Departmental Performance Report

For the period ending
March 31, 2013

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Table of Contents

MINISTER’S MESSAGE

As Canada’s new Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, I am very pleased to present the Departmental Performance Report for 2012–2013.

Since my appointment, I have had the opportunity to meet recent immigrants and new Canadians across the country. Each and every newcomer has come to Canada in search of a better life. They are grateful for the opportunity to live in this great nation of ours, and they are among the hardest-working individuals I have met.

To meet the growing needs of the work force in both urban and rural communities, Canada is welcoming more immigrants in the economic category. The government has stressed the importance of economic immigration in order to help Canada recover from the effects of the global economic downturn of 2008–2009, and the need for economic immigration is expected to increase for years to come.

Many sectors of the economy now have large, growing demands for skilled workers. This past year, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) made transformational changes to the immigration system to ensure it is faster, more flexible and increasingly nimble in responding to the country’s changing labour market.

After cutting the backlog in the Federal Skilled Worker Program by 90 percent since 2008, CIC redesigned the program to guarantee the selection of immigrants who possess the traits that will improve their chances of success. The Department now requires all applicants to submit third-party language testing results as well as foreign educational credential assessments, which are essential for providing a realistic understanding of how a skilled worker’s credentials are likely to be recognized in Canada.

As a complement to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, CIC introduced the new Federal Skilled Trades Program, which will bring in highly skilled immigrants with practical non-academic credentials, for whom there is a growing demand in Canada’s economy.

The introduction of the new Start-Up Visa pilot program—the first of its kind in the world—is another avenue to attract the world’s best and brightest to Canada through our business immigration program. This program links promising entrepreneurs with the country’s private sector organizations to build new companies in Canada, further stimulating economic growth and innovation.

For the immigration system to best serve Canada’s economic needs, CIC must ensure all newcomers have the skills and tools they need to succeed in Canada. First introduced in November 2012, the Come to Canada Wizard—an online tool that helps people to determine if they are eligible to live, work or study in Canada—is used by more than 7,000 people a day. For newcomers selected to come to Canada, the new Living in Canada portal provides a personalized settlement plan that helps newcomers and their families find housing, health care and education. This year’s revamped Welcome to Canada publication further assists immigrants in preparing to come to Canada and helps them navigate their way during their first months after their arrival.

To further ensure our immigration system functions in Canada’s best interests, CIC continues to safeguard against fraud, irregular migration and other abuses. A new asylum system has restored balance to what had become a dysfunctional system. In the system’s first six months, the number of refugee claims from designated countries of origin had already decreased by 87 percent. Canada now offers protection to bona fide refugees within weeks and months, rather than years.

To maintain the integrity of our immigration system, CIC took action this past year to combat marriage fraud. Sponsored spouses are now granted conditional permanent residence for a period of two years and sponsored spouses may not sponsor a new spouse for at least five years.

To protect the safety of all Canadians, the passage of the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act now closes avenues used by convicted foreign criminals to delay their deportation so that they can remain in Canada. CIC is also continuing to implement measures under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This includes sharing information with the United States to improve the screening of immigrants and visitors before they enter Canada; creating an electronic travel authority; and collaborating with the Canada Border Services Agency on a forthcoming new entry-exit system. Finally, 2012–2013 also witnessed the roll-out of biometric screening for certain visitors, students and temporary workers.

Jobs, economic growth and long-term prosperity continue to be the Government’s top priority. We will continue to ensure Canadians have the first crack at available jobs while taking action to meet the increasing needs of the work force. I invite all Canadians to read this report and discover the Department's progress this past year. We are committed to achieving the priorities that matter most to Canadians.

The Honourable Chris Alexander, PC , MP
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

SECTION I: ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW

Raison d’être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada’s leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world’s breadbasket as a foundation for the country’s economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada’s nationhood and its economic prosperity—as farmers settling lands, as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Responsibilities

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents and offers Canada’s protection to refugees. The Department develops Canada’s admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Fundamentally, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping immigrants and refugees settle and fully integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship. To achieve this, CIC operates 29 in-Canada points of service and 71 points of service in 61 countries.

CIC’s broad mandate is partly derived from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for the Citizenship Act of 1977 and shares responsibility with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness for the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), which came into force following major legislative reform in 2002. CIC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) support their respective ministers in the administration and enforcement of IRPA. These organizations work collaboratively to achieve and balance the objectives of the immigration and refugee programs.

Finally, under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, CIC promotes the integration of individuals and communities into all aspects of Canadian society and helps to build a stronger, more cohesive society.

Jurisdiction over immigration is a shared responsibility between the federal and the provincial and territorial governments under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Under the Constitution, provinces and territories have the authority to legislate immigration matters, as long as such legislation is consistent with federal laws. Under IRPA and the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act, the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, with the approval of the Governor in Council, has signed agreements with the provinces and territories to facilitate the coordination and implementation of immigration policies and programs.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

In 2011–2012, CIC adopted its revamped Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)Footnote 1 to better reflect the Department’s mandate and sharpen its focus on outcomes. CIC’s four strategic outcomes describe the long-term results that the Department’s programs are designed to achieve. The Department’s PAA, summarized below, is a reporting framework that links CIC’s strategic outcomes to departmental programs. In the initial stages of conversion to this more detailed PAA, historical spending data were not available at this level of detail. To develop planned spending numbers, it was necessary to make certain assumptions for estimating an appropriate allocation of resources by program. As CIC began to track spending according to the new PAA, it became evident that a realignment of planned spending between programs was required. This has resulted in significant changes between planned spending and total authorities for several programs.

Figure 1: CIC’s Program Alignment Architecture

Figure 1: CIC’s Program Activity Architecture
Text version: Figure 1: CIC’s Program Alignment Architecture

This diagram shows Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s strategic outcomes, programs, sub-programs and their related sub-sub-programs.

Strategic Outcomes Programs Sub-Programs / Sub-Sub-Programs
1. Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy 1.1 Permanent Economic Residents 1.1.1 Federal Skilled Workers
1.1.2 Quebec Skilled Workers
1.1.3 Provincial Nominees
1.1.4 Live-in Caregivers
1.1.5 Canadian Experience Class
1.1.6 Federal Business Immigrants
1.1.7 Quebec Business Immigrants
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents 1.2.1 International Students
1.2.2 Temporary Foreign Workers
2. Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted 2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration 2.1.1 Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification
2.1.2 Parents and Grandparents Reunification
2.1.3 Humanitarian & Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations to Address Exceptional Circumstances
2.2 Refugee Protection 2.2.1 Government-Assisted Refugees
2.2.2 Privately Sponsored Refugees
2.2.3 In-Canada Asylum
2.2.4 Pre-removal Risk Assessment
3. Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society 3.1 Settlement and Integration of Newcomers 3.1.1 Foreign Credentials Referral
3.1.2 Settlement
3.1.2.1 Information and Orientation
3.1.2.2 Language Training and Skills Development
3.1.2.3 Labour Market Access
3.1.2.4 Welcoming Communities
3.1.2.5 Contribution to British Columbia for Settlement and Integration
3.1.2.6 Contribution to Manitoba for Settlement and Integration
3.1.2.7 Support for Official Language Minority Communities
3.1.3 Grant to Quebec
3.1.4 Immigration Loan
3.1.5 Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 3.2.1 Citizenship Awareness
3.2.2 Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation & Revocation
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians 3.3.1 Multiculturalism Awareness
3.3.2 Historical Recognition
3.3.3 Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support
4. Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians 4.1 Health Management 4.1.1 Health Screening
4.1.2 Post-arrival Health and Medical Surveillance
4.1.3 Refugee Health Management
4.1.4 Interim Federal Health
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management 4.2.1 Permanent Resident Cards
4.2.2 Visitors
4.2.3 Temporary Resident Permits
4.2.4 Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda  
  5.1 Internal Services 5.1.1 Governance and Management Support
5.1.2 Resource Management Services
5.1.3 Asset Management Services

Organizational Priorities

In 2012–2013, CIC identified the following five priorities.

Priority: Improving/modernizing client service

TypeFootnote 2: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

CIC’s network has undergone significant changes over the past few years as a result of various legislative reforms and the modernization agenda. To maintain a focus on client service excellence during this period of transition, a task force was established in fall 2012. An action plan was developed by this task force to outline various initiatives and projects focused on: enhancing client communications and accessibility by expanding online self-serve options to meet clients’ expectations; making client-focused adjustments to simplify processes and documentation; expanding CIC’s capacity to receive input and feedback directly from clients; and establishing a long-term vision and commitment to client service delivery.

In November 2012, CIC launched the online Help Centre on CIC’s website to provide information on over 500 of the most commonly requested CIC-related topics, including links to online help tools such as how-to videos, application forms and guides.

The processing of electronic applications for temporary residents world was launched in December 2012. This global e-application system operates through the Come to Canada Wizard, which allows users to self-assess their eligibility to work, study or immigrate to Canada. Applicants can also now apply and pay for their applications securely online through their MyCIC account. In addition, information technology (IT) infrastructure was established for visa application centres (VACs) to transfer temporary resident applications electronically to CIC.Footnote 3

The eMedical system, launched in January 2013, is fully deployed in 103 countries. eMedical allows authorized physicians to submit medical results through an online portal. As an online tool, eMedical reduces costs and improves the client service experience by allowing paperless processing.

The Living in Canada portal was launched in February 2013. It provides applicants with a personalized settlement plan based on the applicant’s immigration status and housing, health-care and adult educational needs.

Newcomers and long-standing Canadians are now able to access an audio version of Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship. This study guide features the voices of prominent Canadians such as former Governor General the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, actor Albert Schultz and broadcaster Ian Hanomansing.

CIC has made great strides and continues to make progress to fully integrate risk management, quality assurance, fraud deterrence and detection into CIC’s day-to-day operations.

CIC has been moving diligently toward an increasingly integrated, modernized and centralized working environment. Updated technology, along with enhanced risk management and program integrity strategies such as the development of risk indicators, risk tiering and triaging, are allowing CIC to exploit efficiencies and take advantage of capacity where it exists in the network. This approach has enabled CIC to move work around its global processing network to reduce inventories and processing times for clients.

CIC remains steadfast in its commitment to introduce service standards on all key lines of business, with service standards in place for a majority of these already. The Department continues to actively pursue an assessment of the readiness of remaining key lines of business for future service standards implementation.

Priority: Emphasizing people management

Type: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

CIC oversaw the implementation of Budget 2012 strategic review measures using its Integrated Change Leadership Framework to equip employees to respond and adapt. CIC’s top priority was to ensure that affected indeterminate employees were given every reasonable opportunity to continue their public service careers.

Employees and their bargaining agents were consulted on the results of the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey, and the action plan that was developed is now being implemented. Preparatory work was completed for the 2013–2014 triennial employee satisfaction survey to be launched in fall 2013. Survey results will provide management with insight into how to better respond to employee concerns.

The Department updated its Code of Conduct to align with the new Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector and established a Values and Ethics Champions Network chaired by the Deputy Minister. Implementation continued under the 2012–2015 Diversity and Employment Equity Plan and the 2010–2013 Official Languages Plan.

Management oversight on human resources trends, issues and people management strategies is critical to managing a healthy organization. CIC continued to strengthen its ability to measure and monitor the work force through the ongoing improvement of internal tools, human resources quarterly reports and dashboards.

CIC also developed generic work descriptions, learning roadmaps and competency-based management tools with the aim of increasing employees’ flexibility and productivity. In addition, a centralized Learning and Development Centre of Expertise was introduced to ensure consistent quality and efficient delivery of an internal training program.

To improve leadership capacity, all executives now participate in the Executive Talent Management System to better allow the Department to understand the composition of the EX talent pool and identify and better respond to any gaps and risks.

Finally, CIC provided employees and managers with the information, tools and support needed to manage through a year of transformation and change.

Priority: Promoting management excellence and accountability

Type: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

CIC understands that successful program delivery to clients depends on a well-managed and accountable organization.

Management accountability and transparency were enhanced through a review that resulted in transformational changes to internal service to align with Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) policies, and bring about clearer accountabilities.

More efficient internal services (e.g., procurement, human resources support, IT services) mean that employees can spend more time doing their jobs—supporting CIC programs and serving clients.

CIC began work in support of the Government of Canada Common Human Resources Business Process initiative that will identify best practices and standardize human resources processes across the public service. CIC also implemented Budget 2012 measures, which integrated and modernized regional internal services.

CIC continued to implement and monitor service standards for its internal services, with a focus this year on monitoring the ability to provide services while undergoing modernization, integration and amalgamation.

Procurement functioning was advanced by establishing quality assessment mechanisms to ensure that protocols are followed. The potential of automating procedures to improve acquisitions efficiency and accountability was also explored.

Finally, the Access to Information Policy tracking system, which monitors incoming requests and provides clients with an auto-reply for expected service delivery time, was implemented.

Priority: Renewing a strategic focus on outcomes

Type: Previously committed to

Strategic Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

The Department uses its Accountability Regime as the framework for setting direction for longer-term outcomes, assessing challenges and opportunities within its operating environment, considering how its operational network will respond to demands, and reallocating resources to support policy and operational goals.

In 2012–2013, CIC reviewed its entire resource base against business priorities, setting the stage for a more integrated approach to business and financial planning and reporting for 2013–2014. CIC also prepared the third annual update to its 2010–2015 Strategic Plan, in which it assessed achievements made during the year and adjusted its plans to move forward.

Priority: Strengthening performance measurement

Type: New

Strategic Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

In 2012–2013, CIC continued to implement its Performance Measurement Action Plan to strengthen its results-based culture and to ensure that performance results inform decision making. Areas receiving attention included:

  • horizontal governance for performance measurement to ensure consistency across the Department, performance measurement data availability and performance results in support of decision making;
  • training, advice and dissemination of performance measurement resources and tools to integrate performance measurement activities across various functional areas;
  • expansion of departmental research and performance measurement data in citizenship and sponsorship business lines, while testing the feasibility of external outcomes data linkage opportunities in areas such as the General Social Survey; and
  • improvements to performance measurement frameworks and data-gathering initiatives for grants and contributions programs.

In addition, CIC’s revamped Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) was approved in the fall of 2012, and came into effect in April 2013. A comprehensive annual PMF data collection and analysis was undertaken for the first time at CIC; the results were disseminated across the organization to promote the utilization of performance results in planning, decision making and resource allocation.

CIC also worked with TBS and other government departments in developing a preliminary PMF to help establish performance measures for internal services that are consistent across the government.

