Syrian Refugees Horizontal Initiative

Name of horizontal initiative

Syrian Refugee Crisis: Resettlement of 25,000 Syrian refugees by February 29, 2016, and 25,000 (in total) government-supported Syrian refugees by December 31, 2016 (Syrian refugee initiative)

Name of lead department

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

Federal partner organizations

  • Global Affairs Canada (GAC)
  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
  • Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
  • Shared Services Canada (SSC)
  • Department of National Defence (DND)/Canadian Armed Forces (CAF)
  • Public Safety Canada (PS)
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)
  • Transport Canada (TC)
  • Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

Non-federal and non-governmental partners

  • Other state governments, in particular those of Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan
  • United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees/UN Refugee Agency
  • International Organization for Migration
  • Canadian Red Cross
  • Provincial and territorial governments
  • Municipal governments
  • Community of settlement/resettlement service provider organizations (SPOs)
  • Community of private sponsor organizations and private sponsors, including the Sponsorship Agreement Holder Council
  • Corporate private sector donors

Start date of the horizontal initiative

November 2015

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 2019

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)

$727,813,453Footnote 1

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)

Canadians generously donated a total of $31.8 million to charitable organizations in response to the conflict in Syria, which the Government of Canada matched through the Syria Emergency Relief Fund.

The Government’s $31.8 million contribution to the matching fund will be entirely allocated to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). This contribution will increase educational opportunities, provide child protection services in Syria and Jordan and support immunization efforts for children in Syria, responding to critical needs and building the resilience of conflict-affected communities.

Description of the horizontal initiative

Resettling refugees is a proud and important part of Canada’s humanitarian tradition. It reflects our commitment to Canadians and demonstrates to the world that we have a shared responsibility to help people who are displaced and persecuted. The Syrian refugee initiative also provided an opportunity to take a leading role among resettlement countries.

Between November 2015 and February 2016, as millions of Syrians continued to be displaced due to conflict in their home country, the Government of Canada worked with Canadians, including private sponsors, non-governmental organizations, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments and the private sector, to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada.

Under the lead of IRCC, the initiative was coordinated and implemented with the collaboration of key federal government departments and agencies. These departments were instrumental in different facets of five phases:

  1. identifying Syrian refugees to come to Canada;
  2. selecting and processing Syrian refugees overseas;
  3. transporting refugees to Canada;
  4. arranging arrival and welcome in Canada; and
  5. providing settlement and community integration, including access to the Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program upon arrival in Canada.

Resettling more than 25,000 refugees to Canada was a national effort and IRCC, with its community partners, continues to help support the successful integration of these refugees into their new communities where they have begun to build new lives.

Canada’s commitment to resettling Syrian refugees to Canada is continuing in 2016. Processing of both government-supported and privately sponsored Syrian refugees has not stopped and these refugees will continue to arrive in accordance with IRCC immigration levels planning.

Shared outcomes

This initiative has four shared outcomes:

  • Syrian refugees are granted protection in Canada and become permanent residents.
  • Syrian refugees have an opportunity to benefit from Canada’s social, health and economic systems and integrate into Canadian society, including obtaining citizenship.
  • Canada’s international humanitarian reputation is upheld by demonstrating to the world that we have a shared responsibility to help people who are displaced and persecuted.
  • The health, safety and security of Canadians are protected through rigorous screening of refugees overseas and upon arrival.

Governance structures

The whole-of-government coordination effort to support the resettlement of Syrian refugees to Canada was managed in accordance with the Emergency Management Act, federal departmental mandates, the Federal Emergency Response Plan and all other applicable legislation. All planning and response was carried out in consideration of cultural sensitivities, as well as the dignity and privacy of the affected refugees.

Initial planning for the initiative began at IRCC, but the Government Operations Centre (GOC) led the coordination of federal response arrangements, maintained operational readiness and established a National Coordination Cell to manage national-level information flow and tracking of refugee movement for IRCC. The federal departments and agencies that formed the primary partners were IRCC, CBSA, GAC, TC, Service Canada and DND/CAF. Other federal departments and agencies provided support within their area of expertise and responsibilities.

After February 29, 2016, the GOC supported the transition of the initiative back to IRCC for its ongoing program and service delivery.

Responsibility for engaging with provinces and territories was managed by IRCC. Collaboration with the networks of settlement/resettlement SPOs, the sponsorship agreement holders and their constituent groups, the groups of five and community sponsors was also the responsibility of IRCC.

