Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Name of transfer payment program: Settlement Program

Start date: May 15, 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description:

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of adaptation by newcomers during which the government provides support and services. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada. CIC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees in overcoming barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, the program also provides information, pathfinding and referral services to internationally trained individuals to have their credentials assessed quickly so they can find work in the fields in which they have been trained. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations. However, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by CIC in Canada and overseas.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results achieved:

The program's ultimate outcomes are that:

  • newcomers contribute to the economic, social and cultural development needs of Canada; and
  • newcomer settlement and integration is supported in Canadian society.

CIC continued to meet the needs of newcomers in 2014–15 by providing eligible clients with the services and information they need to facilitate their integration into Canadian society and the labour market through the Settlement Program. In 2014-15, CIC provided $575,736,723 million in funding to approximately 700 service provider organizations for the delivery of settlement services, both before and after arrival in Canada.

These services included:

  • needs assessment and referrals to other services;
  • information and orientation;
  • language training;
  • employment-related services;
  • community connections; and
  • support service to enable clients to access other services.

In 2014–15, a total of 349,391 unique clients were served in Canada and 19,456 clients were served prior to their arrival.

Program: Settlement Program ($ dollars)
  2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Actual spending
2014–15
Planned spending
2014–15
Total authorities
2014–15
Actual spending
Variance
Total grants
Total contributions 585,511,769 572,212,198 588,197,002 588,197,002 575,736,723 12,460,279
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 585,511,769 572,212,198 588,197,002 588,197,002 575,736,723 12,460,279

Comments on variances:

The difference between planned spending and actual spending is mostly due to internal reallocations of $7,289,259 to fund an increased demand for the Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP). In addition, the $5,171,020 in program under-spending is a result of activities not materializing as planned at the beginning of the fiscal year.

Audits completed or planned

  • Internal Audit of the Administration of Grants and Contributions (due to be completed in 2015–16);
  • Internal Audit of the Management Control Framework over Grants and Contributions (2014); and
  • Internal Audit of the Administration of Settlement Programs (2010).

Evaluations completed or planned

  • completed 2009–10: Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada;
  • completed 2010–11: Host Program, Welcoming Communities Initiative, Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program, Going to Canada Immigration Portal Initiative; and
  • completed 2012–13: Overseas Orientation Initiatives, Recruitment and Integration of French-speaking Immigrants to Francophone Minority Communities Initiative, Foreign Credentials Referral Office.

Decision following the results of last evaluation: Not applicable (N/A)

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2016–17: Settlement Program

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CIC engages recipients through the National Settlement Council, which meets twice a year with representatives from CIC, settlement service providers, umbrella organizations, and provinces and territories. In addition, CIC also engages applicants through an open and fair call for proposals process.

The terms and conditions for the Settlement Program describe eligible recipients of contribution funding. Eligible recipients (often referred to as service providers) for settlement services include:

  • provincial, territorial or municipal governments;
  • international organizations;
  • not-for-profit organizations including non-governmental organizations, non-profit corporations, community groups and umbrella organizations, and regulatory and apprenticeship authorities;
  • businesses (such as employers hiring newcomers, private language schools, conference organizers, Web or production firms for tool development); educational institutions (including school boards, districts and divisions); and
  • individuals.

Name of transfer payment program: Multiculturalism Program

Start date: 1982–83

End date: Ongoing

Description:

The program objectives are to:

  • build an integrated, socially cohesive society;
  • improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and
  • engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at an international level.

The Multiculturalism Program works to build an integrated, socially cohesive society by fostering intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride, and respect for core democratic values grounded in our history, and by promoting equal opportunity for individuals of all origins.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results achieved:

The expected results are:

  • program participants have increased awareness of ethnocultural and religious diversity, core democratic values, and Canadian history and institutions;
  • program participants have increased civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and intercultural/interfaith understanding;
  • federal and public institutions are aware of how to meet the needs of a diverse society;
  • federal and public institutions' programs, policies and services are responsive to the needs of a diverse society; and
  • best practices on approaches to diversity are shared.

In 2014–15, CIC provided $1,792,227 in grant payments and $2,251,966 in contribution payments to support 192 events and various multiculturalism projects. These initiatives fostered one or more of the following:

  • intercultural/interfaith understanding;
  • civic memory and pride;
  • respect for core democratic values; and
  • a more integrated, socially cohesive society.
Program: Multiculturalism Program ($ dollars)
  2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Actual spending
2014–15
Planned spending
2014–15
Total authorities
2014–15
Actual spending
Variances
Total grants 1,250,352 2,005,634 3,000,000 3,000,000 1,792,227 1,207,773
Total contributions 6,673,122 4,576,187 5,521,316 5,249,466 2,251,966 3,269,350
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 7,923,474 6,581,821 8,521,316 8,249,466 4,044,193 4,477,123

Comments on variances:

A reduction in the authorities through the supplementary estimates of $271,850 was due to the transfer of funds to the Department of Canadian Heritage for the Victims of Communism monument. The difference between planned spending and actual spending is mostly due to Multiculturalism Program activities not materializing as planned at the beginning of the fiscal year. The program demand was lower than expected, which directly impacted the level of spending.

Audits completed or planned:

  • Internal Audit of the Administration of Grants and Contributions (due to be completed in 2015–16); and
  • Internal Audit of the Management Control Framework over Grants and Contributions (2014).