Risk Analysis

Risk Risk Response StrategyNote A Link to Program Alignment Architecture Link to Organizational Priorities
Change in a global context Strategic outcome (SO) 1, 2, 3, 4 Renewing a strategic focus on departmental outcomes
Demand-driven economic immigration program
  • Improved the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Provincial Nominee Program and the Canadian Experience Class.
  • Continued ongoing federal, provincial, territorial negotiations and engagement.
  • Consulted with provincial and territorial partners and Canadian employers on a major next step in building a fast and flexible immigration system—the creation of a pool of skilled workers ready to begin employment in Canada.
SO 1, 2, 3, 4 Improving / modernizing client service
Efficient and well-managed family and humanitarian immigration
  • Developed and implemented new policy and program options for refugee reform and backlog reduction.
  • Developed and implemented measures to address world events requiring a humanitarian response.
SO 1, 2, 3, 4 Improving / modernizing client service
Outcomes for newcomers
  • Strengthened the Settlement Program.
  • Supported the integration of internationally trained and educated individuals by introducing a micro-loans pilot program to assist newcomers with costs associated with the foreign credential recognition process and creating a website to share best practices regarding foreign qualification recognition.
  • Successfully ran the 2012 national call for proposals (CFP) for Settlement and Resettlement Assistance programs.
SO 1, 2, 3, 4 Improving / modernizing client service
Public health and safety and program integrity
  • Developed and implemented Temporary Resident Biometrics Project legislation and regulations.
  • Introduced a proposal to strengthen evaluation of language ability.
  • Continued implementation of the Beyond the Border Action Plan.
  • Continued implementation of triage criteria to better identify and manage risk in CIC’s programs.
SO 1, 2, 3, 4 Improving / modernizing client service
Well-managed organization
  • Modernized and implemented performance measurement, program monitoring and results reporting.
  • Improved effectiveness and efficiency of service delivery network.
  • Renewed strategic action plan.
SO 1, 2, 3, 4, and Program 5.1 (Internal Services) Strengthening performance management;
Improving / modernizing client service;
Emphasizing people management; and
Promoting management accountability and excellence

Managing change in a global context

In an increasingly globalized world, Canada must keep pace with other nations in leveraging the best available tools to manage a modern immigration system. CIC’s strategic direction, as well as its policies and operations, are influenced by a number of external factors, such as emerging world events, the Canadian and global economic, social and political contexts, and shifting demographic and migration trends. Immigration is a responsibility shared among the federal government and the provinces and territories, which adds another layer of complexity to ensuring that the benefits of immigration are realized across regions. CIC also increasingly relies on relationships with third parties—both in the public and private spheres—to carry out its mandate. In 2012–2013, CIC maintained relationships with international partners in an effort to advance global migration management and to gather information about the best practices of other states. To improve coordination of domestic immigration selection and settlement within Canada, federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) ministers of immigration approved an FPT Vision Action Plan in November 2012.

Developing a more demand-driven economic immigration program

To make Canada’s immigration system more responsive to national, sectoral and regional labour market needs and employer demand, the Government of Canada introduced a number of changes. Regulations governing the Federal Skilled Worker Program were amended in 2012–2013, adjusting the points grid to better reflect characteristics that predict labour market success. A third-party educational credential assessment is now required as part of the pre-application process when foreign credentials are submitted. This measure will improve integrity in the allocation of points for foreign educational credentials. In addition, improvements to the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) program were introduced to allow skilled worker applicants to apply with 12 months of Canadian work experience (rather than the previous requirement of 24 months) in the preceding 36 months. To address the concern of employers regarding a shortage of skilled tradespersons in some regions and sectors, the government introduced the Federal Skilled Trades Program to attract skilled tradespersons. Under Ministerial Instructions that supported the launch of the program, the program is currently open to workers in 43 eligible occupations.

Immigration can also support an economy by creating jobs through new business ventures. On April 1, 2013, the government launched the Start-Up Visa Program to attract immigrant entrepreneurs with the potential to build innovative companies with the support of Canadian private sector organizations. The program was launched as a five-year pilot program based on new departmental authorities that allow for the creation of new economic class programs through Ministerial Instructions.

As announced in Budget 2012, CIC continued building a fast and flexible immigration system through the creation of a pool of skilled workers ready to begin employment in Canada. Over the past year, CIC has engaged with provinces and territories, other government departments, and employers on the design and implementation of an Expression of Interest system. The system would apply to federal skilled workers and possibly other economic applicants (CEC and skilled trades), with the goal of meeting Government of Canada objectives, as well as the needs of provinces, territories and employers.

Rising to the challenge of increased global competition and greater demands on Canada’s immigration system also requires an emphasis on service delivery. Improving service delivery includes a shift from a paper-based system to electronic service delivery. CIC made significant moves forward with the launch of electronic applications (e-Apps) for temporary resident programs, which uses the Come to Canada Wizard and the MyCIC portal. This also allows the Department to transfer temporary resident applications electronically to offices within the global network where capacity exists.

Striving for efficient and well-managed family and humanitarian immigration

CIC remains committed to its objectives under family and humanitarian programs, as well as to maintaining Canadians’ confidence in the system with respect to integrity and processing times. Following the coming into force of Canada’s new asylum system on December 15, 2012, which was part of the Balanced Refugee Reform Act and Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act (PCISA), CIC implemented changes that will accelerate the processing of asylum claims and will deter abuse of the system. The Department will continue to closely monitor the performance of the new system.

Improving outcomes for newcomers

Underlying structural forces will persist over the long term: labour force growth is slowing and the population is aging. At the same time, the demand for highly skilled labour is increasing, the service sector is expanding and future major projects will increase the need for skilled labour across the country. In response to these forces, CIC supported development of a micro-loans pilot program to assist newcomers with costs associated with foreign credential recognition (FCR) processes, and developed the International Qualifications Network website to enable sharing of innovative practices in FCR.

CIC recognizes the need to provide comparable, high-quality services regardless of where newcomers choose to settle in Canada and is moving toward a more consistent approach to the delivery of settlement services. To that end, CIC manages a large grants and contributions program, which comprises almost two-thirds of its departmental budget, to fund organizations that provide services to newcomers outside of Quebec. Under the Canada-Québec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens, the Government of Canada provides a grant to Quebec for settlement services. In addition, CIC worked with provinces and territories to ensure a similar standard of settlement funding is available for all immigrants, regardless of where they choose to settle in Canada. CIC is working directly with Quebec officials to develop a comparative study to ensure that the settlement and integration services offered in Quebec correspond to those provided by Canada in the rest of the country.

In 2012, CIC launched its first national CFP. The CFP model is the primary method through which the Department seeks applications for grants and contributions funding under its settlement, resettlement and multiculturalism programs. In the past, each region and program had a separate CFP, which led to some duplication of efforts across the country. A centrally coordinated national CFP allowed for a standard assessment of each proposal, thereby facilitating consistency and replacing some 20 individual CFPs. CFP 2012 received over 950 applications, just under 400 of which will receive funding. Close to 85 percent of the required contribution agreements were in place by the beginning of fiscal year 2013–2014.

Ensuring public health and safety and maintaining program integrity

CIC must ensure that its programs continue to deliver services to the right people, for the right reasons and in a consistent manner, while safeguarding against the risk of fraud, misrepresentation, irregular migration and other abuses. Irregular migration can place at risk the safety of Canadians and the reputation of our immigration system. The passing of PCISA sets the stage for requiring biometrics from certain visitors, students and temporary workers in 2013. This screening will help strengthen the integrity of Canada’s immigration system and protect the safety and security of Canadians while helping facilitate legitimate travel. To safeguard the refugee system, CIC introduced a list of 37 designated countries; these are countries that typically do not produce refugees, that are generally democratic and stable states that respect human rights and offer state protection. Hearings for refugee claimants from designated countries are expedited and these claimants do not have access to the Refugee Appeal Division. New measures were also proposed to prevent fraud and enforce compliance in the International Student Program, following consultations with provinces, territories and education sector stakeholders early in 2012–2013.

The integrity of Canada’s citizenship process was strengthened with improved monitoring of testing results and enhanced language assessments. In addition, CIC implemented new regulations to require up-front evidence that applicants meet language requirements.

CIC continues to work closely with domestic and international partners to manage risks to Canadians’ safety and security and ensure the Canadian border remains strong. In 2012–2013, CIC worked with federal partners, such as Public Safety Canada and its portfolio partners, to improve verification of visitor identities, pre-arrival screening of visitors to North America and management of flows of people across borders under the Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Action Plan. The action plan provides a practical road map for facilitating legitimate trade and travel across the Canada-U.S. border, while enhancing the health, safety and security of Canadians.

CIC must also be prepared to respond in case of emergencies, both domestically and abroad. Natural disasters or unexpected world events can happen anywhere, any time, and can place a strain on CIC as it strives to protect CIC employees and assets world, as well as Canadians and migrants affected by these events. CIC’s ability to assist those in need depends on a planned, timely and coordinated response between CIC and our national or international partners in relation to unforeseen events, such as war, periods of civil unrest, cyber attacks, pandemics and natural disasters. To that end, CIC took lessons learned from the 2010 Haiti earthquake crisis to develop approximately 30 recommendations to improve its ability to successfully deal with future disasters and establish long-term objectives. The Department also participated in four task forces, led by the Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, to test CIC’s operational emergency readiness, and completed threat and risk assessments, inspections and reports for all offices and national headquarters.

Remaining a well-managed organization

In 2012–2013, CIC operated under continued financial and human resources constraints even as the volume of applications continued to grow, putting at risk the Department’s ability to meet its operational objective, implement policy changes and deliver on its mandate. To mitigate this risk, CIC performed stringent financial monitoring of its programs and projects, continued to report quarterly against performance plans and targets, and worked to implement efficiencies and reduce backlogs. For example, CIC leveraged its Global Case Management System (GCMS) to process its workload across the network. The impact of overseas and in-Canada office closures was mitigated through the launch of e-Apps, which also allowed the Department to transfer temporary resident applications electronically to offices within the global network where capacity exists.

The Department also focused on strengthening performance measurement capacity and the use of audits and evaluations to:

  • support evidence-based policy-making and program development;
  • ensure that risks are well managed; and
  • ensure that the intended outcomes of CIC programs are achieved in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

Given ongoing technological change, increasingly complex partnership-based information management (IM)/IT service offerings and an ambitious CIC modernization agenda that is based on the use of technology, the Department increasingly relies on IM and IT systems and infrastructure to support the delivery of CIC business lines, as well as selected business lines of other organizations, such as CBSA. In 2012–2013, CIC renewed its strategic IM/IT action plan to ensure IM/IT delivers business value efficiently and securely and to improve IM practices. The Department also enhanced its efforts to control information better across business lines, and effectively managed relationships with key partners, including CBSA and Shared Services Canada.

Summary of Performance

Financial Resources—Total Departmental ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
(Planned vs. Actual Spending)
1,545.5 1,545.5 1,617.3 1,523.3 22.2
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
4,637 4,657 (20)
Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy
Programs Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
1.1 Permanent Economic Residents 57.8 57.8 135.2 41.1 44.8 40.2 36.5 Note B Economic Affairs
Strong economic growth
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents 27.3 27.3 22.3 20.3 27.0 20.6 23.7 Note B Economic Affairs
Strong economic growth
Total for SO 1 85.1 85.1 157.5 61.4 71.8 60.8 60.2 Note B  
Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
Programs Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration 53.0 53.0 42.4 39.0 52.6 48.7 45.1 Note B Social Affairs
A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
2.2 Refugee Protection 31.3 31.3 35.1 30.5 40.6 30.3 33.4 Note B International Affairs
A safe and secure world through international engagement
Total for SO 2 84.3 84.3 77.5 69.5 93.2 79.0 78.5 Note B  
Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society
Programs Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
3.1 Settlement and Integration of Newcomers 979.8 979.8 973.4 964.0 979.2 950.7 966.0 Note B Social Affairs
A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 41.9 41.9 44.0 43.7 47.8 46.6 49.4 Note B Social Affairs
A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians 25.0 25.0 14.3 14.0 17.4 15.1 21.1 Note B Social Affairs
A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Total for SO 3 1,046.7 1,046.7 1,031.7 1,021.7 1,044.4 1,012.4 1,036.5 Note B  
Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians
Programs Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
4.1 Health Management 56.4 56.4 60.6 60.2 68.8 59.6 92.3 Note B Social Affairs
Healthy Canadians
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management 104.2 104.2 87.1 66.6 95.8 76.4 66.8 Note B Social Affairs
A safe and secure Canada
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 2.5 2.5 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.3 3.1 Note B International Affairs
A safe and secure world through international engagement
Total for SO 4 163.1 163.1 150.8 129.9 167.9 139.3 162.2 Note B  
Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ millions)
Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Subtotal 166.3 166.3 237.9 210.5 240.0 231.8 246.1 Note B
Total Performance Summary Table ($ millions)
Strategic Outcomes and Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Total 1,545.5 1,545.5 1,655.4 1,493.0 1,617.3 1,523.3 1,583.5 Note B

Planned spending of $1,545.5 million increased by a net amount of $71.8 million, due to Supplementary Estimates and other funding adjustments to provide total authorities of $1,617.3 million. The overall increase in authorities includes additional funding under the Beyond the Border Action Plan and to meet obligations for employee entitlements under collective agreements, as well as operating funding carried forward from the previous fiscal year.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $94.0 million. Operating resources totalling $65.6 million lapsed, allowing the Department to maximize the carry-forward of funds to the next fiscal year. This is due to lower than projected costs for the implementation of new visa requirements, new refugee reform measures, the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project, the Interim Federal Health Program and other instances of cautious spending in the context of Budget 2012. Also contributing to the lapse was funding that had been set aside to be reprofiled to future years.

Lower than planned expenditures in the Settlement and Resettlement Assistance programs resulted in a lapse of $28.4 million in grants and contributions funding.

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend

During 2012–2013, CIC’s spending to meet the objectives of its programs amounted to $1,523.3 million. The following graph illustrates CIC’s spending trend from previous years and planned spending for future years to 2015–2016.

Departmental Spending Trend described below
Text version: Departmental Spending Trend This graph shows the Department's Spending Trend for grants and contributions and operating expenditures from 2009–2010 to 2015–2016. The data represents actual spending (2009-2010 to 2012-2013) and planned spending (2013-2014 to 2015-2016). The trends are explained in the text that follows the graph.

Grants and Contributions

Grants and contributions spending in prior years and planned spending for future years remain relatively constant at an average of 61 percent of total spending.

Operating Expenditures

The overall level of operating expenditures has declined since 2009–2010, largely due to the effects of government- savings (including Budget 2012), and reductions due to foregone revenue.

Planned expenditures increase temporarily in 2013–2014 to cover refunding fees to applicants for certain terminated federal skilled worker applications.

Estimates by Vote

For information on CIC’s organizational votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. CIC ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. CIC contributes to the following FSDS 2010–2013 theme, as denoted by the visual identifier and associated programs below.

Theme IV of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning with Government


For Program 5.1: Internal Services

During 2012–2013, CIC considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to The Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. Through the strategic environmental assessment process, departmental initiatives were found to have no environmental effects on goals and targets in any theme.

CIC also examined social, economic and environmental impacts and principles of equity for memorandums to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions where it was relevant and necessary. The objective of this broader view of sustainability is to arrive at integrated decision making that maximizes the potential for CIC’s policies and programs. This additional analysis is integral to the CIC Sustainable Development Policy Framework, which brings together the principles of sustainable development as stated in the Federal Sustainable Development Act. This Framework effectively links the goals and targets of the FSDS to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.

For further information on CIC’s activities to support sustainable development and strategic environmental assessments, please see Section II of this report and/or visit the departmental sustainable development Web page. For complete information on the FSDS, please visit the Environment Canada website.

SECTION II: ANALYSIS OF PROGRAMS AND SUB-PROGRAMS BY STRATEGIC OUTCOMES

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy

CIC plays a significant role in fostering Canada’s economic development. By promoting Canada as a destination of choice for innovation, investment and opportunity, CIC encourages talented individuals to come to Canada and to contribute to its prosperity. Canada’s immigration program is based on non-discriminatory principles—foreign nationals are assessed without regard to race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or gender. Those who are selected to immigrate to Canada have the skills, education, language competencies and work experience to make an immediate and long-term economic contribution.

CIC’s efforts, whether through policy and program development or processing applications for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Quebec Skilled Worker Program, the Provincial Nominee Program or other programs, attract thousands of qualified permanent residents each year. Under the 2008 amendments to IRPA, the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada has the authority to issue instructions establishing priorities for processing certain categories of applications. In that regard, the Department analyses and monitors its programs to ensure they are responsive to emerging labour market needs.

CIC also facilitates the hiring of foreign nationals by Canadian employers on a temporary basis and implements a number of initiatives to attract and retain international students.