Performance highlights

The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) welcomed news of the Canadian Syrian humanitarian program for 25,000 refugees. The UNHCR commended Canada on its swift action and demonstration of solidarity with the countries in the region hosting more than four million Syrian refugees.

The plan to bring 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada by the end of February 2016 met the commitments of a quick and successful resettlement effort while not compromising security or health requirements.

With the majority arriving between November 4, 2015 and February 29, 2016, Syrian refugees continued to arrive beyond that date. For the most recent information regarding Syrian refugee arrivals, the communities welcoming them and the number of applications in progress, please visit the Key figures page on IRCC’s Web Site.

The whole-of-government approach required enhanced operational collaboration among all of the federal partners, which involved time-sensitive responsiveness to accomplish the movement of Syrian refugees to Canada.

The significant achievement of resettling over 25,000 refugees in Canada by the end of February 2016 was made possible by the efforts of multiple organizations including federal departments and agencies, the UNHCR, the International Organization for Migration, other international partners, the governments of Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, private sponsors, SPOs, donations from corporate Canada as well as the broad support and generosity of Canadians across the country.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

The collaborative approach taken by the Department resulted in innovative solutions to delivering services and support to refugees, and working with provinces, territories, municipal governments as well as stakeholder organizations. Timely, consistent and transparent communication, including reliable and up-to-date information on the IRCC Web site, ensured all were aware of the status of the incoming refugees.

To assist in resettling 25,000 Syrian refugees, IRCC received and/or assessed 38,000 immigration medical examinations and assessments from November 4, 2015 to March 31, 2016. New innovative approaches, such as securing faster regulatory approval from Health Canada to use rapid tests for syphilis and the human immunodeficiency virus, helped to streamline the immigration medical examination process.

Departmental officials and the Special Coordinator for Syrian Refugee Resettlement met with other federal government departments, provinces and territories, municipalities and key resettlement and settlement stakeholders from across Canada on November 28 and 29, 2015 to exchange information and coordinate planning to receive and welcome refugees into local communities.

With the arrival of these refugees, attention now turns to helping them successfully integrate into Canadian society. Syrian refugees have been located in communities where settlement supports are in place, with consideration given to whether they have family members in Canada, as well as the availability of schools and housing. Privately sponsored refugees have gone to the community where their sponsor lives. Syrian refugees have begun and will continue to access settlement services going forward. Settlement services include: language classes; employment services such as help finding jobs; professional mentorship programs; and workshops that focus on the requirements for building a successful life in Canada and fully integrating into Canadian society.

In December 2015, IRCC, in partnership with the Office of the Governor General, held a Forum on Welcoming Syrian Refugees to Canada to highlight Canada’s diversity, inclusion and volunteerism efforts. The Forum encouraged a coordinated and collaborative national effort to respond to the Syrian refugee crisis and highlighted the practical efforts under way across the public, community and private sectors and among individual Canadians.

Following the Forum, IRCC Minister John McCallum encouraged companies across Canada to contribute, either through financial donations or in-kind offers of support, and to expand their role in the hiring, training and retention of refugees in their workplaces.

As part of this call, the Community Foundations of Canada launched the Welcome Fund for Syrian Refugees, raising over $6 million from corporate Canada to provide housing, job training and skills development support for recently arrived Syrian refugees.

As part of the new Welcoming Communities Initiative, IRCC developed a Community Partnership Settlement Plan process, in collaboration with provinces and territories, which included the development of a self-assessment checklist and key criteria to guide municipalities’ development of their plan. The process was launched on March 10, 2016.

Supplementary funding for the Syrian refugee initiative was invested in 2015-16 in each province and territory, outside Quebec. This funding was in addition to regular federal government funding for settlement services in provinces and territories.

Regular communication was maintained with provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders to exchange key information on settlement programming issues, including face-to-face meetings with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Settlement Working Group and National Settlement Council in Q4 2015-16.

A three-pillar integrated “Outcomes Monitoring Framework” was designed to measure and report on the short-, medium- and long-term outcomes of the Syrian refugee population. This framework was put in place by IRCC to inform decision making for course correction, as needed, and public reporting. The three pillars are:

  • a performance measurement strategy as the foundation for ongoing tracking of the outcomes of Syrian refugees;
  • an evaluation to be completed in 2016 to assess short-term expected outcomes of the Syrian refugee group; and
  • research on the Syrian refugee population.

