Proposal Coordinators. Call for proposal coordinators cannot provide advice on the content of your application.

For help with the GSC partner portal or functionality of the application form, contact GCS team.

Please note that it can take up to 2 business days to receive a response to your enquiry.

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