Performance Indicator Target 2012–2013 Performance
Rank within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) of employment rate for all immigrants Maintain top five country ranking Canada maintained, at 68.8%, the same average employment rate of the foreign-born in 2011 (the year for which the most recent data are available) as in 2010. However, this result led Canada to fall from fourth to seventh place among OECD countries, as Australia and New Zealand improved their performance.Note C

Benefits for Canadians

Immigration continues to have a significant influence on Canadian society and economic development. Permanent residents who arrive in Canada enhance Canada’s social fabric, contribute to labour market growth and strengthen the economy. Changes that modernize and improve the immigration system are designed not only to strengthen the integrity of the Permanent Economic Residents program but also to benefit Canada by targeting skills Canadian employers need and admitting qualified individuals more quickly.

Temporary foreign workers (TFWs) help generate growth for a number of Canadian industries by meeting short-term and acute needs in the labour market that are not easily filled by the domestic labour force. International students contribute economically as consumers and enrich the fabric of Canadian society through their diverse experiences and talents. Some temporary workers and international students represent a key talent pool to be retained as immigrants, as evidenced by growth in the Canadian Experience Class and Provincial Nominee Program.

Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2012

The immigration levels set out in Canada’s immigration plan for 2012 reflect the important role of immigration in supporting Canada’s economic growth and prosperity. In addition, the plan fulfils the objectives of IRPA—to reunite families and uphold Canada’s international humanitarian obligations. Further details can be found in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, 2012.

New Permanent Residents Admitted in 2012, by Immigration Category
(Compared with the Immigration Plan) Note D
Immigrant Category 2012 Plan Target Ranges Number Admitted
Low High
Federal Skilled Workers 55,000 57,000 57,213
Federal Business 5,500 6,000 5,446
Canadian Experience Class 6,000 7,000 9,359
Live-in Caregivers 8,000 9,300 9,012
Quebec-selected Skilled Workers 31,000 34,000 34,256
Quebec-selected Business 2,500 2,700 4,634
Provincial and Territorial Nominees 42,000 45,000 40,899
Total Economic 150,000 161,000 160,819
Spouses, Partners and Children 38,000 44,000 43,193
Parents and Grandparents 21,800 25,000 21,815
Total Family 59,800 69,000 65,008
Government-assisted Refugees 7,500 8,000 5,430
Privately Sponsored Refugees 4,000 6,000 4,220
Protected Persons in Canada 7,000 8,500 8,586
Dependants Abroad of Protected Persons in Canada 4,000 4,500 4,858
Total Protected Persons 22,500 27,000 23,094
Humanitarian and Compassionate Grounds/Public Policy 7,600 7,800 8,894
Permit Holders 100 200 67
Total Other 7,700 8,000 8,961
Total 240,000 265,000 257,887

Rooted in legislative requirements outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can become permanent residents and contribute to Canada’s economic development. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled work force, by addressing immediate and longer term labour market needs. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
57.8 57.8 44.8 40.2 17.6

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
290 303 (13)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Permanent residents selected to contribute to the growth of the Canadian labour force Growth in labour force attributed to economic migration 30–60% 64%Note E
Degree to which lower end number of planning range in the annual immigration levels plan commitments is met for number of permanent residents selected for economic reasons 100% of 150,000 for 2012 160,819
Economic success of permanent residents selected for economic reasons (as measured by employment rates, labour market participation, wages) compared with the economic success of the Canadian-born 100% of permanent residents’ economic success equal to Canadian-born 87.5%Note E
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities decreased by $13.0 million compared with planned spending, primarily due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $4.6 million, due to general operating lapses, which will be carried forward to the next fiscal year.

As shown in the first indicator, immigration is increasingly accounting for labour force growth. In 2011–2012, 46 percent of labour force growth was attributed to immigration, whereas this fiscal year, immigration accounted for 64 percent of the growth.

The target for the second indicator was surpassed by 7 percent when looking at total economic immigration; however, the federal Business Class and provincial and territorial nominee immigration categories did not meet their lower-end targets. All other economic immigration programs met their lower-end targets, with the Canadian Experience Class surpassing it by 56 percent and the Quebec-selected Business Class surpassing it by 85 percent.

Results for the third indicator reflect the weekly wages of all permanent residents 5–10 years after landing, not just those selected for economic reasons. As such, all permanent residents earn 87.5 percent of the average weekly wages of the Canadian-born. Recent male immigrants earn 10 percent less than Canadian-born males, and recent female immigrants earn 15 percent less than Canadian-born females. Statistics demonstrate that the longer an immigrant is in Canada, the smaller the wage difference will be, with established immigrants (those in Canada for 10 years or more) earning more than the Canadian-born on average.

CIC consulted employers, provinces and territories on the design of an innovative Expression of Interest (EOI) application management system that would better support Canada’s labour market needs. EOI could be introduced as early as January 2015 and will allow Canadian employers, provinces and territories to have access to a pool of skilled immigrants to meet their economic and labour force needs.

The multiyear immigration levels plan was originally envisioned as a three-year plan for 2013–2015; however, CIC and its provincial and territorial counterparts concluded that a fixed multiyear plan would not support the flexibility inherent in an EOI system. As such, it was agreed that the focus of FPT work on economic immigration should be on multilateral levels planning, a common evidence base and a distribution model. A robust evidence base will help inform decisions on the overall levels range and the mix among the various immigration categories. As CIC moves toward a more flexible and responsive immigration system, the distribution framework supports the objective of moving toward 70 percent economic immigration and will use the information provided by the evidence base to respond to demonstrated labour market demands and regional needs.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers

The Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) Program allows immigrants to be selected for their human capital, including their age, education, work experience, ability in one or both of Canada’s official languages and enhanced settlement prospects by reason of previous education or work experience, or a confirmed job offer. The benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
Footnote 4 26.0

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
133

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful FSW applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 55,000 for 2012 57,213
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the indicator above, the number of successful FSW applicants who were admitted to Canada surpassed the lower-end target of the annual planning range of 55,000 by 2,213 admissions (4 percent). CIC continued to use Ministerial Instructions to manage immigration system performance and to facilitate achieving Canada’s immigration goals. A fifth set of Ministerial Instructions came into force on July 1, 2012, introducing a temporary pause on new applications for the FSW program (with some exceptions) and the federal Immigrant Investor Program. There was no impact on planned admissions, as the inventory contained sufficient applications to meet current and future admission targets. CIC started accepting new FSW applications on May 4, 2013, under an improved suite of selection criteria. The new FSW points system reflects the importance of younger immigrants with Canadian work experience, who meet a minimum threshold of official language skills, and whose foreign educational credentials have been assessed for Canadian equivalency.

For many years, a large backlog of applications under the FSW program impeded the responsiveness of Canada’s immigration system. The Economic Action Plan 2012 proposed to terminate applications and return those application fees paid prior to February 27, 2008. All applications for which fees were paid prior to that date, and for which a decision was not made by March 29, 2012, were terminated and a refund process initiated. Eliminating the bulk of the backlog will turn CIC resources to processing applications for skilled immigrants applying under new eligibility criteria, and performance of economic immigrants selected under new criteria will be evident sooner.

A sixth set of Ministerial Instructions coincided with the coming into force of the new Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) on January 2, 2013. Those instructions specified that CIC will process a maximum of 3,000 FSTP applications each year, provided applicants meet certain criteria including minimum language thresholds. Within the overall cap, a total of 43 occupations are eligible for FSTP processing. Of these, 17 occupations are limited to 100 applications each, while 26 occupations are not subject to individual caps.

While the FSW program has always been open to applicants in the skilled trades, the FSTP has been designed with criteria that are better adapted to the particular qualifications and experience of skilled tradespersons. In addition to being qualified for an eligible occupation, FSTP applicants must demonstrate basic language proficiency in either English or French at the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)Footnote 5 level 5 for speaking and listening, and CLB 4 for reading and writing. Other criteria include: a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation after becoming qualified to independently practise and within the last five years; and meeting the requirements of the National Occupational Classification system aside from licensing/certification in Canada.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Quebec Skilled Workers

The Quebec-selected Skilled Workers (QSW) program allows immigrants to Quebec to be selected for their human capital, including their age, education, work experience, ability in French and enhanced settlement prospects, by reason of previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer. The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
3.8

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
44

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful QSW applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions for applicants destined to Quebec over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 31,000 for 2012 34,256
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this sub-program, the number of successful QSW applicants that were admitted to Canada surpassed the lower-end number of the annual planning range of 31,000 by 3,256 admissions. This year, 2,766 more QSW applicants were admitted than last year.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Provincial Nominees

The Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) allows provincial and territorial governments to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic needs and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory. Persons who immigrate to Canada under the PNP are deemed to have the skills, education and work experience needed to make an immediate economic contribution to the province or territory that nominates them. There are several federal-provincial agreements that enable the provinces to select immigrants. CIC retains final selection authority, assesses the admissibility of provincial nominees and issues permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
2.9

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
23

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Successful PNP applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 42,000 for 2012 40,899
Number of provincial nominees is consistent with provincial / territorial needs Number of arrivals through PNP and geographic spread 30% of provincial nominees settle outside of Montréal, Toronto or Vancouver 87% outside of Toronto or Vancouver Census Metropolitan Areas
Number of PNP certificates processed against mutually agreed upon targets with provinces and territories 20,655 certificates issued for calendar year (CY) 2011 (operational target) CY 2012: 20,505
Initial earnings of PNPs versus other classes Equal or exceed: initial earning of PNPs equal or exceed initial earnings of other economic classes—analysis by occupation may be required +47%Note F
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC did not meet its PNP target with a shortfall of 1,101 admissions or 3 percent.

For the second indicator, 87 percent of provincial nominees were destined outside the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) of Toronto and Vancouver. Immigrants selected under the QSW program are excluded from the results.

The high proportion of provincial nominees settling outside Toronto and VancouverFootnote 6 (compared with 34 percent for federally selected skilled workers under the FSW program) significantly exceeds the target and demonstrates PNP’s contribution to more regionally balanced migration.

Regarding the third indicator, each province or territory is responsible for achieving its target which, when combined, is expected to result in a similar number of permanent resident applications for the PNP in subsequent periods. The overall nomination target represents an upper limit for nominations received. This target had a shortfall of 0.8 percent as some provinces and territories did not achieve their nomination limit while others exceeded theirs.

For the fourth indicator, the initial earnings of PNP immigrants are roughly 47 percent higher than those immigrating under other economic classes. These results were also confirmed by a recent evaluation of the PNP, which noted that nominees are likely to a) have work experience in Canada leading to their nomination and b) have a job offer or require a job offer to be nominated. The evaluation also noted that earnings, while initially higher, tend to level off and that FSWs have, for instance, higher incomes over time, particularly those with Canadian work experience or a valid job offer in Canada.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Live-in Caregivers

The Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers in private residences to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a disability. Applicants come to Canada as temporary residents, but can apply for permanent residence after two years of full-time employment or 3,900 hours of full-time employment within four years of their arrival in Canada. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
4.0

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
64

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful LCP applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 8,000 for 2012 9,012
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As a result of operational planning and resource allocation toward the goal of reducing the backlog of LCP applications, the number of successful LCP applicants that were admitted to Canada surpassed the lower-end number of the annual planning range of 8,000 by 1,012 admissions.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Canadian Experience Class

Canadian Experience Class (CEC) was introduced in 2008 as a permanent resident category for individuals with certain work experience in Canada. It was developed for TFWs or graduates of Canadian post-secondary institutions with at least the equivalent of one year full-time skilled work experience. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
1.4

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
19

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Successful CEC applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 6,000 for 2012 9,359
Applicants within CEC are economically successful Percentage of CEC principal applicants with employment earnings that are higher than the Canadian benchmark 40% Not yet available
Percentage of CEC principal applicants whose labour force participation (as measured by reporting of employment earnings) is at least equivalent to the Canadian benchmark 100% Not yet available
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the lower-end admissions target of 6,000 for successful CEC applicants admitted to Canada was surpassed by 3,359 admissions, or 56 percent. The increase in the number of admissions under the CEC could reflect a growing awareness and familiarity with the sub-program among applicants with skilled work experience in Canada. For the second and third indicators, the data could be available as early as 2015, for the first full-year cohort arriving in 2009, for earnings for a minimum of a three-year period since landing.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Federal Business Immigrants

The federal business immigration component seeks to attract experienced business people to Canada who will support the development of a strong and prosperous economy. There are three classes of business immigrants in Canada: investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
1.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
17

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful federal business immigrant applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 5,500 for 2012 5,446
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the indicator above, the federal Business Class achieved 99 percent of its lower-end target of 5,500, with 5,446 admissions.

On March 30, 2013, a seventh set of Ministerial Instructions was issued to implement the Start Up Visa Program for immigrant entrepreneurs. Applicants to the Start-Up Visa Program require the support of a designated Canadian angel investor group or venture capital fund to invest in their business idea before applying for permanent residence. The Start-Up Visa Program is the first program to be created under section 14.1 of IRPA, which allows the Minister to issue instructions to create economic immigration programs, limited to a duration of five years. Should the program be successful, there would be a requirement to codify it in the regulations in order for it to continue. It is also the first federal business program to include a minimum requirement for official language proficiency, in recognition of the crucial importance of language skills in maximizing the outcomes of economic immigrants to Canada.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Quebec Business Immigrants

The Quebec business immigration component seeks to attract experienced business people to the province of Quebec who will support the development of a strong and prosperous economy. There are three classes of business immigrants: investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons. The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
0.4

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
3

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Successful Quebec business immigrant applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions from applicants destined to Quebec over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 2,500 for 2012 5,315
Number of admissions in the province of Quebec 100% of 2,500 for 2012 4,634
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the 5,315 admissions destined to Quebec represent 2,815 admissions above the lower end of the planned range of 2,500 (or 113 percent).

For the second indicator, the Quebec business immigrant admissions in Quebec surpassed the target by 2,134 applications, or 85 percent.

Rooted in legislative requirements outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is on processing and facilitating the entry into Canada of temporary workers and students. Temporary economic migration benefits Canada’s economic growth. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas (TRVs), work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
27.3 27.3 27.0 20.6 6.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
252 239 13

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
TFWs and students selected to benefit Canada’s economic development Approval rates of temporary worker applications for TFW permits 90% average acceptance rate in recent years 95%
Approval rates of student applications for study permits 81–85% 81%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $6.4 million, due to lower than projected costs for visa implementation and other general operating lapses.

Compared with last year, the approval rate of applications for TFW permits and study permits was up 3 percent. CIC is committed to meeting its target acceptance rate year over year while still ensuring the program’s integrity and the safety and security of Canada and its people.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students

CIC facilitates the entry of international students to Canada by issuing study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. CIC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial and security requirements are met, including the bona fides, or honest intentions, of all applicants. In order to provide the opportunity of the benefit of Canadian work experience, work permits are issued to qualified international students under CIC’s Off-Campus Work Permit (OCWP) component. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) component, which allows them to gain up to three years of valuable Canadian work experience. Some PGWP holders will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the CEC.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
9.1

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
81

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Qualified international student applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions Target not applicable 104,810
Number of students who obtained OCWPs in Canada 10,284–17,477 33,641
Number of students who obtained PGWPs in Canada 10,284–17,477 26,183
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

More than 100,000 international students were welcomed in 2012, a record-breaking year that represents a 60-percent increase since 2004. This reflects the increased number of applications received as well as modernization and centralization efforts that enable the Department to process applications faster. The International Education Strategy has identified growth in international student admissions as a goal. With demand expected to increase further, additional modernization activities are planned to address increases in demand and to preserve program integrity.