Public Safety Canada (PS)

PS, through the GOC, led whole-of-government efforts that provided the expertise and the facilities to bring together the various phases of the operation and ensure all partners were working in a common environment with harmonized processes and shared information. PS coordinated logistics for the operation and co-led with Global Affairs Canada on threat assessment and intelligence sharing. PS also coordinated public communications to support IRCC and the other departments involved in telling the story of the operation through a variety of channels. In addition, PS provided information technology support to the interdepartmental coordination of the operation.

Involving all of the GOC’s 65 full-time staff as well as dozens of others from PS, coordination for this operation also required the GOC to bring in over 250 surge staff from other Government departments to support its 24/7 coordination capability. In terms of human resources, this initiative was the largest in the GOC’s 12-year history.

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

For GAC, the Syrian refugee initiative consisted of two facets: an Ottawa-based operating environment and a missions-based theatre in the source countries. This required coordination between the domestic environment (such as identifying the best organizational unit in GAC to maintain the surge) and international environment (such as conducting threat assessments, engaging Canadian partners internationally and providing Government employees deployed overseas with the necessary legal protection and duty of care while abroad). An example of GAC’s work in connecting the domestic and international was obtaining overflight and landing permissions for the flights carrying refugees to Canada.

GAC required extra capacity within the Department to work on the Syrian refugee initiative both at missions abroad and at headquarters. Heads of mission at embassies in Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan and Egypt played central roles in the on-the-ground coordination of the Syrian refugee initiative in those locations. In addition to over 150 regular staff at embassies, 58 GAC employees were deployed to Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey, and another 140 GAC headquarters employees devoted their time to the initiative. GAC resources coordinated and managed the deployment of over 1,090 Government personnel to field operations.

GAC identified the security situation in the region and the legal protections of Canadian government officials deployed abroad as the main risks to the successful completion of the operation. To respond to the identified security risks, GAC designed and implemented all security measures abroad by establishing systems to assess threats, developing daily movement protocols, extending security protections to refugees while in process, and liaising with the Canadian security establishment to share information.

In response to the legal risks, GAC initiated a system to request, via high-level diplomatic channels with host governments, that the Canadian diplomatic footprint be expanded to provide privileges and immunities for Canadian government officials on deployment but working out of an off-site processing centre. The goal was to ensure that international law would apply should Canadian officials require assistance or protection during the operations.

To mitigate both security and legal risks, GAC worked persistently to ensure that the Government’s duty of care would apply to all officials deploying to the region, and also provided security training and facilitated diplomatic visas for all officials deployed to the region. GAC also provided cultural awareness training for partner departments deploying staff abroad. These measures mitigated legal and security risks, ensuring a smooth operation in a challenging region with no major incidents.

Department of National Defence/Canadian Armed Forces (DND/CAF)

CAF personnel were deployed in mid-November 2015 to assist in the processing of Syrian refugees destined to Canada. Approximately 290 CAF personnel deployed to Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan. In addition to personnel, medical equipment was sent to Lebanon and Jordan to augment medical screening capacity. While tasks varied at each processing site, deployed CAF personnel:

  • assisted the Canadian defence attachés from the respective Canadian embassies;
  • acted as liaison officers between the Canadian defence attachés and Canadian Joint Operations Command in Ottawa;
  • assisted IRCC with the administrative processing of refugee applications, including the collection of biometric data and data entry;
  • assisted with medical screening; and
  • provided a CAF command and control element for oversight of deployed CAF personnel.

The CAF conducted two of the first refugee transport flights from Jordan and Lebanon on December 10, 2015 and December 12, 2015 respectively.

Within Canada, DND/CAF supported whole-of-government planning efforts at the GOC through the provision of liaison officers for the duration of the initiative. The CAF was also prepared to provide interim lodging sites (ILSs) for approximately 2,700 refugees, primarily at Canadian Forces bases Kingston, Ontario and Valcartier, Quebec, but also with additional spaces made available at military facilities across Canada, if needed by IRCC. However, the use of the interim lodging sites was not required by IRCC during the operation.

CAF support to this initiative ended with the closure of CAF assistance overseas on February 29, 2016 and the closure of the two ILSs on March 3, 2016.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

Under CBSA leadership, a Government of Canada multilayer security screening process, tailored for unique aspects of Syrian refugees and operational time lines, was established. In all, 12,917 files were screened as part of the screening process for 100% of government-assisted refugees. In addition, the CBSA ensured identity and document validity through the use of biometric information as part of the arrival processing of over 26,000 refugees by February 29, 2016.

