ARCHIVED – Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, 2013 – Section 3: Federal–Provincial/Territorial Partnerships

Jurisdiction over immigration is a joint responsibility under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, and effective collaboration between the Government of Canada and the provinces and territories is essential to the successful management of the immigration program. Provincial and territorial governments are primary partners of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC). Under the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Vision Action Plan for Immigration, jurisdictions commit to welcoming and supporting newcomers to join in building vibrant communities and a prosperous Canada. Implementation of the Vision Action Plan will improve Canada’s immigration program to the benefit of all regions.

Under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act, the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration has the authority, with the approval of the Governor in Council, to enter into agreements with the provinces and territories to facilitate the coordination and implementation of immigration policies and programs. Table 6 provides a list of the key bilateral agreements currently in force, with their signing and expiry dates. Framework agreements with eight provinces and one territory highlight immigration as a key area for bilateral collaboration and formalize how governments work together on this issue. Agreements for a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) are also in place with 11 jurisdictions (Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories and all provinces except Quebec), either as an annex to a framework agreement or as a stand-alone agreement.

Under a PNP, provinces and territories have the authority to nominate individuals as permanent residents to address specific labour market and economic development needs. Under the Canada-Québec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens, Quebec has full responsibility for the selection of immigrants (except Family Class - archived and in-Canada refugee claimants), as well as the sole responsibility for delivering reception and integration services, supported by an annual grant from the federal government. The federal government is responsible for establishing eligibility criteria for settlement programs in the other provinces and territories, reuniting families, determining refugee claims within Canada, defining immigration categories, setting national immigration levels, and establishing admission requirements. Table 7 presents the breakdown of permanent residents admitted in 2012 by province or territory of destination and immigration category.

The Federal-Provincial/Territorial immigration ministers approved an FPT Vision Action Plan for Immigration that reflects shared objectives.Footnote 4 The vision identifies key outcomes that describe what success will look like for the immigration program and sets out guiding principles by which the immigration program will be jointly managed through intergovernmental partnership. CIC will continue to work closely with provinces and territories in five key areas over the next three years:

  • Expression of Interest application management system;
  • immigration levels planning;
  • economic immigration programs;
  • pan-Canadian framework for settlement outcomes; and
  • FPT partnership models.
Table 6: Federal-Provincial/Territorial Agreements Currently in Force
Agreement Date Signed Expiry Date
Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Agreement on Provincial Nominees November 22, 2006
(Original signed in September 1999)
Indefinite
Agreement for Canada-Prince Edward Island Co-operation on Immigration June 13, 2008
(Original signed in March 2001)
Indefinite
Canada-Nova Scotia Co-operation on Immigration September 19, 2007 Indefinite
Canada-New Brunswick Agreement on Provincial Nominees January 28, 2005
Amended: March 29, 2005
(Original signed in February 1999)
Indefinite
Canada-Québec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens February 5, 1991 Indefinite
Canada-Ontario Immigration Agreement November 21, 2005 Expired March 31, 2011 (Provincial Nominee Program authority extended to May 31, 2015; Temporary Foreign Worker Annex continues indefinitely)
Canada-Manitoba Immigration Agreement June 6, 2003
(Original signed in October 1996)
Indefinite
Canada-Saskatchewan Immigration Agreement May 7, 2005
(Original signed in March 1998)
Indefinite
Agreement for Canada-Alberta Cooperation on Immigration May 11, 2007 Indefinite
Canada-British Columbia Immigration Agreement April 9, 2010
(Original signed in May 1998)
April 8, 2015
Agreement for Canada-Yukon
Co-operation on Immigration
February 12, 2008
(Original signed in April 2001)
Indefinite
Canada-Northwest Territories Agreement on Provincial Nominees September 26, 2013 September 26, 2018

Permanent Residents Admitted in 2012, by Destination and Immigration Category

Table 7: Permanent Residents Admitted in 2012, by Destination and Immigration Category
Category NL PE NS NB QC ON MB SK AB BC YT NT NU Not Stated Total
ECONOMIC CLASS
Skilled Workers 115 43 520 149 34,256 35,439 663 580 9,748 9,939 3 12 1 1 91,469
Business Immigrants 0 0 41 8 4,634 2,403 8 6 166 2,813 0 0 0 1 10,080
Provincial and Territorial Nominees 365 896 957 1,580 86 1,957 9,531 9,019 10,287 5,943 225 46 4 3 40,899
Live-in Caregivers 2 1 20 19 645 4,724 87 89 1,591 1,807 7 20 0 0 9,012
Canadian Experience Class 23 11 85 43 25 4,663 48 40 2,783 1,613 1 20 4 0 9,359
Total Economic Class (including dependants) 505 951 1,623 1,799 39,646 49,186 10,337 9,734 24,575 22,115 236 98 9 5 160,819
FAMILY CLASS
Spouses, Partners, Children and OthersFootnote A 104 67 401 213 7,787 19,530 1,296 693 5,575 7,448 25 42 8 4 43,193
Parents and Grandparents 13 6 67 23 1,400 12,443 443 134 2,860 4,407 9 10 0 0 21,815
Total Family Class 117 73 468 236 9,187 31,973 1,739 827 8,435 11,855 34 52 8 4 65,008
PROTECTED PERSONS
Government-assisted Refugees 93 49 169 132 1,110 1,957 327 332 719 530 0 3 0 9 5,430
Privately Sponsored Refugees 0 1 12 17 521 1,787 755 155 616 355 0 0 0 1 4,220
Protected Persons In-Canada 7 2 7 2 1,872 5,648 38 34 607 366 0 3 0 0 8,586
Dependants Abroad 0 1 7 4 1,106 3,197 20 28 308 187 0 0 0 0 4,858
Total Protected Persons 100 53 195 155 4,609 12,589 1,140 549 2,250 1,438 0 6 0 10 23,094
OTHER
Deferred Removal Order Class and Post-determination Refugee Claimants in Canada 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Temporary Resident and Permit Holders 0 0 0 0 9 42 1 1 10 4 0 0 0 0 67
Humanitarian and Compassionate Cases 1 1 9 2 542 1,994 19 10 210 129 0 8 3 0 2,928
Other Humanitarian and Compassionate Cases Outside the Family Class/ Public Policy 8 10 46 19 1,068 3,362 76 56 612 700 3 2 0 0 5,962
Total Other 9 11 55 21 1,620 5,401 96 67 832 833 3 10 3 0 8,961
Category Unknown /Not Stated 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
TOTAL 731 1,088 2,341 2,211 55,062 99,154 13,312 11,177 36,092 36,241 273 166 20 19 257,887
PERCENTAGE 0.3% 0.4% 0.9% 0.9% 21.4% 38.4% 5.2% 4.3% 14.0% 14.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

Source: Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Facts and Figures 2012.

Notes: Numbers presented in this table are up to date and may differ from numbers previously published by CIC.

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