On December 29, 2012, CIC pre-published proposed regulatory changes to the International Student Program. Drawn from findings of a 2010 program evaluation and intended to support Canada’s International Education Strategy, the proposed changes would also limit study permits to students attending institutions designated by provinces and territories. In addition, many facilitative measures were introduced to help streamline access to work opportunities to attract international students to quality educational institutions in Canada. The changes aim to eliminate instances where institutions provide poor-quality programs or facilitate, knowingly or not, the entry of foreign nationals to Canada for purposes other than primarily for study. To support these changes, CIC worked with provinces and territories (which are constitutionally responsible for education in their respective jurisdictions) to develop a framework for designating educational institutions. The proposed changes will require students with study permits to be actively enrolled and studying, and will also include measures to verify and enforce compliance.

Currently, foreign nationals are not explicitly required to demonstrate that they pursued studies once in Canada, and there are limited means to track whether they did. The planned changes will provide CIC with the explicit authority to request evidence from study permit holders to verify compliance; international students who fail to comply will be ordered to be removed from Canada. The new requirements are expected to be implemented in 2014.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Foreign Workers

The TFW component allows employers to hire foreign nationals on a temporary basis in situations where no Canadians are available. Some employers require a labour market opinion (LMO) from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. Once in possession of the LMO (if required), the applicant may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). The foreign national must meet all admissibility and eligibility requirements. There are a number of different streams under the TFW. One of these is the LCP component, which allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign nationals to live and work in their private residence to provide care for children, the elderly and the disabled. The Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program facilitates hiring workers from countries with these agreements with Canada. If an LMO is not required, such as for reciprocal employment exchanges, intra-company transfers, international agreements (including the North American Free Trade Agreement, bilateral youth exchange agreements and other exceptions), the foreign national applies directly to CIC for a work permit and visa, and CIC considers the genuineness of the job offer and ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
11.5

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
158

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Qualified TFW applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions Not applicable (N/A) 213,573
Performance against service standards for responses to employers on exemptions from LMOs 80% adherence rate to 5-business-day service standard N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, 22,731 additional TFWs were admitted to Canada in 2012 compared with 2011, which represents an increase of 12 percent. For the second indicator, the service standard has been adjusted since the performance indicator was developed. CIC no longer calculates nor reports against the initial target. The new service standard is an 80-percent adherence rate to 14 calendar days. The Department achieved the service standard.

Employment rates in Canada vary on a regional basis. While some regions have high unemployment rates, other regions are faced with labour shortages. TFWs are important resources for Canadian businesses as they help meet labour demand that cannot be filled by domestic labour. Because the TFW program is jointly managed by CIC and ESDC, the two departments have been conducting a joint review of the program, building on previous actions to improve it (e.g., reducing the paper burden on employers, shortening processing times). This joint review aims to better align the program’s objectives with labour market demands, while ensuring businesses make all reasonable efforts to recruit from the Canadian labour force before proceeding to hire a TFW. On April 29, 2013, a suite of priority changes to the TFW program was announced to better ensure the program supports, rather than competes with, the Canadian labour supply. Work will proceed in 2013–2014 to implement these changes intended to facilitate the admission of foreign workers destined for jobs for which no suitable worker in Canada could be hired.

Finally, with the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games approaching, CIC has undertaken preliminary work, such as securing operational funding, to eventually facilitate the temporary resident application and entry process for those participating in, or working at, the games.

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

CIC is committed to upholding Canada’s humanitarian tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need.

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA, allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members (i.e., their spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children), as well as parents and grandparents, for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

As a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, and the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and further to provisions set forth in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada has international and domestic legal obligations to provide safe haven to individuals in need of protection. Canada meets these obligations through the in-Canada refugee status determination system. In addition, Canada partners with other countries and with international and civil society organizations to come to the aid of individuals in need of protection through resettlement. Every year, Canada resettles 10,000 to 12,000—or one out of every 10—of the refugees resettled globally. CIC engages both domestic and international stakeholders to develop and implement timely, efficient and effective refugee protection policies and programs.

Benefits for Canadians

Promoting human rights and protecting refugees has been a cornerstone of Canada’s humanitarian tradition since the Second World War. CIC plays a significant role in upholding Canada’s international and domestic obligations and reputation with regard to refugees and in promoting the Canadian values of democracy, freedom, human rights and the rule of law. Through family sponsorship, CIC’s efforts enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to reunite with family members.

CIC facilitates family reunification by enabling eligible foreign nationals to be sponsored by family members in Canada who are Canadian citizens or permanent residents. Spouses and partners, dependent children (including adopted children), and other eligible relatives such as parents and grandparents, are welcomed to Canada under this program. CIC may also grant permanent resident or other status to persons who would not otherwise qualify in any immigration category, in cases where there are strong humanitarian and compassionate (H&C) considerations, or for public policy reasons. Such exceptional and discretionary immigration measures provide the flexibility to approve deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
53.0 53.0 52.6 48.7 4.3

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
433 496 (63)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada reunites families and provides assistance to those in need while balancing Canada’s social, economic and security priorities Degree to which lower-end number of planning range in the annual immigration levels plan commitments is met for number of immigrants
  1. granted H&C consideration and
  2. admitted to Canada and reunited with families.
  1. 100% of 7,600 admissions for 2012 for humanitarian grounds
  2. 100% of 59,800 admissions for 2012 for family reunification
  1. 8,894
  2. 65,008
Percentage of H&C decisions that are upheld by the Federal Court Due to the nature of this performance indicator, no target was established for this indicator in 2012–2013 99.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $3.9 million, due to general operating lapses that will be carried forward to the next fiscal year.

For the first indicator, 8,894 persons were admitted in 2012 under H&C or public policy grounds, which exceeded the lower end of the planned range of 7,600 by 17 percent. The overachievement was due to an overall increase in processing Family Class applications, which includes Family Class applications with H&C considerations. As for the second indicator, just under 100 percent of H&C decisions of 2012–2013 were upheld by the Federal Court in 2012 (although not all are referred to the Federal Court). This represents less than a 1-percent decrease from last year.

In support of CIC goals for family and discretionary immigration, 65,008 persons were admitted in 2012 under the total Family Class; sub-programs are analysed in detail in the subsections that follow.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA, allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members, i.e., spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children, for immigration to Canada. Family reunification is a key priority for the Government of Canada and, as such, the highest priority for processing is for those considered to be the closest family members: spouses, conjugal partners and dependent children. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
27.5

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
249

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Spouses, partners and children are admitted to Canada and are reunited with families Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 38,000 for 2012 43,193
Percentage adherence to the 12 months service standard for cases processed overseas 80% 66%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the number of spouses, partners and children admitted to Canada and reunited with families surpassed the lower-end number of the annual planning range of 38,000 by 5,193 admissions (or 14 percent). As for the second indicator, Family Class processing continues to experience challenges caused by geopolitical conflict in the Middle East, as well as Pakistan. Given the sensitive and important nature of this type of caseload, missions are ensuring as much as possible that these applications are processed within the service standard.

On October 26, 2012, CIC introduced new regulations to address issues surrounding relationships of convenience, including marriages of convenience. The new measure builds on 2012 ARCHIVED – regulatory changes rendering sponsored spouses or partners ineligible to sponsor a new spouse or partner for five years from the day that they are granted permanent residence status.

Under the new regulation, sponsored spouses who have no children in common with their sponsoring partner at the time when they submit their application are now required to live in a legitimate relationship with their sponsor for two years, starting on the day on which they became a permanent resident. Those failing to do so risk having their permanent resident status revoked. These new regulations allow for exceptions, where the above conditional measure ceases to apply, when there is evidence of abuse or neglect perpetrated by the sponsor or by a person related to the sponsor, whether or not the abusive party is living in the household during the conditional period. There are also exceptions in place in the event of the death of the sponsor. Taken together these changes are designed to strengthen the program supporting Canada’s social goals for immigration while ensuring the integrity of the program.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA, allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their parents and grandparents for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their parent or grandparent for 10 years. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
10.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
126

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Parents and grandparents are admitted to Canada and are reunited with families Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 21,800 for 2012 21,815
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the indicator above, the number of parents and grandparents admitted to Canada and reunited with families met the lower-end number of the annual planning range of 21,800.

As part of Phase I of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification, CIC undertook a review of the parents and grandparents program with a view to making processing faster and the program more aligned with overall priorities for immigration. Once implemented, the new program will reduce and prevent application backlogs, as well as ensure that families have the financial means to support those they sponsor. Consultations on the program’s redesign – archived were held with provinces, territories and the Canadian public throughout the year.

November 2012 marked the beginning of the second year of the 24-month temporary pause on the acceptance of new parent and grandparent sponsorship applications. CIC has continued to issue parent and grandparent super visas,Footnote 7 a TRV offering extended stays of up to two years, with multiple entries for up to 10 years. The super visa has become very popular among those wishing to visit family. Over 1,000 super visas were issued each month, with a nearly 90-percent approval rate.

The temporary pause in applications combined with the super visa has helped alleviate the backlog associated with parent and grandparent sponsorship applications. As of March 31, 2013, the parent and grandparent backlog stood at 111,096 applications, a reduction of 34 percent since November 2011, while wait times were reduced by close to half. Admission of parents and grandparents increased by 55 percent over 2011, the highest level in 20 years.

In ARCHIVED – Phase II of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification, CIC will launch the redesigned parents and grandparents program with new criteria, which will apply to new applications in 2014, when it is expected that the program pause will be lifted. The Department also anticipates that the program backlog will have been reduced to half by January 2014, from 160,000 in 2011 to a projected 80,000.

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations to Address Exceptional Circumstances

Section 25 of IRPA provides the legal basis for both the H&C and the public policy provisions. These discretionary provisions of the Act are intended to uphold Canada’s humanitarian tradition. They provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases that either do not meet the requirements of a class or are inadmissible to Canada. Under the H&C program, the applicant’s individual circumstances are assessed, taking into account the best interests of the child, and any factors brought forward for consideration. In contrast, public policies created under section 25 are designed to facilitate processing of a number of individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet specific eligibility criteria. While any foreign national may request H&C consideration, public policies are created on the Minister’s initiative.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
10.5

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
121

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Persons who do not qualify in any other category or who would be inadmissible to Canada are admitted or are allowed to remain in Canada and acquire permanent resident status Number of admissions over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 7,600 8,894
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the indicator above, the number of admissions as a result of H&C considerations surpassed the lower-end number of the annual planning range of 7,600 by 1,294 (or 17 percent).

The Refugee Protection program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants permanent residence when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
31.3 31.3 40.6 30.3 1.0

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
348 361 (13)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada protects refugees in need of resettlement Percentage of resettled refugees in the world that Canada resettles (which is dependent on actions of other countries) 8–12% 11%
Number of arrivals of resettled refugees 11,500–14,000 admitted, as identified in the 2012 immigration levels plan 9,650
Number of individuals granted permanent residence who were determined to be protected persons in Canada (by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada or positive pre-removal risk assessment, or PRRA, decision) and their dependants abroad 11,000–13,000 admitted, as identified in the 2012 immigration levels plan 13,444
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities increased by $9.3 million over planned spending, primarily due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $10.3 million, due to lower than anticipated refugee volumes, and due to refugee reform funding set aside to be reprofiled in future years.

For the first indicator, based on United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) data from Displacement: The New 21st Century Challenge, UNHCR Global Trends 2012, almost 71,300 refugees referred to countries by the UNHCR were resettled across the globe in 2012, and Canada resettled the highest number of refugees per capita. Data in Facts and Figures 2012 show that Canada resettled 5,430 persons under the Government-assisted Refugee (GAR) Program or 8 percent of the refugees identified by the UNHCR. This number does not include persons resettled under other programs, such as Canada’s Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program or persons admitted under public policy considerations. Globally, 88,600 Convention refugees and others in similar circumstances were resettled and Canada’s total resettlement was 9,724 persons or 11 percent.

The resettlement of refugees is a priority for the Government of Canada. For the second indicator, 5,430 GARs and 4,220 privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) were resettled in Canada. While this did not meet the lower end of the target of 11,500 persons, Canada met its goal of resettling between 8 percent and 12 percent of all refugees. Additionally, the Department did surpass the targeted lower range for the third indicator by 2,444 admissions, with 8,586 protected persons in Canada and 4,858 of their dependants abroad being granted permanent residence in Canada in 2012.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-assisted Refugees

Working closely with the UNHCR or other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers within the GAR program identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. The primary objective of the program is to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of governmental assistance and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
5.8

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
21

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
GARs are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions of GARs over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 7,500 5,430
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the indicator above, Canada, like many resettlement countries, did not meet its targets in 2012, due in part to the crisis in Syria and an inability to access other refugee populations for security reasons. As a result, the lower-end number of the annual planning range of 7,500 for GARs was not met, with a shortfall of 2,070 persons. CIC will revise its planning mechanisms for this indicator.

Historically, Canada has operated a global resettlement program. For example, in 2012, Canada resettled refugees from over 75 nationalities requiring staff to be present in some 40 countries. To better meet targets for refugee protection, CIC is moving forward with multiyear commitments to resettle GARs. This is expected to help communities and settlement organizations better plan for arrivals, thereby improving outcomes. Multiyear commitments currently under way are for Iraqis (20,000 by 2015), Bhutanese (6,500 by 2015) and refugees in Turkey (5,000 by 2018). CIC has also been working on protecting the needs of at-risk vulnerable minorities. For example, Bhutanese refugees of ethnic Nepalese descent have been living in seven camps in eastern Nepal since the early 1990s. Canada along with other countries, including Australia, Denmark, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway and the United States, is taking steps to address this long-standing situation by resettling some of these refugees. In May 2007, Canada announced that it would resettle up to 5,000 Bhutanese refugees over five years, and more than 5,000 have already arrived in Canada. With additional commitments made since 2007, Canada will now resettle up to 6,500 Bhutanese refugees by 2015.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees

The primary objective of the PSR program is to affirm Canada’s commitment to providing durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the GAR program. Canadian visa officers select as permanent residents members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada who are referred by private sponsors. These private sponsors then provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique as it ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the government.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
2.5

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
28

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
PSRs are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions of PSRs over the lower-end number of the annual planning range 100% of 4,000 4,220
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The crisis in Syria and deteriorating security conditions in various other countries impeded visa officers from reaching as many refugee applicants as planned, resulting in fewer visas being issued for PSRs. In spite of these challenges, however, CIC still managed to surpass by 220 the target of 4,000 for PSRs.

As part of Canada’s Refugee and Humanitarian Resettlement Program, private sponsors, namely Sponsorship Agreement Holders, Groups of Five and Community Sponsors, can submit applications to sponsor refugees from abroad. In October 2012, new regulations were implemented to streamline processing of PSR applications. The regulations limit Groups of Five and Community Sponsors to sponsoring applicants who are recognized as refugees by either the UNHCR or a state.Footnote 8 These changes also require that sponsors submit a complete application for permanent residence with their sponsorship undertaking at the beginning of the process.

Moreover, as part of the Economic Action Plan 2012, the ratio of GARs and PSRs is being adjusted to allow for a number of refugees to be resettled under a new program that will see private sponsors, the Government of Canada and the UNHCR engage in another unique partnership. Under this new Visa Office Referred Program, up to 1,000 refugees identified by the UNHCR and selected for resettlement in Canada will be matched with interested private sponsors by 2015. The Government of Canada will provide for up to six months income support from the Resettlement Assistance Program envelope while sponsors will provide the emotional, social and remaining financial support for up to one year.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, Canada’s asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel or unusual treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the Canadian refugee protection system. Canada’s asylum system includes the determination of eligibility for referral to the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and the granting of permanent resident status to those determined by the Board to be Convention refugees or persons in need of protection as well as providing a PRRA to failed refugee claimants and others facing removal from Canada.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
11.6

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
165

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Decisions made on eligibility of refugee claims are rendered within three working days Percentage of decisions made on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days 97% 99.4%
Permanent residence granted to those deemed protected persons by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and their dependants abroad Number of individuals granted permanent residence who were previously granted protected person status by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and their dependants abroad 9,000–12,000 13,444
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC met its target of 97 percent of decisions made on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days. As for the second indicator, actual results surpassed the targeted upper range of 12,000 by 1,444.