The CBSA deployed a total of 54 staff overseas to provide subject matter expertise, particularly regarding fraudulent documents, in support of IRCC during the refugee selection process. CBSA staff used their knowledge of airport operations to establish strong relationships with host nation airport employees and facilitate flight loading and to verify refugee identity as part of the flight embarkation process in Beirut, Amman, Cairo and Ankara.

The CBSA established two temporary ports of entry (POEs) and tailored the admission to Canada processes, thus ensuring refugees were properly processed in a minimum period of time, emergency medical needs were identified at time of arrival and security was maintained. The flight processing service standard of two hours was met for 99% of flight arrivals. As experts in airport operations, CBSA staff provided subject matter expertise to partners such as IRCC, Service Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada to create a streamlined refugee arrival process. To maintain ongoing airport-of-entry operations during the busy holiday travel season and concurrently respond to the requirement to process Syrian refugees at two of Canada’s busiest airports, the CBSA provided an additional 99 Border Services officers, in addition to those on site at Pearson Airport in Toronto and Trudeau Airport in Montreal, to welcome 24,603 refugees on charter flights and 1,563 on commercial flights.

The CBSA played a leadership role in creating an intelligence capability that was able to support the safety and security of both Government of Canada employees abroad and prospective refugees, and also identify areas of risk in Canada.

As part of the broader Government of Canada engagement with the United States, the CBSA played a leadership role in briefing the United States staff to ensure a shared understanding of how Canada was addressing the security aspects of Syrian refugee selection, screening, arrival and settlement.

As an agency that maintains a 24/7 globally deployed operating footprint to support the security of Canada while concurrently facilitating the entry of travellers and goods, maintains a motivated and expert work force, and is agile in responding to crises, the CBSA was well positioned to support the Syrian refugee initiative. CBSA overseas operations were characterized by a dynamic security environment, compressed time lines and facilities challenges. Through collaboration and teamwork with other Government of Canada departments and agencies, development of positive relationships with host nations, orchestration of airport operations and refugee identity verification at time of embarkation, the CBSA was able to meet all operational expectations.

Within Canada, CBSA expertise in POE operations, existing relationships with Pearson Airport and Trudeau Airport staff, and collaboration with other local, regional and national partners allowed for the creation of a welcoming environment for refugees while ensuring that imperatives for national security and entry to Canada were met.

At the strategic level, CBSA expertise in processing and moving groups of refugees, combined with expertise in planning and governing operations and a committed work force, created a positive and collaborative environment throughout the operation that was able to successfully identify and respond to risks, make timely decisions, regularly brief public and senior officials and support frontline operations on a 24/7 basis.

Overall, 1,280 CBSA employees contributed in various capacities in support of the initiative. Their contributions were recognized across the Agency.

The risk that refugees who presented a security risk would seek entry into Canada, or terrorist groups would seek to infiltrate the Syrian refugee initiative, was mitigated though the development of a multi-agency, multilayer security screening process that included activities from the refugee identification process through to arrival in Canada.

The risk that the extended embarkation, travel time, admissibility processing and welcome centre processing would place refugees, especially children and those with special needs, under undue hardship, was mitigated through CBSA orchestration of the overseas boarding process and a tailored arrival process established at two temporary POEs.

The risk that Canadian and other foreign travellers seeking entry to Canada would experience extended wait times during the busy holiday season was mitigated through an Agency-wide mobilization process that brought together the desires of many Agency staff to participate in the operation with careful management of existing POE staff across the country to ensure normal operations continued.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

As a contributing agency to the whole-of-government approach to security screening processing for Syrian refugees, the RCMP provided verification of biometrics against its Real Time Identification system (Canadian criminal, immigration and refugee databanks).

By leveraging new technologies, the RCMP provided biometric responses to IRCC in near real time, creating added efficiencies in support of security screening operations.

The RCMP also brought together municipal and provincial policing partners, along with research experts in the resettlement of vulnerable people to develop the Canadian police newcomer engagement strategy, designed to help newcomers settle and integrate into Canadian communities. The strategy included an outreach mission to Jordan to get first-hand knowledge of the refugees’ challenges and concerns and to inform them about the role of law enforcement in Canada. These informal conversations were the start of building trusting relationships with the newcomers and, through local partnerships, the RCMP continues to play an active role in engaging with newcomer families as they settle in Canada.