Evaluation completed or planned:

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2011-12

Decision following the results of last evaluation: Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2016–17

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Eligible recipients include:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations or associations;
  • non-federal public institutions, such as boards of education, schools, colleges, universities, chambers of commerce, law enforcement and police agencies, hospitals, and other health-care institutions;
  • provincial, regional and municipal governments and their agencies;
  • First Nations and Inuit governments, band councils and Aboriginal organizations;
  • the private sector—private sector recipients are only eligible for contributions, and applications from the private sector must include at least one not-for-profit partner providing financial or in-kind support;
  • Canadian citizens and permanent residents;
  • the Canadian Race Relations Foundation; and
  • international organizations that foster discussion on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Program efforts were focused on delivering multiculturalism events and strategic initiatives, and preparing for the inclusion of multiculturalism in the 2015–16 call for proposal.

The Department accepts applications for Inter-Action Events on a continuous intake basis.

Name of transfer payment program: Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)

Start date: 1970s (under another name; RAP in its current form was implemented in 1998)

End date: Ongoing

Description:

The RAP provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including government-assisted refugees (GARs), privately sponsored refugees in blended initiatives under the Visa Office Referred Refugee Program, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a public policy consideration, to meet their resettlement needs. In most cases RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country. Income support is administered directly by CIC to RAP clients for up to 12 months if the RAP client’s income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and the needs of any accompanying dependents. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start-up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to service provider organizations in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to: port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, assistance opening a bank account, life skills training, orientation sessions, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Resettlement Assistance Program.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results Achieved:

The expected outcomes of the RAP include meeting the immediate and essential needs of RAP clients. This includes providing direct financial support to those who need it and funding the provision of immediate and essential services, which are timely, accessible and client focused. The RAP also seeks to link clients to the CIC Settlement Program as well as other government and specialized services to enable them to contribute to and participate in fostering an integrated society.

In 2014–15, CIC invested over $64,212,010 million to provide both direct income support to clients as well as services to meet their immediate needs. In 2014–15, a total of 10,470 clients received RAP services, which included: reception services, assistance with accommodations, links to other federal and provincial programs, life skills training, and orientation on financial and non-financial information. These services were delivered by approximately 30 service provider organizations.

Program: RAP ($ millions)
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants
Total contributions 50,742,697 51,163,273 54,922,768 57,422,768 64,212,010 (9,289,242)
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 50,742,697 51,163,273 54,922,768 57,422,768 64,212,010 (9,289,242)

Comments on variances:

The GAR targets are established on an annual basis. In 2014–15, the GAR targets reached 110%. Planned spending was therefore increased by $9,371,515 through the supplementary estimates from the operating vote ($2,500,000), and through internal reallocations from the Settlement Program ($6,871,515) in order to respond to the increased demand. In addition, the RAP non-governmental organization under-spent by $82,273 due to reduced expenditures against planned activities.

Audits completed or planned:

  • Internal Audit of the Administration of Grants and Contributions (due to be completed in 2015–16);
  • Internal Audit of the Management Control Framework over Grants and Contributions (2014); and
  • Internal Audit of the Administration of the Resettlement Assistance Program (2010).

Evaluation completed or planned:

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2010–11

Decision following the results of last evaluation: Continuation

The GAR-RAP evaluation was completed in March 2011 and found that the RAP remains relevant and services provided to GARs remain necessary.

Fiscal year for the planned completion of the next evaluation: 2015–16

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

CIC provides direct financial support to RAP clients (that is, eligible refugees and persons in refugee-like situations) in the form of start-up and monthly income support.

CIC also funds the provision of immediate and essential services, which are delivered to RAP clients by service provider organizations. CIC uses calls for proposals to award contribution funding to applicants. Contribution agreements can be signed with the following eligible recipients to provide services to RAP clients:

  1. not-for-profit organizations and associations, including non-governmental organizations, community groups and umbrella organizations;
  2. intergovernmental and international organizations;
  3. businesses;
  4. Canadian educational institutions (including boards, districts and divisions);
  5. provincial, territorial or municipal governments; and
  6. individual Canadian citizens (such as consultants, facilitators).

Name of transfer payment program: Canada–Quebec Accord Grant / Subvention versée en vertu de l’Accord Canada–Québec

Start date: Financial compensation to the province (in the form of a grant) is based on the Canada-Québec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens, which came into force on April 1, 1991.

End date: The Accord does not have an expiry date.

Description:

The Canada-Quebec Accord relating to immigration gives Quebec the responsibility for providing reception and integration services to all immigrants in that province, including all refugees. Quebec receives an annual grant from the federal government to support these reception and integration services.

Objective/anticipated outcomes: An objective of the Canada-Quebec Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec's demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into the province in a manner that respects its distinct identity.

Activities: Quebec has responsibility for the selection of immigrants and their reception to and integration into Quebec. In accordance with section 26 and Annex B of the Canada-Quebec Accord, Canada is required to pay compensation to Quebec for reception and integration services, where it is established that:

  • the reception and integration services (referred to in sections 24 and 25 of the Accord) offered by Quebec correspond, when considered in their entirety, to those offered by Canada in the rest of the country; and
  • those services are offered without discrimination to any permanent resident in the province, whether or not that permanent resident has been selected by Quebec.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results achieved:

The Government of Quebec is responsible for developing and publishing its own expected results related to immigration.

Program: Canada–Quebec Accord Grant/ Subvention versée en vertu de l'Accord Canada-Québec ($ dollars)
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants 284,501,000 319,967,000 319,967,000 340,568,000 340,568,000 (20,601,000)
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 284,501,000 319,967,000 319,967,000 340,568,000 340,568,000 (20,601,000)

Comments on variances:

Actual spending was higher than planned due to adjustments in the final payment. The final payment is based on a formula in the Accord.

Audits completed or planned: None

Evaluations completed or planned:

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: An evaluation was completed in 2011–12.

Decision following the results of last evaluation: N/A

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: An evaluation will be conducted in 2016–17.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Other orders of government (Quebec)

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: N/A

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