PCISA received Royal Assent on June 28, 2012. Building on the 2010 Balanced Refugee Reform Act, this legislation further reformed the in-Canada asylum system, speeding up the process, thereby granting protection more quickly and for legitimate claims, while facilitating faster removal of those who do not require refugee protection. The Act also introduced new measures to address human smuggling and implemented biometric requirements for TRV applications.

Reforms to the in-Canada asylum system came into force on December 15, 2012, and continue to provide every eligible claimant with a fair hearing before the independent Immigration and Refugee Board, regardless of what country they come from or how they arrive. Since the reforms came into force, the number of asylum claims received each week during the winter of 2013 was down by 70 percent compared with similar time frames over the past six years. Asylum claims from Hungary, Canada’s top source country for claimants in both 2011 and 2012, also dropped by 98 percent compared with the 2009–2012 average. Within six months of the implementation of PCISA, federal and provincial governments have already saved $180 million. It is anticipated that these reforms will save taxpayers an estimated $1.6 billion ($1.4 billion in present value terms) over five years.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: Pre-removal Risk Assessment

In accordance with its commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, CIC offers a risk assessment before removing a person from Canada. The principle of non-refoulement holds that people should not be removed to a country where they would be at risk of a danger of torture, a risk to their life, or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment. Under IRPA, people who have been issued a removal order must formally apply to CIC for a PRRA. When a person has already had a refugee protection claim assessed by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, only new evidence, such as evidence that demonstrates a change in country conditions, is considered. Persons whose applications are approved become ’protected persons’ and may apply and be granted permanent resident status.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
10.4

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
147

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Permanent residence granted to those who received a positive PRRA decision and their dependants abroad Number of individuals granted permanent residence who previously received a positive PRRA decision and their dependants abroad Levels plan annually (protected person numbers include positive Immigration and Refugee Board decisions) 8,894Note G
PRRA decisions are made in a fair manner in compliance with IRPA Percentage of applications for judicial review of PRRA decisions N/A 9.3% of negative decisions
Percentage of PRRA decisions returned to CIC by the Federal Court for re-determination N/A 0.06% of all decisions made
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the targeted number of individuals granted permanent residence who previously received a positive PRRA decision and their dependants abroad was surpassed by 1,294 or 17 percent. For the second and third indicators, the numbers are similar to the results achieved last year, which were, respectively, 11 percent of negative decisions and 0.05 percent of all decisions made.

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, IRPA and the Citizenship Act, as well as a broader constitutional and legislative suite that includes the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Official Languages Act and the Employment Equity Act among others, the Government of Canada is committed to facilitating the full participation of all Canadians in the social, cultural, economic and civic spheres of Canadian society. Accordingly, the focus of this strategic outcome is on a “two-way street” approach that works with communities and Canadian institutions to assist individuals to become active, connected and productive citizens.

Working with a range of partners, including other levels of government, the voluntary sector and community partners, employers, school boards and others, CIC seeks to minimize income disparities and strengthen social integration by helping to remove barriers; enabling individuals to fully participate in the labour market; encouraging social and cultural connections among people of different backgrounds and identities; encouraging active civic participation; and inculcating a sense of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship and the value of diversity.

Benefits for Canadians

Canadians enjoy a higher quality of life when citizens and newcomers actively participate in all aspects of society; contribute to a prosperous economy; have a strong sense of civic pride and attachment; and help build culturally vibrant and harmonious communities.

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, CIC develops policies and programs to support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society focused on information/orientation, language/skills, labour market access and welcoming communities. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country. However, accountability for expended funds and attaining outcomes remains with CIC.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
979.8 979.8 979.2 950.7 29.1

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
329 302 27

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
NewcomersNote I contribute to the economic, social, civic and cultural life of Canada Percentage variance of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada less than 5 years in comparison with Canadian-born

Percentage variance of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada 5 to 10 years in comparison with Canadian-born

Not less than 3% below Canadian-born

Not less than 1% below Canadian-born

1.4%

1%Note H

Percentage of newcomers with language proficiency of the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB 4 or higher) 90% of immigrants applying for citizenship will have CLB 4 or higher level 97.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $28.5 million, due to lower than planned expenditures in the Settlement and Resettlement Assistance programs and to general operating lapses.

The data indicate that the settlement and integration experience of immigrants to Canada is generally positive from the language and labour market participation perspectives. The first indicator demonstrates that the labour market participation of immigrants is consistent with studies, which show that integration in the labour market improves with the length of time that immigrants reside in Canada. As the second indicator shows, after three or more years in the country, the vast majority of newcomers who apply for citizenship had either accessed language training or other learning opportunities to acquire the language skills they need to meet one of the requirements of Canadian citizenship or they had arrived with a sufficient level of language skill. The percentage presented (98 percent) is calculated by using the total number of adult applicants who were not refused citizenship specifically because of language requirements. However, the majority of applicants did not undergo a formal assessment of their language proficiency. This resulted in an overestimation of the real number of newcomers who have CLB 4 or a higher level.

In addition, new regulations require adult citizenship applicants to provide objective evidence of their language ability at the time of application. The regulations came into force on November 1, 2012, establishing clearer language assessment criteria that align with CLB 4, and clarifying that the skills that will be assessed are speaking and listening. This will enhance the integrity of the Citizenship Program by making language assessment more objective, while improving language outcomes for newcomers and improving processing. It will also enable future reporting on the number of citizenship applicants who meet the language requirement of CLB 4 or higher.

Also, to address the need for a standardized in-class language assessment protocol identified in a 2010 program evaluation, the portfolio-based language assessment (PBLA) was introduced as the standard feature of the Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) and the Cours de langue pour les immigrants au Canada (CLIC). Starting in 2013–2014, the PBLA will be phased in over a three-year period across all LINC and CLIC courses and will enable teachers to measure the language proficiency of participants. PBLA was first pilot-tested successfully in Ottawa.

The FPT immigration ministers approved a joint FPT vision action plan for immigration that reflects shared objectives.Footnote 9 The vision identifies key outcomes that describe what success will look like for the immigration program and sets out guiding principles by which the immigration program will be jointly managed through intergovernmental partnership. CIC will continue to work closely with provinces and territories to implement five key actions over the next three years.

In 2012–2013, in the context of the renewal of the terms and conditions for the Settlement Program, CIC developed a performance measurement strategy, which will guide the timely collection and assessment of better information, necessary for performance measurement, evaluation and reporting of the program. As well, the Department replaced the current data collection tool for the Settlement Program. The first modules of the new system, the Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment (iCARE), were launched on April 1, 2013, and other modules will be launched by the end of 2013–2014.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Foreign Credentials Referral

The Foreign Credentials Referral Office (FCRO) was established to help internationally trained individuals (ITIs) receive the information, path-finding and referral services to have their credentials assessed as quickly as possible so they can find work faster in the fields for which they have been trained. In Canada, Service Canada delivers in-person and telephone services on behalf of the FCRO. Information on FCR is also available through the FCRO website to prospective immigrants overseas. The FCRO works with FPT partners, and with national associations, recognition bodies and employers, to strengthen FCR processes across Canada. As the lead department on the pre-arrival component of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications, CIC, through the FCRO, assumed responsibility for the ESDC-funded Canadian Immigrant Integration Program (CIIP) in October 2010. The CIIP helps immigrants prepare for integration into the Canadian labour market while they are still in their countries of origin.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
14.1

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
36

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
ITIs are employed in positions commensurate with their skills and experience quickly in order to better integrate into Canadian society Percentage of ITIs working in the occupational skill level that matches their education level 57.2% Not yet availableNote J
Percentage of ITIs that find employment they believe is commensurate with their skills and experience within 12 months 38% males;
30% females
54% males;
49% females
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The effective labour market integration of many ITIs has been limited by challenges associated with assessment and recognition of foreign credentials. Measuring the number of newcomers who are employed in fields commensurate with their skills and experience provides some indication as to the success of CIC (and Government of Canada) interventions, although actual attribution to government programming is difficult to determine.

For the first indicator, data from the National Household Survey, a component of the 2011 Census, was not available at the time of writing the report. This information will be available for future reports. The target for the second indicator was exceeded for both male and female ITIs who had participated in the CIIP.

Implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications for the second block of six target regulated occupations (i.e., dentists, engineering technicians, licensed practical nurses, medical radiation technologists, physicians and teachers) was accomplished. Ensuring that foreign credentials are quickly and fairly assessed helps highly skilled newcomers find work related to their fields of expertise, and in turn, allows them to contribute quickly to the Canadian economy. The Government of Canada is committed to further improving FCR and has been working with provinces and territories to identify more target occupations for inclusion under the Framework.

To enable newcomers to more successfully integrate into the Canadian labour market, CIC introduced a new education assessment requirement for those applying under the FSW program. Starting in 2013–2014, anyone applying under the FSW program must undergo an educational credential assessment (ECA) to determine the equivalency of their foreign credential submitted (degree, diploma, certificate or other proof of education). ECAs need to be completed by an organization designated by CIC.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Settlement

Settlement refers to the short-term transitional issues faced by newcomers moving to Canada, while integration is an ongoing process of mutual accommodation between an individual and society. CIC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience (such as a lack of official language skills and limited knowledge of Canada) so that they can participate in social, cultural, civic and economic life in Canada. The program accomplishes this goal by providing language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations (SPOs), but certain services (such as some information provision) are delivered directly by CIC, and some services are delivered overseas. British Columbia, Manitoba and Quebec design, deliver and administer their own settlement services.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
596.9

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
212

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Clients have the knowledge, skills and opportunities to participate in social, cultural, civic and economic life in Canada Number of clients accessing settlement services Increase to 200,000 203,668
Number of organizations or institutions funded to provide services to newcomers No target established 606
Funds disbursed to SPOs (outside Quebec, British Columbia and Manitoba) for delivering settlement services $152,633,486Note K $430,333,535 settlement funds disbursed
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator above, CIC surpassed its target, and the number of clients accessing services increased by 14,225 compared with 2011–2012. The target for the second indicator was not specified as the number of organizations was dependent on newcomer needs and areas where they settled. The target for the third indicator was incorrectly reported; however, the results show that the actual funds disbursed closely matched the planned funding allocation of $442,344,912 for settlement services outside Quebec, British Columbia and Manitoba (difference of approximately 3 percent).

CIC recognizes that immigration is a responsibility shared among the federal government, provinces and territories. To ensure that a similar level of settlement services is available across the country, Budget 2012 announced that CIC would resume responsibility for the delivery and management of settlement services in the provinces of Manitoba and British Columbia. Transition teams, governance structures, guiding principles, terms of reference and a draft time frame for key activities were developed in cooperation with the Manitoba and B.C. governments. The Department also engaged representatives of immigrant services organizations in these provinces to ensure that settlement services to newcomers continue without disruption throughout the transition. Resumption by CIC of the management of settlement services in Manitoba was completed on March 31, 2013. The B.C. transition will be fully implemented by the end of 2013–2014. This will create conditions for coherent and consistent federal settlement programming across Canada. For 2012–2013, British Columbia, Manitoba and Quebec designed, delivered and administered their own settlement services.

The CIIP is a collaborative initiative involving the Government of Canada, the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC) and a network of partners across Canada. Managed by the ACCC and funded by CIC, the program provides free pre-departure overseas orientation to FSWs, provincial nominees, their spouses and adult dependants to help them prepare for the Canadian labour market. Information, planning and online support is provided by various Canadian partners. More than 20,000 individuals have graduated from the program since it was launched in 2010. A recent evaluation found that 91 percent of participants strongly agreed that CIIP services were useful and 99 percent agreed that the services improved their understanding on how to find suitable work in Canada.

CIIP services are currently available in a number of cities across China, India, the Philippines and the United Kingdom. Additional service delivery locations are being considered.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Grant to Quebec

Quebec has the sole authority for administration of settlement and resettlement services for clients in that province. This program governs the transfer of funds under a federal-provincial agreement, the Canada-Quebec Accord. The monies are used by Quebec to develop, implement and manage delivery of settlement and resettlement services to newcomers. An objective of this Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants to that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. Quebec has the rights and responsibilities set out in this Accord with respect to the number of immigrants destined to Quebec and the selection, reception and integration of those immigrants.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
284.5

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Provision of comparable settlement services by Quebec Frequency of Comité Mixte meetings Once per year Annual meeting held in June 2013
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Comité Mixte (established as part of the Canada-Quebec Accord) is required to meet at least once every calendar year and, among other things, approves joint directives, ensures the exchange of information and promotion of joint research projects relating to migration flow, and discusses Quebec’s sponsorship criteria. Since the introduction of the Accord, the Joint Committee’s mandate has included monitoring the speed of processing immigrants destined to Quebec, providing an opinion on any changes Canada might wish to make to the definition of classes of immigrants and the inadmissibility criteria, and studying annually the reception and integration services offered by both Canada and Quebec.

The Comité Mixte meeting for 2012 was held in February of that year. The 2013 meeting was held in June. As a follow-up to the management response to the evaluation of the grant to Quebec, discussions are ongoing on conducting a comparative study of settlement services.

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loan Program is a statutory program under IRPA. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target groups for the program are GARs and PSRs. These individuals have undergone extreme hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. CIC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses CIC. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest-bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients’ ability to repay while integrating.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
1.5

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
13

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Support received by those otherwise unable to afford medical and transportation costs Proportion of resettled refugees that receive transportation and/or admissibility loans 100% Approximately 90% of resettled refugees (GARs and PSRs) received transportation and admissibility loans.
Support received by those otherwise unable to afford initial settlement costs Proportion of resettled refugees that receive assistance loans 100% of 12,000 Approximately 43% of all resettled refugees (GARs and PSRs) received assistance loans.
Loans repaid by recipients Percentage of transportation/admissibility loans that are repaid within the prescribed time frame

Percentage of transportation/admissibility loans that are repaid within 10 years of landing

50%

90%

+60%

+90%

Percentage of assistance loans that are repaid within the prescribed time frame

Percentage of assistance loans that are repaid within 10 years of landing

50%

90%

+60%

+90%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The first indicator shows that 90 percent of GARs and PSRs received loans during 2012–2013. Most resettled refugees in need are receiving transportation and admissibility loans. These results indicate that the program is achieving its desired objectives.

For the second indicator, the result of 43 percent falls very short of the target of loans to 100 percent of resettled refugees. However, these assistance loans are overwhelmingly issued to GARs because PSRs receive such settlement assistance directly from sponsors. If the number of loans issued is compared with the number of GAR principal applicants landed in 2012–2013, the result is 86 percent. These results indicate that the program is approaching its expected result as a significant proportion of resettled refugees in potential need receive loans.

The third and fourth indicators demonstrate that while loans are not always repaid according to the original repayment schedule, the majority (more than 90 percent) are repaid within 10 years. This reflects the fact that in order to alleviate undue hardship, CIC allows for extensions to repayment timelines when necessary and requested by the client.