The RCMP deployed in-flight security officers on the Canadian charter flights to ensure the safety and security of passengers as they were flying to Canada. In addition to ensuring the safety of all passengers and crew on board, the in-flight security officers played an outreach and engagement role by interacting with passengers, especially children.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

The PHAC deployed dedicated quarantine officers to meet each and every one of the chartered flights of arriving Syrian refugees to ensure the health and safety of Canadians as well as the refugees. To achieve this, 31 newly trained quarantine officers were mobilized from across Canada to assist with the Syrian refugee initiative, ensuring that during this intense period the Agency was still able to maintain capacity for routine quarantine services at Canadian POEs.

The PHAC organized five webinars for more than 1,800 participants on refugee health, mental health and caring for Syrian refugee children. The sessions provided practical, evidence-based guidelines, information and advice on caring for refugee families.

The PHAC also published a special edition of the Canada Communicable Disease Report, focusing on the Syrian refugee resettlement process and the need for clinicians to prepare for future and ongoing health requirements of this population.

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

In preparing for increased procurement activity related to the Syrian refugee initiative, PSPC took exceptional measures to have the greatest possible number of standing offers and supply arrangements in place upfront in order to ensure a more open and transparent procurement process and provide the best possible value to Canadian taxpayers.

In all, 83% of procurement contracts put in place were competitive, despite the urgency and very short required turnaround times. Canadian businesses and suppliers were given a tremendous opportunity to do their part to help the Government of Canada achieve its objectives.

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

ESDC issued 25,287 social insurance numbers (SINs) to Syrian refugees shortly after their flights arrived at the Toronto and Montreal airports. The SIN is a nine-digit number that is required to work and access government programs and benefits in Canada.

Refugees arriving in Toronto or Montreal as part of the Syrian refugee initiative received their identification documents from IRCC, and their SIN application was processed before their departure to hotels.

A total of 350 ESDC employees were involved in the Syrian refugee initiative, at the managerial, operational, logistical and service delivery levels.

Key challenges for ESDC were to make sure Syrian refugees had the proper identification documents to apply for their SIN and to operate within tight time lines (less than five minutes to issue a SIN) in busy airport and welcome centre environments.

A total of 2,063 calls related to the Syrian refugee initiative were received at 1 800 O-Canada. Of these calls, 99% were answered in less than 60 seconds.

ESDC regional staff connected with key partners in their communities, including with local and national resettlement assistance providers, to share information regarding departmental programs and services and support efforts toward project development which will ultimately enable the successful labour market integration of Syrian refugees.

Shared Services Canada (SSC)

SSC played a key enabler role in supporting the organizations participating in the Syrian refugee initiative. The Department implemented an information technology infrastructure for the operation that served all departments and permitted secure communications both inter- and intra-departmentally, thereby contributing to the success and security of the initiative.

Up to 46 employees from various disciplines were involved in the installation and support of the infrastructure, which was implemented both domestically and internationally.

For the overseas component, SSC provided 300 secure tokens and 383 wireless devices to allow secure communications for staff deployed abroad.

Domestically, SSC provided all telecommunications requirements for the mission as well as ensured the IT fit-up of the POEs and ILSs. This included providing network extensions at domestic sites to CBSA, IRCC, ESDC and PHAC.

SSC also managed the acquisition and leasing of all IT requirements from all partner organizations. Despite the urgent need and the approved exceptional contracting authorities, SSC managed all these procurements using competitively tendered contracts.

Transport Canada (TC)

TC contributed to the Syrian initiative by ensuring safe and secure transportation of the refugees from international destinations through the application of regulatory instruments and their effective oversight. TC provided advice, guidance and expertise throughout the initiative. It also supported the aircraft procurement phase to ensure that the chartered aircraft met International Civil Aviation Organization standards and applicable aircraft certification and insurance requirements.

In support of the whole-of-government efforts, TC provided 24/7 situational awareness and surge capacity to the GOC during both the planning and operational phases. Lastly, TC was on the ground at departure and arrival points to coordinate all necessary aviation security requirements in accordance with International Civil Aviation Organization and Canadian regulations (deployment of transportation security inspectors, validation of screening standards for people and goods before boarding) and to monitor inbound flights. These activities enabled the Government of Canada to address all concerns for the safety and security of transporting Syrian refugees to Canada.

In total, more than 150 TC employees were involved in this initiative. By the end of February 2016, Syrian refugees had arrived in Canada on 99 flights: 56 to Toronto’s Pearson International Airport and 43 to Montreal’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.

Results achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

An important achievement in the planning and implementation phases of the Syrian refugee initiative was the common commitment made at the Working Forum on Syrian Refugee Resettlement in November 2015 by federal departments, the settlement sector, service providers, sponsorship agreement holders, provinces and territories, as well as national and provincial organizations, including the Canadian Labour Congress, the Canadian Council for Refugees, Lifeline Syria, the Canadian Red Cross, the Aga Khan Foundation, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. The Forum built a platform for ongoing dialogue on refugee issues and support specifically in relation to Syrian refugees. The representatives built common understanding, identified priorities and forged important relations that continued through to February 29, 2016 and will also serve immigrant and refugee populations in the future.

The positive results achieved in relations between IRCC and the settlement/resettlement and Sponsorship Agreement Holder communities are evident in the response of stakeholders to a call for new organizations to provide services to Syrian refugees. Eight new SPOs were approved to support refugee integration.

An unprecedented number of offers of goodwill and support (meaning offers of goods and services for incoming Syrian refugees) were made by members of the Canadian public, large corporations, the private sector, foundations and individuals. While the volume of offers was at its peak just prior to the holiday season, offers coming directly to the Department continued until the end of March 2016. More than 400 goodwill offers were received.

The Government of Canada made a $100-million contribution to the UNHCR to meet the needs of people affected by the Syrian refugee crisis, of which $10 million was allocated to help the Agency select eligible Syrians for resettlement in Canada by February 2016. The UNHCR was successful in identifying and prioritizing vulnerable refugees who are a low security risk, and in contacting them to determine if they were interested in being resettled in Canada.

Non-federal and non-governmental partners also provided information and referral services to ongoing community supports such as language classes, translators, community-based mental health care, medical services and long-term accommodations.

Contact information

Dawn Edlund
Associate Assistant Deputy Minister
Operations
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Dawn.Edlund@cic.gc.ca
Telephone: 613-437-9176

David Manicom
Acting Assistant Deputy Minister
Strategic and Program Policy
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
David.Manicom@cic.gc.ca
Telephone: 613-437-9152

Performance Information

IRCC

Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Refugee Protection $152,330,164 $0 $75,203,376 Effective and efficient selection, matching, processing and transportation of Syrian refugees to Canada. Over 25,000 Syrian refugees (families and individuals) were resettled through a complex orchestration of steps to select on the basis of vulnerability without compromising security, match the refugees with Canadian communities and sponsors, process applications ensuring all Canadian requirements were met, and transport these people to Canada efficiently, safely and with respect within a four-month period. The operational goal was successfully achieved by developing surge management strategies, innovative processing efficiencies and by enhancing collaboration with other government departments, affected state governments and international and domestic organizations.
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Newcomer Settlement and Integration $374,967,597 $0 $102,711,719 Immediate and essential needs of resettled Syrian refugees are met. All government-assisted and blended visa office-referred refugees received Resettlement Assistance Program services. It is too early to report fully on outcomes associated with this indicator.
Resettled Syrian refugees are linked to IRCC’s services and other government settlement and social services that can respond to their needs. It is too early to report fully on outcomes associated with this indicator.
Resettled Syrian refugees are equipped with the knowledge and information needed to contribute to Canadian society. It is too early to report fully on outcomes associated with this indicator.
Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Health Protection $33,714,614 $0 $97,464 Syrian refugees are screened for conditions that could pose a risk to public health or public safety. A full immigration medical examination, including screening for communicable diseases (such as tuberculosis) was conducted for all Syrian refugees as part of the immigration process before arrival in Canada. In addition, all refugees were screened for signs of illness when they arrived in Canada, as per the Quarantine Act, and treatment was made available for anyone who was ill.
Resettled Syrian refugees receive health-care coverage under the IFH Program. Under the IFH Program, all resettled Syrian refugees received basic coverage (such as hospital or doctor services, pre-and post-natal care, laboratory, diagnostic and ambulance services and vaccinations) until they became eligible for provincial or territorial health coverage. In addition, for one year, the IFH Program provides all Syrian refugees with coverage for supplemental services and prescription medications, similar to what provinces and territories provide to their residents on social assistance.
Internal Services
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
  $19,215,552 $0 $9,244,784 To be confirmed To be confirmed

CSBA

Admissibility Determination
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Air Mode $5,938,210 $0 $4,710,632 Safe and secure integration of 25,000 Syrian refugees into Canadian society. Over 25,000 Syrian refugees (families and individuals) were processed at two dedicated POEs (Montreal and Toronto). The sites were designed to provide for a facilitated POE experience while maintaining the safety and security of all Canadians. The CBSA achieved the flight processing service standard of two hours for 99% of arriving flights.
Risk Assessment
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Intelligence $6,494,988 $0 $2,592,984 Reliable, accurate and actionable information and intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible people.