Sub-Program 3.1.5: Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program

The Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) for GARs provides immediate and essential support services and income support to assist in meeting refugees’ resettlement needs. In most cases GARs have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country. Local CIC officers administer and deliver monthly income support to GARs who cannot support themselves and their dependants (if applicable). Income support is available for up to 12 months, or until they become self-sufficient, whichever comes first. GARs also receive start-up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Essential services are supported through contributions to SPOs in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, reception services, assistance with accommodations, links to mandatory federal and provincial programs, life skills training, and orientation on financial and non-financial information.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
53.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
41

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
GARs have access to CIC settlement services Percentage of GARs, outside of Quebec, Manitoba and B.C., who access settlement services within six months after arrival 85% 82%
GARs have their immediate and essential needs met Percentage of GARs, outside of Quebec, who receive temporary accommodation during their first month after arrival 100% 79%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CIC is aware of data gaps in recording take-up of both orientation services and temporary accommodations and is moving to a new data collection system. These gaps, as analysed below, help explain why CIC did not achieve its targets this past year.

Although the take-up rate was lower than the target, of the 18 percent of GARs (outside of Quebec) who did not receive orientation services, 62 percent of the members of this group were under the age of 15. It is likely that settlement services were provided to entire families but the data were captured for only one member of the family.

Of the 21 percent of GARs (destined for provinces other than Quebec) who were recorded as not receiving temporary accommodation during their first month after arrival, it is very possible these persons did in fact receive the service as part of a family unit. For example, 28 percent of those who were recorded as not having received temporary accommodation outside of Quebec were under the age of 15 and 25 percent were between the ages of 15 and 24. It is likely that persons in this age cohort would have used the accommodations provided to the head of their family. Furthermore, 47 percent of those who were reported as not receiving temporary accommodation were over the age of 25, with an even split between men and women and it is possible that some of this cohort would have also used the accommodation provided to the head of household.

CIC will continue to monitor its results for these targets to consider to what extent its commitments may need to be modified.

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. CIC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
41.9 41.9 47.8 46.6 (4.7)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
545 562 (17)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian citizenship is a valued status among newcomers and the Canadian-born Take-up rates of citizenship among eligible newcomers 75% or higher 85.6%Note L
Sense of belonging to Canada for newcomers and the Canadian-born Maintain at over 70% the overall response to having a strong sense of belonging and maintain within 10% discrepancy between immigrants and Canadian-born Not available
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities increased by $5.9 million over planned spending, due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $1.2 million, primarily due to citizenship judge vacancies.

The first indicator demonstrates that Canada continues to have high take-up rates for citizenship translating to a high value placed on Canadian citizenship. Current rates are based on the 2011 Census data and Census data are updated only every five years. Work is under way to determine whether the citizenship take-up rates of eligible newcomers can be collected on an annual basis using other data sources. For the second indicator, there are no data available for 2012–2013. CIC has revised performance indicators for this program to ensure data availability in the future.

CIC undertook an in-depth policy review of the Citizenship Program to improve program integrity and protect the value of Canadian citizenship. The Department consulted provinces and territories and undertook discussions with other government departments on the potential way forward and associated impacts for certain elements.

CIC also continued to focus on enhanced program integrity and strengthening the value of Canadian citizenship by instituting greater scrutiny when verifying applicants’ eligibility for citizenship, as well as ensuring adequate official language proficiency of newcomers. The Department also implemented measures to increase efficiency and prioritized addressing citizenship fraud.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Awareness Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as: citizenship ceremonies; citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies; Citizenship Week; Citation for Citizenship award; and the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g., Discover Canada citizenship study guide).

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
9.2

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
46

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Newcomers and established Canadians have knowledge of the responsibilities and privileges associated with Canadian citizenship Percentage of applicants required to meet knowledge criteria who met those criteria 75% (Maintain rate or higher) 79%
Knowledge levels of all Canadians on responsibilities and privileges of citizenship 80% (Maintain a response rate of 80% or higher) 80%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Citizenship knowledge criteria are established to ensure new citizens understand Canada’s history, symbols and institutions and their roles and responsibilities as citizens. With 79 percent of applicants required to meet the knowledge criteria who met them, the actual results achieved for the first indicator surpassed the target of 75 percent. For the second indicator, 80 percent of respondents to CIC’s 2012–2013 Tracking Survey were able to name at least one responsibility associated with Canadian citizenship. To improve monitoring and reporting of current knowledge-building and promotional activities, these indicators will be modified for 2013–2014.

CIC continued to promote civic participation and the value of citizenship to both newcomers and long-standing Canadians, with a focus on Canadian values, history, symbols and institutions, as well as the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Focus in 2012 was on the Commemoration of the War of 1812 and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. CIC is undertaking an evaluation of the Citizenship Awareness Program to assess its relevance, as well as performance (in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and economy) in relation to its intended results. The final report is expected in fall 2013.

CIC officials also supported a number of knowledge-building and promotional activities, including citizenship ceremonies. A partnership was established with a major Canadian retailer to leverage citizenship-related messaging, specifically highlighting hockey as a shared tradition of Canadians. Two events were held as part of this partnership, including a citizenship re-affirmation ceremony with approximately 1,200 attendees and a citizenship ceremony at the Hockey Hall of Fame. In Saint John, New Brunswick, the Department also hosted a special citizenship ceremony with Their Royal Highnesses The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall as part of the Royal Tour.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of Canadian citizenship helps newcomers fully participate in Canadian life and contributes to their successful integration into Canadian society. A person’s citizenship is revoked if it is found that they have obtained their citizenship fraudulently, by misrepresentation or by knowingly concealing information during the course of their immigration or citizenship application process. CIC reviews files where there are allegations of fraud and collects and analyses information to determine if a recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
37.4

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
516

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible applicants are able to acquire citizenship grants and proofs Total number of citizenship grants issued (new citizens) 154,298–214,944 106,353
Total number of proof certificates issued (confirmed citizens) 45,888–79,111 52,741
Applications are referred to initiate revocation proceedings if there is evidence of fraud Number of cases referred to the Minister for consideration of Issuance of Notification of Intention to Revoke 2011–2012: 440 cases 2012–2013: 24
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC did not meet its target for citizenship grants issued (new citizens), falling short by 31 percent for a variety of reasons. Intake of grant applications has exceeded the Department’s processing capacity for a number of years, and output production and inventory growth have been affected by internal changes to file processing, as well as new regulatory requirements. High vacancies in citizenship judge positions also resulted in a significant reduction in decision-making capacity. For the second indicator, CIC met its proofs target.

Related to the third indicator, 24 cases were referred to the Minister for consideration of Issuance of Notification of Intention to Revoke. Increasingly, these notices have been referred to the Federal Court, reaching about 90 percent of all notices served, or about 250 cases at this time. This is significantly higher than anticipated and has a very large impact on resources at CIC and its partners. CIC has decided to limit both the number of notices to revoke issued and the revocation cases ongoing before the Federal Court. Coupled with significant changes in the Citizenship Program to enable a greater focus on protecting the value of citizenship, the target for this performance indicator has been revised and will be updated for 2013–2014 reporting.

CIC has and will continue to explore measures to determine where modernization efforts should be focused in support of greater operational efficiency and to reduce risk in the Citizenship Program. In this regard, the Department implemented a number of tools and procedures to assist citizenship officials in the detection of fraud, as well as in the standardization of grant file preparation.

CIC provided ministerial support this year to a private member’s bill, Bill C-425, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (honouring the Canadian Armed Forces). Bill C-425 proposes to reduce the residence requirement in Canada before being granted citizenship by one year for any permanent resident who is a member of the Canadian Armed Forces, who has signed a minimum three-year contract and has completed the basic training. Furthermore, this bill contains provisions that deem individuals to have renounced their Canadian citizenship or withdrawn their application for Canadian citizenship if they engage in an act of war against the Canadian Armed Forces.

The Multiculturalism Program is the principal means of carrying out the Minister’s responsibilities under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for promoting the full and equitable participation of individuals and communities of all origins. Grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, provincial and municipal governments, non-federal public institutions and individuals seek to advance overarching program objectives. These objectives are to: build an integrated, cohesive society (through intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride, democratic values, and equality of opportunity); improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and actively engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level. Direct public outreach and promotional activities by the program primarily target young people. The program assists federal partners to meet their obligations under the Act and ensures annual reporting to Parliament on its operation.

It also engages with non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity. The program provides a forum for cooperation with provinces and territories and is the locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions with respect to multiculturalism, anti-racism and related issues.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
25.0 25.0 17.4 15.1 9.9

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
52 34 18

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Program participants and beneficiaries are enabled to support an integrated society Annual percentage of program participants and beneficiaries who report that they are more enabled to support an integrated society 70% >70%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities decreased by $7.6 million compared with planned spending, primarily due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $2.3 million, due to lower than planned expenditures in grants and contributions programs.

The actual result listed for the indicator is for 2011–2012 (the year for which the most recent data are available). CIC has revised the performance indicator for this program to ensure data availability in the future. The Multiculturalism Program was evaluated in 2011–2012. Findings and recommendations were made public in March 2012. CIC developed a management response action plan to address the evaluation recommendations—most of which have been implemented. The program also undertook a policy review that resulted in keeping the current program objectives.

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness

Multiculturalism Awareness comprises a suite of policy, operational, and public engagement and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada’s stance on diversity issues, project funding (grants and contributions) is disbursed to recipients (e.g., not-for-profit organizations, the private sector and individuals) seeking to address the program’s overarching objective of building an integrated, cohesive society through intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride, core democratic values, and equal opportunity for full participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism Awareness also directs public outreach and promotional activities, primarily targeting young people, designed to engage newcomers and Canadians on multiculturalism, racism and discrimination issues.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
13.0

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
33

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Program participants and beneficiaries are informed and value an integrated society Annual percentage of program participants and beneficiaries reporting awareness of issues related to an integrated society 70% 80%
Annual percentage of program participants and beneficiaries reporting positive attitudes on issues related to an integrated society Target not established N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the actual result listed above is for 2011–2012 (the year for which the most recent data are available). Because a target was not established for the second indicator, actual results are not available to report. No new data are available for 2012–2013 because CIC revamped the program participants’ survey, which needs approval as public opinion research. Nonetheless, CIC has revised its performance indicators for this program and has launched a revised survey to ensure data availability in the future.

In March 2013, Canada assumed the chairmanship of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.Footnote 10 In preparation, CIC worked in partnership with key government and community stakeholders to develop a strategy to support the Canadian Chair. CIC also initiated the preparatory work to host two meetings of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, which will be held in Berlin (June 2013) and Toronto (October 2013).

Throughout 2012–2013, CIC officials, in partnership with stakeholders, organized hundreds of direct public outreach and promotional activities designed to engage Canadians and newcomers on multiculturalism, racism and discrimination issues, among others. From January to March 2013 alone, for example, communications officials in the National Capital Region and in regions organized more than 80 outreach events and activities on issues related to Black History Month, the Award for Excellence in Holocaust Education, and the promotion of the Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism.

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Historical Recognition

With the sunsetting of the Chinese Head Tax Ex-Gratia Payments initiative on March 31, 2009, there remain two components to the Historical Recognition Program: the National Historical Recognition Program (NHRP), which funds federal initiatives related to wartime measures or immigration restrictions, and the Community Historical Recognition Program (CHRP), which funds eligible community-based commemorative and educational projects linked to historical wartime measures and immigration restrictions or prohibitions.

Note: NHRP and CHRP sunsetted on March 31, 2013.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
2.0

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
1

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Historical experiences of affected communities are recognized and/or commemorated Proportion of affected community stakeholder groups who feel that their historical experiences were recognized and/or commemorated 60%
(for CHRP—to be assessed through a survey of funded clients)
Not available
Public awareness of the historical experiences of affected communities and their contributions to Canadian society is increased Annual reach of related media coverage Target not established Mainstream media—5 (10%)
Ethnic media—46 (90%)
Total—51 stories
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, a survey was never created as the public opinion research was not approved; as such, no actual results can be reported. For the second indicator, no targets were established, yet it is clear that there was strong media coverage in ethnic media.

Sub-Program 3.3.3: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support efforts are directed toward improving the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population, a Multiculturalism Program objective. To assist federal institutions in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Multiculturalism Program coordinates the Multiculturalism Champions Network, for high-level executives in federal institutions to incorporate multiculturalism in activities and policies within their respective institutions, and produces and disseminates the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act (PDF, 3.56MB). The annual report fulfils the Minister’s obligations to Parliament under the Act, but also serves as an education tool for institutions seeking to become more diverse and/or inclusive. Multiculturalism Champions Network participants also receive the latest research, policy developments and messaging through a regular communiqué and bi-annual meetings. The program also houses the Secretariat of the Network of FPT Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues and disburses project funding (grants and contributions) to provincial and municipal governments and non-federal public institutions. The Multiculturalism Program is responsible for policy relationships and portfolio management of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and manages the relationship with the Global Centre for Pluralism, which reports to the Minister on its work to promote intercultural understanding and equality globally.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
0.1

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Targeted institutions have external and internal policies and practices that are responsive to a diverse society Proportion of federal and targeted public institutions that have policies, practices and programs that are responsive to the needs of a diverse society 30% 24%
Degree to which departments meet reporting requirements under the Act 80% 86%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, 35 out of 145 (24 percent) targeted federal and public institutions were featured in the 2011–2012 Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act (PDF, 3.56MB) for having reported new or innovative initiatives, which include policies, practices and programs that are responsive to the needs of a diverse society. However, due to a lack of an objective framework to collect this data, the Department recognizes that the data may not reflect the actual percentage of federal institutions with policies, practices and programs responsive to the needs of a diverse society. The Department is reassessing the indicators of this program to better reflect expected results.

For the second indicator, 86 percent (151 out of 176) of federal institutions responded to the request for input to the multiculturalism annual report. Current performance data are based on the percentage of federal institutions subject to the Act that submitted a report. There has been an increase in the percentage of institutions submitting a report over the years, which may be attributable to improved outreach activities, including a streamlined reporting template and delivery of multiculturalism reporting workshops.

The Multiculturalism Champions Network has reviewed and approved a proposal to move ahead with the development of a tool to better assist federal institutions in the implementation of the Act. Collaboration with institutions through an Interdepartmental Multiculturalism Working Group is under way to create this tool based on best practices and lessons learned across federal institutions.

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians

Canada welcomes thousands of permanent residents, TFWs, international students and visitors each year. CIC manages the movement of people within the context of a more responsive immigration system that benefits Canada’s economic, social and cultural development while at the same time protecting the health, safety and security of all Canadians. To manage health issues related to immigration, CIC develops and implements risk mitigation strategies in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, provinces and territories, and partner countries. Any residual public health risks regarding the transmission of infectious diseases are mitigated through medical surveillance of newly arrived permanent and temporary residents as required. To protect Canadians—and to ensure that the benefits of a more responsive immigration system are not undermined—CIC works with CBSA, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to conduct appropriate background screening of both immigrants and temporary residents and to identify applicants who could pose a security risk to the country. CIC shares information with these organizations, fostering timely and effective delivery of its program.

Internationally, migration and humanitarian issues continue to gain the attention of governments, bilateral and multilateral forums, non-governmental organizations, and academic and other research institutes. CIC plays an important role in framing and advancing international dialogues on migration and integration policy, refugee protection and governance. These dialogues explore the links between migration policy and development assistance, health, the environment, trade and the movement of human capital. CIC works to develop and implement a strategic agenda on global migration and refugee protection, and to advance Canada’s policy and program priorities.

Benefits for Canadians

Growing international migration has increased the possibility of Canadians being exposed to disease outbreaks and infectious diseases. CIC and its partners in health management work to reduce the impact of identified risks on the Canadian population.

Policies and programs that affect the international movement of people—across Canada’s borders and outside them—have a direct bearing on the safety and security of Canada and Canadians at large, whether they are at home or travelling and conducting trade abroad. Strengthening Canada’s refugee programs and demonstrating continued leadership in refugee protection, human rights and the promotion of cultural diversity through active participation in various international and regional forums and partnerships support Canada’s broader contribution to a safe and secure world. Finally, coordinated and responsible sharing of information supports a fast response to threats to the safety and security of Canadians.