The CBSA played a leadership role in supporting the safety and security of both Government of Canada staff abroad and prospective refugees, and in identifying areas of risk in Canada.

The CBSA deployed 54 staff overseas to provide subject matter expertise, particularly regarding fraudulent documents, in support of IRCC during the refugee selection process.

The CBSA established strong relationships with host nation airport staff to facilitate flight loading and verify refugee identity as part of the flight embarkation process in Beirut, Amman, Cairo and Ankara.

The CBSA established two temporary POEs and tailored the admission to Canada, ensuring refugees were processed in a minimum period of time, emergency medical needs were identified at time of arrival and security was maintained.

Targeting $0 $0 $358,591 Air passengers who pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival.
Security Screening $1,412,009 $0 $684,884 Persons who are a national security concern are found to be inadmissible to Canada.
Immigration Enforcement
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Immigration Investigations $2,323,021 $0 $11,098 Immigration investigations are conducted against persons who are or may be inadmissible to Canada. Immigration expertise was provided in relation to the Syrian refugee initiative. The objectives were met.
Immigration Hearings $1,442,188 $0 $0 The CBSA will seek admissibility determinations of persons alleged to be inadmissible on the basis of national security, human rights violations or serious criminality. Did not occur in 2015-16.
Detention $1,945,701 $0 $0 Persons who may pose a risk to the safety and security of Canada are detained. Did not occur in 2015-16.
Removals $2,116,577 $0 $0 Timely removal of persons subject to an enforceable removal order. Did not occur in 2015-16.
Criminal Investigations
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
      $33,784 Ongoing criminal investigation related to the Syrian refugee initiative. The objectives were met.
Business planning around the potential impacts to the Criminal Investigations Division of the Syrian refugee initiative. The objectives were met.
Internal Services
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
  $4,748,006 $0 $1,406,808    

Note: Total allocation (from start to end date) has been restated from the original CBSA-Syrian Refugee Crisis - Horizontal Initiative reported in the 2016-17 RPP to reflect a better realignment of Agency spending by program.

GAC

Canada’s International Agenda
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements $993,368 $0 $993,368 Increased capacity of Canada’s missions to undertake outreach and liaison activities necessary for the smooth implementation of the initiative.

Increased capacity in missions to undertake outreach and liaison was achieved by:

  • producing regular GAC situational reports to establish communication lines between the missions and headquarters;
  • efforts to coordinate a whole-of-government approach;
  • clarifying GAC operational responsibilities, response structure and support to staff deployed; and
  • facilitating surge capacity in headquarters and in missions (temporary duty employees).
Improved bilateral and regional diplomacy with Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan as their refugee influx burden is alleviated.

Improved bilateral and regional diplomacy was achieved through the following actions/results:

  • ministerial calls to counterparts in the United States, Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon for securing positive high-level responses from source countries;
  • diplomatic notes (demarches) delivered by Canadian ambassadors in Amman, Beirut and Ankara (bilaterals/the G20);
  • a memorandum of understanding between the Lebanese Ministry of Interior and Municipalities and GAC regarding exit fees ($2M);
  • securing of overflight permits with source and transit countries;
  • ministerial announcement on Government extension of the Syria matching fund commitment until February 29, 2016; and
  • Minister Dion’s meeting with the United States Secretary of State John Kerry at the North American Foreign Ministers’ Meeting.
International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Consular Services and Emergency Management $0 $0 $0 Effective coordination of Government of Canada staff and efficient management of human resources being deployed to source countries in support of Operation Syrian Refugees.

Effective deployments to the region were achieved through the following outputs:

  • requesting GAC managers to facilitate surge capacity in headquarters and in missions (temporary duty employees) – volunteers in headquarters and temporary duty employees abroad;
  • creating an internal volunteer tracker to adequately respond to needs in the missions;
  • preparing a GAC deployment kit and deployment process overview for deployed staff;
  • providing training on cultural awareness, general security (including movement protocols for missions), and additional security briefing at the missions to ensure safety of deployed staff in high-risk environments; and
  • GAC ensured deployed staff had diplomatic visas entering the source countries.
International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Humanitarian Assistance $100,000,000 $0 $100,000,000 Improved access to protection services, improved access to lifesaving relief supplies and shelter assistance, and improved access to essential services, particularly education and health care for people affected by the conflict in Syria. International assistance and poverty alleviation was achieved by the GAC announcement of a contribution to the UNHCR ($100M), of which $10M served to build UNHCR capacity to identify refugees.
Canada’s Network Abroad
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services $11,191,417 $0 $3,343,696 Better situational awareness of the security and health environment and legal obligations/status for all Government of Canada staff deployed as well as those to whom the Government of Canada owes a duty of care.

Better situational awareness of the security and health environment and legal obligations/status for all Government deployed staff was achieved by ensuring duty of care, immunity options and assessing the threat to the missions and temporary operation centres (in Beirut, Adana, Amman, Ankara and Gaziantep). The results on duty of care and security include GAC’s Contingency Review, Potential Risks and Responses. The results related to duty of care considerations include:

  • legal assessment of “Duty of Care Considerations in the Pre-Deployment Phase”;
  • legal note info: Operation Syrian Refugees Duty of Care;
  • insurance coverage for personnel deployed by the Government of Canada to Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan; and
  • immunity options for deployment of Canadian personnel to Syria.

On security, the results include:

  • baseline threat assessment for Beirut;
  • baseline threat assessment (update) for Beirut;
  • baseline threat assessment for Amman;
  • baseline threat assessment for Turkey: Adana, Ankara and, Gaziantep;
  • critical incident plan for Adana and Gaziantep; and
  • critical incident and evacuation plan for Operation Syrian Refugees sites in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey.
Internal Services
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Internal Services $0 $0 $0    

PHAC

Health Security
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Implementing the Quarantine Act; Supporting health infrastructure at ILSs; and Facilitating national coordination and public health support to provinces $2,180,040 $0 $619,191

Canadians are protected from communicable diseases at points of entry.

Deployable assets available to support ILSs.

Strengthened collaboration with provincial and territorial counterparts in support of Syrian refugee resettlement.

Quarantine officers were on hand for every chartered flight landed in Canada to undertake appropriate screening measures of Syrian refugees and assess for communicable disease symptoms.

The PHAC provided deployable assets to set up mini-clinics at designated ILSs.

The PHAC worked with provinces to ensure human health resources were available should the need arise. The PHAC maintained close contact with provincial and territorial counterparts, as well as with the Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health and the Public Health Network Council. This provided public health partners with the opportunity to exchange information and concerns around the resettlement operation.

SSC

IT Infrastructure Program
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Distributed Computing Services $1,277,650 $0 $95,058 Modern, reliable, secure and cost-effective IT infrastructure services are provided to support the resettlement of Syrian refugees.

Domestically, SSC fulfilled all telecommunications requirements for the mission as well as ensured the IT fit-up of the POEs and ILSs. This included providing network extensions at domestic sites to all partner departments.

SSC managed the acquisition and leasing of all equipment to meet IT requirements from all partner organizations.

SSC provided telephone help desk support as well as on-site staff at the POEs to ensure continuous IT operations and expedite resolution of any issues.

All sites were completely operational from a telecommunications and IT perspective prior to their go-live date and there were no major issues during the operations. All IT issues during the operation were minimal and immediately resolved.

Production and Operations Computing Services (Data Centres) $2,641,263 $0 $245,211
Telecommunications Services (Data, Voice and Video) $2,769,452 $0 $1,341,233
Cyber and IT Security $0 $0 $42,470
Internal Services
Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars) 2015-16 Expected results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
  $111,636 $0 $40,707    
Total for all federal organizations
Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2015-16 Planned spending (dollars) 2015-16 Actual spending (dollars)
$727,813,453 $0 $303,777,058

Note: There is no planned spending for 2015-16 as this initiative was not presented in the 2015-16 RPP.

Note: The following departments incurred costs related to this initiative. These expenditures were funded through their existing reference levels.

  • Global Affairs Canada: $57,350,000
  • National Defence: $13,746,441
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada: $5,806,345Footnote 2
  • Employment and Social Development Canada: $1,719,749
  • Public Safety: $908,744
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police: $731,841
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development: $689,441
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