This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant access and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health of applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada and develop pre-departure, in-transit, and post-arrival interventions. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of identified risks on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
56.4 56.4 68.8 59.6 (3.2)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
69 91 (22)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Migrants who pose health risks are identified and are treated or refused entry Number of cases of active tuberculosis (TB) found during an immigration medical examination (IME), treated and rendered inactive According to historical trends, this is expected to be 2.1% of the IMEs conducted 0.067%
Number of cases of active TB found during an IME overseas over total number of new active cases of TB in Canada According to historical trends, this ratio is expected to be around 17/100 409/1,577Note M
(or 26/100)
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities increased by $12.4 million from planned spending, primarily due to temporary funding for the Interim Federal Health Program and a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $9.2 million, due to lower than anticipated expenditures for the Interim Federal Health Program, including the impact of reduced refugee claims and backlogs.

The result reported in the first indicator is comparable to previous years. As for the second indicator, 2010 is the most recent year for which the Public Health Agency of Canada has published data on TB cases in Canada.

In an attempt to modernize CIC’s approach to protect public health and public safety, a health inadmissibility policy review was initiated to move toward an epidemiological-based approach to determine risks and to include risk mitigation strategies in CIC’s risk management framework. The policy review is expected to be nearly completed by the end of 2013–2014.

CIC has also initiated a review of its excessive demand determination process, which includes a review of what constitutes excessive demand on individual immigration clients inside or outside Canada, as well as research on the main medical conditions identified during immigration screening that cause significant burden on Canadian medical and social services. CIC is currently establishing a centralized admissibility unit, increasing dialogue with provinces and territories on excessive demand, and creating an excessive demand database to enhance the determination process and improve the consistency of decisions.

As recommended in the 2011 fall report of the Auditor General of Canada, CIC has developed a comprehensive quality assurance framework on medical admissibility, which will be implemented world at the end of summer 2013, following the eMedical implementation.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening

Manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residency according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under IRPA, which are (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety and (3) excessive demand on health or social services.

The IME is a tool used to screen all applicants for permanent and temporary residence for infectious diseases. The IME includes an x-ray and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are in good health are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease are referred for treatment before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada’s health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
8.6

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
61

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Cases of inadmissibility of potential permanent residents and temporary residents are refused i) Ratio of cases refused for health reasons other than excessive demand over number of inadmissible cases identified other than excessive demand 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012, 540,354 immigration medical assessments were conducted by CIC. The assessments found 940 cases to be inadmissible on health grounds and 11,541 cases to require medical surveillance. Of the latter, 7,435 notifications were sent to provincial and territorial health authorities for further action. As shown in the performance results table, all the cases that were deemed medically inadmissible due to danger to public health and danger to public safety were refused.

As part of the Department’s modernization agenda (see organizational priority Improving/modernizing client service in Section I), CIC made substantive progress on eMedical, the system enabling physicians that have been designated to carry out IMEs (called panel physicians) to complete where technologically feasible, their IMEs and submit the results electronically. The English and French versions of eMedical were finalized and tested. The deployment of the system commenced and CIC began offering eMedical training. As of March 31, 2013, over 400 panel clinics in 44 countries were trained and are now using the eMedical. A total of 12,619 IMEs were submitted and an additional 7,358 were in progress.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Post-arrival Health and Medical Surveillance

Section 38(1) of IRPA sets danger to public health as a condition of inadmissibility to Canada. Two medical conditions are considered to be a danger to public health: active TB and untreated syphilis.

Section 32 of the regulations specifies that any applicant who has had an IME may have a condition placed on them to make sure that they do not represent a danger to public health.

The post-arrival and medical surveillance links the above-mentioned applicants with the provincial/territorial public health authorities in order to help them meet their terms and conditions of landing and protect their well-being, that of their families, as well as that of the Canadian population.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
0.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
12

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Migrants who can potentially pose a health risk are identified to provincial and territorial public health authorities Percentage of identified inactive TB and adequately treated syphilis cases that landed in Canada and were reported to provincial/territorial health authorities 100% 99.1%
Percentage of identified cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that landed in Canada and were reported to provincial/territorial health authorities (except for the provinces/territories of N.S., P.E.I. and N.W.T.—CIC’s Health Management Branch does not have an agreement with those provinces/territories) 100% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, out of 7,435 cases of inactive TB and treated syphilis that landed or tested in Canada and were reported to CIC, 99 percent were referred to provincial and territorial health authorities. Cases were unreported for immigrants who did not have a specific Canadian address when they landed. Follow-up is done for six months when the client’s contact information is obtained. For the second indicator, there were 144 cases of HIV among immigrants who landed in Canada, all of which were reported to provincial and territorial health authorities.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Refugee Health Management

Canada is a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and has integrated the protection of refugees into its laws through the Immigration Act in 1967 and IRPA in 2002.

The resettlement of refugees has its health challenges. Refugees normally have considerable health challenges and significant health needs. The objective of Refugee Health Management is to facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees in Canada and their integration in a way that maximizes their contribution to the country while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians.

CIC’s role includes gathering field intelligence on the health conditions of the target populations and develop pre-departure, in-transit and post-arrival interventions that respond to the specific needs of the target populations and assume a leadership and coordination function to provide for those needs in collaboration with federal, provincial and territorial health partners and stakeholders.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Provision of appropriate and timely health care to refugees identified for group processing and other vulnerable refugees who are destined to Canada Number of resettlement cases with social or medical needs referred to provincial and territorial authorities over those that were identified 100% Not available
Number of issues treated/interventions over the total number of issues identified 100% Not available
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CIC is currently not able to report on actual results for both indicators as the information required is not available. This program has been deleted from CIC’s PAA, and will no longer be reported separately, but will be included under Sub-Program 4.1.1 Health Screening.

Sub-Program 4.1.4: Interim Federal Health

The Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) provides health care for specific non-insured populations, who are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration or for whom the Department feels responsible, in order to mitigate risks to public health and ensure care for these populations while they are awaiting an immigration decision in Canada or to minimize the draw on the Canadian health-care system from these populations. IFHP coverage is currently extended to refugee claimants, resettled convention refugees, victims of trafficking in persons, persons detained under IRPA and other groups identified by the Minister through special measures, who do not have the financial means to pay for health services.

Eligible services include basic coverage (i.e., treatment normally covered under provincial/territorial health insurance plans) and supplemental coverage (i.e., health benefits similar to those provided by provincial social assistance plans to social service recipients, such as drugs, dental and vision care). The IFHP provides coverage to approximately 110,000 beneficiaries through a network of over 18,000 registered health-care providers across Canada. Health-care providers are reimbursed directly for services rendered to eligible clients.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
50.3

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
18

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible persons have access to temporary health coverage during the time CIC is responsible for them Percentage of refugee claimants who are covered by the IFHP over the total number of claimants 100% 99.6%
Percentage of refugee claimants who received an IME over the total number of claimants 100% 99.6% for 2011–2012
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, out of the 16,215 claimants deemed eligible for IFH, 16,145 had access to health services via the IFHP.

For the second indicator, due to billing procedures, health-care providers have up to six months following the date of service to submit their invoices to CIC’s insurance adjudicator, Medavie Blue Cross, for payment. As such, the number of IMEs paid for by the IFHP for refugee claimants in 2012–2013 cannot be calculated accurately until September 2013, and is therefore not included in this report. However, the percentage of refugee claimants who received IMEs paid for by the IFHP in 2011–2012 (available too late to be included in last year’s report) was 100 percent. This indicates that the procedures in place to protect the public health and public safety of Canadians are followed by the vast majority of refugee claimants.

As a result of June 30, 2012, reforms to the IFHP, coverage of supplemental health-care benefits ceased for most beneficiaries (e.g., drugs, dentistry, vision care and mobility assistive devices).

The reformed IFHP currently offers differential coverage depending on the immigration status of the beneficiary. These changes were implemented to ensure that most IFHP beneficiaries do not receive taxpayer-funded benefits that are more generous than those provided to most Canadians. They also support the recent changes to Canada’s asylum system by removing a draw factor that may have encouraged people to file unfounded refugee claims in order to receive generous health and social benefits. As a result, CIC is anticipating cost savings of about $100 million over the next five years. More detailed information on the changes is available on CIC’s website.

In accordance with IRPA and Regulations, this program aims to ensure the managed migration of people to Canada in order to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Even as CIC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers, it also deploys an array of policy interventions to manage access and entry to Canada, including visa, admissibility, information-sharing, travel document and identity-management policies. Effective partnerships with public safety-related departments and organizations are an essential component of this program. Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a TRV except where an exemption has been granted under the Regulations. The TRV requirement is Canada’s primary means of controlling migration and allows for the screening of individuals for health, safety and security risks before they begin travel to Canada.

CIC also aims to ensure that the admissibility policy continues to provide flexibility to address compelling circumstances that warrant a foreign national’s presence in Canada, while maintaining the integrity of Canada’s immigration system. Information-sharing agreements and mechanisms support immigration management and provide security advantages. This program supports CIC’s policy initiatives related to identity management and entry document requirements, including the expansion of biometrics to accurately identify foreign nationals entering Canada and the provision of a highly secure proof of status document to all permanent residents. The permanent resident card also serves as a travel document and is required for all commercial travel to Canada.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
104.2 104.2 95.8 76.4 27.8

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
593 609 (16)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Managed migration of people to Canada facilitates the movement of low-risk, genuine travellers, while denying entry to Canada to those that pose a safety or security risk Number of TRV applications (a) processed, (b) issued and (c) refused for security reasons Not applicable (a) 1,170,807
(b) 951,517
(c) 63
Proportion of known immigration violations by (a) visa-exempt country and (b) non-visa-exempt country Not applicable (a) 0.19%
(b) 3.10%
Proportion of asylum claims by (a) visa-exempt country and (b) non-visa-exempt country (a) 58–70%
(b) 30–42%
(a) 73%
(b) 27%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities decreased by $8.4 million from planned spending, primarily due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $19.4 million, primarily due to lower than projected costs for the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project, delays in the start-up of the information-sharing initiative and other general operating lapses.

Many different factors influence the size, composition, and magnitude of regular and irregular migration flows to Canada. The performance data demonstrate to a certain extent the effectiveness of CIC policies including the designated countries of origin, visa requirements, and security screening. The true number of inadmissible persons prevented from entering Canada for security reasons may be underreported as some individuals may have been denied entry based on other grounds for inadmissibility (e.g., criminality). Furthermore, migration control and security management policies may have a deterrent effect on illegal migrants contemplating travel to Canada. Given the evolving nature of international migration pressures and threats, new performance indicators are being developed for future reporting.

The Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act was tabled in the House of Commons on June 20, 2012, and received Royal Assent on June 19, 2013. Legislative amendments will expedite the removal of foreign criminals from Canada and enhance the safety and security of Canadians.

CIC started collecting biometric data from TRV applicants in 2013 to ensure that individuals approved to travel to Canada are the same as those entering the country. By the end of 2013, applicants for visitor visas, study permits or work permits from 29 countries and one territory will be required to provide fingerprints and a photograph. Exemptions will apply to minors under the age of 14, elderly people over the age of 79, and diplomats travelling on official business and their family.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Cards

In accordance with IRPA, CIC must process and issue a secure status document for travel purposes to all permanent residents. The five-year permanent resident card serves as proof of permanent resident status in Canada, and meets international travel document standards and may be easily verified by commercial carriers and border officers. While not mandatory within Canada, it is required for all permanent residents seeking to re-enter Canada on a commercial carrier. It contains security features to reduce the risk of fraud. New permanent residents are issued permanent resident cards. Permanent residents who obtained their status under previous immigration legislation or those who wish to replace an expired, lost or stolen permanent resident card may obtain one upon application. Limited use travel documents are also issued by visa offices overseas for qualified permanent residents outside of Canada that do not have a valid permanent resident card to facilitate return travel to Canada. The permanent resident card program makes it more difficult to access Canadian territory fraudulently. The program establishes a mechanism to verify compliance with the residency requirement, provides permanent residents with a status document confirming their right to live, work and study in Canada, provides permanent residents with access to government services, and enables them to be recognized and processed quickly at the border, thereby enhancing border security.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
19.6

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
153

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Permanent residents have required documentation to re-enter Canada Number of permanent resident travel documents issued 10,791–20,261 15,308
Performance against service standards 80% adherence to 40 business day service standard for new cards N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The first indicator measures a client-driven activity, and demand remained consistent with the past five-year average. For the second indicator, the service standard has been adjusted since the performance indicator was developed. CIC no longer calculates nor reports against the initially set target. The new service standard is 80 percent adherence to two months (or 61 days) for new cards. The actual adherence rate was 56 percent. Factors contributing to the lower adherence rate results include the need for photo retakes, errors on forms filled out by clients, as well as the lag time from date the client was landed at a port of entry to the date CIC received the form.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Visitors

Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a TRV, except citizens of countries for which an exemption has been granted under the regulations. A foreign national that wishes to come to Canada, and for which a TRV is imposed, needs to apply at a Canadian Embassy abroad. If the application is accepted, a TRV—a secure counterfoil document affixed to the passport—will be issued to the visitor.

Canada assesses countries against several criteria when deciding whether to impose or lift a visa requirement. CIC maintains the visa requirement for only those populations for which an overseas screening process is considered appropriate. The screening of travellers requiring a TRV is carried out by CIC in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once individuals arrive in Canada, their status needs to be maintained, regardless of whether they needed a visa to enter the country. The TRV is designed to prevent individuals who would abuse temporary entry from coming to Canada, and to facilitate the entry to Canada of genuine temporary residents. The requirement to obtain a TRV will limit the number of immigration violations (e.g., refugee claims, no proper travel documents, not leaving Canada once the period of stay had expired, working illegally, etc.).

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
19.4

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
190

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Entry of genuine temporary visitors facilitated for those who are required to be processed through a visa screening in order to enter Canada Number of temporary visitor documents issued at ports of entry 54,341–64,750 57,774
Acceptance rate 81%–83% Visitors 82%
TFWs 88%
Students 73%
Valid temporary status maintained (as a visitor) Number of extensions of temporary visitor status issued in Canada 23,976–36,433 56,879
Acceptance rate Unable to predict the number of failed TRV applicants seeking an extension 93%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the target of visitor documents issued at ports of entry was met. This number is higher than last year and may in fact increase further in the coming years as the demand to visit Canada is projected to continue to increase.

CIC also met its targets for the second and third indicators. CIC prides itself on meeting its target acceptance rate year over year while ensuring the program’s integrity and the safety and security of Canada and its people. The high number of decisions rendered on extensions of TRVs issued (in Canada) is reflective of the increased number of applications received by CIC every year. This increase is also reflective of the modernization and centralization of certain services, which allows CIC to process more applications. As demand is expected to continue increasing and further modernization activities and services are planned for roll-out in the coming years, it can be expected that the actual performance data will continue to increase beyond the target in the coming years.

For the fourth indicator, there was no target set as CIC’s data systems could not previously capture this information. The high acceptance rate is to be expected as those who are applying for extensions pose little risk to program integrity or the safety and security of Canada as they were already vetted on their initial TRV application and/or examined upon entry to Canada.

Sub-Program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits

Persons seeking temporary residence in Canada who do not meet IRPA requirements are subject to refusal of a TRV abroad, denial of entry at ports of entry or refusal of extensions inland. In some cases, however, there may be compelling reasons for an officer to issue a temporary resident permit (TRP) to allow a person who is otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada. Designated officers may issue these permits abroad, at a port of entry or in Canada, depending on the circumstances. Grounds for issuance of a TRP include, among others, inadmissibility due to medical reasons, criminality, reasons of security, infringement of human or international rights, or organized crime. TRPs are issued for a limited, often short, period of time and subject to cancellation at any time. TRPs provide officers with the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances and, in so doing, maintain the integrity of Canada’s immigration program.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
1.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
18

Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
People seeking entry to Canada who would otherwise be inadmissible may avail themselves of a TRP, which may be granted in special circumstances Number of TRPs issued at ports of entry 1,190–14,640 11,307
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this sub-program, the high number of decisions rendered is within target and reflective of the increased number of applications received by CIC every year. This increase is also reflective of the modernization and centralization of certain activities, which allow CIC to process more applications faster. As demand is expected to continue increasing and further modernization activities are planned for roll-out in the coming years, it can be expected that the actual performance data will continue to increase beyond the target range in the coming years.

Sub-Program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection

Policy is developed and procedures are designed in order to maintain confidence in Canada’s citizenship and immigration system and to protect the safety and security of Canada while effectively delivering on economic and social objectives by selecting only those applicants that meet program needs. Program integrity is achieved through case processing procedures that filter out applicants who fail to meet eligibility requirements, admissibility requirements or who commit fraud, and through referral of these cases for enforcement action where appropriate.

Identity management contributes to strengthened program integrity by ensuring that services are delivered to the correct individual; developing efficiencies across the multiple business lines; and allowing CIC to streamline interactions with repeat clientele. Identity management involves the application of procedures to establish, fix and manage client identity across CIC operations and between key partners based on personal identifiers, identity documents and biometric identifiers.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
35.7

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
248

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The integrity of Canada’s citizenship and immigration programs is assured in that applicants that do not meet program requirements are refused Proportion of refused cases by business lines over all cases/decisions No target can be established until a greater number of files are available in the GCMS Citizenship
  • Grant cases refused: 9,533 of a total of 122,644 (8%)

Temporary Residents

  • Visitor cases refused: 208,048 of a total of 1,135,453 (18%)
  • Study permit cases refused: 43,496 of a total of 225,472 (19%)
  • Worker permit cases refused: 17,367 of a total of 368,781 (5%)

Permanent Residents

  • Economic cases refused: 12,409 out of a total of 87,359 (14%)
  • Family Class cases refused: 12,186 out of total of 94,556 (13%)
  • Humanitarian cases refused: 12,953 out of a total of 47,856 (27%)
Proportion of cases refused for misrepresentation (section A40) by business line over all cases/decisions No target can be established until a greater number of files are available in the GCMS 2012: Number of TRVs refused for misrepresentation: 1,330 of a total of 1,170,807
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the increase in the percentage of refusals under the citizenship grant line of business may be correlated to the anti-fraud and program integrity initiatives undertaken. Refusal rates under all temporary resident streams are consistent with 2011–2012 rates, within a 1-percent variance. Refusal rates for all permanent resident streams are also consistent with 2011–2012 rates, within a 4-percent variance.

This is the first year that the second indicator has been tracked, with 1,330 refusals of a total of 1,170,807 TRV applications processed.

CIC continued to protect foreigners against fraudulent immigration representatives by implementing the provisions of An Act to Amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. With approximately 2,500 registered representatives, the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC) is the sole designated body, appointed by the Government of Canada, to regulate the immigration consulting profession and safeguard consumer interests. CIC conducted a compliance audit of the ICCRC to ensure fair and transparent regulation of immigration consultants.

Under the 2011 Beyond the Border Action Plan, Canada and the United States committed to share systematic biographic and systematic biometric informationFootnote 11 by 2013 and 2014 respectively. The Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Canada for the Sharing of Visa and Immigration Information, signed in December 2012, calls for the sharing of information of third-country nationals applying for a visa, work or study permit or seeking refugee protection in a manner consistent with Canadian law.

Canada also committed to implement the Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) system to screen travellers, before travel arrangements are finalized, from those countries whose citizens do not require a visa. U.S. citizens would be exempt, just as Canadians are exempt from a similar U.S. system. Enabling legislation to introduce the eTA system received Royal Assent in December 2012; program and regulatory work continues with planned implementation in 2015–2016. For a whole-of-government summary of progress made on the action plan to date, please refer to the Beyond the Border Horizontal Initiative report, annexed to Public Safety Canada’s Performance Report.

As part of its mandate, CIC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues, and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums.

CIC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

CIC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in the International Organization for Migration, and contribution arrangements with other international migration policy organizations.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
2.5 2.5 3.3 3.3 (0.8)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
11 12 (1)

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian positions on managed migration, integration and international protection are advanced in international forums Number of international initiatives that promote Canadian goals It is not possible to forecast how many times it will be necessary to develop international initiatives 18
Number of positions initiated or supported by Canada at fora such as the International Organization for Migration, Intergovernmental Consultation, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe and Puebla, which are eventually reflected in international policy debate It is not possible to forecast how many times it will be necessary to develop positions 23
Extent of influence on the direction taken by key international organizations Medium-high Medium-high
Degree of success in promoting Canada’s interests in the negotiation of multilateral resolutions and in bilateral and regional discussions Medium-high Medium-high
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities increased by $0.8 million over planned spending, due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program.

For the first indicator, the number of initiatives that promote Canadian goals changes from year to year, depending on topics that arise in international forums and with bilateral partners, but has increased to 18 for 2012–2013, compared with 13 in the previous year.

For the second indicator, the number of positions initiated or supported by Canada that are eventually reflected in international policy debate also changes from year to year and depends on which topics arise in international forums, as well as the degree to which other countries support Canada’s position.

Due to their subjective nature, the third and fourth indicators are currently under review and will be modified for future reporting.

The Department continued to engage its international partners through forums and international bodies such as the Five Country Conference (FCC),Footnote 12 the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD), the International Organization for Migration, the UNHCR and the European Union.

CIC continued to work with FCC partners through such groups as the Data Sharing Working Group to enhance collaboration on immigration and border security issues and work collectively to manage international immigration threats, including through enhanced information sharing. CIC represented Canada at the 2012 GFMD Summit Meeting, which was held in Mauritius in November, as well as other GFMD planning and preparatory working groups held throughout the year at various locations. The Department also continued to work with the United States on bilateral issues like information sharing, establishing and managing visitor identity, pre-arrival screening of visitors to North America, biometrics, and the management of flows of people across the borders through eTA.

Finally, CIC worked toward implementing its international strategy by better aligning the strategy with the Department’s strategic direction, including the 2010–2015 Strategic Plan. Ultimately, the international strategy will enable CIC to identify, articulate and manage its priorities on the international front on a short-, medium- and long-term basis.

Program 5.1: Internal Services

CIC’s internal services are groups of activities and resources that help the Department achieve its strategic outcomes. Internal services apply across CIC and are not linked to a specific program. These services include management and oversight, communications, legal, human resources management, financial management, IM, IT, real property, materiel, acquisition, and travel and other administrative services.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
166.3 166.3 240.0 231.8 (65.5)

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
1,715 1,648 67

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Total authorities increased by $73.7 million over planned spending. This increase includes operating funding carried forward from the previous fiscal year, funding to meet obligations for employee entitlements and other statutory requirements. Authorities also increased due to a realignment of estimated authorities by program. Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $8.2 million, due to general operating lapses that will be carried forward to the next fiscal year.

As outlined in the Section I organizational priority Strengthening performance measurement, CIC revamped its departmental PMF, which came into force in April 2013. The first-ever PMF data collection was also conducted, with the results and findings analysed, summarized and shared with employees.

The results of the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey were shared with all CIC employees to inform them and gather feedback on potential ways forward. After careful analysis of identified issues, a departmental action plan was developed to address issues. Implementation of the action plan is ongoing. The Department has committed to providing biannual updates on progress to unions and central agencies. For more information, please consult the Section I organizational priority Emphasizing people management.

In support of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, CIC is a participant in and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV, Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning with Government:

  • greenhouse gas emissions from the federal fleet;
  • electronic waste (electronic and electrical equipment);
  • print units;
  • paper consumption;
  • green meetings; and
  • green procurement.

For additional details on CIC’s Greening Government Operations activities, please see the List of Supplementary Information Tables in Section III.

Throughout the year, CIC also conducted, as per the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, sustainable development assessments when required. No serious impacts were identified in the completed assessments and, as such, there was no need to publicly disclose the information.

SECTION III: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

Financial Statements Highlights

The financial highlights presented within this Departmental Performance Report are intended to serve as a general overview of CIC’s Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and Statement of Financial Position as presented in CIC’s unaudited financial statements. These are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and, therefore, are different from the information published in the Public Accounts of Canada, which are prepared on appropriation-based reporting. The complete unaudited financial statements can be found on CIC’s website.

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013
($ thousands)
  2012–13
Planned
Result
2012–13
Actual
2011–12
Actual
(Restated)
$ Change
(2012–13 Planned vs. Actual)
$ Change
(2012–13 Actual vs. 2011–2012 Actual)
Total expenses (1,821,434) (1,808,065) (1,819,620) (13,369) (11,555)
Total revenues 6 13 6 (7)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers (1,821,434) (1,808,059) (1,835,091) (13,375) (27,032)
Departmental net financial position 13,921 26,331 13,921 (12,410)

Total departmental expenses have decreased by $11.5 million or 1 percent, from $1,819 million in 2011–2012 to $1,808 million in the current year. This decrease is the net result of decreased spending on the IFHP due to lower intakes of refugee claimants and changes in IFHP implemented in June 2012; and increased spending on Migration Control and Security Management due to additional funding received for biometrics and information sharing.

Similarly, total expenses for 2012–2013 are $13 million or 1 percent lower than the planned results reported in CIC’s 2012–2013 Future-Oriented Financial Statements (FOFS). The variance is mainly attributable to the lapse of operating and grants and contributions resources, and variances between the estimates used in the preparation of the FOFS and the subsequent actual results.

Transfer payments comprise the majority of the Department’s expenses (52 percent, or $936 million) followed by employee costs, which include salaries and benefits (35 percent, or $634 million).

Most of the Department’s spending was under the Settlement and Integration of Newcomers program, comprising 53 percent or $955 million, of the Department’s expenses, of which $922 million are transfer payments.

The charts below outline CIC’s expenses by program and CIC’s net cost of operations before government spending and transfers:

Expenses by Program described below
Text version: Expenses by Program

The pie chart shows a breakdown of Expenses by Program. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Expenses by Program
Program Percentage
Settlement and Integration of Newcomers 53%
Migration Control and Security Management 10%
Permanent Economic Residents 4%
Family and Discretionary Immigration 5%
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 4%
Health Management 3%
Refugee Protection 3%
Temporary Economic Residents 3%
Internal Services 14%
OtherNote N 1%

Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($ millions) described below
Text version: Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($ millions)

The chart shows a breakdown of Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($millions). The table below provides the numbers as indicated in the chart.

Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($ millions)
Planned 2012-2013 1,821
Actuals 2012-2013 1,808
Actuals 2011-2012 1,835

Departmental revenues earned on behalf of government were $446 million in 2012–2013 and represent the majority of the Department’s revenues. Revenues decreased by 6 percent or $31 million compared with the previous year’s revenues. Most revenues are from the immigration service fees, which accounted for 78 percent or $347 million of the total revenues. There is a $4-million variation between the 2012–2013 planned results and the actual revenues, which is derived from lower than planned collected immigration service fees.

The charts below outline CIC’s revenues by type and revenues earned on behalf of government:

Revenues by Type described below
Text version: Revenues by Type

The pie chart shows a breakdown of Revenues by Type. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Revenues by Type
Immigration service fees 78%
Right of permanent residence 15%
Citizenship service fees 4%
Other revenuesNote O 3%
Revenues Earned on Behalf of Government ($ millions) described below
Text version: Revenues Earned on Behalf of Government ($ millions)

The chart shows a breakdown of Revenues Earned on Behalf of Government ($ millions). The table below provides the numbers as indicated in the chart.

Revenues Earned on Behalf of Government ($ millions)
Planned 2012-2013 442
Actuals 2012-2013 446
Actuals 2011-2012 476
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013
($ thousands)
  2012–2013 2011–2012 $ Change
Total net liabilities 489,366 565,263 (75,897)
Total net financial assets 361,934 432,674 (70,740)
Departmental net debt 127,432 132,589 (5,157)
Total non-financial assets 141,353 158,920 (17,567)
Departmental net financial position 13,921 26,331 (12,410)

Total net liabilities decreased by $76 million due to a decrease of $61 million in accounts payable and accrued liabilities at year end and a reduction of $15 million in the Immigration Investor Program’s liabilities.

Total net financial assets have decreased by $71 million due to a decrease of $70 million in the amount due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund. This variance is mainly attributable to a decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities at year end.

Overall, the Department’s net financial position decreased by $12 million due to a reduction in non-financial assets, such as prepaid expenses and capital assets.

The charts below outline CIC’s net liabilities and net financial assets.

Total Net Liabilities described below
Text version: Total Net Liabilities

The pie chart shows a breakdown of Total Net Liabilities. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Total Net Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 52%
Immigrant Investor Program 36%
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 4%
Employee future benefits 8%
Total Net Financial Assets described below
Text version: Total Net Financial Assets

The pie chart shows a breakdown of Total Net Financial Assets. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Total Net Financial Assets
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund 86%
Accounts receivable and advances 6%
Loans receivable 8%

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2012–2013 Departmental Performance Report can be found on CIC’s website.

  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs;
  • Greening Government Operations;
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations;
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits;
  • Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue;
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects;
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding; and
  • User Fees Reporting.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

SECTION IV: OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST

Organizational Contact Information

For any additional information, on this report or other parliamentary reports, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

Research Activities

CIC’s research program provides expert evidence-based support for policy development, program monitoring, performance measurement and evaluation. The research program enhanced the Department’s knowledge base through systematic application of evidence-based analysis and research. The program also facilitated data sharing and reporting of service commitments to both internal and external partners and stakeholders, including the Canadian public. CIC continued to align research with the departmental strategic objectives, focusing on policy research questions related to immigration levels and optimum mix, labour market outcomes and economic integration, social inclusion and social integration, diversity, and multiculturalism. CIC continued to use research to support departmental service modernization through improvements in data content and scope, new dissemination channels for knowledge products, and modernized data-sharing mechanisms. CIC also streamlined its performance measurement for enhanced program monitoring and evaluation, while also expanding CIC’s research partnerships with other federal government departments, provinces and territories, and non-governmental research networks.

CIC updated its knowledge frameworks in the following program areas: immigration, refugee resettlement and determination, integration, citizenship, multiculturalism, and official languages. These frameworks provide the foundation for a research and data plan by identifying knowledge gaps, priorities and data requirements. CIC also implemented a knowledge dissemination strategy and a research partnerships strategic framework to continue to enhance its knowledge management activities and guide its outreach to governmental and non-governmental research partners.

Gender-based Analysis at CIC

Under IRPA, CIC is accountable to Parliament for conducting gender-based analysis (GBA) on the impact of the Act and its regulations. CIC’s GBA policy, implemented in 2011, continues to guide analysis pertaining to diverse groups of men, women and children across the Department’s -ranging mandate, including its citizenship and multiculturalism programming and policies. In accordance with CIC’s GBA policy, several models of good practice have been identified in CIC policy and program development as well as in evaluation (see Section 5 in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, 2012). Throughout 2012–2013, CIC’s operational data-gathering activities incorporated gender as a standard element of analysis of permanent and temporary residents. Along with supporting policy and program development, these data support the development and dissemination of gender-based research. Furthermore, the Department collaborated with the interdepartmental GBA community and Status of Women Canada to share knowledge, and regularly conducts training and awareness activities for CIC staff to enhance their analytical capacity and understanding of GBA requirements. For more information on the Department’s GBA activities, models of good practice and gender-related trends, please consult the annual report.

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